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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, December 05, 1903, Image 6

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1903-12-05/ed-1/seq-6/

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i
1
mms&m
Bottled
Pickles
CRO,WN BRAND.
QUEEN OLIVES
In three sizes,
Place to Buy
i
•$
I '3.
$
lb-
A
at 76c, 50c dnd mOIi
FRENCH IMPORTED VINEOAR
HEINZ'
Qtteen Olives, Pickles, ChowChow
Cross & Blackwell's
Imported l'icklcs, Cliow Chow
and Vinegar.
Dunkley's riustard.
O. S. HADELAND,
412 Broadway.
Full line of BELL'S
A
COFFEK 20c to ^frOt#
Weak
Chest
If yon catch cold, easily, you
should by all means wear a
CHEST PROTECTOR. They
prevent rapid changes in the
temperature of the body and
render "catching cold" almost
impossible. We have those of
Chamois, flannel lined and of
flannel only. In sizes from to-'
fants to those of large adults
WILSER'S
U S O E
G04 Front Strmmt, FARGO
The Factory
At a great saving. Inspection will
prove profitable to intending pur
chasers.
... Superb Assortment of
FUR NECKWEAR
In Sfcble,
Mink, Black
Marten,
Alaska Bear, Fox, Chinchilla, Er
l^mine and Siberian Squirrel.
MUTS (:Mr
talnateH' of the finest qualkyand
workmanship.
/tV
FUR COAT#
of the finest grades of Alaska Seal,
Natural or Dyed Otter and Persian
[•Lamb, combining in the highest
degree style, fit and finish to give
them a distinctive individuality
Jientirely their own.
FURRIERS,
No. 108 Broadway, Fargo
THE GARLAND
BASE BURNER
*ii *i*atmrmm lb. rintrl $'
.^jPWBTW® 119 PnNil| -,\4*•*:.••. *$•
thai Finf awl
aooratas
•i
-For Sale By-
H. Harrington,
Broadway* Fargo.
A NEW BILL
Senator Hatwbrough Has Introduced
Second Bill to Araeaftl
the Land Laws.
i i i
Washington, Dec. 5.—Senator Ilans
brough'is continuing his efforts to se^
cure land law legislation this session
•of congress, which, in his opinion, will
cure defects in the existing statutes
and prevent fraud*. His first bill in
this direction was introduced some
time ago. His second bill, covering
the desert Jand act,, was introduced
'yesterday.
Senator Hansbrough said': "I stfct-:
ed early in October that I should in
troduce a bill calculated to strengthen:
the desert land act. At that time,
however, I did not have certain infor
mation on the subject which it was
necessary to have. This information is
now at hand and I shall introduce a
bill today providing for a reduction in
entry from 320 to ten acrcs and strik
ing out the assignment clause of the
existing law.
"The desert land law is absolutely
indispensible to irrigation by private
enterprise where small quantities of
land may be reclaimed and where the
government, under the national irri
tfaton law, cannot be expected to op
crate for many years to come, or until
1 he larger projects are developed. Set
ih mcnt in Wyoming, southern Idaho
i a part of Colorado and Utah has
1
Is
the
ken place almost exclusively under
the desert act. It is to that state
what the homestead law is to North
1 )akota and other humid regons..
'Now, as to the charge that the
provision of my bill relative to the
forest reserve selection right would
operate to nullify the irrigation law,
111 ere is «no ground for it whatever.
It
will be found that this charge was
originally made to defeat remedial
land legislation. The fact is that lands
withdrawn under the irrigation act arc
held to be lands appropriated for a
specific purpose and under the rulings
of
the interior department, forest re
serve selection rights cannot be used
on
lands otherwise appropriated. My
bill does not re-enact the forest r*
serve land selection law. It simply
amends it so as to provide that lands
taken under it shall not be more val
uable for timber than for agriculture.
'A rule of construction repeatedly
laid
down by the supreme court sus
tains the department in its decisions
rejecting all applications to locate for
est reserve selection rights or any
kind of land scrip upon lands appro
priated for a specific purpose, as in
case with land withdrawn under the
irrigation law. I think the real
friends of irrigation may be depended
upon to sustain the purposes of the
law even against those irresponsible
persons who seek to foster private
schemes under color of blatant pre
tense*, pf excessive patriotism."
REYES CALLED.
Washington, Dec. 5—General Reyes,
special minister from Colombia, called
on President Roosevelt today and told
him why he came to Washington.
DE PAUW'S PRESIDENT.
Greencastle-, Ind., Dec. 5.—The cere
monies incident to the inauguration of
th,e Rev. Edwin H. Hughes as presi
dent of De Pauw University will be
gin tomorrow and continue through
the greater part of the coming week.
Tomorrow morning there will be ser
mons in various churches by college
presidents and others, who are to be
guests of the university. Monday will
be taken up with an inspection of the
university building. The chief events
of Tuesday will be a reunion of the
alumni and the dedication of the Ed
ward L. Scarritt memorial fountain.
Wednesday will be inauguration day.
Wrilliam Newkirk, president of" the
joint board of trustees and visitors,
will preside over the ceremonies and
the programme will include addresses
by United States Senator Beveridge.
and President Bashford of Ohio Wes
le^an University.
CRIME IS SUSPECTED.
Lawton Man la Suspected of Murdering His
4 r.
Hired Man.
a w e 5 .- i e y s e
ious disappearance of a man named
Shannon, near here, Nov. 22, has giv
en rise to rumors that he has been
murdered. Shannon was employed by
a farmer named Posey.' They had not
agreed very well and ort the day Shan
non disappeared both had been drink
ing heavily at Lawton. It is also re
ported that Posey had threatened On
several occasions to kill Shannon.
Mr. Posey left town on the south
bound train Tuesday, saying he was
going to the woods. His wife and
neighbors became suspicious and -or
dered an investigation. Up to 8 o'clock
this morning nothing but a lap robe
saturated with blood had been found.
The story is about as follows.: Mr.
Posey and Mr. Shannon were in town
all day Sunday, Nov. 32, drinking
heavily. About 7 o'clock in the even
ing the two left in a single rig for Mr.
Posey's farm, six miles west of Law
ton. A neighbor, who knew the horse
and rig, although the evening was
quite dark says he could see a man
sitting up straight, holding with his
left arm the reclining figure of anotheit
person. A robe of some sort i{*s
drawn up over, the figure and he could
not say positively whether it wai, a
human being or not, but has a strong
suspicion that it was^ The horse wa$
galloping when it passed him and he
thought it rather peculiar at the time,
but 'soon forgot qll abput it, until the*
investigation came up'
Mr. Posey's wife says lie arrived
home about 8 Q'C1OCV, did the chores
around the barn, but he seemed mif
agitated when he came in and co
hot eat any sujpper. He went back
forth to the barn several times, so
twin* onusnal for hffitv £h& asfaid
if Shannon was drtink it) the ti|ta.
atisppd: "No llljHAi in Ktffr
parties
jettl regards
:«$/. 'fctw I'
f&&. '*M::
EXPORTS OF MANUFACTURERS
1
The Record for October Was the Bert for That
(t
Month With One Exception,
Washington, Ehsc. 5?—Exerts' of
manufactures in October seem to
shpw something ,of the expected revi
val in that branch of our foreign com
merce. The total, exports of manufac
tures in October, as shown by the re
ports of the department of commerce
and labor through its bureau of statis
tics, amount $37*558.675. This is a
larger export tban in any preceding
October, except that of 1
111 October, 1903, are $i-y375.375^
against $14,540,799 in the correspond
ing month of last year, and articles
wholly or partially manufactured for
use as materials in the manufacturer
and mechanic arts are $12,843,890,
against $13,348,145. Iron and steel
manufactures, of which the importa
tions had been unusually large,.. show
marked reduction, the total for Oc
tober, 1903, being $2,552,380, against
$4,149,631 in October of last year.
Articles in\a crude condition for use
in manufacturing also show a reduc
tion in October, 1903, as compared
with October, 1902, in which the total
was the largest for October .in the his
tory of our import trade.
The figures of exports of manufac
tures for the ten months ending with
October show a condition quite as sat
isfactory as those relating to the
month of/October only. As has been
already indicated, the October exports
of manufactHres are larger than those
for the corresponding month of any
preceding year except 1900, and'this
may also be said of the etn months,
ending with October, in which the ex
ports of manufactures were $384,688,
560, a larger total than for the corres
ponding ten months of any earlier ytfar
except 190a
1
goo, and even,
in that banner year of exports the total
was less than $100,000 above that of
October, 1903. The increase, over Oc
tober, 1902, is about $1,500,000 over
October, igor, $3,000,000, and is more
than double the total for October in
1893. Most of the principal articles of
manufacture show a slight increase in
October.. 1903, compared with, October
1902. Agricultural implements show a
gain of over $40,000, compared with,
the sams month of the preceding year
cars and carriages, about $25,000
clock and watches, $45,000 copper
manufactures, $450,000 scientific in
struments, $130,000 steel rails, $113,
coo wire, $35,000 sewing machines,
$75,000 iron and steel manufactures of
all kinds, $318,000 boots and shoes,
$156,000 leather of all kinds,'$419,000
mineral oil, $604,000 manufactures of
tobacco, $50,000
5
manufactures of
wood, $50,000, and manufactures of
wool, $140,000. Cptton manufactures
show a slight reduction, the total ex
ports for October, 1903, being $2,005,
650, against $2,689,076 in October of
the preceding year.* This reduction
occurs almost exclusively in exports of
cotton cloth to China, of which the
total for October, 1903, was 9,370,600
yards, valued at $414,156, against 20,
472,678 yards, valued at $1,036,726. in
October, 1902. The figures for Oc
tober, 1903, however, compare favor
ably with those of the corresponding
month in years preceding
y*
19^2, in
which the exports of cotton cl6ths to
China were 'extraordinarily large by
reason of the small importations dur
ing the disturbance of 1901.
On the imports side manufactures
show -a slight decrease as" compared
with October, 1902. Articles of vol
untary use, luxuries, etc., are for Oc
tober, 1903, $11,242,417, against $11.
676,126 in October, 1902. Articles
manufactured ready for consumption
SAMUEL 60MPEBS, HEAD OF THE AMEBICAH FEDEEATION
•r LABOR.
'fOO MANY PEDDLARS.^:
N. D., Dec. s.—The mWf
chants are taking active steps to rijl
the place of the peddler evil which
recenffy assumed no small proportiotff*
many of th^m operating in violati$j£
Eof tike state peddlers' law. Several E
:arrests arc certain to follow uhleV
$ obnoxious vendors leave fa
{strict court wiB reconvene
^sei the
fill
feafendar term. Amt
the cases to
Come
np for trial ifc tJ
iwi
W%t'
fjr- *'$*•••./ w^Mf v.^v-^-A'^^v??
ftll5i®19||i' s^#s«« w^m
THE FARGO FORUM AND DAILY REPUBLICAN, SATURDAY EVENING, DEflEMBTEtt-5,~-J90&
v,
v
•V^rtW-j
N:
ft ,'
WARM WAKE".
Brooklyn Wake Over Two.podies
Resulted In Twe Mor#ii
s-.i
WOULD-BE WRECKERS:
Scofield, Utah, Dec. 5.—An attempt
was made to wreck a Denver and Rio
Grande train by tearing up the heavy
planking of the bridge over Price
the issues. She gives- as her excuse
that she is suffering from sciatica, but
it is generally understood she has be
come content wijh home l^fe, enforced
by two years of mourning, and does
not desire to resume her facial suprem
acy. According to report a number
of other women who have been nota
ble figures in the social life of the cap
ital during the last few years prefer
to.,, take little part in teh social aaye
ti«js
d'f
the present season.
BANKS CLOSED.
Des Moines, la, Dec. 15.—The banks
at Ira, Baxter and Mingo, owned by
George Woods, who committed suicide
at Colfax yesterday, were closed, tem
porarily.
MAYVILLE NOTES.-
Mayville, N. D., Dec. 5.—The city
will, Atend its water mains to the hospi
tal, the expense: to be shared jointly by
thp city and th^ hospital society, the
former paying for the pipe and the latter
for the ditch. A watering trough will
be erected by the roadside.
A new lodge has been organized, in
city, and sttU there probably will
found room for more. It is the Goose
Stiver Camp of Royal Nfifcbfoors, and
it starts on its career witt* t»*enty-th»e
charter lumbers. It yifl meet on ttte
second a^d fourth Priday of thfe month.
Miss A|tt|| ^lcLean is.^ ^ast oracle apd
wUr*- Me^Js oracle.
.. The sMJp{ took John Hovland to the.
bounty seat to be examined, by the .cptttl
board' of
ing south of th«,cityv i\
ihfeen acting
hi
to OQta»|»t^e the cbritinf
$$£
?ft»*
Deaths. :Ti .fv w
Yinrk, Dec. 5.—Tw, lifw ywere
lost and a number injured in a fire in
Brooklyn where a wake was being held
over the bodies of Mrs. Mary Gilli
gan and Arthur Eioherty, the boy who
died of hydrophobia* recently. An
overturned lamp started the fifik V
vRivcr
near Castle Gate, and Piling it across
the tracks. The obstruction was dis
covered by armed guards and removed.
The work is believed to b^. tft&t of
striking Italian miners.
IOWA TRAVELING MEN.
Des Moines, la., Dec. 5.—The Iowa
Traveling Men's Association, the first
state organization of its kjnd iri the
country, held its annual meeting in
this city today with a good attendance
of members from all part of the state.
The annual report presented by Sec
retary Haley showed the affairs of the
organization to be in splendid shape.
The total membership is near the 20,
000 mark, a net gain of several thou
sand having been made during thai last
twelve months.
DEPEWS' DIN-NER. V '?V
Washington, D. C. Dec. 5.—Society
is manifesting unusual interest in the
dinner announced for this evening by
Senator and Mrs. Depew in honor of
Senator Piatt and his bride, formerly
Mrs. Janeway. The invitations in
vitations included the flower of social
and political circles. The announce
ments for the dinner were sent out
more than a fortnight ahead, but even
so. all of the cabinet members, it is
said, except Postmaster General
Payne aiid Secretary Cortelyou had
made earlier engagements.
It is understood that social compli
cations pending in Washington have
frightened several conservative social
leaders. Mrs. Hay. as already an
nounced, prefers to spend the winter
in semi-retirement rather than meet
t"
KaMiitfUMI
^|»||Sff#!'ft
fW
PRexamineEourTstockE
Diamond Solitaire
Rings from $2.50
MP
Cluster Rings
from $5.00 up ro
fit? y ./.
£&«-". '. "iViHl~!*r^ S
^•Jewelers^-72 Broad way
Broochei, j•
blil^okld and Peiirjl
1-64 to 3-Karat.
.w'
TH
i #to,|te^ct
Gold Thimbles—/ 4%
From $3.75 to
Coral Neck Chains-r i
From 75c to... v "iwV
Coral Guard Chains— O
OBS
From $1.25 to
Gentlemen's Gold Vest A
Chains from $8.00 to. vvU
Meerschaum Pipes, Gold
I.0D up to
I
J1
...ifl'Ai
,, A *1
Invites ^o» to call and in
spect their remodeled jewelery
establishment at
Diamond Department
O S I V U Y E S W I O W E O
before buying, as our Mamonds were purchased
early in the summer sirt.ce which time there has been two advances of
,f Per Cent each. ., '.
Our stock from last year is complete in all sizes and we are wil
ling to give our customers the benefit of last year's prices, although
Diamonds advanced 10 per cent from October, 1902, to October, 1903.
Early in the summer (this year) we purchased,heavily in Diamonds, un
derstanding there would be another advance this fall, which came—
one of(5 per cent. Oct. is't another of 5 per cent, Nov. 1st. We can
save our customers at least 10 per cent on some, 20 per cent: which
can be considered a big saving as Diamonds are sold on av*W^ lo$e
margin. Do not fail to call in and see us, before buying.
$500
$15^
$126
Diamond and Em
erald from $15.00
up to
Diamond and,Tur
quoise from
$5.00
up to
Diamonds Cluster Brooche%t^
Di^mon and Emerald
Broadway.
72
yj E jtecf ia^t year that We had the largest
and most complete jewelry store in the
west, as every one that came in the store
said so, both from the city and adjacent
towns, but now we can say that our store,
as reftiodeled*, copses that of a year ago a&
hundred fold. 0 c'.T
Also Diamonds
I S E A E N W A S N E V E S O O
plete nor the variety and style to select from so large and attractive
as it is this season. We invite comparison. Below *e quote a lew of
mifiy rare bargains td^be found— v
aGold Lockets, Plain and Set with Stones, A
from $1.25 to VVV
"Gentlemen's Fine Gold Cuff Links—Plain, Fancy,
and set with Diamonds and other precious RfB
stones, from $2.00 to
Medium Priced Gold Brooches, beautiful ftAA
designs, from $2»00 to wdaa V
Neck Chains—Gold—a beautiful collection ttCB
fromj—Prices frota $1.50 to.......
Ladies' Guard Chains, Plain or
Diamond Slide—
Gold Scarf Pins, an end
less variety to Select
from—75c to
Briar Pipes, Gold Mount
ed^-From $1.25 to ..*M.
*Vi. -t
V
44
Xi
"S\f \'vt' ft' w'
miT™
We carry the most ex
tensive and up-to-date
collection of Gentle
men's Gold Fobs to
be seen west of the
Twin Cities. They
are much appreciated
as Christmas Gifts.
Prices range from-r
UNto
!$354»'
p.. T-
EdHiUi^ife
ms-
.„ 3'-rt^f't'4v
',• V#
•MW:
T- #U
*}J'
fl
V*
1
CvVxis##?' W
V,,'
i* 5- A-
v".
^:S§1
1
tA'
4 AA
frpm $15.00 to ...,
911911
$60
Cigarholders, Gold feO
Mounted—From $2.50 to 99
s
ft
Wtm
e?'.'
Wt
Vr'
10
'.v
.. I
$ v ii:
l.1]
,-Vr

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