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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, March 11, 1907, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1907-03-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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PART IV
PACES
Ito 8.
SHOOK iSl
JURING OTHERS—TOWN WAS
SHAKEN BY EXPLOSION.
Metuchen, -N. J., March 11.—Two
men were killed and a number of oth
ers huFt and Metuchen was shaken and
threatened with many fires today when
the boiler of a locornotivc on the Penn
sylvania railroad exploded while draw
ing: a freight train through the town.
The dead are: V
WM. J. SISHER, Engineer, of Phil
adelphia.
S. C. SMITH, braKernan, of Trenton,
N. J.
W. H. FRITSCHE, fireman, Trenton,
N. J.
The train was passing through under
good headway when just opposite the
railroad station the boiler exploded.
Portions of the boiler were blown two
blocks away and tore through build
ings. The bodies of Engineer Sisher
and Brakeman Smith were found 100
yards from the railroad tracks. Many
of the freight cars were piled in a heap
and several of the train hands were
injured but none seriously. The broketi
cars caught fire but the blaze was soon
extinguished. A portion of the loco
motive was blown into Hahn's drug
store, two blocks from the track and
other pieces of the steel entered Mc
Cutcheon's pharmacy. Both stores
were set on fire simultaneously but
In neither case was there any serious
Jo«f,
SON StAYS FATHER.
Kills Parent With Baseball Bat While
Defending Mother.
Solon, O., March 11.—Richard Ken
nedy, jr., 20 years old, struck his father
fsunday' with a baseball bat, killing
instantly. His father and mother
*vere quarreling and the son came to
his mother's rescue, dealing his father
the fatal blow. The boy surrendered
to the police.
TRAVELER OlPv'-*
ON FUMES
INVESTIGATION BEING MADE
MYSTERIOUS DEATH.
and Freeze to Death.
/i
Si
.:
s
4
ratal Explosion of Loc^
motive Boiler
PENNSYLVANIA ENGINE EXPLOD
ED, KILLING ENGINEER, FIRE
MAN AND BRAKEMAN AND IN­
IN
J. k. Silver, While Driving to Lans
ford, N. D., Fell Out of Sleigh and
Driver Allows Man to Vie in Road
Minot, N. D., March 11.'—Was it
.//Theart failure or undue* ^bfposure as a
t'osult of a sudden attack of sickness,
.^fthat caused the demise of J. B. Silver,
prominent cigar salesman, is a ques
v tion over which the coroner of Botti
^cKjioau county and his jury are at pres
ident debating. J. B. Silver, a represen-
f,:i.tative
of the Ashland Cigar Co., who
v-nnJeft Minot but two days ago, died Fri
vx^lay evening while traveling between
... Grano and Lansford. Mr. Silver, In
isf'Pmpany with a Grano liveryman and
\v&ischool teacher from Grano. who was
i3to take the train for Minot at Lans
ford, started for Lansford in a sleigh.
'.'.Both of the men had been drinking
%v during the day, according to reports
.yVhieh have been received in this city.
"^Vhen the drive was partly completed
'f: ^Silver became deathly sick and fell
from his scat on tiie sleigh. The driver
,sridlsmf)unted and attempted to pick hitn
v%4ip, but the weight was too much. He
!th.*oi dragged him to the side of a
-final) hut, which was situatrd a short
distance away from the .Toad and hast
.i-.-ycned on to Lansford, where a number
*'f the citizens were organized into a
.relief party. Upon their arrival at the
ciiut the man was found dead, although
"when left by the liveryman he had
•been breathing, but was seemingly* un
conscious. The body was taken into
«i#Xiansford and the coroner summoned.
Up to a late hour tonight it had not
been decided whether Mr. Silver died
,„,from a sudden attack of heart trouble
due to alcoholism or whether the un
?idue exposure at the time of this sud
xvden sickness caused his death. Mr.
.Silver but recently took this territory,
}'having replaced Mr. Davies, who died
from heart failure at Crary In thf sta
v /'tion but three'weeks ago. Silver has
lieen in Minot for some time since ac
V ^V-ceptlng the position and is weH known
among the traveling men.
A LADIES' BAND.
WWIWon S«ts Beauty and *h»Jerrt in
One Organization.
U Willlston. N. D„ March 11.—This city
'rif?4o have the distinction of having a
band composed entirely of ladies. There
are already two bands in the city and
Professor Onstad has succeeded in or
ganizing the ladies into a musical com
biUMliMlt
*N
4,
'ife of a Week Then Dis-
v-
RESULTED IN MANY FIRES UUSBANn WAS THE.WIM
appears
MRS. WAMBOUGH WHO MARRIED
MAN SHE FLEECED IN COLO
RADO, AGAIN DUPED "HUBBIE"
AND TAKES TO THE TALL AND
UNCUT.
Chicago, March 11.—Mrs. Sophia
Wambaugh, formerly Miss Flnlen of
Denver, who was married in cdurt last
Friday, after she had been arraigned
on a- charge of obtaining $3,000 from
her* prospective husbtjnd, William
Wambaugh, disappeared today after
obtaining more than $3,000 from her
husband. Wambaugh reported te the
police that he went to a department
stoi^e with, his wife to buy a pair of
trousers. While he was trying them
on in his room his wife departed with
$3,000 winch she induced him to give
her while she waited for him. Wam
baugh saii he had spent more than $6,
000 on his wife since he met her in
Denver a week ago. When the police
asked him why he gave her so much
he said: "Well, she wanted td buy a
hat." Wambaugh is a Colorado farmer.
Girl Sues Father.
Devils Lake, N. D„ March 11.—Mar
garet Regan, who recently had her
father, B. B. Regan arrested on a crim
inal charge, has brought suit against
him for $26,000.
STATE RESTED.
tnaanft/^Exoerta Take Stand in Bo
half of Weherg.
Grafton, N. D., March 11.—The state
in the case of Otto Weberg, who to be
ing tried for the murder of his sweet
heart, rested its case this morning
shortly after court convened.
The defense took up its side of the
case immediate^j ,.&nd the greater part
of the day was ^glve'n over to* the
testimony of experts on insanity. Dr.
Engstad of Grand Forks was the first
f\pert"to testify.
•FIRE IN A MINE
•WWJMWiyI»IP»Im•»••
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in
FARGOANS ARE INTERESTED IN
THE OWNERSHIP.
The Mine Caught Fire Ult July and
Has Been Burning Steadily Ever
Since—Fine Grads Lignite in the,
Klin*. ^,
Kenmare, N. D., March 11.—Much
concernment is being felt in regard to
the fire wVilch is raging in the coal
mine which is known as the Soo mine.
The fire originated in some unknown
way last July and has since spread
throughout several of the large entries.
Two entries iead into the mine, which,
together with the air sshaft. permits
considerable draught in the interior of
the mine and gives life to,the flames.
No one in particular has given the
matter any attention until now when
it is evident that unless the fire is soon
checked great damage will result.
In the immediate vicinity of this
mine is our best grade of lignite coal
and should the fire be undisturbed in'
its destructlveness these valuable veins
would eventually be consumed.
The properly was filed on by Jaa.
Vidal of Fargo, but Is now controlled
by by his wife, who Is being commun
icated with. If the matter does not re
ceive her immediate attention, local
parties who have property in that vi
cinity will make an effort to extinguish
the burning mass.
FEDERAL INSPECTION.
Government to Establish Grain In
spection Laboratory in Minneapolis.
Minneapolis, March 11.—A govern
ment laboratory for the testing and
standardization of: grain is to be es
tablished in, Minneapolis. This is in
line with the federal inspection project
which Senators Hansbrough and Mc
CutTtber
are working upon. Two such
laboratories are now in operation, one
in New York an.1 one in Baltimore.
The movers for the establishment of
another Jn Minneapolis hope by Its
work to show the advantages of feder
al control of inspect ion ^and grading
over the state control that now pre
vails.
Dispatches from Washington, say a
long conference was held SaturJay be
tween Senator IJansbrougli and Dr.
Galloway, Mr. Shanan and Mr. Wood
of the agricultural department on the
subject of. federal inspection and the
grading of grain, and it was decided
that laboratories should be establish
ed at Duluth, Minneapolis and St.
..
The foundation of the testimony by
which the prosecution in the Thaw
murder case hopes to discredit the
witnesses who swore that Thaw was
irrational on the night of the shooting
of Stanford White, will be laid with
the testimony of Anthony Debbs, a
policeman on the roof garden, who
saw the shots fired. A fireman vyjr-
GENERAL STRIKE
IS IN PRIffiSS
Former Metropolis.
Teheran, March U.-—As a protest
against extortion and reactionary
methods of the son and staff of the
governor general of Ispahan, Masud
Mirza Seill, ex-sultan, who Is the eld
est uhcle of the shah, a general strike
Is in full progress at Ispahan, the for
mer metropolis. The strike has led
to serious disorders during which many
were injured among the strikers, some
of whom hatfe sought refuge on the
premises of the British telegraph of
fipe. Urgent telegrams from inhabi
tants of Ispahan have reached the Per
sian parliament demanding a recall of
the governor-general and the .expulsion
of his family from the city.
PICTURES OF THAW TRIAL.
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W* THE FARGO FORUM
A N A I Y E U I A N
REPUBLICAN, ESTABLISHED SEfT. S, 1878. FABGO, NORTH DAKOTA,v MONDAY EVENING, MARCH 11, 1907. FORUM ESTABLISHED NOV. 17, 1891.
Jerome Lin.es Up His
Forces in Rebuttal
Efforts to Lay Foundation for Introduction of Affi
davit Signed by Evelyn Thaw Blocked
by Attorney Delmas.
New York, Mtfrch 11.—lining up his
forces in rebuttal in the case of Harry
K. Thaw, District Attorney Jerome be
gan today an endeavor to lay the foun
dation for the introduction of the affi
davit said to have been made by Eve
lyn Nesbit in the office of Abraham H.
Hummel. He was blocked at every
turn, however, by the objections from
Delmas, counsel for the defense, and
he soon switched to the testimony of
the policemen, who saw Thaw the
night of his arrest, and who declared
his actions .to them seemed to be those
of a rational man. Mr. Delmas asked
one of the officers if he had not over
heard Thaw in lils cell say he had
heard the voices of women crying out*.
The officer said thero had been no
such statement in his hearing.
4
aided in making the arrest and f* expert chemist, was called by Jerome
Sergeants McCarthy and McCanri**«Wh) to testify a* to the effect of drugs in
were in the station house when the the wine.
ISPAHAN THE SCENE OF SERIOUS
DISORDERS.
Inhabitants Protest Against Action of
Governor General's Family and Staff
and Want Them Expelled From the
Moving Picture Enterprise to Spring
Them on the Publio.
Des Moines, la., March 11.—This
City, expects soon to see the Thaw
trial in moving pictures. A dealer
here has received word that pictures
are being prepared and will »oon byj derlaid with gas and oil.
sent out all over the country. They
will show the entire tragic story from
the time Evelyn Nesbit was a, young
girl to the thrilling episodes in the
court room now. The Lubensture Co.
is getting up the pictures, and they
have secured models as nearly like
ihe reai actors in the tragedy as pos
sible.
DISCHARGED
UTTtt HOPE OF SAVIH6 THE
VESSEL* v
V
GrWtt ff&rlftfcfn Steanishfp %o'! .Paid
the Expenses of the Passengers—Of
ficers Smt the Crews to Important
Ports—-Captain Still With Ship.
Tofcoliatpa, March 11.—Th«r crew of
the wrecked steamer Dakota has been
discharged. The Europeans will be
sent to America on the American
steamer Tremont. The Asiatics will be
sent to Hong Kpng. The majority of
the passengers left here, will take the
steamer Siberia. Their hotel and oth
er expenses were paid by the Great
Northern Steamship Co., bwners of the
Dakota.
The- American consul has sent $150
to the governor of Chlbu for distribu
tion among the fishermen, who assist
ed in the rescue of the American pas
sengers.
No salvage measures have yet been
taken.
1
An official inquiry has been arranged,
steps having been taken for the pres
ervation of the evidence. Captain
Fraricke of the Dakota is still at the
scene of the wreck awaiting the de
the ua4erwjriter»i
prisoner was arraigned and who noted
his demeanor when he asked Reporter
McElhone If It was necessary that he
(Thaw) give his real name. McEl
hone will be summoned to rebut the
testimony of Martin Green, another re
porter, who testified that the manner
of the defendant Immediately after the
shooting was not rational. Following
these witnesses Drs. McDonald, Flint
and Mabon will probably take the
stand. The district attorney has. sev
eral other alienists whose names have
not yet been made public and they too
are expected to take the witness stand.
Frederick W. Longfellow was the
first witness called by District Attor
ney Jerome when the Thaw trial open
ed this morning. Longfellow formorly
was Thaw's attorney. Longfellow was
stopped from giving any definite tes
timony as to Ethel Thomas' suit on
the ground that he was acting as
•JThaw's counsel and his dealings with
him were confidential.
Polilce Captain Hodgins wa? the first
witness in the Thaw case this after
noon. He testified that on the night
of the tragedy Thaw seemed more ra
tional than irrational. He was not
cross-examined. Dr. Rudolph Withaus,
PREMIER WAS
niiurti
MINISTC* OF INTERIOR SHOT
AND KILLED AT SOFIA.
Was Walking in Garden III Company
"With Other Ministers When Attack­
ed by Unknown Man Who Fired
1 Three Shots, All Taking Effect.
Sofia, Bulgaria, March ll.—M. Pet
kofif, premier and minister of the in
terior, was assassinated here today. M.
Petkoff, with other ministers, was
walking in Boris garden when he was
attacked by an unknown man who
fired at him with a revolver. The
premier was wounded by three bullets
and died instantly. M. Gaumadteff,
the minister of commerce and agricul
ture, who was one of the ministers ac
companying M. Petkoff, was wounded
in the aiyn.
GAS AT DENBIGH*
Organization Formed to Dig, ftot Gas
and Oil.
Denbigh, N. D., March 11,—An or
ganisation has been formed for the
purpose of drilling for gas anft oil.
Several parties who formerly lived irf
the great oil fields of Pennslyvania,
claim that they are certain that this
section of the Mouse rive^ valley is un-
Their claims are not without some
foundation in this vicinity. Oil forms
on the water in the well on the John
Mortenson place five miles west of
Towner to such an extent at times that
the water can hardly be used.
If oil or gas is struck in paying
quantities it will be a great boom for
this section of the country.
ATTEMPT TO RUN
CARS WAS FUTILE
LOUISVILLE STRIKERS 8TONE
NON-UNION EMPLOYES.
Street Car C&mpany Attempted to ftun
Its Cars Today, But Were Compelled
to Run Their C*r« to the Barns by
the Striker*.
Louisville Ky., Marcjh, 11.—'The at
tempt of the street railway company to
run cars with non-union men this
morning, was only partially successful.
While no violence was reported thero
were numerous demonstrations. The
company usually runs 600 cars, but
only 100 were in service early today.
At Thirteenth an«l Main street two
cars bound to the city were stopped
by several hundred men on their way
to work, two conductors were forced
to return the fares to the passengers,
reverse the trolleys and take th? cars
back to the barns. At Fourth and
streets the strike sympathizers sur
rounded the car and stoned the mo
torman and conductor, injuring the
former, Edward Pierson, seriously The
police dispersed the crowd. At Fourth
and Hill streets, several cars were
Stopped and their airbrakes quickly
put out of commission. The crowd
threw some stones through the win
dows of one or two cars before the
police
II
Question of Amnesty Is
all Absorbing Topic
THE RADICALS ARE AT ODDS
PROTESTS SUBMITTED AGAINST
THE ELECTION OF THE ENTIRE
DEPUTATIONS FROM THE SEV
ERAL PROVINCES—EFFORTS TO
UN8EAT MEMBERS.
St "Petersburg, March 11 —The low
er house of parliament reassembled
this morning in sections for the exami
nation of credentials of the members.
Protests were submitted against the
election of the entire deputations from
Bessarabia, Poltava, Minsk, MohileiT,
Novgorod, Veronezh, Kazan, Kherson
and the city of Kishinev.
The conservatives challenged the
election of members from Kursk and
several other provinces, but with no
chance of unseating them.
The radical parties are hopelessly
at odds regarding the manner of rais
ing the question of amnesty.
The socialists persist in forcing it
Immediately to the front in the form
of an open declaration to the people,
which practically would be an appeal
for revolution. The caucus of the so
cial revolutionists and members of the
peasant league last night rejected this
as well as the proposition to make an
appeal or demand to the emperor on
the subject, and It was decided to in
troduce a regular bill providing am
nesty for political prisoners. This un
doubtedly is* unconstitutional and
hence unacceptable to the constitu
tional democrats, who are- anxious to
observe the forms of legality.
ESCAPES AS8ASSINATION.
Crimean Colonel Slightly Wounded—
Would-be Assassin Suicides.
Yalta, Crimea, Match 11.—Colonel
Dumbadze, commandant of the garri
spn here, was slightly wounded and his
adjutant and his coachman were ser
iously injured today by a bomb thrown
at the colonel's carriage from an upper
window in a house on th» street
through which he was driving. The
man who threw the bomb committed
suicide in order to avoid ear*tiUP®.
LOit HATE
ROADS OPERATING IN NEBRASKA
TO CONTEST LAW.
.The 2-Cent Rate Law Which I* Effec
tive Now, Is to Be Tested in the Ne
braska Courts by the Railroads as
to Its Validity.
Omaha, March 11.—It is authorita
tively stated in a private report of offi
cial character from Chicago, that the
railroads of Nebraska will contest the
2-cent fare law whicl^ the legislature
enacted a week ago, and the governor
signed last Wednesday at midnight,
placing it in effect at once. The roads
are now preparing to carry the case
tQ the courts and there make a vigor
ous contest to determine the validity
of the new law. -j
When the law was enacted ll carried
an emergency clause which provided
for Its operation upon its being signed
by the governor or within fiVe days
without his signature. The governor,
George L. Sheldon, though elected by
the republicans upon a so-called anti
railroad platform last fall, on the
stump during the campaign advocated
a graduated scale of fares, rather than
a flat 2-cent law, believing the latter
would be confiscatory in many cases of
small or branch roads. So when the
legislature passed the bill providing for
a flat 2-cent rate, Governor Sheldon
hesitated to sign the bill, thinking
to be consistent with his pre-election
course. But when he considered that
without his signature the law might
be unconstitutional owing to. the word
ing of the emergency clause, he de
cided to sign it rather than place him
self In the way of what the majority of
the legislature had
measure.
deemed 4- wise
POSTAL CARD OROSft.
bards Issued by Government Cannot
Be Written on Face.
Washington, March 11.—The infor
mation given a few days ago that
the face of postal cards can be written
upon was erroneous. All postals are
printed by the government, ajnd by no
one else, and on the face of such
postal cards will be found the* follow
ing: "The space above IB reserved for
postmark." "Postal Card." "The space
below is for address only." The pub
lication referred to should have men
tioned only "post cards." which can
be printed by anyone so long as they
conform to the requirements, and can
writtea boUi aids*.
k
•Iritis
ISSUE
12 PAGES
IS
r-
Resolution Sets Stalwarts
Right on Record
THE CLERK U1KL QUESTION
MAJOR BUTTZ' RESOLUTION
BLOCKS EFFORT8 OF INSUR
GENTS AND DEMOCRATS TO
MAKE CAMPAIGN MATERIAL OP
ALLEGED OVER-PAY OP CLERKS
Bismarck, N. D., March 11.—Indig
nant over the special message of Gov
ernor Burke to the legislature, charg
ing unwarranted expenditures for clerk
hire, Representative Buttz of Ransom
county prepared a resolution to place
on the records of the house, but it was
denied publicity on motion of a stal
wart member who had been promised
Insurgent endorsement for a position
as assistant attorney general, accord
ing to the major.
The law provides that the paf roll
for the members of the legislature and
the clerks shall be audited by the gov
ernor, the state auditor and the at
torney general. Major Buttz alleged
that the governor failed to consult the
other two members of the board and
personally gave his o. k. to the bills
at the twentieth and fortieth day, and
when toward the last of the session,
he discovered hia error, the special
message was sent.
The effect of the special message
was to place the blame for the over
pay on the republican members of the
legislature instead of on the governor,
where it really belonged.
If there were too many employes In
the lower hou«c, Major Butt/, -feels
that the insurgetit members and demo
crats are to blame, as they organised
and controlled the hou^e.
The object of his resolution was to
place the blame where it belonged and
to show the people of the state that
the "stalwarts" were not responsible.
He does not propose to have the In
surgents and democrats frame up any
campaign thunder in that way. The
resolution was as followTs:
Whereas, this has been the reform
house of the Tenth legislative assem
bly, and w
Whereas, it is quite well known (ftt
(Continued on Page S|g»}
fiMrftnt
DAS ARMED
CHARGED WITH MAINTAINING A
PUBLIC NUISANCE.
Sensation Sprung When Alderman E.
G. Patterson Was Arrested on Com­
plaint of Dining Room Girls—Said
He Sold Liquor.
Bismarck, March 11.—A mild sensa*
tlon was caused by the arrest of Ald
erman E. G. Patterson on the charge
of maintainnig a public nuisance In
the Northwest hotel. A search warrant
was issued, but no liquors were found
The hearing will be held before (fudge
Gilbert today, Mr. Patterson being re
leased on his own recognizance. An
injunction was placed upon part of the
hotel.
The complaint was sworn out by
three dining room girls of the North
west hotel, who claim to have suffi
cient evidence to convict. The date of
the offense Is set as last Friday. The
girls have furnished the state's attor
ney with the names of a number, of
people who, they claim, will make good
witnesses for their contention, and In
certain quarters considerable uneasi
ness* is felt.
Inasmuch as the best of feeling does
not exist between the state's attor
ney and Mr. Patterson, the former re
quested Governor Burke to have the
attorney general assist in prosecuting
the case, and Assistant Attorney Gen
eral Andtew Miller was requested by
the governor to assist State's Attorney
Patterson, which he is doing.
In Justice Pierce's court the three
girls, in the name of one of their num
ber, to whom they have assigned their
accounts, have begun suit to recover
$141 alleged to be due for wages.
The fact that Mr. Patterson has juat
announced his candidacy for mayor
lends chic to the case ajnd it Is prob
able there will be plenty of develop
meats to make It Interesting.
WOLVES AND COYOTE8.
South Dakotana Alarmed by Large
Number of Animals.
Wesuington, 8. D., March 11.—Timid
residents of this place, especially the
women and girls, have b^en greatly
alarmed by the appearance in thia
immediate vicinity of a number of
wolves and coyotes, which, to Judgo
by the volume of the "concerts" which
they give In the outskirts of lownteach
night, number into the hundreds. Thty
fear is expressed that the wolves may
become bold enough to raid the town
some dark night and attack the num
berless dogs that "swarm the streets,"
us one ^utboxii^'
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