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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, November 26, 1906, Image 12

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1906-11-26/ed-1/seq-12/

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FAIN
Ml) in the head—pain any whrr»', hu ita
ftifn iscomccation, pain is blood pn-sstire—nothing
else usually. At least, so siiys I)r Khonp, and to
provo it hp has created a little pink tablet. That
tablet—trailed Dr. Shoop's Ili-adache Tablet—
ciiftii'S blood pressure away Irum pain centers.
Its effect is charming, pleasingly delightful. Gently
though safely, it surely equalizes the blood circo
lation.
If you have a hoadache. It's blood pressure.
II it's painful periods with women, samo cause.
II you are slwpK'ss. restless, nervous, it's blood
congestion—blotnl [iressur". That surely is a
certainty, for Dr. Shoop's Headaehe Tablets stop
ft in 20 minutes, and the tablets simply distribute
tho unnatural blood pressure.
Bruise your finger, and doesn't it got red, and
swell, and jiftin you? Of course it docs. It's con
gestion, blood pressure. You'll find it where pain
U—always It's simply Common Sense.
We sell at cents, and cheerfully recommend
Dr. Shoop's
Headache
Tablets
MCDONALD DRUG .'CO.
TIME CARD
?%». j-
TRAINS.
FARGO.
WESTBOUND.
No. 1—"North Coast Limited" 3:25 p. m.
No. 3—Pacific Express (1:00 a. m.
No. 7—Minnesota Local 5:35 p. m.
No. 6—New Coast Train 7:40 a. m.
EASTBOUND.
No. 2—"North Coast Limited" T:10 a. m.
No. 4—Twin City Kxproas .... 11:10 p. m.
No. ft—Minnesota Local 0:25 a. m.
No. &— Dab. & Man. Express.. 9:40 p. m.
F. 8. W. BRANCH.
•Leaves 8:30 a. m.
•Returns 7:05 p. m.
CASSELTON BRANCH TO MARION
•Leave* Fargo 8:10 a. m.
•Returns 6:40 p. m.
•Daily except Sunday.
All other trains dally.
Through tickets to all points In ttie
United States, Canada, Alaska. China and
Japan.
A. M. Cleland, G. P. A., St. Paul. Minn.
J. E. JOHNSON, Agent.
St. Paul and Duluth slepeers are run on
Train &
Or »•-»«gr-~3P
3" bsnsmi*
TMt COMfOHTABU **V
THE COMFORTABLE WAY.
Fargo, N. D., June 3, 1906.
OoIiik
Kast
'). 2. Fergus Falls, St.
Paul x3:80l"
N ). 14. Wahpeton, Sioux
City, St. Paul,
Duluth 8:00 i
NO. 12. St. Cloud, St.
Paul 8:30 i
NO.
1&
Wahpcton,
8t.
Paul xlO:33t',n
Going West
X). 0. Or. l'-rks., Ml not
i Winnipeg ,, *5:05 ji in
N ).129. i'ruokstoii, Duluth,
Winnipeg 0:30 ".in
Nft. Ji. Oriental Liniit
I'd, Hutte. Spo
Jiane, Seattle and
^-nnuf. nnlnty
a
i
u i i K i i i u s v
s A
MiW tfipaf&K «»s JI i iiilo
,' V
rr!
^i-oast points.
Fargo-Aneta
,:.vjkenves .. 0:20 pm
"Arrives ...10: am
Larlmore-Fargo
Arrive ..11:30am
Leaves 8:15 pm
xDaily. Others dally except Sim
'lay.
Sleeping ear reservations, ticket
a ltd Information from
J. P. ItOHAN, Agent,
—, i-
~£v«'v"""*'
k & &
OPP09ITB
S S E N N S Y A N I A
mswiNoraM D.G«
900 Rooms With AH Modem
Improvements
THE LARGEST AND
PEST KEPT BOtJSB
"IN WASHINGTON FOR
PRICES CHARGED!
CENTRAL IN ITS LOCATION.
Convenient to all lines of Street Cars,
Churches, Public Fuildiags and Point*
of Interest* J* Jt jt jt jH
Steam Heat and Electric light through
out the Entire House. jt Jl jl
RATES.
American Plan, $2.50 to 94 00
per day.
European Plan, 91.00 per day
and upward.
OTgT STAPLESTT^
GEO. F. SHUTT, Man*e«».
Lowest Rates to West and Southwest.
On the first and third Tuesdays of
each month Until March, 1907, Inclus
ive, the Chicago Great Western rail
way will sell one-way colonist tickets
at nearly half fare to points in Ar
kansas, Colorado, Indian Territory,
Kansas, Louisiana, Mexico, Missouri,
Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma,
South Dakota, Texas and Wyoming.
For further information apply to R. R.
Jones, T. A., 64 Edwards building
Fargo, N. D.
For State News Read The Forum.
•-f
*f
WOMAN SENT TO THE PEN
Mr*. ItHoh of New Salem Must Pe a
Year and a half Serv
ice For 8tate.
Mandan Republican: The closing
scenes of the November term of court
were enacted at the Inter Ocean ho
tel, last Saturday morning, when the
Jury having reached an agreement In
the Itrlch case after an all night
se^-icn, r.ame into court, with a ver
dict of guilty. Judge Winchester had
left instruction to have the jury
brought to the hotel in case It reach
ed an agreement, and have the ver
dict open there, so one of the smok
ing rooms was turned Into a court
room, and found to be Just large
enoagh to permit ths court, Jury, offi
cials, lawyers and accused to squeeze
In comfortably.
Mrs. Itrlch, who was found guilty
of procuring an abortion upon a young
woman of New Salem, was given a
chance to express her opinion of the
verdict, before sentence was passed,
and she did so In vigorous terms and
forcible language. She upbraided the
witnesses for the state, accused them
of ingratitude and asserted hefl Inno
cence over and over again. When the
court sentenced her to one and a half
years at hard labor In the peniten
tiary she appeared to be chiefly con
cerned about her house at New Salem
which was left unprotected, and the
birds which had probably starved.
Judge Winchester instructed the sher
iff to take her out to New Salem and
give her a chance to put her house
in order, and to secure an appeal
bond, if possible, which was fixed at
$2,000, and to take her to Bismarck,
If the bond was not secured.
Judge Winchester before adjourn-"
ing court decided a motion submit
ted in the case of H. W. Potter
against John Spitz, and judicially de
termined that the office of the clerk of
court is not under the clerk of court's
hat, but up at the courthouse. The
case was an appeal from a Justice
court, and the papers were given to
the clerk of court on the street after
office hours on the last day allowed
for appealing, and though he then and
there marked them filed as of that
date he did not actually deposit them
in his office until the next day, which,
under the decision of the court, was
too late, and the appeal was dismiss
ed. The appellant contended that
handing the papers to the clerk was
sufficient though he was not standing
behind his counter In the clerk of
court's office, and so insistent are his
attorneys upon this point, that though
there are probably not over $25 in
volved in the controversy, they are
threatening to go to the supreme court
just to find out if Judge Winchester
is right.
A sour stomach, a bad bre&tli, a
pasty complexion and other conse
quences of a disordered digestion are
quickly removed by the use of King's
Dysiepsia Tablets. Two days' treat
ment free. Sold by McDonald Drug
Co.
THANKSGIVOINQ.
Proclamation by Governor Sarles
Dm*
ignating the Observance of
This Day.
State of North Dakota. Bxecutlre
Department, Bismarck.
Agreeably to established custom and
in harmony with the proclamation of
President Roosevelt, I do designate,
Nov. 29, as
Thanksgiving Day.
Within and for tHe state of North
Dakota. The abundant crops, the
steady growth and development of the
state, the splendor of its institutions
and the patriotism of its citizenship,
are potent reasons for returning
thanks to the Giver of all good, for
the bounties he has bestowed. Let
us, therefore, on the day appointed,
refrain from our secular avocations
and return reverent thanks to God for
the bounteous good with which he has
blessed us, and for the blessings of
free government and its wise and be
niflcent lnstitutionsv
Done at the capltol at Bismarck and
the great seal of the state affixed this
fifth day of Novenlber, 1906.
B. T. Sarles,
Governor.
By the governor:
B. F. Porter,
Secretary of State.
41
KEEP THE KIDNEYS WELL.
HEALTH IS WORTH SAVING,
AND SOME FARGO PEOPLE
KNOW HOW TO SAVE IT.
Many Fargo people take their lives
in their hands by neglecting the kid
neys when they know these organs
need help. Sick kidneys are respon
sible for a vast amount of suffering and
ill health, but there is no need to suf
fer nor to remain in danger when all
diseases and aches and pains due to
weak kidneys can be quickly and per
manently cured by the use of Doan's
Kidney Pills. Here is the statement
of a Fargo citizen who has reclaimed
good healthb y the use of this remedy.
David Gardner, of 8il Eighth street,
North, Fargo, N. D., says: "For
years I have been troubled with disord
ers of the kidneys and pains through
the back and loins. At times the trou
bles would be worse than usual, es
pecially after taking cold or overtax
ing myself in any way. I had heard
how Doan's Kidney Pills were curing
similar cases, and deciding to try them
I got a box at J. M. S. Wilser's drug
store. I had expected the remedy to
help me, but I was surprised by the
promptness and extent of the benefit I
received. The annoying irregularities
of the kidneys were at once corrected,
my back was strengthened and every
pain and ache disappeared. With
Doan's Kidney Pills obtainable I fear
no return of the trouble."
For sale by all dealers. Price 50
cents. Foster-Milbura CO Buffalo,
New York* sole ageifts for the United
States.
Remember the name—Doan'f—and
taVf no other.
ffBTB FiROO tORTTM 'ANC irAITjT BEPTJBTjrCXIT, MfWTfAT frVTWWff ffftTFVB™,
North Dakota A.
IQ06
Minneapolis Journal: North Da
kota has taken new prominence 011 the
football map this season through the
coaching ability of a former Minne
sota star, Gilmore Dobie. The foot
ball season closed in that state a week
ago with the Fargo Agricultural col
lege holding undisputed possession of
the state chamDlonship. having gone
through the season without a defeat
and humiliating every organization in
the northwest which met the "ag
gies."
Dobie went to Fargo from Minne
apolis, with a splendid football rep
utation. He was a star quarterbach.
on some of the gophers' most famous
teams and after he had finished his
period of play he acted as assistant
coach for several years. The school
ing he received as a player and as
sistant coach under Dr. H. L. Wil
liams was a thorough one and when
he went up to the prairie districts his
lriends knew that his success
only a matter of material.
Superiority in football in the ftt&te
had always rather rested with the
state university at Grand Forks,
coached by Dr. Sweetland. The ma
terial at the agricultural school, as at
the state university, was late in show
ing up on account of farm work. Do
bie was confronted with tut three
men of any experience when he start
ed to build his team and the work
performed puts the stamp of a suc
cessful coach upon him.
Football stands high in the esteem
of the heads of departments at the
Farsro school, although there are the
usual requirements as to scholastic
standing and an obedience of the state
conference rules as to, eligibility. Do
bie found plenty of moral support and
went to work to build up an organi
zation. Barring Minnesota, he had,
at the close of the season, what was
probably the strongest football team
in the northwest, and that is class
ifying this year's Wisconsin team as
a northwestern affair.
Praise for the Aggregation for Its Splendid Work Dur­
ing the Se*i son—Some Stars Developed
by Coach Dobie.
Carleton, Hamline, Yankton college, 1
and the University of North Dakota,wonderfully successful organ
were subdued in rattling games and ***}&,,
North Dakota "U» declined the final
game of the season on a day's no
tice. North Dakota had one of the
strongest teams in its history this sea
son, holding Wisconsin to a low score,
but the eleven was not equal to the
task of holding the aggies.
In the fall Dobie was discouraged
over the outlook, but the students
started to roll in and he soon had a
fair-sized squad at work. He started
in as though none of the players knew
a football from a goal post and this
was necessary, as some of his best
looking men knew nothing of the
game. It was necessary to teach
football for a time in kindergarten
style. It paid in the long run as he
developed one, two or three splendid
players who knew nothing of the
game when they first turned out for
practice. He worked out a good
stiff, although versatile attack under
the new rules and it worked wonder
fully well against the teams met and
vanquished during the playing sea
son.
The team at the end was very
strong and fast enough for all pur
poses. South played left end and
went into the agricultural school with
a slight football experience gained at
Oberlin, O. He weighs 158 pounds,
and is now a resident of Casselton, N.
D., taking the regular agricultural1
course. He played more of a safe
than a spectacular end, and was fair
ly fast in getting down the field.
Jacobson, left tackle, haiia from
Sleepy Eye, Minn., and lent lh5 pounds
of energy to the line. Jacobson was
one of the star men of the team and
his defensive playing was superb.
Sleepy Eye, by the way, appears to be
strong on football, as Joe Cutting, the
University Minnesota backfleld
man of last season was a high school
mate of Jacobson's. He had some
high school training the same time
that Cutting was playing in Sleepy
Eye, but chose to finish at Fargo in
agriculture instead of following Cut
ting to the state university. Has
kins, left guard of the "aggie" team,
is taking his last year of work in the
Fargo institution, and never had any
experience in football until this year.
He weighs about 200 pounds and
should he return will be one of Do
ble's most valuable men next year.
Swenson, the center, Is a Fargo vet
eran, having played three years on the
team. He weighs 190 pounds and
plays a steady game. Oshwald, right
guard, weighed but 165 pounds, but
made up for his lack of weight in
fighting material. He is just finish
ing his course in the school. Eakins
played right tackle, and is well known
to Minnesota rooters through playing
on the gopher freshman team of last
season. He was taking special work
at Minnesota last year and enrolled
at Fargo this fall.
He is fast and aggressive and a
go^d-all-round man. Birch, the cap
tain of the team, was at right end. He
weighs 145 and has had three years of
play at Fargo. Hallenberg, quarter
back, was light, weighing but 135
pounds, but he was one of the finds
of the season. He is fast, has unlim
ited nerve, and kept the team well in
hand at all times. His home is In
Fargo, and this is his first year of col
lege football.
Nemzek, left half, came over the
river from Moorhead. He played one
year with Ed- Rogers at St. Thomas,
bat decided to go to school nearer hi*!'
,«r •fcVH"&vW,&•».>$$-yX-i*
Football
home. He la all thai a half nfeeds to
be. He was fast, a hard plunger and
got into motion quickly and was the
most clever at dodging. At full back
was Jack Marks, well known in Min
neapolis through his wonderful work
with the Northslde high team in years
gone by. He is one of the best play
era ever receiving his preliminary
training in Minneapolis, and was a ter
ror to the teams the "aggies" encoun
tered. He was good for line smash
ing, for end running and did all of the
kicking.' Marks was the star of the
team.
Dobie worked with these men ear
ly and late, and the "accusing finger"
was ever pointing out the weakness of
the play. Dobie is everlastingly pes
simistic about his teams and is al
ways predicting his own defeat. -He
kept the "aggies" to the point of be
lieving that they were to be everlast
ingly licked in every game in which
they started, and they went in believ
ing that it was a forlorn hope but
with a fighting chance—maybe. The
result was a season of victory. Do
bie was not doing this for effect. He
believes everything he says to a team.
He always gives the opponents more
credit than they are entitled to, and
it Is a safe plan.
Fargo's success this season was a
personal one for the coach, and the
school Is to be congratulated upon
securing him and his services. He is
the best coach turned out of a west
em university in the past five years.
It might be safe to say the best turn
ed out of any Institution in the coun
try in that period. He knows foot
ball thoroughly, has the faculty of im
parting his knowledge to others, and
is a clean sportsman.
1 His team worked as he had coached
1 them, fast and clean. It was the
most powerful organization of the
class in the west this year, and if the
material is available next season Do-
Die will repeat. Followers of Min
nosota football have taken a keen in
tei*9st, in the development and pro
I gress of this team, and *nile it ha
Michigan.
...28 Case
Michigan j,
Michigan.
if'
Jc,"* *.
!A"W_ VftYNTtHW V'Trff'VTXr/l-- WATrPiroTP-o '-4nA« ..

ex^ected-
Th
?ale
^T,
Wa*
rooters knew Dobie.
'. Saturday Football.
Minnesota S, Indiana 6.
Illinois 5, Purdue 0.
Chicago 38, Nebraska 5,
Iowa 0, Ames 2.
Depaw 19, Miami 0.
Cincinnati 0, Carlisle 18.
Ohio State 12, Woostef 0.
scanaba 0, Benton Harbor 60.
6, Harvard 0.
Amherst 0, Swarthmore 21.
Dartmouth 0, Brown 23.
Syracuse 4, West Point 0.
Navy 5, Virginia Polytechnic 0.
Pennsylvania 22, Villa Nova 12.
Western U. of P. 24, Grove City 0.
Lafayette 33, Lehigh 0.
Haverford 6T, New York U. 0.
1906 Football Recdrif.
i Minnesota.
Mlrmesot^,....... 22 Ames .:
Minnesota........13
Minnesota,,,.^... 4
Minnesota,. 0
Minnesota.^ 8
o. s. u..'.*
Illinois
Vanderbilt
Alumni..
Pennsylvania.
Michigan
Michigan..
Michigan... ..... $
Michigan........
.10
Chicago.
Chicago 39 Purdue
Chicago.... ., .83
Chicago......
Indiana ..
Minnesota
Illinois ..
Nebraska
v
.. 2
Chicago....*..l..8
Chicago.. •,.»..... 38
iscon sin.
5 Lawrence
Wisconsin*.»,
Wisconsin, .v.
Wisconsinf,»,,
Wisconsin,.,,,
Wisconsin.
.10
.18
.16
.29
North
Iowa
Illinois
Purdue
Dak
Notre Dame.
Notre Dame 26 Franklin
Notre Dame 17
Notre Dame 88
Notre Dame 5
Nervous
ft Prostration.
The symptoms of nervous prostration
well illustrat i the fact that there is
not a single organ in the human body
but IP ^ntlrtly and absolutely depend
ent on the nervous system for the en
jrgy and power by which its functions
are performed.
You feel tired, ^reak and worn out. 1
'ose Interest in life, have no appetite
and popr digortipn, disorders of liver, i
kidneys and oowels, you cannot sleep,
your head aches and you feel discourag
ed and despondent.
Dr. A W. Chase's Nerve Pills cure
nervous prostration and exhaustion ir
the only way it Is possible to really cure
them—by actually forming nerve force
to revitalize the wasted nerve cells.
It may require a dozen or more boxen
of this medicine to bring about a thor
ough restoration of your health, but you
can be certain that each dose is. at
least, doing you some good, and the
cure is bound to be natural and thor
ough. Dr. A. W. Chase's Nerve Pills,
50c a box at all dealers, or Dr. A. W.
Chase. Medicine Company, Buffalo,
N-.y.
sTOJUT
A.
PORTERFIELD
44, im.
Low Rates
to Chicago
Notre Dame 2 Purdue .. ... 0
Notre Dame. 0 Indiana ,, ..12
Notre Dame......29 Beloit.* .»• 4. 0
Nebraska.
Nebraska. Hastings ^. .1*0
Nebraska...v.&. i 4 South Dak.. .jfO
Nebraska .is,*... 5 Drake .. 0
Nebraska..^.. .s. 8 Ames ..
Nebraska 28 Doane Col.. •.. 0
Nebraska 0 Minnesota
Nebraska It Crelghton .. .. 0
Nebraska Kansas 8
Nebraska 5 Chicago 88
Illinois.
Illinois 27 Freshmen .. .. 0
Illinois a Wabash 0
Illinois •, Michigan .. .$8
Illinois Wisconsin .. ..16
Illinois 0 Chicajfo .. ..#3
Illinois.. 5 Purdue .. .... 0
Indiana.
Indiana ......17 Alumni 0
Indiana 12 Wabash 5
Indiana 8 Chicago 33
Indiana.. 12 Notre Dame .. 0
Indiana.. 6 Minnesota .... 8
Purdue.
Purdue 17 Freshmen .% 2
Purdue 0 Chicago .. ,^.19
Purdue 0 Wabash.. ....11
-i
Nebraska
Chicago
Carlisle
Indiana ..
Trains for-
vl?
VV'V.. .7 5,
3
Hillside
P. and S.
Mich. Ag
n
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'a "iS
"v f'
v
I*.?*}"'
t, a
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rt
4
V
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1
4
Account International Live ock nxpostftotl
|t be held at Chicago. December 1 to 8
,, .five a rate of OWE FARE PUIS
Milwaukee & St. Paul
ftaflwajlr't: .•
Tickets will be on sale December I ^5 -inclu*
iive. Half of above rate made for children of
/half fare age. Final return limit December
|fro6. For further information nearest
ticket agent or address
AS. H. DiGNAN 7%
Agent
FARGO, N. &
L«t DM give yen farther details of Mrvte*. flSas*.
F. M. RUGQ, Northwestern Passenger Ag«*t»
aermania Life Bids., St, Paul, Minn.
LOW
THANKSGIVING
RATES
i,:-r
file
Nov. 28-29 final limit Dec. 3, 1906. sy
icketanot goodon "NortbCoast I4«a- -'C,
Sited."
4. e,
-'P
rX\-r
FARGO, N. D.
Northern Pacific Railway
A. M. CLELAND, G. P. A.,
$T.
V*-%'
10,
F. A MILLER
JNittrai Passenger Agent!
CHICAGO
Purdue 0 Notre Dame .. .iV
Purdue...«... 5 Wisconsin -»..,It
Purdue.. 0 Illinois .. «... I
Carlisle.
Carlisle. ..., 5 Vilahova ,.
Carlisle. L, *+..». 0 Penn State ...*4
Carlisle..........48 Susquehanna.^
Carlisle. .82 Wes. Penn .... j|
Carlisle 84 Pennsylvaate 4
a i s e S y a u s e
Carlisle 0 Harvard j|
Carlisle .....17 Minnesota .. -i
Carlisle. 0 Vanderbilt .. V
Carlisle..........18 Cincinnati .. 0
Annapolis.
Annapolis 0 Dickinson .. 0'
Annapolis 0 Princeton
Annapolis 12 Lehigh ..
Annapolig 0 Bucknell .. ..
Annapolin: 0 Penn. State... *S
Annapolis.....^.. 0 Swarthmore .« 4
A n n a o i s 4 0 N o a i 9
Annapolis...'.,... 6 Virginia .. ... 4
West Point.
West Point 12 Tuftsj .» ..
West Point 24 Trinity
West Point 0 Colgatl
West Point.yv. .,17 Williams .. .. 0
(Continued on Page Thirteen)
Busy People
Our specialty is in running trains for people who
like to leave on time and reach their destination®
on time.
It is the business-like regularity with whick
Burlington trains run, as much as their many
comforts and conveniences, that has made then*
famous,
Mississippi River Scenic Line Trainst
Xieava Mioneapolls 7 :.'I0 a. m. 7:50 p. m. 9 V) p. m.
X4*av« Bt Paul
Arrive Chicago
A*r|'
lv* Bt. Louis
8:-'» am 8:40 p. m.: 10:30 p. m.
9 35 p. m. 9:00 a. m. 11:15 a. u.
7:19 a m. 5:35 p.m.
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"V "i"1'" *c^V fj/'^-•%
,*,-*.* f..
1.,.'
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tv"
inchi*.-v
$2.00
will be madct,
Ipf the ROUND TRIP from all stations on the'
'-ffi Chicago!
-P
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s
1
V'-*
'»,
i i
k
1
1
and a third for the round v:- «,
'Children half rates—to any point on
^he Northern Pacific lines in Wiscon
'lin, Minnesota, North Dakota, with
.lriinimuin rate of 50 cents. Tickets on .v*~" *V
iM
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