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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, November 24, 1906, Image 1

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PART I.
PAGES
1 to 6.
Li
Turkish Official Wore,,
jfcake Bomb Deals.
WANTS TO CURRY FAVOR
REPEATED ATTEMPTS TO ASSAS
SINATE THE OFFICIAL HAVE
AROUSED SUSPICION AS TO
THEIR GENUINENESS AND MAY
HAVE BEEN PUT UP JOBS.
Constantinople, Nov. 24.—It became
known today that the explosion of a
bomb in the Pera-quarter of Constan
tinople, Nov. 22, was the second al
leged attempt to blow up Fehmi
P&sha, the chief of the secret police
the palace.
The bomb exploded ndar his carriage,
while Fehml-Pasha was driving
through the main street of Pera
quarter.
*, Two spectators were injured. The
*$tllce claim that they have arrested
the man who threw the bomb and say
that he Is an Armenian, but there is
much skepticism as to whether the
explosions were not engineered by
Fehmi-Pasha himself with a view of
impressing the sultan-with his impor
tance as chief of the palace police and
tficuring a continuation of imperial
fftvors.
A year ago a bomb was thrown from
.he roof of a house on the main thor
oughfare of the Pera-quarter as Feh
mi-Pasha was passing in his carriage.
He escaped uninjured and the explos
ion did little damage. The attempt
attributed to Armenians.
Washington, Nov. 24.—According to
a late tabulation of the census bureau,
substantial gains in, all forma of wealth
Wte shown in the compilation of the sta
tistics gathered in the Dakota*. In
North Dakota the total wealth in
creased from 1542,380,565 In 1902 to
t?35,802,909 in 1904. The value of
rial property and improvements In
M04 was $371,303,432, an increase of
$12,000,000 in the four years. Live
stock was valued at $65,592,944, an in
crease of $22,000,000 farm implements
and machinery at $18,260,984, an ad
vance of $4,000,000 manufacturing
machinery, tools and implements at
•I ,910,251, an increase of $300,000 gold
and silver coin and bullion at $7,930,
810, an increase of $2,300,000. The val
ue of railroads and their equipments
Was $123,390,000, a jump of $28,000,000
Of street railroads, etc., $7,553,034, an
increase of $1,900,000 and of all other
wealth $139,871,954, an increase of
143,000,000.
Canadian Cobalt Shipments.
Toronto, Nov. 24.—The government
bureau of mines, in its report on the
season's output of the silver cobalt
Wines in the cobalt region which was
Issued today, states that the shipments
of cobalt, nickel and arsenic can only
be roughly estimated, as in most cases
no assays were made in the dominion.
The fact remains, however, that for
the past nine months 2,542,827 ounces
Of silver, worth $1,609,554, were ship
ped. To this amount must be added
1,130 tons adltional ore shipped at the
#nd of October. Averaging the price
df this 1,120 tons at the same rate
A|s for the 2,305 shipped in the preced
ing nine months, it would come close
on $800,000, or say a total of $2,400,
#00 in round figures for the ten .months
Of 1906.
HORSE TIP,Lit
w
I
Great Increase in the Wealth
of N. D. Shown in Late Report
'.v
OF THE STAGE
fQUINE CREATED EXCITEMENT
A THEATRE.
the Animal Jumped Over the Foot
lights Into the Orchestra Pit, Where
It Smashed Things Until Sat Upon—
Women Fainted and Panto Prevailed.
E a s S o u i s 1 1 1 N o 2 4 W i e
performance was in. progress, at the
Broadway operabouse, last night, a
fcorse, utilized in the last act to draw
the heroine in a buggy, became fright
ened and spring over the footlights in
ie the orchestra. The heroine fell un
conscious to the stage and three wo
atjen in the audience fainted, while
the horse floundered around in the or
chestra pit demolishing the chairs with
lis hoofs and creating excitement in the
thent re. The presence of mind of a
tiumber of men in seizing the horse
amj sitting on it, at the same time ad
monishing the people to sit down, pre
panic.
''"J"
V* i
-f- ...rv
Wt
THE
AN ELECTRIC
CAR ACCIDENT
RESULTS WERE ON A FREE SlL*
VER RATIO.
xteen People Were Injured and One
Was Killed—Freight Car Came Down
an Incline and CrMtNHfe tf»to the
Passenger Car.
Detroit, Mich... Nov.. 24.—Miss Har
riett Hargee of Pontiac was killed and
sixteen other persons were injured
sarly today when an electric freight
car crashed into the rear end of a
suburban electric car near Birming
ham, eighteen miles from this city,
on the Pontiac division of the Detroit
United railway. The passenger car
was a theatre car, bound out to Pon
tiac from Detroit and was well filled.
It had stopped at the foot of a steep
grade in front of the power house
when, without warning, a freight car
also outbound and which had been
following the theatre car fpom De
troit, appeared over the crest of the
grade and dropped down the 300-foot
incline at a terrific speed.
It struck the standing passenger car
with such force that it telescoped the
car for two-thirds of its length.
It took three hours to extricate the
injured from the wreck and dress all
their wounds.
It is thought that all the injured will
recover. i
French General te Teur.
Paris, Nov. 24.—General Brugere,
formerly commander-in-chief of the
Franch army, left here today on the
Lorraine for New York, on a tour of
the world. General Brugere's son is
at present attending a military school
in the United States. When in Ameri
ca he will visit all the principal cities
and on arriving at Washington will be
the guest of President Roosevelt.
THE GILLETTE
MURDER CASE
THE PROSECUTION MAY CLOSE
TODAY.
Testimony During the Day Was by the
Physicians Who Performed^ the Au
topsy on the Body of the Murdered
Woman.
Herkimer, N. Y., Nov. 24.—District
Attorney .Ward, just before the open
ing of court today, declared that he
hoped to have finished the state's evi
dence before the jury in the casp of
Chester E. Gillette, accused of the
murder, of his sweetheart. Grace
Brown, before the afternoon session is
ended.
When the court adjourned last night
it was to meet this morning at 9:30
o'clock.
The opposing counsel lost nearly an
hour at the close of yesterday after
noon's session in discussing the tech
nical points of a map of Big Moose
lake. The issue at stake was whether
or not the drawing showed a small
projection of land, which was depicted
In one of the. photographs of the scene
of the alleged murder.
Before adjournment was taken, how
ever, the prosecutor had drawn near
to the closing chapters of his narra
tive. The jury was told in minute
detail, of the circumstances surround
ing the finding of Grace Brown's body
and of its' position and general out
ward condition.
Today all the doctors who took part
in the autopsy will be heard.
OVERRODE THE COMMITTEE.
The Trans-Mississippi Congress
Adopted the Bryan Suggestions.
Kansas City, Nov. 24.—After adopt
ing two resolutions by William J.
Bryan, after they had been voted
down by the committee on resolu
tions, and after adopting a set of reso
lutions Including the endorsement of a
proposition submitted by Secretary
of State Elihu Root "for encouraging
our merchant marine and increasing
our intercourse with South America
by adequate, mail facilities," the
Trans-Mississippi Commerci&I con
gress adjourned late today to meet in
1907 at Muskogee, I. T.
Cheap Excursion Rates.
Montreal, Nov. 24.—Tpday the an
nual excursion rates from Winnipeg
and western points to eastern Canada
come into effect. The round trip will
only cost $40 and will be available for
three months. Traveling agents from
the United States roads have been
canvassing the territory for some
months past and report that there will
be heavy business for their roads dur
ing the month of December. They are
boasting through the St. Paul and
Minneapolis papers that the United
States lines this year will handle the
bulk of the business on both sides of
the line.
n
AND
PPS7*
Minneapolis, Nov. 24.—Minnesota
and Indiana plaved the closing game
of the season on Northrup field this
afternoon. The weather was fine and
a large crowd witnessed the game. The
Minnesotans were confident of wiping
out the humiliating defeat by Carlisle
of last week, but after twenty minutes
of play Minnesota made a blunder and
Indiana got the ball and ran it over
for a touchdown before Minnesota
knew it. Minnesota fumbled the ball
repeatedly, but finally made safety
and a touchdown. The first half end
ed with a tie score, 6 to 6.
The final score was 8 to 0 in favor
of Minnesota.
"BILLY" NOLAN
WAS 1ETED
itftTllNG NELSON'S MANAGER
IS IN HOC.
Embezzlement in Connection With
the Moving Picture Show of the
Gans-Nelson Fight is the Cause—
ir le Result of Partnership Row.
Cincinnati, 0„. Nov. 24.—On the
charge of embezzlement, "Billy"
Nolan, manager of "Battling" Nelson,
was arrested here today. The arrest
came as a sensational finish to the
dispute over the proceeds of the ex
hibition of the 'pictures of the Gans
Nelson fight. Nolan, it is charged,
Withheld about $7,000 from the Cali
fornia treasurer of the films, pending
a decision as to thS proper' division
of the money, and be was therefore
arrested.
To Improve Race Horses.
New York, Nov. 24.—The American
Protective Breeders' association of
which Col. E. F. Clay is president and
George Whitney of New York treasur
er, are negotiating *for the purchase
of some famous racing stallions for
the purpose of improving the breed of
race horses in Kentucky and the south
generally.
Racetrack for Havana.
New York, Nov. 24.—The work on
nie new racetrack near Havana,
Cuba, has been commenced. Tim
othy D. Sullivan and Frank Farrell,
two of the most prominent sporting
men in the east, are interested in the
Havana track,'on which $1,000,000 will
be expended. W. T. Burridge, who is
an active member of the American
syndicate, is now in Havana looking
after the interests of the syndicate.
IMPORTANT DECISION.
Church Given Title to Considerabli
Property in the Philippines.
Manila, Nov. 24.—An important de
cision by the supreme court of tha
Philippines, ousts the Agilpayanos and
the municipality of Lagonoy from the
possession of the parish edifices there
in favor of the Roman church. The de
cision affects suits for the possession
of about fifty churches seized by the
Agilpayanos.
FARGO
DAILY REPUBLICAN
REPUBLICAN, ESTABLISHED SEPT. B, 1878. FABGO, NOBTH DAKOTA, SATURDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 24, 1908. FOBUM ESTABLISHED NOV. IT, 1891.
8, ind. 6
Yale 6, Halved 0
if—
Minnesota Caught a Tartar ih the Hoosiers and Won
Only By a Narrow Margin—Yale
Surprised Harvard.
The Elevator Discrimination
Against North Dakota Aired
mS,
e
Duluth, Nov. 24.—The complaints of
the Superior elevator men against"the
Duluth board of trade and the alleged
discrimination by Superior and Duluth
elevators against North Dakota grain
shippers were aired before the inter
state commerce commission. The
commission, with Charles A. Prouty
presiding, began the investigation of
the grain conditions, at the head of
the lakes, in the federal building. Much
their fight on the inspection question
but apparently the matter is now in
the same shape as it has been in since
the law went into effect.
Homer T. Fowler, E. Schwedler and
Senator George B. Hudnall, all of Su
perior were on the stand during the
greater part of the session. They al
leged that the Superior board of trade
could not do business with the Duluth
board and also went into the charges
against the elevators and the inspec
tion department.
George B. Barnum of Duluth, who
followed Fowler on the stand, emphat
ically declared that the statement that
the Duluth men would transact no
business with Superior men was un
qualifiedly false. Fowler declared on
the stand that he was practically forc
ed out of business about a vear ago.
talk was indulged in by Duluth and
Superior grain men in continuance of is received at the terminal elevators it
»9 UwUur?a ,lt .w&s fclaioat wer© bying,
YALE AND HARVARD.
The Big institutions in a Great Game
This Afternoon.
New Haven, Nov. 24.—Yale and
harvard fought it out on the gridiron
Here this afternoon before a crowd
which taxed the capacity of the grand
stands and bleachers. The first half
elided with a score of Yale 6, and Har
vard 0, Yale having made a touch
down and kicked a goal.
Neither team scored in the last half,
First Halves:
|chftsago 24, Nob. 5.
"III., 0, Purdue 0.
Brown 23, Dartmouth 0.
PRESIDENT ON
HOME STRETCH
I i
THE NAVY DEPARTMENT GOT A
WIRELESS.
Ths Battleship Louisiana, en Which
the Chief Executive Is Returning,
Appears to Be Making About Fifteen
Knots fsr Hour.
Washington, Nov. 24.—The navy de
partment today received a wireless
dispatch from the battleship Louisiana,
giving its location at 9:20 o'clock this
morning as 530 miles north of San
Juan. This Indicates that the ship
bringing the president home from his
Panama and Porto Rico visit, is mak
ing about fifteen knots an hour, al
though the message ^parent'7
waa
«ti:*ed i» sending aa»d rather confusing
to the naval officers.
Noted Author Weds.
Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 24.—The
marriage was quietly celebrated here
today of Miss Eva C. Stevenson of
Lexington, Ky., and George W. Cable,
novelist, war veteran and journalist.
Mr. Cable, who is the author of Old
Creole Days, was 62 years old on the
12th of October last and in 1869 was
marriejl to Louise G. Bartlett.
Bluefish Season.
New York, Nov. 24.—The bluefish
and weakflsh season having closed on
Ihe eastern coast, all the fleets will
commence dismantling today and will
be laid up for the winter. Weakflsh were
scarcer than during any season for
the past nine years, and also command
high priccs. The season for codfish
opens today and a large number of
smacks are preparing to sail for the
Newfoundland banks in a few days.
Reports to hand show that cod will be
unusually plentiful this season.
VENIRE EXHAUSTED.
Jttiy Will Be Secured Dec. 3, When
Special Is Summoned.
Grafton, N. D., Nov. 24.—After nine
jurors had been secured in the case
against Anton Sor, the venire was ex
hausted and court was a^ourned till
Dec. 3, when a special venire will be
called. It developed the prisoner's
name is Sor instead of Shores. He
is charged with killing his brother,
Joe Sor,
slble for him to get business any long
er. He said that he believed that the
elevator men and buyers meet in a
corner of the Duluth board of trade
and fix prices and they all agree to pay
the same price. According to Fowler
if a Superior man opposes the Duluth
board he gets boycotted.
W. C. Macfadden of Fargo, N. D.,
read the report of the Investigation
made by the committee appointed by
the North Dakota Bankers' associa
tion. It stated that after the grain
is elevated to the top of the houses,
where it is weighed. Then comes the
blow that the bankers' committee says
is an injustice to the shipper.
"During the process of elevating,"
says the report, "all grain Is subjected
to a suction draft. This is an injus
tice to shippers, as in our judgment,
al grain should be weighed immediate
ly upon being unloaded and nothing
should he taken from it before it is
weighed."
A. D. Thompson of Duluth testified
that the statement that eastern millers
were dissatisfied with the grade of
wheat obtained from the Superior
bouses was false that he had received
in the course of the past three
months letters from a great many of
them in which they stated their satis
faction with the manner in which they
5 V V .1. i i
v
FORUM
tws FINE
WAS NOT PAID
SENIOR COUNSEL BROKE
THE DEAL.
.t..
Till Monday.
INTO
dlust as the Mbftiy Was About to Be
Paid Over the Counsel Rushed Into
Court and the Matter Was Postponed
New Tork, Nov. 24.—The $10 fine.
imposed upon Enrico Caruso, the fa
mous Italian operatic singef in the
Yorkville police court yesterday, after
hje had been declared guilty of annoy
ing women In the monkey house at
Central park, was not,paid today. One
of his attorneys had gone to court with
the intention of paying the fine under
protest and the money was about to
bje passed across the clerk's desk when
Caruso's senior counsel rushed into the
courtroom and brought the proceed
ings to a halt. A consultation be
tween the counsel and the court fol
lowed and it was agreed to permit the
matter to go over until Monday, In
tpe meantime Caruso has been parol
ed in custody of his counsel.
•Salmon Destroyed by 8eals.
Dundee, Scotland, Nov. 24.—The
cason's salmon fishery on the river
"weed and on the Berwick coast,
vhich closed today, has been a com
plete failure owing to the great de
struction of the fish by seals. The
board of fisheries have been appealed
tio in the matter and it Is announced
that during the winter months they
will take steps to greatly reduce the
number of seals. This fishery is the
most important in the United King
dom andt specimens of the fish weigh
ing as much as 100 pounds have been
taken from time to time. Commer
cially, the seals are useless, being of
pie gray or rock species.
REAL VERDICT
ON GREAT TENOR
IT WILI. COME WHEN HE SINGS
AGAIN.
Italian Comment on the Conviction of
Caruso for Annoying Women in the
Central Park Monkty House in
Wicked Gotham. ,.
Rome, Nor. 84.—The announcement
that Senor Caruso, the tenor, was
found guilty in a New York police
court yesterday of annoying a woman
in the Central Park zoological garden
and was fined $10, reached Rome so
late that only The Messagero, one of
the morning papers, published the
news. In so doing, the paper added:
"Caruso will appeal,but the real ver
dict will be given by the people of New
York in the manner in which they re
ceive him the first time he appears be
fore an audience after hi# condemna
tion."
the property of John R. Keene, are en
tered—Peter Pan for the derby and
Court Dress for the Oaks, next sea
son. Both horses have other valuable
engagements in England. Mr. Keene
has already won the Oaks with Cap
fnd Bells, and his horse Disguise cap
tured the Jockey club stakes, valued
ft $50,000. He is now anxiaus to add
the derby to his record of English vic
tories. Mr. Belmont's contingent of
eighteen yearlings at Newmarket,
America will be w-ell represented on
the English turf next season.
PEARY'S RETURN TRIP.
The Arctic Steamer Will 8aiI For New
York Thanksgiving Day.
Sydney, C. B., Nov. 24.—The Peary
arctic steamer Roosevelt will leave-for
New York Thursday, Nov. 20,
Tampa Cigar Shipments,
Tampa, Fla., Nov, 24.—Tampa has
broken all its previous records in the
line of cigar shipping. The total ship
ments from Jan. 1 to date amount to
222,875,000, being an increase of 41,
285,000 over the same period of last
year. Cigars made in Tampa have
a largely increasing sale in England
and France and to meet this trade
alone the tobacco plantations, In this
state will have to be expanded.
Foreign Cyclists Coming.
Cherbourg, France, Nov. 24.—-Cy
clists representing England, France,
Belgium, Germany and Italy sailed
from here today for New York on the
liner Lorraine. They are all cham
pions in their own countries and will
take part in the six-day bicycle race
in Madison Square Garden, York,
commencing on Dec. 9, They will im
mediately on landing at the other side
proceed to the Vailsburg board track
near Newark, N. J., where they will
r-
Scandal Brewing Among the
Employes of Land Department
s
train for the event. i lodge, and then returned to Rome.
o
viVv'v?'7
THIS
ISSUE.
22 PAGE*
IIEATEN10
MM
S
Massacres Will Follow
Proposed Reform#.
PKOXESTS BY REACTIONISTS
THE RUSSIANS ARE BEING IN'
CITED TO OUTBREAKS IF PRE
MIER STOLYPIN'S PLAN8 OF
JEWISH REFORM ARE PUT INTO
EFFECT—WILL CAUSE TROUBt*
St. Petersburg, Nov. 24.—The threats
of the reactionary parties that Jewish
massacres will be organized If the
rights of the Jews are enlarged, are
steadily becoming more definite. The
central council of the league of Rus
sian people, claiming to represent 80,
000,000 people, has issued a declara
tion disclaiming the responsibility for
the "outrages which may result from
just indignation produced by the en
largement of the Jewish rights" and
has published the text of 200 dispatches
of protest sent to the emperor from
the local organizations of which the
following Is-a sample phrase:
"It Is dangerous to further test the
gentleness and patience of the peaceful
Russian population, which may be
forced in its defense against the Jew*.
to overstep limits of law and order and
resort to violence."
The publication of reforms Is certain
to result in a final break between the
reactionary and the monarchtal par
ties and Premier Stolypln's administra
tion.
Nov. 24.—There f9
Washington,
brew I ng a "scandal in connection with
the administration of the general land
office, which promises to be fully a&
•sensational as anything yet reveated.
Facts are coming to light showing
the existence of stupendous frauds la
the operation of the landoffice by
which the government has been cheat
id out of millions of acres of valuable
lands. Not only is an effort being
made to secure the restoration of the
lands to the public domain, but the
general landoffice, including its agents*
receivers and inspectors, is to be thor
oughly reorganized. Honesty of ad
ministration is to be the watchword.
It is considered remarkable that
Secretary Hitchcock, handicapped as
he has been by unfaithful subordi
nates, subjected to immense political
pressure and frequently compelled to
Justify by evidence and argument ac
tions he has taken, has been able to
ferret out the fraud and to punish tha
men guilty of It. But though the sec
retary has dug deep, the full extent of
the system which he was undermining
has been revealed only within the
last few months.
It is alleged officials of the general
landoffice have held up papers In or
der to facilitate the transaction of un
derhand business, and even destroyed
records.
American Horses. Frequently the secretary has receiv
London, Nov. 24.—Two race horses, I
ed
information from outside sources
showing orders not approved had been
issued. The affairs of this office have
been run with a high hand, and It has
been almost impossible for the head of
the department to bring the offenders
to justice because of the powerful in
fluence they exercised.
It is predicted that when the full
truth about the land- situation is
known there will be a sensation whietl
will astound the country.
A PAIil OF KINGS
ON A HUNT TODAY
THEY KILLED SOME WILD BOAftft,
WHILE OUT.
Italy's King Acted as Host to the Boss
of Greece—They Visited a Historic
Spot and Participated in Succeta*
Hunt*
Rome, tfotf. 24.— Ruorge of
Greece and King Victor Etnmanucl,ac
companied bv their suites, were driy
en in automobiles today to Castle Por
siano, the royal preserves situated la
the beautiful nine woods near Ostla,
which extend to the Mediterranean.
Theii majesties visited the spot where,
according to classical legend, Aeneas,
the Trojan prince, founded the city of
Lavinium. After taking part in a suc
cessful wild boar hunt, the two kings
lunched together at the royal hunting
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