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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, July 28, 1906, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1906-07-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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PART
PAGES
1 to 8.
*t
J-***
f" 1 i•
I.
«atm iifc.itt
HE NAVIGATING OFFICER
OF A CRUISER.
V
Bullet Fired
by
W
KPUBTJOANr ESTABLISHED SEPT. 5. 1878
-,r»jiu .a
fl '. Mi» I itl
Trains Went Through in
Western Style.
EIGHT THOUSAND SECURED

DARING TRICK TURNED 6Y REV
OLUTIONISTS TRAIN WAS
GUARDED BY TROOPS BUT
THESE FAILED TO PROTECT
THC WEALTH
Warsaw, July 2 8.-^-A passenger, train
carrying government money and
guarded by a detachment of soldiers
and gendarmes, was attacked today
between Czenstockowa and Herby by
a large and well armed band. Lively
firing ensued during which two gen
darmes, four soldiers and two civil
employes were killed and others of the
guards were wounded.
The attacking party carried off $10,
000 and tho arms of the defenders of
the train. It probably was the same
band which captured the train on
Thursday, announcing that the revolu
tion had begun.
The countryside is said to be In a
ferment and sympathizing with the
guerilla bands.
Tho small force of troops operating
in the district will be re-inforced. Ag
itators are making capital over the re
cent incidents. They affirm that it
will be difficult for the provincial ad
^iiiiiiisiratiori to detach enough troops
from the cities and the towns to make
a net large enough to catch the mar
auders.
Later details say that the attacking
party consisted of ten revolutionists
and that among the killed were Gen
eral Svekat, chief of the frontier
guard: and General Weitenring chief
of the customs service. Four of the
guards, who were wounded, sustained
severe injuries. According to the
latest report the revolutionists escap
ed with $10,000.
Ffeneh tailor* Hit
Him In the Spine and Caused Death
8ix Hours Later—Shooting Was
ftyjMfy Accidental.
Chee Foo, China, July 28.—Lieu ten
.ant Clarence England, navigating of
ficer of the United States cruiser Chat
tanooga, was wounded at about noon
today by a rifle bullet flred by a mem
ber of the crew of the French "arm
ored cruiser Dupetit Thouars, and died
at 6 o'clock this evening. The Chat
tanooga, with Lieutenant England on
the bridge, proceeded from the har
bor to the target range, just outside,
and was passing the French squadron,
which was anchored near the American
squadron and was engaged in a small
arms practice. The Chattanooga,
after several bullets had struck the
side of the ship, signalled to the
Frenchmen to cease firing, but before
this was accomplished, Lieutenant
England was struck in the back at
the base of the spine, probably by
a ricocheted bullet, which left his body
under the arm. The crew of the Du
petit Thouars later continued their
practice from the deck of the cruiser.
.jTheir lire was directed at targets in
the water, differing from the Ameri
can practice of landing men on the
barren island at the entrance of the
ftat'bpr.
iti.
1
AFTER STANDARD OIL.
\,,'New Investigation to Be Started by
,• v/uL' U. S. Grand Jury in Chicago.
Chicago, July 28.—The Standard Oil
"f Co.'s methods of transporting itji pro
'1 jducts are to investigated Aug. 6
if When a federal grand jury will con
^vene here to take testimony on that
subject. The decision to draw a
"special grand jury was reached after
,ian all day conference between govern-
:'"ment
s
fi
4
lawyers. Judge Landls in the
.U. S. court issued the order for the
..yury.
-sfi District Attorney J. J. Sullivan of
^Cleveland, Assistant District Attorney
^Francis Hanchett, Special Agent T. C.
M. Shimbler of the department of
"commerce, Assistant Attorney General
'ifOliver E. Pagln and Special U. S. At
torney C. B. Morrison were in the
v
ft
.'V V
conference. It Is declared that new
~v -Hand important evidence was discov
ered ibi» fi&erfifiOlk
MR.
In & l&UMi of1 glory the biggest, best
and most successful state fair North
Dakota has ever had is drawing to a
close today. From the start early this
morning everything has. been propiti
ous. In contract to yesterday the sun
shone brightly throughout the morn
ing hours, there was' scarcely a cloud
in the sky and the Jveather conditions
Were perfect, "the grounds were
£ticky with mud and pools of water
werfc standing everywhere during the
early morning hours but the hot sun
and stiff northwest breeze did good
•service and it was not long before
they were sufficiently dried BO that
•Visitors could walk about in comfort
by'^iftepititi in the beaten pathfc
Moorhead Day. w
For Objection to Color.
brlt
It Is Moorhead day and the residents
of our sister city across the Red bent
on doing what they could to make it
the biggest day of the season simply
emmigrated to the fair gi-ounds. Judg
ing from the crowds which came over
on the cars the streets of the Minne
sota town must have presented a de
serted appearance during the day for
4gt*
Were
all the usual denizens of the
at the fair. The Moorhead people
not the only ones to flock to the ifair
ffroitvdq^ R«bbed- of tbehf own day
through the spltefulness of the weath
er the citizens of Fargo generously
laid aside all considerations of riv
alry and assisted Moorhead in cele
brating. Really it was both Fargo
and Moorhead day today.
Eager to take advantage of this last
opportunity to see the big show
residents of Fargo flocked to the
grounds and from 10 a. m. on there
KMIICIK! CHASED BACK SIWT LEADS WORLD A
MORE BITTERNESS LIKELY TO
RESULT.
The Chink Had an Eye Disease That
Bars Immigrants and Was Sent
Back on that Account Rather Than
Washington, July 28.—Through the
enforcement qf the immigration laws
of the United States against a Chinese
student who was one of a party which
arrived in Seattle a short time ago, a
young Chinaman of great promise was
forced to return to his native country
and the case may result in intensify
ing the criticism China offers against
the immigration restriction this coun
try imposed on the Chinese of the
favored class. He was afflicted with
trachoma, a disease of (he eyes.
HER NIGGER MUBBIE.
White Woman in Grand Forks Now
Wants a Divorce.
Grand Forks, N. D., July 28.—Mrs.
Mabel Robinson has brought an action
in the district court, praying for a di
vorce from Frank Robinson, to whom
she was married in Minneapolis in
1896.
Mrs. Robinson charges cruel and In
human treatment, and says that her
husband has on numerous occasions
threatened to kill her. Ordinarily but
little attention is paid to cases such
as this, but this takes on interest by
the fact that Mrs. Robinson is a come
ly white woman and the man from
whom she wants a divorce is as black
as the a9e spades is generally sup
posed to be.
The couple lived in Grand Forks
for some time and have some proper
ty, Robinson for years being employed
on the Great Northern as a porter.
Some time ago he left and is supposed
to be in St. Paul. Mrs. Robinson is
somewhat reticen£ in talking of her
marriage to the colored man, and ex
plains simply that the marriage re
sulted from spite. Mrs. Robinson will
ask the court to restrain her colored
husband from disposing of two lots in
this city, and the case will come on
for a hearing at the next term of the
district court. oka A. Sorley is b?r
attorney.
A N A I Y E U I A N
FARGOj NORTH jAKO^A, SATI in
fe*
fr'4 'J
was almost a continual stream of hu
manity pouring in through tho main
gate. Many who had postponed com
ing to the fair until Fargo day in
order that they might .Celetwato .prop
erly and help to swell the attendance
record at that time but who were kept
away by the weather yesterday deter
mined not to miss the fair and their
numbers served to augment the vast
throng.
Fortunately the street car company
was much better prepared to handle
the crowds today than it was during
the opening days of the fair. With the
Fourth street loop completed most of
the delays on the passing tracks were
avoided and the cars were nin on a
much faster schedule and consequent
ly could bring more people to the
grounds. Nevertheless all the com
pany's facilities are being taxed to the
utmost to carry the immense crowds
of people who are headed fairward.
Band Concerts.
On account of the condition of the
track it was found impossible to hold
the races scheduled for this afternoon
in the morning as was planned yester
day, so that this special attraction
was lacking but about 10:30 a. m. the
Minot band and Dr. Prftnam's musi
cians put in an appearance and start
ed rival concerts, one playing from the
porch of tfie Arts and Miscellaneous
building and the other from that of
the Manufacturers' building. They
alternated their pieces, giving a c»n»
tinuous performance which was-fiuidi
appreciated by 'the crowds which
thronged ti»e grounds. y
At the Rao**.
The people devoted the morning
hours to inspecting thd various ex
hibits in the two main exhoblt build
ings and the livestock, and shortly af
ter noon they began to gather in laqge
numbers in the vicinity of the grand
stand to witness the biggest racing
programme of the week, and it was
not long before the grand stand was
HALF A, MILLION ACHES TAKEN
IN THE LAST QUARTER.
Total Receipts of the Year Wore $550,
000—This Is the Last Big Report
For the District Which Has Been
Divided.
Minot, N. D., July 28.—The local
landofflce for the quarter ending June
30 kept at the head of the landofflces
in the United States.
Dhere were 246 final homesteads, 376
commuted homesteads and 3,306
homestead filings involving 500,000
acres. The total receipt^ were $122,
739.
For the fiscal year ending June 80,
1906, there were 816 finals, 2,109 com
muted homesteadgj and 8,533 filings,
involving 1,300,000 acres. The total
receipts for the year were $550,000.
This is the last big report for the
Minot office, as by president's recent
proclamation the western half of the
district will after Aug. 1 constitute the
Wiliiston district. The new officials
at Wiliiston are George W. Wilson of
Minot, register, and Victor Chaffee of
Grand Forks, receiver.
The Minot office was established in
1892, but did comparatively little busi
ness till five years ago. Since that
time the influx of settlers has been
marvelous. By Aug. 1 there will be
nearly 45,000 filings on record, 12,000
commuted homesteads and 3,000 final
homesteads. Nearly all of the filing
will be done In Wiliiston hereafter.
On Aug. 8 about 450,000 acres will
be restored to the public domain which
had been withdrawn for irrigation
purposes. This Is in the new district
and much of It is good land.
An idea of how this region is pro
pressing by leaps and bounds may be
gained from the fact that within a
week at the townsite of Ryder on the
Soo men stood waist deep in flax in
bloom growing on land that two years
ago was government land, and bid
from $400 to $1,600 for lots_.
'uj Tillman Campaigniitf.
®r*»sperity, S. C., July 28.—-A large
open air meeting is held today at
Young's grove, near this town, which
will be addressed this afternoon by
United States Senator Tillman. There
will also be a barbecue otter 0&T
tertalfimeat features,
4Tr
i, A
me-
KVKNINTG, JULY 2R, IWH5.
ureatest Racing
e Ever Given in the
This Is Moorhead Day and the Indicafiotfs Are That the Attendance Will
Be the Largest of the Week—Many Fargoans, Disappointed
Yesterday, Are There Today.
packed and the course lined with peo
jple almost .all the way around.
Lively Scene*.
Today the fair grounds present a
brilliant scene of bustling activity.
Throngs of people surge through the
exhibit palaces and fill the barns
where line stock is kept, the bands
play, the horses speed around the race
track while the big crowd cheers, the
Wild West performers do their acts
amid the enthusiastic applause of the
audience, the spellers in front of the
shows on roundup drive keep the air
filled with their calls and the acro
bats present their thrilling feats. This
evening the scene of brilliant activity
will be continued until midnight. At
•12 p. m. sharp will come the signal for
lights out and the greatest fair in the
history of North Dakota will be over.
3i
IN THE ART DFt'AHTMLNT
Seme Plfirtingft That Attracted At
tention for Their Excellence-^
Exhibits High Class.
Has North Dakota any art? This
Question which might be asked by
aone who regarded it merely as a pio
jg&er state of the wild and woolly west
offitj^easHy bq answered by an inspec
tion of the art exhibit at the state
fair. Although not of great extent
the exhibit more than makes up in
quality wnat It lacks In quantity.
It is almost regarded as a supple
ment to the women's exhibit for al
most without exception the artists are
feminine. Perhaps this is because the
men of the state have been too busy
breaking up its virgin soil, harvest
ing its bountiful crops and growing
rich.
BIG ONE foft MEDICAL 8SRVICES
FOR FIELD.
Dr. Billings Wants $25,000 for Seven
Days Treatment of the Late Mar
shall Field During the Millionaire's
Last (lines*—Largest Ever Made.
Chicago, July 28.—Dr. Frank Bill
ings yesterday filed in nrobate court a
sworn claim for $25,000 against the
Marshal Field estate. The bill is
for seven days' professional attend
ance on Mr. Field in a New York ho
tel when he was suffering from the
attack of pneumonia that caused his
death. The fee is believed to be one
of the largest ever charged by a phy
sician in the United States for ser
vices that did not include the perform
ance of a surgical operation. It has
been announced that there is no in
tention on the part of the trustees of
the estate to contest the claim of Dr.
Billings. They rpadiiy accepted the
service of the papers in the case.
THE HARTJE CASE.
Former Maid Was on the Stand—New
Letter Discovered.
Pittsburg, Pa., July 27.—Susie Wag
ner, formerly a maid In the employ of
the Hartje household was a witness
for Mr. Hartje today, in his suit for
divorce, but by her testimony made
an important point for Mrs. Hartje.
That Susie Wagner received three let
ters from Mrs. Mary Scott Hartje,
while Susie was in Germany was
brought out. Hitherto only two let
ters had been mentioned, one of them
being the disputed letter known as ex
hibit No. 6. Miss Wagner said she
gave the second letter to "Ed." Hartje
in New York. Mrs. Hartje's attor
neys have contended all along that ex
hibit No. 6 was a forged reproduction
of another letter. The admission that
the second letter reached the Hartje
side two months beofre No. 6 is re
garded as important in view of the
contention of Mrs. Hartje's counsel.
Although the new letter has been trac
ed to Mr. Hartje's counsel by their
own counsel it was not offered as a
"standard." In order that she should
not be further subjected to annoyance
at the hands of rowdies, three detec
tives guarded Mrs. Hartje. The hear
ing was adjourned until next week,
when it is expected tbe evidence wlU
t* sempieteq, i
i 11.
..f
If this be so they should not fa!! to
appreciate the excellent work Jbne by
their mothers, wives, sisters and
sweethearts.
In the exhibit there are excellent
examples of painting, crayon sketch
ing and burnt woodwork. As the visit
or ascends the stairs to the gallery
where the exhibit is located he takes a
glance about and his attention is at
onee riveted by a striking figure study
hanging high on the wall to the left.
The picture is that of an old man dad
in shabby clothes and holding a violin
lovingly in his hands while he plays it
with great vigor. His face is express
ive of a kind of reverie tempered with
sadness. The study which was made
by Miss Pearl Sidnam is an excellent
one which would merit more praise
were the original idea hers. However,
it Is an excellent copy of a very fine
painting.
Miss M. S. Berg exhibits a number
of excellent crayon sketches. Nearly
all are of the conventional classic
style and subjects, but there la one
from life which Is very good.
In the center of the booth are two
stands which show what can be done
In woodburning by an artistic hand.
On a dark background a design of
richly colored oak leaves in the aut
umn has been worked out and shows
to excellent advantage. The work is
that of Mrs. A. J. Roach.
One of the largest exhibitors Is Mrs.
George Darmody who has fully a
dozen pictures i^ung upon the- walls.
They include a number of studies In
fruits and flowers as well as several
very attractive animal portraits. Two
boys' heads done in colors make a
pl ture which is worthy of particular
notice.
Sheep in a Storm is another picture
which attracts attention as does the
dainty little winter landscape which
is the work of Mrs. Ashley. A num-
(Continued on Page Three.)
HISTORICAL DI8COVCRY
IN VENICE TODAY.
Coin of
MADE
Twelfth Century
Found in
Cement of 8t. Mark's Which Is Be
ing Itestored to Its Former Condi
tion—Fixes
the
Age
of the Pil«.
Venice, July 28.—An important dis
covery has been made here while de
taching the mosaics from inside the
basilica of St. Marks to carry out the
work of restoring the whole cathedral
which was shaken through the sink
ing of its foundations. Buried in the
cement was a very rare coin of the
time of Doge Enrico Dandolo, who
died in 1205, thus proving that the
building of basilica was going on In
the twelfth century. It is supposed
that the coin fell from the clothing of
a workman into the cement remaining
there seven centuries.
CANNON HAD FUN.
8peaker Took in Coney Island and
Enjoyed the Occasion.
New York, July 28.—"See here,
young fellow," said Uncle Joe Can
non. "It has always been an opinion
of mine that a man was a damn fool
to talk when he had nothing to say.
I have always acted on it. Now I
come down here and take in Coney
Island. I don't talk about it and yet
your old papers are full of wbat I
said about It."
'Sure, I had a good time at Coney
I am still a youngster—I'm only 70
years young—and if you couldn't en
joy yourself at Coney Island you
would be discontented in paradise. I
did* the shoot the chutes, race In an
auto, was introduced to an actress
and had a good time, but I did not
drink beer in a dance hail, sing a song
in a music hall, make love to a chorus
girl, try to buy an Interest in Luna
park or waltz with a Bowery girl.
"We got back to the hotel at a de
cent hour—1 o'clock in the morning—
and I found that the fun had com
pletely cured me of an attack of in
digestion. I tell you, a fellow is just
as old as he feels. I never believe in
sitting around and piling the years
Oft,"
THIS
ISSUE
16 PAG&J
FORUM ESTABLISHED NOV. 17, 1891.
USSIAN
MULES
All Communication Cut
Off With Interior
SWITCHBOARD BURNED OUT
THE "ACCIDENT* 18 REGARDED
WITH 8USPICION BUT OPERAT-
ORS' 8TORY HAS TO BE ACCEPT
ED—8TOLYPIN CANT OCT MEN
HE WANT8 IN CABINET.
M. Petersburg, July 28—The switch
board of the central telegraph station
In St. Petersburg was burned out to
day, destroying all communication
with the provinces. While there is
suspicion that the "accident" was ar
ranged by the revolutionists no evi
dence to support it can be found and
the telegraph department authorities
are apparently satisfied with the ex
planation of the employes. However,
the public is cut off from telegraph
communication with the interior for
some time but the government retains
the possibility of communication with
the provincial authorities over the
railroad wires.
New obstacles have been encoun
tered by Premier Stolypln in his ef
forts to secure service in the reorgan
ized cabinet of men of standing la
Russia, outside of official life.
The conditions laid down by Guis
koff^and Prince LvofI are understood
to have been rejected and they have
definitely refused to enter the minis
try. This makes a practical ship
wreck of the entire school since with
out the participation of the non-bu
reaucratic elements it would be diffi
cult to convince even the conserva
tives and liberals of the sincerity of
the government's promises.
Meanwhile M. Stolypln is energetic
ally trying to convince the country
(Continued on Page Five)
BUTCHER USED CLEAVER ON U*
PONENT'S HEAD.
They Quarrelled In the Butcher Shop
and After Flaying Hia Opponent the
Butcher Continued to Chop Meat
With the Cleaver.
Bast St. Louis, III., July 28.—After
quarrelling for some time In the butch
er shop of Michael 8chmitt yesterday,
Schmitt struck Charles Mommertz on
the neck with a meat cleaver. Mom
mertz staggered outside with his head
half severed from his body and died
in a few minutes. *S"hen the police
arrived and arrested Schmitt he had
resumed his work of chopping meat
with the same cleaver.
EXPELLED FROM UNION.
Qaaor Case Against a Chicago Alitor
man—The Reason.
Chicago, July 28.-~Aldenna.n Daniel
lierlihy, of the Twenty-eighth ward,
was a member In good standing of the
steam engineer's union until last
night..
Now he is an outcast from thit la
bor organization, and for a strange
reason. He was expelled from the
union because a few weeks ago he in
troduced into the city council a reso
lution calling upon the state legis
lature to make assaults upon women
and girls punishable by death.
The union, through the medium of
a series of sharp resolutions, "deplor
ed the outrages upon women and
children," but declared that Insane
asylums and hospitals are the proper
places for the weak-minded persons
who commit such assaults.
Alderman Herllhy, at one of the last
council meetings before summer ad
journment, introduced the resolution
seeking capital punishment. His ac
tion followed the many brutal attacks
on women reported throughout the
spring.
Nothing was done with the resolu
tion except to refer it to the state
legislation committee where it now re
poses. Herlihy's expulsion last night
was unexpected. The resolution pro
viding for it was introduced by Ar
thur McOracken, secretary of the ufl
lon, and was adopted unanimously
after a spirited discussion in which
the offending alderman was berated
roundly as a traitor to tbe mulee HMr
ton movement.
,*0
-Ma*5*
t'lrerv

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