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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, December 01, 1903, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1903-12-01/ed-1/seq-8/

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Very Important
•There's A Stir
I Mysterious Something
About to Happea^r^i
Christmas Is Coming
$ Already Christmas Candies and
liovelties are appearing,^-.
We are making many things in
Sweets to help you in the plan
ning of your Christmas Tjfiee and
Table. v
A
Bif Box
of
A S S
U S E
CVERY MAN that I fit makes a fav
orable lmpression--«8 far as cloth
ing can do it and If a man will live up to
tny clothing he can pass muster any
where.
PETER PICKTON,
MERCHANT TAILOR.
D8HTN IT. FARM, R. 0.
LIGNITE COAL.
f'K
Washburn Lignite Coal Co's lignite
can be had in large or small quantities
of the Wedgewood Dray Line, agents
614 Front Street, 'phone 774.
f: DIRECT CONNECTIONS AT
Ifnion depots are made at St. Paul and
Minneapolis by all trains from Pacific
coast and northwestern points with the
Wisconsin Central Railway, thus af
fording a comfqrtable and convenient
journey to Manitowoc, Milwaukee, Chi
cago and eastern and southern cities
via two modern trains leaving daily.
For further information apply to your
nearest ticket agent.
jfs .' &"''f*Qnd» G. P. A,,
Tv
,v. •.
:*'v-
1
Everhart's Choco­
lates makes a nice present.
At AU Peelers
C. A.
Everhart
(& Ceil
Wholesale Candy Makers.
i Metropolitan
Skating Rink
NORTH BROADWAY S
1
Will Be Formally Opened on
Monday Evening.
W
Skating Afternoon ami
Evening.
State Band In Attendance.
*r
loo in First-Class
Condition.
Season Tickets for Sale—$5.00.
Admission for Opening j®
Adults 25c., Children j£c. 2s
Milwaukee, Wis.
W.6.0LSEI
The cold weather is here—antf space' & val^Sf- y'i
I able. Buy 3-i ,1* 4
a..-uChiffonier?..'
Of Ola#ftrrwTl
clt to Store little things about the {iou«e
it saves room. From
CRIMINAL
IS AT LARGE
Percival Young Escaped From County
Hospital While His Ouard Was
Dining Last Night.
Feigned Sickness and Was Removed
From County Jail—He Was||p
sisted by a Confederate,
Last night about 6 o'clock Guard Sher
lock left Young in his bed in a chamber
011 the first floor of the hospital and
went into the dining room to supper.
When he returned about thirty minutes
later to Young's room the prisoner was
gone. He had got out of bed, fully
dressed himself, even to his pvercoat,
deliberately down the hall and out of a
side door, where it is believed a confed
erate was waiting with a carriage. The
sheriff's office was immediately notified
by telephone and a number of deputies
were sent out. but no trace of the fugi
tive could be found, and it is pre
sumed that he was taken over the bridge
into Minnesota and that he left
on the late train out of Moorhead
About 6:30 o'clock last night a nurse
employed at the infirmary saw a team
drive up to the building. A man alight
ed from the carriage and after fixing
the harness, started down the road
leading north of the hospital. She de
cided that it was the county physician
and did not think anything more of the
incident until Young's escape was re
ported a few minutes later and then
no trace of the buggy could be found.
It is concluded from this that Young
had been in communication with
friends on the outside and that his es
cape was carefully planned. The offi
cers have but small hope of capturing
him.
Young was arrested about sixty miles
west of Fargo, charged with burglar
izing the Erickson photograph gallery
and the Saindon barber shop. He was
found in a railroad camp and after a
fierce battle with Former Chief of Po
lice Regan and Captain Gowland, was
captured and brought to this city. He
was held to the district court on a
Krand larceny charge. Shortly after
having b^en bound over Young feigned
sickness and through the efforts of his
attorney, Taylor Crum, Judge Pollock
ordered his removal to the county hos
pital. His case is not a surprise to the
officers, as they expected him to make
just such a break as he did last night.
Young is known by the officers to be
a professional crook and is a member
of a well organized gang that has been
working the state for the past year.
After his arrest several letters fell into
the hands of the sheriff's department
from "pals," who spoke of robberies
they had committed and in which they
discussed a "divy* of the spoils.
Young, whose real name is not
known to the officers, is unusually
bright. He is about
25
&3^WKF3RB?Wa<m*^6®^i
4
:V
Percival Young, arrested aboot three
months ago by members of the local
police force after an exciting chase and
the exchange ot a number of shots, es
caped from the county hospital last
night about 6 o'clock, and has so far
successfully covered his tracks.
Young, who was confined in the coun
ty jail after his r.rrest. feigned sickness
about a month ago. and under orders
irom Judge Pollock of the district court
protested by Assistant State's Attorney
Barnett and Deputy Hanson, was re
moved to the county hospital for treat
ment. Harry Sherlock was appointed
by the court to guard the man. Young
apparently showed no signs of improve
ment and until a few days ago his condi
tion was considered serious. Appar
ently, it is to be presumed that the guard
in charge was a little lax in his vigil.
years of age
and has a thorough knowledge of the
photographer's business. Descriptions
have been sent out oyer the country,
but the officers will be surprised if the
fugitive is apprehended. Assistant
State's Attorney Barnett states that the
escaped man has a brother in the Unit
ed States senate.
WARNED LINCOLN.
Bishop Thomas Bowmap of f$ast
Orange, N. J., the oldest Methodist Epis
copal bishop, just past his eighty-sixth
birthday, says that he warned President
Lincoln against John Wilkes Booth five
days before the emanenpator was slain.
Bishop Bowman, then chaplain of the
United States senate, had observed
Booth prowling about the capitol and the
white house and at once called on the
president with a warning. Mr. Lincoln
smiled kindly and said he did not think
anyone wanted to kill him. Two days
later Mf. Bowman started for his home
in St. Lpjiis and had haj"dly reached
there when lievfd of fKe assassinatran ar
rived.
7 '/v'
The riirnttura Man
Broad way.Pargo.
y"" Va5^r'* •&' ^'/,m
OLD FOOlfES.
"I'm a good deal of an Old fogy about
some things," Mr. Push was saying
to Mr. Pull. We want every one in
Fargo to know that we are all old fo
gies in the
"Savings OBl Loas/'
when it comes down to plain business
sense, with every commendable feat
ure that was known to the ancients and
and a few to the moderns, but no frills.
Remember, we are still paying FIVE
PER CENT upon savings deposits.
The "SAVINGS AND LOAN"
HERB'T L. LOOM IS, See. and Treas.
09 N. P. Avenue, Fargo, N. D.
SWEET ALICE WAS A BUROLAR
Lower Front Street Man Awoke to find Her
and a Man Robbing His
ROOM,
Here's a novelty in burglarielf ^Any
way, Hugh Pcttersori, who ri&nfc on
lower Front Street, told the police it
was not a figment of a brain rebelling
against a .stomach i overloaded with
booze. .*• V'-A
'Twas a woman burglar.
With a male companion, she invaded
Petterson's room Sunday night while he
was slumber wrapped.
Petterson was awakened about mid
night by the glare of a lamp in his face.
He knew he had put out the light be
fore he had retired, so he was sleepily
puzzled. Over a bureau drawer a man
and a woman bent.
"What do you want?" was Petterson's
natural question.
The man turned. The woman modest
ly kept her face averted. Tp^ wan
pointed a gun at Petterson. t$v
"Lie still," he commanded.
Petterson did. He didn't like the looks
of the muzzle of the gun.
"Alice, um-mum-um," said the man to
the woman in a tone so low that Petter
son could understand only the first
word.
The woman ransacked ther'bureau
drawers. Then the man, still covering
Petterson with his weapon,, ordered the
woman to follow, and the pair4)acked
out of the room and fled.
•The experience cost Petterson $55, he
told the police last night. "Thejt:threat
ened me with death if I left my room
that night or ever told the officers," said
Petterson, "and it took pie aU, day to
muster up courage and copie het e now."
The officers have but little hope (ftf^ap
prehending the couple.
Q00D MONTH IN LANDOFFICE.
Th« November Receipts Were More
Than §1,006
In Excess of October.
An unusually large business
done
iri
•,« ,-s, i ,W W ^-^fy*' »i 'V :V
5-"tfas
the Fargo landoffice during the
month of November, the gross receipts
of the office being over $1,000 in ex
cess of the October business.
The monthly report shows that .2^42
acres of land were sold during the
month, the proceeds being $3,257.61.
There XVere twenty-three homestead
entries, aggregating $293.39.
Thirty-two final proofs brought in
$194.70, and other items amounted to
$64.36, making a grand total of $3,810.06
NOTICE TO THE CITY.
If I have the power of law there shall
be no new pump installed until a suf
ficient supply of water be furnished for
thegpump. W. A. Knerr.
ST. THOMAS/
St. Thomas, N. D., Nov. 30.—To The
Forum: The Imperial Symphony
Quartette gave their musical entertain-*
ment here Friday evening, the first in
a series of five musical and lecture at
tractions to occur in our little city.
The quartette was preceded by the
"Hiawatha Drama" acted by the First,
Secondhand Third Grades of the pub
lic schools. We had a packed house,
eager for something good. All ex
pressed thenjsflvesas highly enter
tained- Receipts at th$ door were jjat
isfactory.
The football seasoa is closed. The
boys gave a social last week in hoiior
of their successes and defeats.
Stoddard's lectures, tile Internation
al Cyclopedia and the Century Dic
tionary have been added to the high'
school library in the past few weeks,
v c- -v Cor. St, T.
IN MACHINERY CIRCLES.
His friends wUl be gratified to Hear
that Jacob Lowell, jr.* who ha,s been
bookkeeper for the Champion division^
will be retained.by the- I. H. Co under
the new order of things in the sates
departments.
Another appointment heard of is't*h$.
Leo Rya^ a Fargo boy ^yho has been
in one df th6 office* at Grand Forks, iS
booked to reitSfft to "^aSo id
posttjon as second
I. Co.-«**iy orga
inept
is
employ
feeling
feast. -Tway .
|racts so that they
an. 1 as they have
n«itruct«»us t^
tfte
nOt
eeper
d3a
won divis
hpr
thirty
on has
.# V,, il v
THH PABGO FORCM AND DAILY REPUBLIC AN, TUESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER^- 190a v:
THE HONEYMOON WAS BRIEF.
Secured the Trusting Woman's Money and
-Tien BHsappenid at «Im BUth.
f}$Q Vent to a Turkish bath, and I
have not seen him since."
Regina Miller Curtis of Siottx City,
la., stopped in Fargo yesterday, after
a fruitles search in the Twin Cities- for
her husband, James Wr. Curtis.
"I aid not meet Curtis through an
$d in a matrimonial paper. I did mort
gage my house for $1,500 irid took $250
to Kansas City to:irtarry Curtis. I was
foolish enough to let him have the
monly only on an unsecured note. I
can't understand why I did it, but I
loved and trusted him.
"I never imagined he met foul play.
The night he disappeared he said he
was not feeling well and the only thing
that would help him would be a Turk
ish bath. We went to dinner together,
and then he went to the bath. Next
morning, when he failed to pu in an
appearance, I sent messengers to the
different bath houses, but he had not
been at any of them."
At the time of her husband's disap
pearance Mrs. Curtis notified the po
lice of St. Paul, believing her husband
had gone to that city. The report said
that she then suspected foul play, but
that the officers differed with her.
"I met Curtis first in Sioux City in
June last. He was a handsome fellow
and represented that he had monied
interests in Kansas City, where I mar
ried him last month after mortgaging
my home. After the wedding .we went
to Sioux City. He was as attentive as
he could be until the hour he skipped.
realize that I have been duped, but
I can't understand his motive. The St.
Paul authorities advised me to come
here and look for Curtis, but. I have
obtained no clue in Fargo.
'PHONE CONNECTIONS
Bismarck Palladium: A year ago
Bismarckers were living "in hopes''
that the city would be connected with
the long distance telephone. We are
now connected with Dickinson on the
west and Washburn on the north and
all that is needed to bring us in touch
with the east is a 100-mile line from
here to Jamestown. Perhaps we will
get it before another Thanksgiving
rolls around.
ESCAPED THE PEN.
Bismarck Tribune: The district court
opened this morning with a jury in at
tendance and the trial of the case of the
state against James Murphy was first
proceeded with. Murphy was an in
mate of the state penitentiary from Pem
bina County, sent up for two years and
eight months for assault with a dan
gerous weapon. He escaped during the
summer of 1902 before his time expired.
The greater part of the time this morn
ing was consumed with the obtaining of
a jury, and the taking of testimony was
begun shortly before noon and is pro
ceeded with this afternoon. State's At
torney Register is prosecuting and the
defense is being conducted by T. R.
Mockler.
The case against L. N. Chapman for
extortion will probably be the next
criminal case taken up.
7 O N N Y O O K
tfcmnybrook, N. D., Nov. 3o.-^ito The
Forum: The Modern Woodmen of
America gave their annual ball Thanks
giving eve. It was a grand success, the
hall being crowded: Irwin's Orchestra
of Minot played for the occasion. Many
people were present from Bowbells and
Kenmare.
Misses Grimm and Larson of Ken
mare and Messrs Messenger, Andrews
and Olson of Bowbells were guests here
Wednesday evening.
The Catholic fair, which was held ip
the new operahouse Thursday, Friday
and Saturday, was a grand success. A
ball was given on both Friday and Sat
urday evenuings.
Rev. Buckwater, disappeared for a
day or two but returned yesterday with
a lady "not his sister." It was a sur
prise to all. We all congratulate him.
Mr. Strehlow of Casselton has been
here for two or three days playing a
gasoline gas lighting plant in the new
operahouse.
R. G. Freeman, who is with F. C.
Gardner, of Fargo, gave us a call last
week. He stated that this would be his'
last trip into this territory. We will
miss him as he is a member of the I. O.
R. N. of this place.
A creamery meeting was held here last
last Tuesday. Considerable interest was
taken in the same. Another meeting
will W held here on Dec. 4. There is. n^f
doubt but what the people want a cream
ery and that it i» a gcud thing for any
community.-., Cor. D.
For State News Read The Forum.
$200 Worth of Jewelry
Win eatfl (0 «f«4 purchase of eur
ftae caadlM.bfiefull couposi
is g*vp fas*..
mm MADE PANPIPS
Alvtyi
1W\' llfllW"ri' r"r x' v y
p'm
familiarixe
.- -y.
^:'4*v'Ki.
£*fE«ESf
tho
WILLING TO TESTIFY.
Owqer of
1
tyrooses-r-a sight, of which will
you with many othe|.
ttsefcl qnd ornamental objectf
which help to make up the largf*
est stock of sniaU leather goods
ever shown at this season.
Noveltifi^n|Mp^na, import
ed
an4
rare and beauti­
ful {ndlylfluaJ, pieces purchased to
pte§ff*ri^U ,.r.
*.\i A
pocket an4 desk
#nd
n
,f I &
4 15
I Saved in buying- a Heating Stove
mean|i that much money earned.
Stovas afterl you start your fire* They are built to last.
Many people have taken advantage of our
FACTORY PRICE SALE,
Call and get'one for your home or office and you will never regret It.
WAS EM & GAARD,
Largest Complete House Purnlslisrs In ths Wsst.
Hie Big Furniture Store With i On the Corner Broadway and
the Little Prices.
(try Safe Recommends Its fire
V- Proof Strength
MiTbank, S. D., Oct. 1, 1857—Cary
Safe Co., Buffalo, N. Y.—Gentlemen:
On the night of Feb. 23, 1897, my large
drug store with six other frame build
ings were totally consumed by fire.
My Cary safe. No. 24, carried all its
contents through in fine condition, and
to show my appreciation of your safc
in this fire I have since ordered a large
fire and burglar proof safe, through
your agent, Mr. Fred A. Bopp, and have
same now in use, and will say it meets
my entire expectation.
You can reter any intending purchaser
you mav have to me and 1 will cheer
fully ansvyer any inquiry regarding the
safe.
Since the fire I see you have sold sev
eral large safes here. Yours very truly,
H. G. C. Rose.
BOUGHT CORN FOR YEARS:
Mandan Times: A paper'up at La
-kota tells of a wagon load of corn be
ing brought to town for sale by a farm
er and says that it is the first in that
county and probably the first in the
state. The editor is away off. The
Times man has seen corn marketed in
Mandan for fifteen years, and it was
a common thing before our time. The
Mandan and Ree Indians have raised
corn on the Missouri slope for many
years. The Lewis and Clarke expedi
tion of 100 years ago found stores of
corn in the Mandan villages on the
issouri River just above this place,
owever it is only within the last few
«r. iv,,
i
i
Warms the Floors,
Saves the Fuel and
feeerate* the Hom^i
-For Sale By-
H. Harrington
Broadway, Fargo.
Turn Your Attention To
GIFTS
LEATHER GOODS TOILET ARTICLES
An exposition of fashions
wrist, waist i-nd hand bags and
purses. Fashion ekten'ds her do
main even to leather goods—
telling her devotees what thejr
shall carry as well as what they
shall wear. Our show cases areJ
a revelation of her latest dicta
regarding leather goods for aU
Manicure Sets', Combs, Brush
es, for clothes, hair and hand, in
various highly polished woods:
Cocabola, Mahogany and other
woods. AH Sterling Silver
mounted.
ART PICTURES
Our window now contains a
beautiful combination of engrav
ings all ready for the frame with
others in frame and glass mount
ed, and marked at 15 cents each.
Other, larger and more highly
artistic pictures are to be seen
on display suitable fdr Various
rooms of a home.
Stationery Books
Fine correspondence and so
ciety stationery embossed and
engraved if desired.
Ijooks—The latest novels
v
tr
a
Why should you buy a
Stove and pay a big
price for it before in
vestigating other
makes?
Uook over The Penin
sular makes before
buying and you will
find so many points
ahead of other makes
that you can at once
see for yourself that
the stoves will do all
we claim for them.
Every Stove is back
ed up by a
GUARANTEED
so you are not taking
any risks. You will
not find any eraektd
bottoms in Peninsular
the Corner Broadway
Second Avenue North.
years that corn has become one of the
staple crops of the state and is now
being successfully grown in the Red
-River ValUey as well as on the slope.
GOES FROM BAD TO WORS|^
Always true of Constipation. It be
gins many maladies, but Dr. King's New
Life Pills cure or 110 pay. Only jfgc,
Fout & Porterfieli'.:
THE GARLAND
BASE BURNER
0
4
k
*4$
fw
".A
:34f
1 $
1Vvt
V
.*
ti
s
and
stories by the best authors. We
have standard and historic books/
and
i
i
prices—or we
will get for you the book yofl
want.
•V
V*»5
\+A
tut
3
*''M

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