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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, February 07, 1907, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1907-02-07/ed-1/seq-1/

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PART 1,
PAGES
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V
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IW.-W
1 to 8.
MAN! KILLED
Great Western Train 1$
Wrecked^Illinois. I
MEN
BURIED J\y
FAST CHICAGO TRAIN
WITH ELEVATOR WHIC,
•IED
TO
CLERKS,
TRAIN, CAUSING
E N I N E E A
Hkrlock of Staples, Minn., slightly, an
Mrs. I. M. Koonts
at
slightly.
Forf Dodge,
CREW PERISHED.
Schooner Pounded to Pieces and No
Trace of Its Crew Could Be Seen.
Baltimore, Feb. 7.—A dispatch from
Cape Hatteras t$i the Maritime ex
change, says the schooner which went
ashore on the Diamond shoals Tues
day night, went to pieces last night
and no trace of the vessel could be
0«en this morning, mid the crew have
'til all probability perished.
SUSTAIN HEAVY LOSS.
Nebraska Live Stock Men Will L*e
v! Heavily Beeauee of Severe Cold.
froni the Sand Hill country of north
west Nebraska, where live stock is the
Chief Industry, say that heavy losses
have been sustained because of tho
long continued severe weather. Be
ginning as early as October, it was
necessary to teed hay, the ranges be
ing covered. A little later a heavy
sleet storm covered the range grass
and with the snow that followed all
kinds of stock have suffered severely
from cold and hunger. Reports from
the Billings country In Montana, one
Of the centers of the, sheep industry,
ate to the effect that some sheep men
have lost 80 per cent of their droves.
In a number of cases this means ruin
tor some flock masters.
FIFTEEN DEAD
IN SNU
WOODCUTTERS LOSE LIVES
BY AVALANCHE OF SNOW.
Men Were Working on Mountain Side
When They Were Overwhelmed
Bodies Were Frozen and Had to Be
Dug Out of th® Snow.
Bucharest, Roumania, Feb. 7.—Fif
teen woodcutters were overwhelmed
by an avalanche yesterday in the Mus
cel district ,of the Transylvania moun
tains. All the men were dead when
they were dug out of the snow.
SMALL DISTILLERIES,
to Manufacture Denatured Al
cohol by Bill Reported.
Washington, Feb. 7.—Senator Hans
brough intrbduced the bill recently
fdvorably acted upon by the house
committee on ways and means, which
permits small distilleries to manufac
ture denatured alcohol.
_____
...t.
CONDITIONS IMPROVED.
^Recent Thaw iri Oregon Expended Its
Energy and Traffic Is Resumed.
Portland, Oregon, Feb. 7.—Improve
^enent all along the line is the report
Of conditions on the Willamette and
'Columbia rivers. The recent thaw
Has expended its energy and the nor
.'mal conditions will certainly -obtain
iy the beginning of the week. Tin
Railroad conditions ari perhaps a lit
tie better than for the past few days.
",4'he Oregon Bailroad & Navigation Co.
JiaS not and will not be able to get
trains through fur a day or two more
"ut the connection was made today
between some of the delayed trains
fnd the river steamer Harvest Queen
fcnd about sixty passengers were
brought to the city. No serious suf-
5
7 JAY s
Dv^iV
POStvZ'
O
St. Paul, Feb. V- The following
statement was issued by the Chicago
Great Western railroad on the wreck
$t German Valley. Train No. 5, which
left Chicago at 11:30 last night, met
with an accident at German Valley,
111., at 3 a. m. today. The train wa
going in on a siding and struck som
cars standing on the track in from
of an elevator. The force of the col
lision turned the engine over ort its
side. The mall car next to the en
gine was telescoped and the baggage
car and head C9ach were derailed. The"
force of the accident demolished the
,elevator which came down on top of
the train and caused the greatest
amount of injury. Engineer M'Ciine
of Chicago, was killed Fireman Bram
ble slightly burned and bruised Ex
press Messenger Jamison was burnecl
and bruised. The railway clerks whose
names are unknown, are buried undei
the wreckage and probably dead. On
ly two passengers were injured. James
a knife.
THE
l" "I ,» *.'
GOV. LESLIE DEAD.
Deranged Official Wounds
Assistant.
WAS SHOT OVER THE HEART
MISSISSIPPI SHERIFF ABOUT TO
COMMIT SUICIDE, WAS PRE
VENTED BY HIS DEPUTY WHOM
HE SHOT DOWN AFTER WHICH
HE TRIED TO CUT HIS THROAT.
*1 i ft'
Wittotta, Miss., Feb. 7.—-WhtiB., at
tempting to save his chief from suicide,
Deputy Sheriff Blnnaford was shot
over the heart by a revolver in the
hands of Sheriff Whitehead, who had
become deranged by illness. White
head's daughter held her father and
the deputy ran from the house. White-
WINTER CROPS DESTROYEO.
Intense Cold W««ther in Spain Will
Result in Heavy Loss.'
Madrid, Feb. 7.—The intensely cold
weather which has prevailed In Spain
recently, has destroyed the winter
crops in several provini e»
WORLD'S POOL TITLE.
Champion Pool Players Will Compete
for World's Championship.
New York, Feb. 7.—ThomasHueston
of St. Louis, and Jerome Keogh, of
Buflfela, will commence *a series of
matches here tonight for the pool
championship of the world.
ICE IN HARBOR.
ico Plotting in New York Harbor First
Time This Winter.
New York, Feb. 7.—For the first
time this winter the harbor today Is
tilled with floating ice and all incom
ing vessels are coatod with it. On
board the steamer Seneca froru Manila,
the Chinese crew were clad In cotton
clothing and some in bare jfeet were
breaking up Ice about the decks.
Dili VARIETY Of:
I DIM PLANTS
PROF. HENSON RETURN8
EUROPE.
&, p.,
Yank,ton,
REPUBLICAN, ESTABLISHED SEPT. 5, 1878 FARGO, NORTfi DAKOTA, THl IWDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 7, 1907.
of Montana
Forwiir Chief Executive
i Died Today.
Helena, Mont., Feb. T.—Former Gov.
Preston H. Leslie, died at his home in
this city this morning, aged 88 years*.
Leslie had the distinction of having
been governor of Kentucky and of the
territory of Montana.
SHERIFF SHOT
HIS
FROM
JS! i'jj I
Spent Six Months on Agricultural Ex
ploration for Government and
Brought Back Many Plants' and
Cereals to Be Tested Here.
Feb. 7.—Prof. N. E.
Henson of South Dakota Agricultural
college lias returned from a six
months trip of agricultural exploration
for the United States department of
agriculture through northern Europe
and ^Lhe entire length of Siberia bring
ing with him a large variety of new
foreign plants and short season cereals
for trial in similar Regions in the
northwest. The U. S. agricultural de
partment has directed a large part of
these new introductions to be tested
under the direction of the South Da
kota experiment stations.
MEYER IN BERLIINfcV
Ex-Ambassador Arrive* in Germany
From St. Petersburg,
Berlin, Feb," 7. Ex-Ambassador
Meyer arrived here today from St
Petersburg. He will attend the grand
4
New York, Feb. 7.—Evelyn
Thaw, wife of the man charged with
the murder of Stanford White, t«ok
the witness stand today in the defehse
of her husband, and told the story of
her relations .with Stanford White.
The story was a simple narrative told
in a girlish way and in its midst the
young woman broke down and cried
arid could proceed only with difficulty.
Her husband sat brave-faced for a.
while, then he, too, burst into tears
and buried his face in his handker
chief. He sat thus tor some time.
When he again looked up his eyes
were red from weeping.
"It was In September, 1901," said
Mrs. Thaw, who appeared but a slip
of a girl in the big witness chair with
I had been left in his care by my
mother, whom he had sent to Pitts
burg. I was just past 16 years old.
"This night, when I got to White's
studio in Twenty-fourth street there
was not anybody there..
"Mr. White said, 'Well, they «31 seem
to have turned us down.* He said,
'never mind, we will eat alone,'
"l iter I isaM I mitHt -go
"He said he wanted to show me an-
A N A I Y E U I A N
Wife of Man Charged Witli Murder of Stanford White
i. Takes Witness Chair in Defense of Her Husband.
TELLS HER SENSATIONAL STORY TO THE JURY
Witness Breaks Down and Cries When She Re
ialje^ Her Association With Stanford White
Before HerJ^arriage to Thaw.
Scene in Court Room Affcctcd Harry Thaw, Who
Cried Like a Child When His Wife Told
Story of Her Early Life—The Woman Was on
the Stand During the Entire Day.
Nesbit 4iem of her skirt and kissed It.
She had been sent to dchooj In New
Jersey in 1902 by Stanford While, and
became ill there and had submitted to
an operation, the nature of which the
doctors did not tell her.
her hair caught low on her rrock andjjiours, and her direct examination had
tied with a big black ribbon, "when"! hot been concluded when the luncheon
Mr. White invited me to another of .'adjournment was taken. As she
the parties I had attended with him. walked from the witness chair along
Evelyn Nesbit Thaw, Who Is On the Stand
other part of tlie house, and we went
V nto the bedroom, with mfirrors all
around. He gave /ne more charrtpagne.
Then everything became whiriy and
black.
"When I came to my. clothes were
all off. I screamed and screamed, but
he kept telling me to stop, saying, 'It's
.tver, it's all right.!
The girl told the story to the
twelve men in the jury box, she declar
ed, just as she related the incident to
rry Thaw one night In Paris late
in 1903,,when he had asked her to be
come his wife and she hgud tora him
she could not,
He pressed for a reason and it was
then that she told him all.
(f~
the
Thaw came to see her at the hos
pital and said she could be taken
abroad to recuperate. She went to
Paris with her mother and Thaw, and
it was in Paris that Thaw made his
first proposal of marriage.
Going back to her earliest girlhood,
th* prisoner's wife told the entire
story of her life—how she vnus brought
to New York by her mother and posed
for famous artists to earn ,.»oney for
the family support. She also took the
place in a cho.rus of a musical, show
uid it was while there she tnet White.
Mrs. Thaw was on the stand two
the passageway back of the jury box,
iihe feJt along tjhe wall with the finger
tips of her left-hand, as if about to
faint.
On the witness stand she appeared
lor the first time In court unveiled and
her beauty was remarked on all sides.
Tt. Is of.the girlish type, a mass of
lilaek hair framing a face of daintily
i^wuldod features.
While the Thaw jury was on Its way
day in Defense of Her Husband.
To­
to the court this morning "a man on
the street called out: "Vote for Thaw."
Captain Lynch of the" court police
immediately ordered the man's arrest,
and he was brought to court to be ar
raigned before Justice Fitzgefald.
Captain Lynch attached no import
ance to the incident, saying the man
simply spoke "as a smart Aleck." The
captain did not believe afty of the jur
ors heard the remark.
Mrs. Thaw calmly took her place on
the witness chair, and after answering
questions as to her age, she told of
going to the Cafe Martin with her
husband, Thomas McCaleb and Trux
ton Beale. She saw White there. He
Cape in at the Fifth avenue entrance.
-j
FORUM
SEND TROOPS.
To Qitoll Riot of Miner*, in t£t« Copper
Mine*.
Tokio, Feb. 7.—Troops have been
dispatched to the copper mines In
AlThlo district, where yesterday miners
made an attack upon the property,
using dynamite freely.
Either Reject Canal Bid
or Sterns Resigns.
GOVERNMENT UP AliAINST IT
MATTER OF AWARDING THE CON
TRACT TO OLIVER & CO. TO DIG
THE PANAMA CANAL MEETS
WITH ANOTHER OBSTACLE TO
DAY.
Washington, Feb, 7.,
SIGNS PENSION BILL.
President Roosevelt Signs General
Pension Bill Today.
Washington, Feb. 7.—-The president
has signed the general pension MIL
A BIG FEAST.
Fronoh Chefs Hold Annual Ball and
Feast.
New York, Feb. 7.—The forty-flrst
-annual dance of the Societie Cullln
alre Philanthroplque, better known as
the French Cook's ball will take placr
In the Terrace Garden here tonight.
There will be seven hundred persons
present. Fully 700 dishes from the
most celebrated public and private
kitchens In New York will be dfs
played during the afternoon, as well
as tonight before the chefs make a
frank movement on them. Several'
chefs will be In attendance to tell lay
men how the delicacies are prepared
and explain how they got their names
The ball has been a great success
every year but tonight's affair pro
mises to outshine all others as the
number of French cooks In this city
Is annually increasing.
CASUALTIES
ARE ALARMING
BULLETIN 8HOWS 19,850 CASUAL
TIES IN THREE MONTHS.
Dur4n# Tlrtft P#rtod THl^®'' W&e 267
Passengers and Employes Killed in
Train Accidents and There W®re
3,672 Collisions in the U. 8.
Washington, F®b. 7.—An accident
bulletin issued by the Interstate Com
merce commission for the three
months ended Sept. 30 last, shows the
total nuinft^r of casualties to passen
gers and employes while on duty, to
have been 19,8f0, as against 16,937 re
ported in the preceding three months*.
The number of passengers and em
ployes killed in train accidents wa*
267 as against 194 reported in the pre
ceding three months. Fifty-two pas
sengers! were' killed.
The total number of collisions and
derailments in the quarter was 3,672
(1,891 collisions and 1,781 derailments),
of which 269 collisions and 201 derail
ments affected passenger trains. The
damage to ears, engines and roadways
by these accidents, amounted to $2,
932,760.
The number of employes killed In
coupling and uncoupling cars and en
gines wa« 81, being an increase of 13
1 1
FORUM ESTABLISHED NOT. 17, 1891,
The
admin
istration is face to fa e with the alter
native of rejecting the Panama Canal
bids, or losing the services of Chief
Engineer Stevens. Friends of Stevens
have told hlin If the canal was built
by the contract he would lose the
credit of the work. Stevens Is obdu
rate and Indications are that the ad
ministration will accede to his request.
This in thy cea^on jC^r ^he, (lela^ of
the administration in accepting the
bids of Oliver & Co. A conference
between Secretary Taft and the presi
dent is being held on the matter today.
THIS
ISSUE
12 PAGES
House Gets Down to Busi
ness After Recess.
FIFTEEN BILLS INT!l!)ill)(M
MANY IMPORTANT MEASURE8
INTRODUCED TODAY IN THU
HOUSE—SEARCH AND SEIZURI
BILL AND OTHER PROHIBITION
MEASURES PRESENTED.
Bismarck, Feb. 7.—The legislator*
resumed today after the week's reeesi.
Owing to the trains being Irregular
many of the members of both branch**
failed to reach the capital city and
many will not be able to get here un
til tomorrow or Saturday.
Notwithstanding the fact that many
members are still absent, those who
were more fortunate in reaching the
city got down to business at once.
Owing to the fact that but a limited
i inie remains In which the volume of
business before the legislature must b#
transacted, the members will woitc
overtime in grinding out new laws that
iire demanded by the constituents of
the legislators.
After the house was called to order
the roll call was passed and th^ house
was down to business in short order.
To start the ball rolling after th®
recess, fifteen bills were put into tlsi
hopper of the house, many of whl*h
are among the most Important to be
introduced thus far.
Among the most important bills to
be presented was one providing for th«
search and seizure of intoxicatiti||
liquor imported In the state.
Another provides for the use of
lines collected in the police courts and
provides that fines collected in the po
lice courts up to $1,000 be devoted t0
the liquor prosecution fund Instead 'of
the school fund.
Another bill provides that the state
treasurer shall collect all bills due th©
twine factory at the state penitentiary
Instead of the warden of the peniten
tiary. This bill is one drafted by the
Insurgents of the house.
Another bill provides for the ofl!6£
of a state fire marshal.
Another provides for a bolleij Inspec
tion law.
Another ''important pr 1 tiiion
•rrreBHur*'- fJrwirtrjf that all liquor
1 lenses issued by the United states
in this state be registered and pub
lished broadcast throughout the stat®
and that the authorities publish all
such licenses in the newspapers.
Another bill introduced provides for
the appointment of a deputy county
superintendent of schools In counties
with over 30,000 inhabitants. Thta
will effect Ward and Cass count!®*
and give the two counties deputies,If
the bill passes.
The senate met during the after
noon with Senator LaMoure In the
chair.
Lieutenant Governor Lewis failed to
reach the city when the senate wa*
called to order.
THE FACTS WERE
LEADING JAPANESE PAPER EX
PRESSES INDIGNATION.
Regrets That th® Facts Regarding th®
Meeting of the Privy Council W»r®
Misrepresented in Being Transmitted
to America.
Tokio, Feb. 7.—Hochl Sinlbun, which
i.as been \he most outspoken of th®
Japanese papers in expressing Indig
nation at the action of the San Frah«
cisco authorities, regrets the misrep
resentation of facts transmitted to
America regarding the meeting of th®
privy council, it ridicules the care
lessness of ttl® publishing of such
news without full Inquiry. v/hlCh th®
nature of the subject deserves.
VI8COUNT GOSCHEN DEAD.
uished Statesman Died Sudden*
ly of Heart Failure in London.
London, Feb. 7.—Right Hon.
Goschen (Viscount Goschen), .died
suddenly this morjiing at his residence,
Seacox Heath Hawkhurst, of heart
failure. His death was quite unex
pected. Viscount" Goschen, who wa#
born in 1831, had a distinguished c&-
reec.
y
4
I
STUDENTS EXPELLED.-
Troops Participated in the Expulsion
of Students From 8eminary.
Nice, France, Feb, 7.—Troops and
gendarmes today participated in th®
expulsion of the students from the lo
cal seminary. The superior of the In
stitution made a protest against tli®
action taken by its local authorities.
There was much hooting at the sol-
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