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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, February 25, 1907, Image 6

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1907-02-25/ed-1/seq-6/

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MARKETS
,,i* at
i'
CWA^MARi.ET8.
Market Quotations, Furnished Daily
by Chj». e»..Lvyi« A,Ctu*
Way AVhea-t.
a«Wi mjI*
!f' ,"ST7/H
«W
Low 72
Close ,.. IHVj,
.mi
T.'T^r&O 80%
jjiywhtri«£
Eii^
^C^PSs"*'
Opcn
N)i'"1
*H*h
UlM.ll
High"
Low
im
:JK/8 r"y Ml
78 4 79
80%
4 ?V Jf
fiLi.
n
*0%
^1%
to .-re
S«jrt«mber Whia*.''
.Chgw.
.*78%..
'78%'
Mt'a.
7!»%
S '/4
TS7'8
f*T'
,ru*
LlL J3»
iYl'0
'Chicago, Cornj*,
*.*»"»'•»' ari&:•j.-.sept
bpen..
*n«a\
»W" .'» JiKtti I of hWH -•.
•Close 47 K it 11»:k *i% 47%
•*•frt i v Jjii: v• -.
May. July ,|g e,/eeft
•w
open i
ftigft
Low
'loae
r' tfi'tvf
4 4
-4U%» r««
iUfowJs&aH 32%^^
42^4 ^7 3Z%-.
ciul tn^tt !".• kit* W3f
f% i Porlti »tWi2i!-rJ::
A,V^.W:ml,
opm
nm
..4W»Wi.
liJAr' HO
4i*nf:2
w
*. ti'^K
Minneapolis Cash Closer
Xu, 1 hal-a ...... S. W«UI'J
Nd 1 norths .U-.'.'MyH.' ::. .'81%
K** l.pin tlrcT'h ^V^t^e,V. :v8lii:'
No 2 nc»rfTit'i 5!
iffa, 3 nortlirrh 'to 'am've. .".'!V9\
Ni. *!i'' nurtti^m—---. \i'
No. 1 tjurum j. fa-O.. 3.tPU
*#ft# I1 UttrtmT.vt'.V.'.
*No. 3 'yrlKi*r-^ort« VV.'i'... 'AfM
S O Z n A U I i
tJo. 3' vvhit«- Yui^":..
No, 3 whitu. .nals Lu arrive
.3H14,
•No. 3 «»ats
Barley
.tj.
.ujovi.i*V!}y^.
Ryev.. .• .rivr.Wi ^«'2«
u":
Duluth .bash Clo««. '.V*!1.^
SN*
1 -hor-l wtKHil 'I'll -k
ftr-''
4Wi *1 A it
39H..S "li'orrti o
1
v V v v i v
-r v^fh' f*"'*'--
8
J'o.' 1 anvtimjy .J, =V-V
*)Vo.
2
duruiii ',
Ch »h flat** -w.-r»-rrT-.-«"rf .'i
May flax •''*.' /iV .A.. yt ?&&
Jfia-rs •'oorjjj'
u u i a i
DMTfitn^mat r-/r,
.jlUAV HO-L
1
v/
^riiiy fiai'vy. /:*:».2^4
'October flax /,.Tv.
4.V'
ilwl (?-. -4vn6f)t0?ji?
,4^ J.v
)t
t.i ,-, .»"A'r -v MarKatt
Nov"! "iWit'Tiii-rTT V:7 r.T~T^TT^Tp
3 ^ofjkhcf^ ...
JV7::r
U. ,i,v.'-"' l"""
•ifi^ Reeeifjts.'
$}iJ
v
k'vG,|Stpck.
Chlfflfftw,
Shoep, 2%n0 ^j^eaily.
4
•Ui»oot!»ft8—Horv
'Ji&l'lKU ieftipvrr, J:02y liiiirHtit T.cCtttk'
.cr.*HRht
-:.D?V•fl". fwsf?.
M^V' *V^^ri
'7-.T"B '^-u'
Kansaw—?Htyr—Frt»r-—4.
lloifs, A—3JAC HO"
TaiVfe1.00ft?
Sheep, litPOO.
Vf ^»7i5!—{*(/'»- :iJAB BO*-'
Omaha Jfebd* ai^Usc»Aiit^»Hfcg.'
6,000. .W. ,&n>lr*i»K W .wt"
('Httle-. 4rfmv^—1—
s^ep, i.
m,? 3 ,a8
Cii/VSE
f,0*!
•"^Ctock''
-NStcjck ^Mr X"lt
--ItpoKt,4 i •.'
if
i' l^v
.Alia
w
H. O. MOfT, MG'»„
Morton. Blk., Fargo, N. D.
'fchone 515.
A
:h
.W'tri
WATSON & CO.
drains, Stotks and Provisions
ci 9: N. Y. Stock Hxchnngr, Clikaen
floaul of Trade, Mpls. Chamber Commerce.
.Prjv^te Wires to All Points.
ttinro QW« MORTON ?L0CK
E: Ov WLLINQ.
|hotie 528 V," Manager.
SIIKfXKD C'OUN
€R6uno #£ED
Write ds K.r "prices.".. 'Z'. Z
overage Co.
P. O. Gmm 867, F«rg*o, N. D.
Chas. T. Lewie A Co. Commint,
JC'hicagOj F6b ,. *r57—'FTOiti '^wjajsit,' ~'ty"
gmher we belf£\'e' tl^t: u# nbcm aK'thc
wlather warij»« )v-p .Hr «rfiing t* get a
whole lot of-iviiop. iiiinaisB on our gEon
•Itllf \v inter ^yKMtft ^C'Itli.4"hj
!'*ilm*fdruat»*fo: :foiJ8Trt^tfh
U{-
,rt-?^jC3i
1
it
ry^*t
mOm
THE'
ms a buslicl jit the outside ip buying
vrpe.it and he
uilKht
slidtilcj.
make 20 .if there
be any damage to X\\e wheat
'-T0P.f. .to we consider it a mighty good
bet to make to buy wheat and we had
dbou'l fu* soon buy the July a« anything
else and'for a long time pull. Septem
ber might be a good purchase. There
•is
a bfg l«ng interest in corn here and
there, iril ruined, and we are going to
have a big demand for export. We will
liMyv-ip- week os I^n days of «uoa re
^f fpts, feut'-after 'that th^r«f will 5»e a
Mff
let ^jp and w« oxpeet
to,
of
aee .May
corn well well over 50c. Oats are lu a
very. pecjiJiar position, ^tocks of oats
irp-'-v^l-y^light an'd there, „are no lorsi
jtoi-kj "o£ oat}I hfld dnV! pUM e*The
.ea^rlir tare
ott'te and tftere 1^ a gooct
*iiipi»ij)& demand.nfcttirig^ a. shu^t' V%n
•ler» .VJMy to 2
to
3 cents',Over
fi)e the
fancy grades. 1 believe
"May oatfl will
'^eir at 45C. v v-..:••.:.
Watson dt Co.'* Commsirt.
'Although the statistical
situations
were bearish in every way, Uie market
showed firmness from the start, except
ing".*a small dip right 'at the opening.
The-'-'ifc&rclty
of
offerings caused the
narket to advance sharply when some
of the 'early settlers trleS to cover.
1 imports
of
an urgent expolrt demand
wiiioh cannot be confirmed by export
TTS here, as their bids are still way
ut of .line, except on durum wheat
and the reports of damage from points
in Indiana and Ohio, along with the
ad vines of a poor crop outlooK in Uus
«ta«'Werd the strong influences, at the
best prices there was considerable
wbeftt put Upon the mffrket by some.of
the leading commission houses, the
southwestern primary. movement,, es
pecially heavy. Visible supply de
cretrsrd' *72,000, -against 359,000
a
*tn. 1 green
Mo. 2 green
So. 1 green,
year
AJhUuigo stocks, decreased 54,000
clearances, were liberair w4wo.
agatnst 289,000.* it,»'
Hicfsfc.
^or-4"-e«r«d
^T- 2 cu red:... ..'. ...
nto.
1 cured, hulls.
v^tV*'
V-0. 2 curod, -builBi.••*«#••*
... \4&.w.r:
bulls....
So. 2 green, bulls....
Fur*.
QTROTED
by Bo lies
No. 1
^large....
A Rogers, 103
'.roadway, Kargo, N. jD
taccoo*. Minn, and
No, 1 large.... .... .'•. .11.909*1.25
ilink, Minn, ind' Dakl
........ 8.000
4.60
ikj^nk^ -M inn-, ttndf
jiturow stripe, Ho. 1.. id,[email protected]
'kunk, Minn, and Dak.
broad stripe. No. 1.... 25cgl40c
fi^Urnt, Minn, and Dak.
"fail caught.. [email protected]
-\iutiluuij... Minn. and Dafc,. I....
wlh'ter' caught .V 10C®t4c
Muskrat, Minn, and Dat.
Jklts,... .. [email protected]
-jRejl, fox, Minn, ,ana DaJc^t'.',
v,
No, 1 large [email protected] 4.0o
Prairie wolf, Minn. and .v.?
Dak. No. 1 large j." T6C0t i.OO
Badger, Minn, and 'VDaiCrr.. 7v
:,t^o. i tafise., i:rof
.'padgQr, No. i
value. ... ,,
-f^ynx, No»..l [email protected] 7.00
vtartin, as to sUie anH
color..'.' .... »'.®05»18.00
vVeaSfl, snow
whftf'^^Oc^tOc
/.rouh tveasel nd Va^lue.
Aliove' prices arb for prime, well
handled furs. No. 2, .3, Ar and poor
handled lots at .their"vain*.
The Old Fa»liioiieti "Hired Girl."
i...The "hired girl" (we never, never al
luded to her as "the maid" in the small
American toWii or'quiet country place
where you and I Avere "raised") was
like oue of the family, and mother was
glad to have her help, and noue of us
any frills with her, and £be was
not compelled to put on any frills of
cap or apron with us. Ofttimes, espe
cially ,)n the quiet country places, her
social standing was as good as that of
•anybody else. Uauafly"she was one of
a grown family of girls. There waa
plenty of help at her house, and so she
came and assisted our mother at our
house. In their hours of ease mother
and she discussed the neighborhood"
gossip together. The "hired girl" had
her beau, a neighbor's stolid, sheepish
son, and much was she Joked about
him, and Anally,"after years of faithful
and friendly servitude, she married
hi in. ..We went to the wedding, and it
was quite a social affair, with much
teinjerate merriment and with many
c5«ap '-"feuf useful presents.—EVery
body 'n,M a gazine'.
:•/.: YWebster's. Compliment.
•While-it is well known that Daniel
"N^ebstw in speaking of General Tay
lor's candidacy for the office of presi
dent pronounced it "a nomination not
fif to be made," he neter failed to do
JViiftice5 to the general's military abil
ities and eminent service In the field.
On one occasion he pnid the old sol
dier a delicate arid well deserved com
pliment. General Taylor was com
plaining of the crowds of people,who
U',iily besieged him soon after his as
cension to the presidency.
"Tliey interfere,"'he said, "with my
official engagements &hd violate my
domestic retirement, Jput still-I, do .not
wish to ttftti my t)ack upon my
friends."
"Yoti never did upon your enemies,
general," &Ir. Webster instantly re-.
pUed*» v". i,
,?*: i •--ft' i .jr' fit-.,••
'.'1* ThestktoV /'v
Bk-huto Mdal
"us ppeu
llitfjr whftit rtwfrUft. Wf
tliat a ujau WOIIM lose more than th- .! 1 own.—Npw Vnrlr \T»ii1
j. *..
Jr^-VhU^'M/
Mi
+****.
jnffWJ#
•M&tfi'
Asllle froilr ait»pw)lrlatlbn blhsf*. and
conference, reports, the ship subsidy
bin* is tlfe only measure of-'jreneral im
portanic' lhat is lUtCtj io rc-ce:ve im
attention of the hcyse, and the Aldrich
finabcial lyi th^. Only one ^tt^at psfoba-*
bty vCitl ie^eive the am-nffon' of the
senate during this, th* closing Week
of the last session of the Pifty-nimh
copgi'&jj.^. It Is .Sendtor Aldrich's^pur
p'tfee to press, his'bill fgtr^on .side ration
whep*'^.^ flpRkortuijity oilers, alhd is
stiif. K^eru) 'of success,^riotw i'iUsi^pd
ing tl-ye -opposition, the cpji#oMed- .epn
ditlou 'ot business and tjje .limited tfiine
left* The house friends of ship sub
sidy also profess themselves as hopeful
bu( fh£y adfiift that every day 'that
gOfs bj- without action lessens their
chances. Sofrie of therft .express con
fidence In getting some features ot the
bill incorporated in "the postofllce ap
propriation bill as a rider, but If they
fail in that prgramme they will make
a last5^effort for independent action
by the house after the passage of the
general deficiency bill, They wilt ask
to have two or three days set aside
for tKfe consideration of the ship'sub
sidy bill when conference reports are
not before the house, and the inclina
tion of the leaders is to grant this con
cession. r-
No otty«f business will be-permitted
to interfere with appropriations, bills
and conference reports in either house4
"but there will be times when pther
business may be. interjected and much
miscellaneous legislation may be ex
pected. An order will be brought into
th« house by the committee On rules
early., ii\ the week, making certain
cUikkos.-
t.«4r-w4ii2c
...^v ^ric
10C
•,9c
10'
9c
8e
7c
of legislation of a minor char­
acter Irr order at »ny time Vmdpr a
suspension •of the-rules, and members
generally hoi
v
to get a large.number
Lif. hiUs, pajjsed urtlier this order. As
Mspal. the. .so^atp will make art effort
to:*«4ef'.n inii-.tiie calendar 'and by the
enfl iof the w'eek there will be few
senate measures left to which there is
nt«l' 'lrtMit{W'R.fl»le objeetlon. ...
All oi' ^lie app^opi-iiiLions except the
general defU'ieiij-y liave passed the
house, but there me still five of these
mea-sures to j-eceive first consideration
at the hands of the senate. These are
the agricultural bHl, which Is now un
der .£om'ilerati.on the postofllce bill,
the pension bill, the sundry giyij bill
and the general deficiency bill. It is
expected thut the consideration of the
agricultural bill will be cdricjjyd^d
Monday, and it will he -followed by the
post office" bill. The grazing and forest
reserve propositions on the agricul
tural bill Will rect'lve some, otorc at-
.3ITwaw ovuv
s
Dull, dead monot^^,
napery.
UTe Snot) eiiitlvfltes a man or a wom
an not because he expects to.get a job
or a loan ou.tqf either, but because he
thinks «itixer can help him along inta ,.. ....
society's elect. He cuts a former ac- I ^ien the long, «u.U da/ w^
qua inta nee bocause the .unfortunately^ diveralonl.. .would actually.
peraon seems to be of no use in hla |g The Inmates At Matteawan help in
own social advancement. He sup- the kitchen, thb (fining'voOrfr dnd latin
presses the impulse that may lead him dry, but- the greater portion of the time
to dislike useful people and like use-lis spent in the big, long ward, hrnng
less oues just as the ambitious bank I
The relatives ^a'nd friends of a pifls
oafcr in this state institution are per
mitted,'Hi a small measure to add to
his coinforts. The great wealth of
Thaw., would bring him three things.
He could have his own food and jils
own,clothes, arid.he could avail him
self fully of the "common privilege of
reccivitic visitors briefly three time's a
week. No -valet, however, could aid
him in. dieK'f^ftl^ knd He would have to
eat hlft'/^-'otl from tv tin bow vylth a
pewter ^pooh'. Juslf'tis'does every other
Incite-.
c': V*:'
T6v* of TIrrrr^ Tbaw w«jl(i
be D9v* rif jnonotonous ryu
tUiQ timfc OiVft /3%y .pwujld atarce be told
from another A 5 In the summer
morjiji^g^-^Cly^ji. iipur later during the
\yhi.ter in^rilh^-^he' would rrte. Tlie
privilege of a'shower bath Is a matter
of choice with the "patients." He
would then dress, assist in making his
bed and pfcfttiHfe "tfie: watd'to order, for
h%'' woilld-bectifoV"'a Ward 'WHh- doiens
Of others,
Breakfast is served at 7:JJ0. If Thaw
broko. bis, fast with-the hospital fare
it woykl be,upon a.bowl of mush with
syrup,
:,a.5\ip
lng
clerk suppresses his small extrava- i »*»'tted. but of wha-t is there to talk'.'
gances. his fondness for the race track. [Whenever three or four, "patient** are
position „eem.
lm-
IK) ,t him he admires excessively 'number is Instantly transferred to an
those who nave it and snubs those'other ward, for fear insubordination
whose position he deema Inferior to hla may resQlt from the discussion:
.Ottt-ofrOoojr ex/in:
1
hi- i# U&a
ft?
ijf
1
£*X
-. y:.' .'" ,,
FAtlGO FOIttJM AND XA KEt'tJBUCAlSf MONDAT JJVENTNG FEBRUARY 25
Inspection and with that out of the
way it is hoped that the bill will get
through .without aqy further contro
versy.
The only two appropriation bills that
have been completely disposed
of
tejitlon fuitl' \yith, those matters Tlfe-VKtag* during tho week. Baseball men
ponet^ of ,the sejiate, will tak.? the r*«presentlng''both the major and minor.
Beveridge amendment regarding ^ieat,!| leagues, will hold a'«eHes of meetings
Life Matteawan Would
J5e JiJIard One for Thaw
-1:
3.wSS
•03 AV
Plain food.
f^onve-fw^+HMi strlctlji limited- .*
Harti, ,w wooden .chains tables
-Without
'1. .X
A 'cotf irt-'a ward.
Nearly everything done by.drW.
'Constant sUrvettlanoe. ^. ,3
frequent searches.
§. Perfunctory exercise.J'
Punfg^ment "by aolitaoy^conftne*"*^
me&U.\,?,:i'?.5£
-T -f rt.3T^^v.«
$$ 8
PlshkWl Landing, N. Y«.» Feb.- g&—
"Harty» Thaw "might wfll prefer4he
olegtriR:. eha|r rather than to .came
here," enjphtitlcally declared an offi
cialf Matteawan Asvlum for the
Criminal. Ii^ajq^e,'. which Is cond\i^ted
at this village by 'the state of Ifew
York. ci
z To thts novef -penfvf +nsti't.tttlofi ^hc
young PifctaJkurjK millionaire will have
come if he is found insaine now and
h'fs'"trial -for slaying Stanford "Wliite
discontinued. Although its "inmates
are. mailed J.'patie&tig," this asyluirf' is
esseri'tla'lly""a prison. -j..
Confinement in tire Matteawan asy
lun» is-terminated usually .only i by
death, -.but In- the.: breast of eviery
patient, no matter,, how .friendless
i,s
eyor- bi}|-ni/ig tjtisgt .constant hope for
frevdorn that is t^e attribute of hu^an
nature.
..of. .^pftee and a piece "of
»nd reading. Conversation is per-
"een tUamBelve!. togethtr. tn
to ail apparent Intimacy one ,gt the
HggaiggagBBBaMaBa!^^
and aurpmer, but there is little, liberty
attached,to it- The prisoners walk irf
an. uhctffyered cdrfldo#', ArOtttyJ 'ftnd
inound tliey go, one following quickly
•upon the footsteps ol,.another* like ir^
a treadmill.: i''/
Shlklnefe- tfrfd f^ista^ice to c*#ritro!
.ire. ae.veVely. discip^ned' a'i JSat.teawan
by isolation. •.
O Duplicate Chandeliers.
you ever uotice." said the ob­
serving man, "that every public buuu
ing has chandeliers unlike those of any
other public building? There are no
duplicates. You go into one church
and' you see a handsome chandelier
that it would seem worth while to du
plicate. for another church, but you
never find it in, another "church. You
go into a big ball, and you'll observe
some stunning globes and chandelier
fixtures and look for 'em in some othetj
big hall, but they're not there. I dou't
know what principle the matters of
chandeliers go on, whether it'is a,mat
ter of pride with them not to fit out
two tmiMings alike or whether con
tractors for such buildings insist on
exclusive designs, but the chandelier
people must employ some remarkably
versatile artists to think up so many
different, designs. It seems like a waste
of money to make only one of a kind,
but it Is a pleasure to know that hall
or home may be exclusive in ita chan-
Co^certiaif*
The" threatened revival of the con
certina as a serious musical instrument
in England would be a return to an
old fashion no doubt, but uot to a very
old one, sinei&'tye concertina dates from
the early part of the last century. Its
invention was an early indiscretion of
Sir Charles Wheatstone of telegraph
fame, who took out a patent for it in
1829, the very year in which some
body In Vienna Invented that similar
Instrument,* the accordion. The concer
tina Was'popularized by Sig. Regondi,
who had* come before the public as a
Juvenile prodigy with the guitar. At
one time no "London concert was real
ly complete 'Without hftn and his con
certina, and he astounded the Germans
Witty thb music he could get'out df'&
'Gladstone an ton' Orator.
It was a budget last night—about a
page of a morning'paper spoken In two
hours by Mr. Gladstone, and he hard
ly referred to a note, never paused a
moment, broke through cheers, dashed
over Interpellations—logic, figures, il
lustrations, extracts—all pellmell, with
a'-whirl and fury that took the breath
away. .And he did 4t all with the ut
most ease and got to the end without
turning a hair. Mr. Gladstone took it
all quietly and did It quietly and left
the house snd went home quietly,
probably mentioning to Mrs. Gladstone
•a* a en son for beln& rather tired that
he lin3 been snv lng a "few words"
that evening.—From Whitty's "Parlia
mentary Retrospect."
,i iiiiiijpiufi i, -rr".
4? :$k\r
u,\- v'-.
Important Events of the World for This Week 1
by
oagc®s9,. ait"? th« legislative and the
diplomatic, bills. All the others that
have been passed by both houses have
still to be acted upon In conference,
and, as:th© senate :has not allowed any
of them to get through without mater
ial additions, nnui'h spirited debate
may be expected upon these reports.
.Both houses will materially prolong
their sittings. They will begin earlier
in the morning, and night sessions
will be the rule. In addition to the ap
propriation bills the slxteen-hour rail
road employes' bill and the criminal
appeals bill, as well as many other
matters comparatively
of
minor im­
portance, are in conference, and will
call
for
attention
from
things
both houses. All
considered it will
be,
a
busy
week.
in addition to routine matters re
ferred to. Senator Depew will make
a
formal address in the senate on the
deposit,of the public moneys on Mon
day, and Senator Patterson another
on Wednesday on the same question
of the government ownership of utili
ties. There will also be an effort dur
ing the week to secure the ratification
of tfce dominican treaty.
Interest is expected to debtor chiefly
in the proceedings before the inter
state commerce, which will meet in
New York city today to continue its
investigation of the Harrlman rail
roads. Many notable financiers and
railroad men have 'been subpoenaed,
and are expected to appear for ex
a mination at this sitting of the Commis
sion. Notable among them all Is E. H.
Harrlman, the controlling factor in the
vast, transportation system of the
Unldn Pacific-Southern Pacific lines.
It is planned to call Mr. Hafriman to
the witness stand immediately on the
opening of the hearing, and it is be
lieved that two days will be consumed
in taking hiS testimony. Among the
other men who are expected to appear
before the commission at this time are
Win. C. Rockefeller, Jacob H. Schlff,
head of the great New York banking
house of Kuhn, Loeb & Co., which has
financed many of the Harrlman deals.
Otto H. Kahn, also
a
member of
the banking firm C. W. Hilliard,
comptroller- of the
Union
Pacific Al­
exander Miller, secretary of tbe
Union
Pacific, and others.
Representatives of the athletic world*
also \Vill have a central position on the
In fcew York city. The annual sched
ule meetings of the National and
American leagues, will begin Monday
and probably continue until Wednes
day. On Wednesday the national base
ball commission will begin a session
which is expected to continue the re
mainder of the week. The commis
sion will pass upon many disputed
points affecting the*Various leagues of
the country. On Tuesday the national
skating association will hold a meeting
in New York, at which time an effort
will be made tq straighten out the
tangle which has grown out pf a con
flict of authority between the associa
tion and the Amateur Athletic union.
The trial of Harry K. Thaw for the
murder of Stanford White enWrs updta
its. Sixth week with little project of
New York, PeB. 25.^-Aceordihg to a
stiry1 'published h^re today, Evelyn
Thaw is to receive $3OD,0Od at the con
clusion of the trial of her husband, no
matter, what its outcome be, In return
for baring her soul on the witness
stand, \y
Immediately folO^ping the ari*fegt of
Harry Thaw, goes the story, Evelyn,
frightened, prepared to flee to "Europe
to avoid the searchlight of publicity
which began sweeping the tenderloin
within two hours after Stanford White
died."
Thaw's family and attorneys, believ
ing that she alone could save her
husband from ,the chair, drew up an
agreement by which the girl wife was
to receive the $300,000 the day the trial
concluded, on condition tMat she re
main within the court's Jurisdiction.
HlliS OS
rn*n
I 'i 3
Ill/ill
Railroad Magnate Tells of
Financial Operations
EXPLAINS THE Blfi HEALS
PRESIDENT OF THE U. P. TELLS
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COM­
MISSION OF OPERATIONS OF
HIS GROUP—HOW THE VAST
R. ft. PROPERTY WAS ACQUIR^ED1
————"v
New York, Feb. 2 5.—lave
st iga tion of
the financial operation of the^ Fferri-j
man group through the Unlott PcioUld
rallrOatJ, undertaken by the-'Interstate,
commerce commission In behalf 'of the?
United States, government wlaa
March i ^:-I
$34.85 to
4
i:%.
tr,
an early, termination, ... Mrs. EvQlyp
Thiw, the wife of the prisoner, whb
already has been nearly a full wefek
on the witness stand, Is expected to
appear for a continuance of the crosa
examinatioa ^hen the trial is resutn^.
A case which gives promise of de
velopment of some sensational feat*
"ures will come up in New York Thurs-'
day'When Mi's. Lettle Wellan will be
formally arraigned on a charge of hav^
ing mUrdefred her mother, Mrs. Ida
ithlgs, by administering mercury la'
champagne *?hile Mrs. Rings, was des
porateiy, jll. Mrs, Wellan is now at
liberty unde^r $50,000 ball.
Wife of Accused Murderer Said to Have Been Of
fered Small Fortune to Remain III America
and Give Her Testimony.
It is doubtful if any man. who heard
Thursday afternoon's proceedings with
Evelyn on the stand will believe the
story. ..
If he does he Jtniist fee£' sure that
the girl made a poor bargain'.'"*'1
The story has been hinted at 'before.
Rumors of it cropped out in PlttsbOrg
several weeks ago A woman* at the
Lorraine hotel was authority for the
statement that Evelyn [fh^w qoji-
King Frederick Augustus of Saxony,
-will leave Dresden Monday on a Vlfcit
o
5
K i i A V o s o o
vertlWe bonds in
sre-l
sumed at ih^^iecleiAl'
o'clock today. v .•
E. H. Harrimatr, president of thoj
Union Pacific, was the first witness,'
and under examination by Frank B.
Kellogg, began at 10:10 o'clock
an explanation of the financial opera-!
tions of his company* commencing
with the isB.ue of the- 100,000,0Q© c/fi
Also Oft-salu lV^iicU 1:t.
v
K n $
Carlos' of Portugal.'
». ... i ,»•••
Evelyn Thaw to 6et
$300,000 for Story
11
.-j* ...
•'.*
S
fessed to her that stte Intended to leave
for Europe.
Despite this, there is.the best
of roa
son for believing that this is the
cruelest blow that has been aimed at
Evelyn Thaw. What her past has beet},
everyone knows. No one has tried to
defend that. But rising above all tHI*
has been the
one
her life—her
redeeming feature
love
is not willing
for her husband.
Writers have written reams on the
subject, but probably the most sincere
tribute to the genuineness of the little
woman's love
comes from
the
offlcil^s
at ^the Tombs.
These men are real'judges of humafi
nature. They see it unmasked and
unaffected poses. For months they
have watched Evelyn Thaw and her
husband. Not
one
of them today who
to
stake his
Jlfe on the
statement that it was the love she has
for hlrft which alone made It possible
for, Evelyn Thaw to suffer the mental
torture she underwent Thursday In thfe
hope of saving her loved one's life.
Slowly she lo,st her grip Thurs
on her wonderful self-control and when
the final adjournment came her crn*
ditlon was pitiable. Crushed and limp,
she slipped from the witness staadiitt,
collapse in the clerk's office. Tli&a
she was whiskgd ayyay to her hotel*
i,s —v i n.1. .4 i.
JL901
for the'* pur-
tltase of stopk in Southern
^M»*tl1*rii.(P4cifto'.' I-l'.
1'
c-t-.-.t .r|%i
Harrlman testified that the purchase
of tbe Union Pacific and Baltimore &
*hio amoantbd to $45,000,000 and were
i. be paid for in March and Septehi*
ber.
Harrlrpsyj identified the statem«|St
prepared by Controller Oahle, showfti®
that the value of the stocks acquired
by the Union'Pacific and the Oregon
Short Line since July 1 laat amounted
to $131,000,000.
The inquiry developed the fact that
after the decision of the supreme court
of the United States dissolving tjflk
Northern Securities Co., interest ,-bf
the Ufilon Pacific Co. in that corpor
atlo.i was returned to them in shaires
of tbe Northern Pacific, and Great
Northern Co. These subsequently
were sold, as Harriman explained, be
cause the revenues derived from them
wit re limited and* the proceeds were
invested,in stock of the Illinois 'Mi
tral Railroad Co., the Atchison, Tk
peka & Santa Fe Co,, and the? Balst^
more & Ohio'Co.- 'Following this la
quiry Harriman was questioned i»
Bpecttng the puicxhase and reorganisa
tion of. the Chicago & Alton Co.
1901. Mllburn of Harriman's counsel,
objected to this line of inquiry on the
ground that it did not fall, within the
jurisdiction of the" Interstate Corf**.,
rtiavce commission.
»A
•i.r
MINERS KILLED.
Falling Slate Fatal for Two
Others Were Injured.
Princeton, Ind., Feb. 25.—Geopge
Bird, owner of a mine, at Francisco,
and John Skelton, minqr were killed
in tho mine by falling slate. Two otkt
ex. miners were injured. .. .-~t. ..
U E N
Great Northern Railway
STOPOVERS
ON COLONISTS' TlCRefS
roHan^0^1N.
ck 4
FViUtis liui tii, yn Site
1
v..
.•
f.',
"VfT .1 .(/• n
SAN FRir^iSS^and
r- LOS ANGELES. CAL.
*iLaHr
FAKGO, O.
wf

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