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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, August 15, 1906, Image 1

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ASS11MCE8 OF GOOD WILL
SECRETARY OF St ATE TOLD THE
DIPLOMATS THAT WHILE THE
UNITED STATES MADE NO
FORMAL ALLIANCES IT WAS
ALLIED IN SENTIMENT.
Buenos Ay res, Aug. 15.—At the of
ficial banquet given at the govern
ment house last evening by President
Alcorta in hoobr of Secretary of State
Root of Washington, to which the
diplomatic corps and the high officers
of state only were invited, the secre
tary naade what was considered the
roost Important speech he has deliver
ed "while on his tour.
The scene was most brilliant, the
staircase and the banquet ting hall
presenting a picture of great splendor.
Replying to President Alcorta's
address of welcome, Secretary Root
said, among other things:
"I deemed it my duty to come in re
sponse to your kind invitation to say
that there is not a croud in the sky of
good understanding.
"We can rejoice In each other's
prosperity. We can assist in each
other's development. We can be
proud of each other's successes with
out hindrance or drawback. Our tra
policy in the United States
of America Is to make no alliances..
iT.Ln »o
al,lanc^
NED KISSED BY RILL
MONARCHS SMACKED EACH OTH
i ER THIS MORNING,
King Edward Reached Cronburg and
Was Met at the Railroad Station
by Emperor William and Suite—
Thf Greetings Were Cordifi,
Cronburg, Hesse, Nassau, Prussia,
Aug. 15.—King Edward arrived here
on a special train from Frankfort at
45 a. m. today. Emperor William
and Prince and Princess Frederick
f'harles of Hesse—Nassau, met him at
|he railroad station. The emperor as
iteted the king in alighting and then
they kissed each other on both cheeks,
^he meeting was very cordial.
Strict Silence.
^jUndan, Aug. 1G.—The strictest stl
fnce is maintained" in official circles
$s to the subjects to be discussed be
tween the king and the Haiser at
irtiedrichpf.
I'J-* t!Vfce* AmsrioaW*.
Cassel, Aug. 15.—Herman Kidder. of
Jjtfjew York, had a second audience of
Jlt.iperor William, The emperor was
Keenly interested In everything rela
ting to the U. S. and said he desired
the good will and friendship of the
'American people. He strongly wished
to visit the United. States and meet
lite people and President Roosevelt,
for whom he has the highest admira-
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REPUBLICAN, ESTABLISHED SEPT, 5, 1878.
iiiUL
Address at Buenos Ay res
Was Cheered.
Minneapolis,
but we make an
alliance with all our sisters in senti
ment and feeling in pursuit of liberty
and justice, in mutual helpfulness and
in that spirit, I beg to retUKcPto you,
sir, and to your government and to
the people of this splendid and won
derful country, my sincere thanks for
the welcome you have given me and
my country in my person."
Secretary Root's speech was re
ceived with vociferous applause and
with the greatest possible satisfac
tion.
Cheyenne Festival Open*.
Cheyenne, Wyo., Aug. 15.—Wyom
ing's annual fete known as the Fron
tier Day celebration is now under way.
Crowds are coming in from Denver
and the east and strangers line the
streets for blocks. Many cowboys
are in the city from all parts of the
state, and they, with the Indians in
their red and yellow blankets, are at
tracting much attention from the vis
itors. Rough riding contests, roping
contests, relay races for women and
numerous other festivities make up the
programme. Many open air attrac
tions have been provided and the na
tive element, as well as the visitors,
are giving themselves over to two days
of merriment and good fellowship.
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$
Aug. 15.—For the for­
tieth time since its work was finished
and its glory won, the Grand Army of
the Republic was in line today.
There have been many parades more
gorgeous, many spectacles more daz
sling and bewildering but never has
there been in this country one more
appealing and impressive than that
which passed through the streets of
Minneapolis during the greater part
of this morning.
The parade was a notable affair as
such things go, well handled, quick
moving and inspiring to look upon.
It was a day of pride for the old
soldiers in themselves and for the
multitude in the soldiers.
Over the heads of the veterans, as
they marched along, countless flags
snapped in the breeze and their lines
passed for two miles between build
ings gorgeously decorated in their
honor.
The plaudits of
the
crowd
and the spectator
were
THE REMARKABLE CASE
NEGRO.
Uf find Eating.
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in
their ears. The day was Idea!.
Several sharp showers during the
night dispelled the oppressive heat of
yesterday and a soft cool breeze swept
the city streets.
The sky was dark during the early This comprised an escort of' the
part of the morning but as the col-| Grand Army and then, inarching in
umns gathered at their rendezvous the splendidly even ranks with the forma
clouds departed and bright sunlight i tion superbly kept throughout the en
succeeded. [tire parade, came the first of old sol-
Every precaution. that could make diers, the Columbia Post of Chicago,
the parade a success for the veterans!acting as personal escort of the com
qj mander-in-chief.
authorities. Behind this post came Commander-
was taken by th
The line of march, two miles in in-Chief Tanner, beautiftilly mounted
length, was wired off, nobody being ani attended by his personal staff,
able to obstruct the column for an in- I Following the staff officers, rank on
stant. rank, came the men who were the life
Hours before the scheduled time the guard of the nation, heroes of the Civ
streets were filled with spectators and il war.
during its progress they were packed
solidly with cheering, enthusiastic hu
manity.
The parade itself, which was organ
ized by departments, formed at 9
o'clock and moved exactly one hour la-
OF A
Mississippi Coon Is Still Alive After
Being Shot Through the Heart and
Through the Head—He Is Sitting
Hattiesburg, Miss., Aug. 15.—With
one bullet straight through his heart
and another through his temple, enter
ing at«one side of the head and com
ing oftt at the other, Chas. Williams,
a negro of this city, has survived for
three days and the prospects are he
will eventually recover. The wounds
were inflicted with a 38-calibre re
volver, flred at short range. Williams
fell over as though dead. An under
taker was telephoned for but a sur
geon beat hijn to the scene and when
the dead wagon arrived the wounded
negro was able to sit up^ Since then
he has been eating heartily and his
physicians venture the opinion that he
will recover if no unforseen compli
cations arise. Williams was shot by
another negro in a dispute over a
game of chance.
Union Veterans.
St. Paul, Minn., Aug. 15.—The an
nual encampment of the Union Veter
ans' union adjourned today after a
successful and well attended gathering
under the presidency of Commander
in-Chief Gen. Richard L. Gorman.
DENNY IN DESPAIR.
Former Mayor of Witliston Begins to
Lose His Nerve.
Williston, Aug. 15.—Ex-Mayor Den
ny, the former banker, who was found
guilty of horse stealing and sentenced
to the penitentiary for three years, is
beginning to fear that he cannot se
cure a reversal of the sentence if he
takes the case to a higher court. He
has been given sixty days to prepare
for an appeal and released on $2,500
bonds, but it is thought now that this
merely giving him a chance to ar
i'yjage business ailairs.
,. i'oage Ws business stairs. ^uttineas and reUglyua circles.
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A N O A I Y E U I A N
•*'.
Directly behind the police at the
head of the parade proper came the
magnificent Cook band and drum corps
of Denver, its showy Zouave uniform
making a splendid appearance. Tweh
ty-two young ladles, who form the
drill corps and are a portion of the
organization, were especial favorites
with the multitude and were given a
continuous ovation during the parade.
Next came the chief marshal of the
parade, ex-Governor S. R. VanSant,
and his chief of staff, Gen. Fred B.
Wood, adjutant general of Minnesota,
who was followed by a throng of of
ficers, composing the regimental and
staff officers of the Minnesota national
guard.
The states marched in order of their
admission to the Grand Army.
Illinois had right of line followed by
Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Ohio and
New York in t)ie order named.
4
liere Were Pathetic and Impressive Rather
the
Twenty other states followed these.
ALL SUIT lil'IW) FilHLSr IffiSllAI MAN'S ACT
MINNESOTA IS SUFFERING FROM
THE FLAMES.
Settlers Are Driven iProfn Their
Homes and Wild Animals Were
Forced to Leave the Burned Dis
triet—Rain Would St#p Fires.
Biwabik, Minn., Aug. 15.—Several
large forest fires are burning fiercely
West
and south of
this
dreds of acres of second growth and
thicket have been burned over and
still the flames sweep on unresisted.
Much damage has already been done
aside from the burning of the wood.
Many settlers have been forced to
abandon their homes and have lost
most of their property. Wild animals
are invading the limits of the villages.
Unless rain falls within twenty-four
hours valuable tracts of pine will be
destroyed.
Long Winded Battle.
Sofia, Aug. 15.—According to official
reports the fighting between Greeks
a n u a i a n s a A i o u o n A u
TTiSh Imposing and Magnificent Features
Old Glory Waved in Great Profusion Over the Heads of the Men Who Had
Fought to Preserve
Throng Witnessed the Parade.
1MV the signal being a single gun. Each
dc ir ment carried two guidons, one
black, the other red, both bearing the
department number. A guidon, also
designating the number of the depart
ment, was carried on the right of each
formation.
At the head of the column was a
splendidly mounted platoon of police,
filling the streets from curb to curb
and effectually sweeping away any pe
destrians or vehicles that escaped the
vigilant eyes of the members of the
national guard and the policemen who
were stationed along the line of march.
ik..
1 2
lasted from dawn until 8 o'clock in
the evening, in the course of which
seven were killed, the number of
wounded not being ascertained. The
fire is now under control. More than
half the town, including all the public
buildings with their archives and the
Bulgarian and Greek schools and mos
que, was destroyed.
DOCTOR KILLS COLLEAGUE.
Quarrel Between Maysville, I. T.»
Physicians Has Fatal Ending.
Maysville, I. T., Aug. 15.—Dr. Pat
terson shot and instantly killed Dr.
Herrod yesterday on the main street
of the town and in front of the post
office. The killing resulted from bad
feeling which has existed for some
time over business affairs, the former
having sold his practice to Dr. Her
rod and later came Into the town and
reentered the practice of his profes
sion. Both men were prominent in
and reUgiyua circles.
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fABGO, NORTH DAKOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 15, 1906. FORUM ESTABLISHED NOV 17, 1891.
Integrity of Their Country-Immense
column Was about three hours'
jiassing a given point.
The parade was the feature of the
day. Everything else gave way to
it, and when the inarch was over the
veterans were in no mood to do any
thing but rest or enjoy the concerts
or other entertainment provided for
them. With the receptions and enter
tainments, the free spectacles and
concerts, the veterans and their
friends are having a most enjoyable
time. Open house is being kept in
all the local headquarters and nothing
is being left undone that might con
tribute to the pleasure of the visitors.
Trainloads of veterans are still arriv
ing, and the encampment now begins
to assume the proportions of the larg
est held by the organization in recent
y^ars.
The Campfire.
The feature of the evening was a
large campfire held in the auditorium
which packed that structure to its ut
most capacity. Addresses were made
by Governor Johnson, Commander-in
Chief Tanner, R. B. Brown of Zanes
ville, O., a candidate for the honor of
being the next commander of the
grand army, and a number of others.
An address of welcome was made to
every prominent organization of na
tional scope now attending the en
campment and a response offered in
behalf of each thanking the citizens
of Minneapolis for the manner in
which the members of the Grand Army
liave been entertained.
A parade of the Topeka Flambeau
club, which is held in the evening was
a most attractive affair of the pro
grammer
Two Died.
Two more members of the Grand
Army died, making three who have
passed away since the commencement
of the present encampment. J. H.
Burge of Burlingame, Kans., fell dead
while standing in front of the clerk's
desk in the Pauly hotel. Death was
caused by apoplexy induced by the
heat of the day. The other death was
that of George H. Smith, a former
KILLED BROTHER-IN-LAW AND
WIFE.
After the Double Crinpa the Unfor
tunate Man Cut His Own Throat
Mind Weakened by Despondency
Ovir His Illness.
place, hun­
Chicago, Aug. 15.—In a lit of In
sanity today, Emil Borner, a mechan
ic of Batavia, III., murdered his broth
er-in-law, Ernest Franzen, by cutting
his throat with a razor, slashed Mrs.
Borner sot severely that she will die,
and then cut his own throat, dying
within a few minutes. After being in
jured Borner's wife summoned neigh
bors. Her daughter, Sigma, and a
boarder in the house jumped from the
windows and escaped. The tragedy
was enacted at the Borner home.
jBorner had been 111 for three weeks
land at times had been delirious, but
|no symptoms of violent insanity had
been previously noticed.
Th* Shoshone Lands.
Cheyenne, Wyo., Aug. 15.—The lands
of the Shoshone reservation in Fre
mont county, not far from the Yellow
stone National Park, were thrown op
en to such prospective settlers, who
have registered and filed their respec
tive applications during the past
month. The number of settlers is very
large and there Is quite a rush to the
jaew lands. k-
|DASHED OVER DAM TO DEATH.
Mishawaka, Ind., Young Woman
i
Drowns, But Escort Escapes Alive.
i Mishawaka, Ind., Aug. 15.—Miss
Mary Skinner, one of the belles of this
city, was drowned In the St. Jospeh
river in company with J. C. Miller of
South Bend. The young woman was
rowing in a boat near Hen island, a
dam east of this city, and lost control
of the oars, the young man also be
ing unable to handle the skiff. Both
snot over the twenty-foot dam, but
Milkr ftao&Md.
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Ami
member of tJ»a IM Ntew York dra
goons, who has been visiting relatives
In the city for some time. Mr. Smith
was knocked down by a horse which
was driven rapidly around a corner
just as he was about to take a street
car. He was removed to a hospital
but died in a short time of concussion
of the brain.
Fight for Commander.
The fight for commander-in-chief
became active and bitter today. Many
copies of a circular attacking the war
i
record of Capt. P. H. Coney of Kansas, I
a prominent candidate were handed
around. The circular was not signed I
and Captain Coney declared that the
attack was so utterly baseless as to be
almost beneath his notice. He con
tented himself by giving it a simple
denial and referring all persons who
desired Information as to his war re
cord to the history of the 111th New
York infantry.
National Museum.
It is the intention of the ladies of the
Grand Army to offer a resolution in I
the business meeting of the Grand
Army urging the purchase of the Mc
Lean house at Appommatox for the
purpose of converting It into a na
tional museum. It' Is said that the
plan has met with favor on the part of
the confederate veterans, who have
offered to aid in the project. Miss
Nellie Underwood and Mrs. Belknap,
of the ladies of the Grand Army are
pushing the plan.
z
Next Encampment.
The flrBt move towards securing the
national encampment of 1907 was
made by the New York delegation
which announced its Intention of get
ting it, if possible for Saratoga.
"Street Car Ruah.
St. Paul, Aug. 15.—During one hour
of the rush to gqt over to Minneapolis
this morning the Twin City Street
railway carried 20,000 passengers on
its three interurban lines. The fare
one way is 10 cents and the rush con
tinued from 8 tfntll 10 o'clock.
iliS FOR SILVER
FOUR WERE RECEIVED BY DI
RECTOR ROBERTS.
The Government Has Already Pur*
chased 50,000 Ounces But no State
ment Was Made of the Names of
the Successful Bidders.
Washington, Aug. 15.—Bids Were
opened by Director Roberts of the
mint this afternoon on tenders of sil
ver in pursuance with the announce
ment of Secretary Shaw that such bids
would be received. Four bids were
received and it was announced the
government had purchased 60,000
ounces of silver. The bidders'
are not announced.
First Conduotor.
Bwlhi, Aug. 15.—An Interesting fes
tivity has just taken place at Ltchter
felde, near Berlin, where Inspector Be
yer celebrated the day when, twenty
five years ago, he ran the first electric
railroad in the world. It was in the
year 1881 that Herr Werner von Sie
mens, the founder of the Gr^at Ber
lin firm of Siemens and Halske, built
the first electric road from the Anhalt
railway station to Lichterfekle. Herr
Beyer was the first man In charge of
the new conveyance, uniting In his
person the function of motorman and
conductor. He afterwards rose grad
ually to the post of chief inspector of
the now enormously increased electric
railway system of that part of Ber
lin.
DROWNED BY HIS HORSE.
Animal Throws Rider Into Slough
Near Williston, N. D.
WUIIston, N. D. Aug. 15.—Rpjr Con
ead, 25 years of age, was drowned in
a slough at F. R. Zahi s ranch, thirty
miles in the country, today. He and
others were on horseback. At the edge
of the water his horse lunged Into
deep water, and he never came to the
surface. Parties dove after him, but
the water was too deep. The body was
recovered by the use of grabhooks.
The body was brought to Williston
to be shipped to Glyndon, Minn, his
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THIS
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12 PAGES
lidlfRS'
IMALITY
Young: Girl Lashed for
Jesting Remark
POPULAR INDIGNATION HIGH
CRACK GUARDS OF RUSSIA BRU
TALLY LASHED A REFINED
YOUNG LADY AS IF 8HE HAD
BEEN THE LOWE8T AND MOST
GUILTY CRIMINAL.
St. Petersburg, Aug. 15.—Intenaa
popular indignation has been created
here by the brutal treatment of Mile.
Smirnoff, a refined young lady, at the
hands of the crack chevalier guards.
While a squadron of these guards
men was passing along Nev*k« Proe
pect yesterday, Mile. Smirnoff, who
was accompanied by another young
lady, remarked:
"They are as gay as If they had
captured Port Arthur."
Passers by, hearing the remark, re
peated it and quite a crowd collected
and joined in the jeering. The com
mander of the cavalrymen suddenly
wheeled his squadron and gave the
command to charge with drawn whips.
The troopers then charged the
crowd, laying about them right and
left.
Mile. Smirnoff and her companion
who in the meantime had passed on
down a side street, were pursued.
They tried to escape in a doorway, bat
were caught.
Under the direction of an officer,
they were forced to enter cab sod
were driven to the guards' barracks,
where the young ladles were takes
before Colonel Stenbokfermor.
The latter was disposed to turn
Mile Smirnoff over to the police, but'
the other officers interfered and the
girl was finally taken to the court
yard, where the troopers, in the pres
ence of two officers, administered to
her twenty-seven lashes with three
whips.
The girl's clothing was cut as If by
knives by the wire thongs of the whips
and her flesh was horribly lacerated.
Doctor Convieted.
Aberdeen, S. D., Aug. 15.—The first
arrest under the new state medical
law has resulted in a conviction. A.
II. Pruning, an exponent of the chiro
practic art of healing, who was ar
rested on complaint of Dr. H. E. Mc
Nutt, as secretary of the state board
of medical examiners on a charge of
practicing medicine without a state
license, was tried by jury and fo.md
ilty. The case will be appealed as
it Is desired to secure a final ruling.
A nominal fine of $50 and costs was
imposed. Bruning's principal offense
was the use of the prefix "Dr." to his
name. He said that he was a grad
uate of the Chiropractic college of
Davenport, la.
SHAH WAS FORCED
REFORMERS IN PERSIA COM
PELLED CONCESSION.
There Had Been Some Fighting of a
Revolutionary Character Before the
Shah Granted the Reforms No De
tails Given Out.
St. Petersburg. Aug. If.—In addition
to the details of the sweeping change
of regime presented by the reform
party in Persia and to which the shah
has given bis tentative consent, as
announced in the dispatches last night,
which came directly from a corres
pondent of the Associated press at
Teheran, another telegram received
this morning says the shah's action
was preceded by fighting of a revolu
tionary character, during which many
persons were killed by troops. The
correspondent evidently was prevented
by the censor from telegraphing the
particulars.
Wireless Conference.
New York, Aug. 15.—-BrlgarffW"Gen
eral James Allen, chief signal officer
of the army, has sailed for Europe
where he will remain several months.
He will attend the International Wire
less Telegraphy conference, which will
be held in Berlin, beginning on Oct. 8.
With him sailed Brigadier Generals
Thomas H. Barry and W. P. Duval!
and Captains P. E. Traub and H. C.
Sshuam, who are to attend the German
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