OCR Interpretation


The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, May 30, 1906, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1906-05-30/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

A I
Pages
1 to 6.
1
1
1
sat
mmrnmmmmm
Eleven Additional Victims
of the Quake.
REMAINS FOUND IN RUINS
%HE TOTAL DEATH LIST OF THE
EARTHQUAKE IN 'FRISCO IS
NOW 418 OTHER BODIES
FOUND TODAY IN THE RUINS—
ENTIRE FAMILY LOCATED.
San Francisco, May 30.—The re
mains of eleven mort victims of fire
have been discovered, bringing the
death list at the morgue up to 418.
Those of Andrew Coleman and David
Cook were found in t:ie ruins of a
store at 114 Third street five bodies
were taken out of the ruins of Kings
bury house. The first four were those
of Louis Stambler, a tailor, 34 years
of age, his wife, Celia, their daughter
Rosie, 10 years of age and Stambler's
niece, Miss Fannie Weiner, 23 yeans
of age The fifth body taken out of
this building Is unidentified.
The remains of two Chinese were
taken from the ruins in Chinatown.
The remains of Frank Prochaztia,
waiter, were found in a lot near the
old postoffice. The body of -a man,
supposed to be Fred Kennell, was
fOUAd in the rear of 505 Third Street.
HIGGINS DISGUSTED.
Delays in Patrick Case Cause tha
Governor Annoyance.
4lbany, N. Y., May 30.—"Little less
than scandalous," is the phrase used
by Governor Higgins in a veto memo
randum last night regarding "law's
delays" In the case of Albert T. Pat
rick, convicted of the murder of the
aged millionaire, William M. Rice, in
New York city, in 1900. The govern
or's veto Is of two bills, introduced
by Assemblyman Wade, of Chautau
qua, to amend the code of crim
inal procedure so as to permit an ap
peal from an order denying a motion
for a new trial tn the criminal case
on the ground of newly discovered
evidence.
8HONT3 WONT RESIGN.
tfiMi of Canal Commission no Notion
of Quitting.
Atlanta, Ga., May 80.—T. H. Shonts,
chairman of the Panama canal com
mission who is a guest of friends here
denied positively the report from Pan
ama that he had resigned the chalr-i
msmship of the canal commission*
Over the telephone he said:
"There is not a word of truth In the
report."
JAP PHILOSOPHER.
Ha Quit Life By Taking a Header
Into a Volcano.
iVictoria, B. C., May 30.—Yamada
Na«kuma, the noted Japanese philo
sopher and pupil of Dr. Inouyo, has
committed suicide by jumping into the
Crater of a volcano.
CONGRESSMAN MARSHALL&F
THI3 STATE REMEMBERED.
His Good Fight for the Alcohol Bill
Will Give Him an Autographed
Photograph of the President JSffter
the Alcohol Bill.
Washington,. May SO.—Representa
tive Marshall is to get a souvenir of
the free alcohol fight in the shape of
an autographed photograph of the
/president signed with the pen he uses
to approve the free alcohol bill. Rep
resentative Hill, of Connecticut, is to
furnish this pen and is to retain it as
his souvetkir of a successful cam
paign.
Hill was the active friend of the
measure in the interest of the manu
facturers, and Marshall was the lead
ing representative of the farmers of
the country.
MURDER TRIAL
Haalett Case Progresses Slowly at
Formal!—Some New Testimony.
Forman, N. D., May 30.—'The dis
trict court convened at 1 p. m. yester
day and the Hazlett case was resum
ed. The afternoon was taken up in
fixing the date of the homicide and
the condition of the body when found.
All testimony showed that the man
was killed with his mittens, a coarse
leather faced pair, on his hands. It
is evident, the state contends, that the
murdered man was dressed' for the
stfeet and was In no condition \o show
assault upon his part.
From the trend of the questions of
defendant's .counsel it is evident that
the defense will be in part an at
tempt to show threats of violence on
the part of the dead man against the
defendant.
v, v.nu
"Washing-7 j. n.y 30. Decoration
day, the greti^.iational holiday dedi
cated to the memory of those who
fought in the civil war, was celebrat
ed today throughout the. country. In
the north as well as in the south,
wherever there are graves of Union
soldiers, the day was observed in a
more or less Impressive and elaborate
manner. In the national capital deco
ration day is always generally observ
ed, not only by all the patriotic and
veteran organizations, but by the citi
zens in general. Everywhere flags
waved from the mastheads, not from
halfmast, as in former years. This
change was due to the position taken
by. Commander-in-Chief Tanner of the
Grand Army, and to his explicit rec
ommendation in hi# Memorial
day
In New York.
New York, May 30. The Grand
Army and other military and patriot
ic organizations of New York and
Brooklyn are celebrating Decoration
day in the customary manner. The
various posts of the G. A, R. and affil
iated organizations met and marched
through the city to the various ceme
teries containing soldiers' graves. At
every one of the cemeteries special
exercises were held and after one or
more addresses the graves of the sol
diers were decorated with flowers and
(lags. In Brooklyn the Order of For
esters and several thousand members
of the Royal Arcanum marched with
the veterans and took part in the dec
oration exercises. In the afternoon
Henry M. Shrady's equestrian statue
of Washington, donated to the city by
ex-Register James R. Howe, will be
unveiled on the Brooklyn plaza of the
Williamsburg bridge, where it will
stand ..directly ih frdnt-»of the block
containing the new building of the
Williamsburg Trust Co.
At Norfolk.
Norfolk. Va., May 30.—Never In tht
history of this city did the celebration
of Decoration day attract so enormous
a crowd of visitors from the surround
ing districts as this year. This was
due to the fact that President Roose
velt had consented to deliver the me
morial address at the exercises of the
Army and Navy union in the naval
hospital cemetery at Tidewater, near
Norfolk.
President Roosevelt, accompanied
by Secretary Loeb and several person
al friends arived here this morning on
BUSINESS TROUBLES LED
THE TRAGEDY.
Route.
REPUBLICAN, ESTABUSHEP SEI'T. 8, 1878. FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA, WEDNESDAY KVKSIXO, MAY 30,1906.
or­
der.
In accordance with previous ar
rangements the various nosts of the
Grand Army and affiliated organiza
tions met at their respective halls and
marched to the various cemeteries as
signed to them, to decorate the graves
of the Union soldiers burled there.
The most Important exercises were
held in the Arlington national ceme
tery, where not only thousands of en
listed men are buried, but where rests
the remains of hundreds of prominent
officers. One of the Interesting feat
ures of the exercises was the visit to
the cemetery by the members of the
Cuban legation, who decorated not on
ly the graves of the sailors of the
Maine! ^jut also the graves of those
who had fallen during the Spanish
xVmerican war.
TO
British Columbia Man Selected Du
luth as the Proper Place to Quit
This Map—He Uwd tha Revolver
Duluth, May 30.—C. W. Young, aged
BO of Summerland, B. C., committed
suicide by shooting himself in the
temple some time between ft o'clock
Monday when he left the fit. Louis
hotel and noon yesterday when his
dead body was found on the beach on
Park Point. It is thought that de
spondency resulting from business
troubles led to the tragedy.
DESERTER ARRESTED.
Told a Fake Story About a Sister at
Bismarck.
Bismarck, N. D., May 30.—8. It.
Smith, bootblack at the Grand Pacific,
was arrested today on complaint of
J. E. Perry for renting a room for dis
orderly purposes. It appears he rent
ed a room Sunday from Perry repre
senting that he wanted it for his sis
ter. Last night he occupied the room
also and the arrest followed. Now it
appears the woman came from the
houso under the hill and that her
name is Marie Brown and no relation
to tlie man, though he maintains the
contrary and that he remained in the
room last night to prevent her escai e
as he was trying to reform her. The
girl admits where she came from and
would like to get work and cut loose
from it. She may be taken to the
Crittenden home or may be sent to the
reform school, as she is but 17 years
old. In Smith's clothes were found
letters which show that he Is a de
serter from the military post at Fort
Yellowstone, and will probably be sent
back there- if they want ttfm,
i
A
4 .•+) cf"
..
»ri v^!v- v
rni-omrn
Ktemi
...
CHIEf* ADDRESS At PORTS
MOUTH WAS MADE BY HIM.
Southern Audience Heard President
Roosevelt Pay Tribute to the Sol
dier Dead in Connection With tha
Decoration Day Exercises.
Portsmouth,
Va.,
Won't Be Much Lata*
anby, Minn., May 30.—Several cit
izen who have been "posted" habitual
drunkards, have complained to the
city council and asked tp have their
names stricken from the "blacklist."
In case of refusal they threaten to
remove to another town.
Very Critical.
Dublin, May 80.— Michael Davitt at
1 p. m. today was in a most critical
condition.
A N A I Y E U I A N
K 1 Vs
1 •$4«
board of the Mayflower and landed at
the pier of the navy yard. Rear Ad
miral P. F. Harrington and the mem
bers of his staff were there to receive
the president. After the exchange of
greetings the president and his party
seated themselves in carriages and
were driven through the city to the
naval hospital cemetery grounds at
Tidewater. In front of the Ports
mouth courthouse, which the president
passed on his way to the cemetery, a
grand stand had been erected, which
was occupied by the school children of
the town. They received the president
with cheers and the waving of little
flags. The president stopped and brief­
ands Today Placed Floral Offerings on the
eroic Dead
-r-
i i",
it
v
u
ipr,:
mi
l\ "if- i
Willi!
I
m(
III
iiiillftl &Ullfl''flM|[||j
Love and (ears for the Biue,
Tears »od ia*e for tbe Gray."
Will BET SOUVENIR STRANGER SUICIDED PRESIDENT SPOKE A HEAVY FiRt L0SS!BA1ER ARRESTED FEDERATED (MS
May 30.—Presi­
dent Roosevelt arrived here this morn
ing to deliver the Decoration day ad
dress at this point. There is an enor
mous crowd here to hear the nation's
chief executive.
Immediately after delivering the
oration of the day President Roose
velt unveiled the monument erected in
the navy cemetery by the army and
navy union.-
BATTLESHIP ASHORE.
English Fighting Machine la Stranded
On the Ro5ks.
Lundy Island, England, May 30.—
H. M. S. Montague is ashore on the
rocks at Shutter Point. The battle
ship is in a bad position with a hole
in her bottom. She struck during a
dense fog. The weather is calm but
should a storin arise she would fare
badly. The Montague is a twin screw
battleship of 14,000 tons attached to
the channel fleet Her captain is
Thomas B. S. Adair and her com
mander George n. g. 1'etclj.
.'fs W V
«•. v
ly addressed the children. A few min
utes later he continued on his way to
the cemetery, where the union and
confederate veterans of Norfolk,
Portsmouth and Berkley were already
assembled awaiting the arrival of the
president. A salute was fired when
the president entered the cemetery
grounds and proceeded to the grand
stand from which he addressed the
asembled veterans and citizens.
At the conclusion of the address the
president returned to the navy yard,
where he was the guest of Rear Ad
miral P. F. Harrington. In the after
noon, after luncheon, the president
will receive the officers of the naval
MILLION BUSHELS OF GRAIN
DESTROYED TODAY.
Flames Started in an Elevator of the
Armour Plant and Spread to a
Lumber Yard—Loss May Reach a
Million.
Chicago, May 30.—Fire early today
destroyed Armour & Co.'s elevator D,
standing along the slip extending from
the south branch of the river at Flsk
street and was spread by mans of
sparks to the John Spry Lumber Co.'s
plant yards, Twenty-second and Fisk
streets. With the elevator were de
stroyed 1,000,000 bushels of wheat,
corn and oats.
Four men employed in the elevator
were hurt, one fatally.
Soon after the fire started there
were a series of explosions caused
by the Ignition of the dust, which
spread the flames throughout the
building.
The loss was estimated roughly at
from $500,000 to more than $1,000,000.
In addition fifteen cars, filled yester
day with grain, were on tracks by the
elevator arid these were destroyed.
Switch engines hauled 150 cars out of
danger.
State Crop Report.
Bismarck, N. D., May 30.—The past
week was generally cloudy, with light
to heavy rains In all parts of the state,
being heaviest in the southern and
lightest in the northeastern portion
in the western ,as wqII as at a few
places in the extreme northern por
tion, the rain turned to snow.
The temperature was generally
low, caused bv low maximum tem
peratures, rather than by low mini
mum readings, although during the
latter part of the week the minimum
fell below the freezing point In most
sections, killing frosts were the
re
tail, ice forming in tome sectiani,
station and then he will return to the
Mayflower and start for Washington.
In New England.
Boston.
May 30. Throughout New
England Memorial day was observed
today with impressive ceremonies. The
Grand Army posts in the various
towns and vilages marched to the var
ious cemeteries and decorated the
graves of their comrades with flags
and fiowers. In many churches me
morial services were held. The day
also generally marked the opening or
the yachting, canoeing and horse rac
ing season.
In this city the Gaelic Athletic as
sociation of Greater Boston held its
annual Held day on the I_,ocust street
grounds.
In Richmond.
Richmond, Va., May 30. A monu
ment to William Smith,' twice gover
nor of Virginia and a brave confeder
ate general, was unveiled here today.
The cemetery formed part of the Me
morial day celebration in this city.
Judge Keith delivered the presentation
address and Governor Sw&nson replied
In behalf of the state.
At McKinley's'Home.
Canton, O., May 30. The local
Grand Army posts celebrated Decora
tion day in the usual manner. Thou*
sands of visitors from the surrounding
districts came to this city and many
floral offerings were deposited upon
the tomb of the late President Mc
Klnley. A large crate was sent from
the White house and other offerings
came from Chicago, Cincinnati, St
Louis, Cleveland, Pittsburg and
ern cities.
Memorial Decorated.
New Haven, Conn., May 30.—la
MILWAUKEE MAN MAILED OH
PACIFIC COA8T.
He Is Charged With the Embezzle
ment of $14,000 of the Bank's Funds
and Will Return to the Beer
Tewn.
Portland, Ore., May 30.—Arthur C.
Relnke, formerly receiving teller of
the Marshall & lllsey National bank
of Milwaukee, was arrested here last
night on a telegraphic warrant charg
ing him with embezzlement of $14,
000. Relnke expresses a willingness to
return to Milwaukee without legal
process.
CHILDREN IN DANGER.
surance.
.v
V" *J
FORUM ESTABLISHED KOV. 17, 189t.
eon*
nectlon with the Memorial day cete
biation in this city, a C. S. Bushnell
memorial was dedicated today in the
park at the junction of Chapel
street,
Winthrop and Derby, avenues.
At Pittsburg.
Pittsburg. Pa., May 30.—As usual
Memorial day was observed here by
the various posts of the Grand Army
and affiliated organizations. There
was a general parade In which nearly
3,000 men took part. The various cem
eteries were visited and the graves of
the Union soldiers decorated. In
every cemetery exercises were held,
consisting mainly of the reading of
Lincoln's Gettysburg addrtaa of
an appropriate oration.
Square Decorated.
Syracuse, N. Y., May 30.—This aft
ernoon an open air meeting will be
held on Clinton square, when that
square will be dedicated to memorial
purposes. It is intended to erect a sol
diers' and sailors' monument on that
square and a considerable fund has
already been collected for that pur
pose.
In the Far West.
Oregon City, Ore., May 30.—Memor
ial day was generally observed here
and throughout the state. Memorial
meetings were held, the graves of sol
diers decorated and flowers scattered
(Continued on Page Six)
.5
8chool Building Burned at Port Htu**
on—Pupils Escaped.
Port Huron, Mich., May 30.—Just In
the middle of the afternoon session of
school yesterday when the building
was filled with 400 pupils and teach
ers, the Poi-t Huron high school
caught fire. Despite the fact that
hardly fifteen minutes elapsed be
tween the first alarm and the falling
in of the roof, teachers and pupils all
escaped without injury. There was
no panic. Twelve girls and women
fainted and had to be carried to safe
ty, but none were injured. The build
ing was completely destroyed. The
loss is $50,000,
fully
coveted
by
J4
VK, Hp JT \h
v
in­
Casteilane Case.
Paris, May 30.—Every detail of tt$
legal formalities of the Casteilane case
has been completed with the notifi
cation of service of the divorce writ
on Count Boni. It only remains to ap
point a day for the hearings. This
possibly will be delayed for some
cause or other, but probably only for
a few days. Iu the meantime the
countess ijgs tx f&ris
London,
ffcon*
THM
ISSUE
12 PAGES
AT FAN
Dangerous Fire Is in Fro*
gress Today.
U. S. SUPPLIES' HAY Bill
FLAMES STARTED IN A JkfiRO
SENE WAREHOUSE IN THE
REAR OF THE MAIN COMMIS­
SARY DEPARTMENT OF THE
UNITED STATES IN PANAMA.
C&.ion,
Panama, 'May
30,—Fire
Started at 9:30 this morning among
the stock of kerosene belonging to the
United States commissary department
fifty yards back of the main commis
sary building, where over $5,000,000
worth of goods are stored. The or
igin of the fire is not known. Efforts
are being made to confine the flames
to the spot where they broke out and
prevent them from reaching the main
commissary building but water, up to
this hour, has been lac king and there
is a possibility of an extenalve
tlagration,
AD sports
DOWEITE8 IN CANADA.
New Colony May Be Formed by
Overseer Voliva.
Winnipeg, Man., May 30.—There is
a strong probability that a Dowielte
colony will be founded in western
Canada in the next few months. Rep
resentatives of Wilbur Glen Voliva are
touring the prairies for the purpose
of securing a suitable location for a
Canadian ZIon City.
When such a site has been secured
an appeal will be made to the Domin
ion government for free grants of
land which will most assuredly be
given, the government being ever
ready to offer every inducement to
any colony or sect wishing a refuge.
It is said the Dowleltes want to get
away from the rule of the United
States, their efforts there not having
been appreciated in the manner they
think they should be.
With the Dukhobors and Dowleltes,
western Canada will be supplied with
all the religious excitement necessary
for the welfure of any country.
•ACK TO MOONHEAD.
Negre Prisoner Will Return Witheut
Requisition Papeni.
Bismarck, N. D., May 30.—John
Crawford, the negro arrested here the
other day and wanted in Moorhead
for grand larceny, was taken to Moor
head today by Sheriff Brayer who had
a requisition, but Crawford consented
to go without its being presented.
His white female companions do not
seem to be wanted. Crawford and his
wife, Grace Crawford, are Implicated
with Eva Bentley in the north bridge
robbery at Moorhead. He is supposed
to be the man who put up the Job and
got the money.
BIG MEETING BEGIN8 IN THE
SAINTLY CITY.
Representatives af Women'e Clube
From all Over fhe United 8tat««
Are in Attendance Addresses of
Welcome Tanight. ,,
St. Paul, May 30.—Women from ail
parts of the United States are arriv
ing In St. Paul today, their shirt
waist fronts gaily decorated with
badges of all colors, showing that they
are delegates and officers of the gen
eral Federation of Women's clubs,
which begins a week's convention
here tonight.
The first meeting In connection with
tliis event was held at the Ryan hotel
this morning Where General President
Mrs. Sarah Piatt Decker has her
headquarters and where she met the
board of directors.
This afternoon a meeting of tbe
council was held in the old eapitol
building at which business to come
before the convention was discussed.
The formal opening of the conven
tion will take place tonight at the
national guard armory at the corner
of Sixth and Exchange streets, where
all the meetings will be held.
This meeting will consist of ad
dresses altogether of welcome. MlSs
Margaret J. Evans, dean of the wom
an's department of Carleton college,
will deliver the Invocation. Mrs. Julia
Ward Howe's Battle Hymn of the Re
public will be sung by the convention
and then Governor Johnson. Mayor
Smith, and President Herzog of the
commercial club will welcome the del
egates. Mrs. J. W. Edgerton, will
speak for the fourth district of the
Minnesota Federation and Mrs. J. L.
Washburn, of Duluth, president of the
Minnesota federation, will speak for
the state organization. Mrs. Decker,
president of the general federation
will respond.
The first business eesatan will b%
held Thuraday morning.
1
V "V V
1

xml | txt