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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, August 31, 1908, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1908-08-31/ed-1/seq-4/

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The Fargo Forum
And Dally Hepubll
THE FORUM PRINTING CO.
Itatered at poetoffioe a* second elate matter
VOLUME XXXI, NO. 247.
Forum and Republican la
evenfnj except Sunday Id
First Avenue
Tbe Fargo
»nbllshe4 every
nil
rgo,
the Loral Knight* Temple
North. Fargo. N
Subscription The Fargo Forum and
Dailiv Republican, br carrier, 15c per week,
40c per month. In adtance. $5 per rear,
fhe Fnr*o Forum and Weekly Republican,
per r»8r The P"»rf?o Fnrum i»nd Katur-
U»*l
Or 4
Republlcsin, $2 per year. Rlnjrle copies
Subscriber* will find the date to which
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le* on their address slips.
Add reed nil rommunlratloBa t» The
Forum. Fargo. N. D.
MONDAY. AUGUST 81, 1*0*.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF CASS COUNTY
FORUM TELEPHONE CALLS.
Night and Noon Cells.
fbrutn Switch Booed f696
Business Office ...f695
Composing Room 1596
Idltorlal Room .1697
Looal Reportora and Room. .1697
TIME CARD.
On effect Aug. 9. W0i.
Trains ArrlvO.
K. P'—From east, 5:22 p. m- 5:50 a. m..
7:16 a. m.. 8:10 p. m. and 10:M a. m.
H. P.—From west. 6:52 a. m., 1:50 a.
a., 7:46 p. m., 11:21 p. TO.
H. P.—Cesselton branch—6:00 p. nv
p. A S. W.— From west. 7 p. m.
CL, & St. P.—From south, 11:10 a.
m. and 6 p. m.
O. N.—From east, 5: IS a. 1:6$ p. m.,
8:10 tn. 5:40 p. m.
G. N.—From weat, «:4S a. «!., 10:Sf p.
m
0. N.—Arrtves from Aneta, t:10 p. m.
#. K.—From Grand Forks, 10:60 a. m.
tt, N—Moorhead Northern, 10:10 p. m.
Trains Depart,
W. P.—Going ea»t. 7:OS. 4:00 a. m. and
J: 40, 11 31 and 4:50 p. m.
K- P.—Cf^ing west, R:55, 8 a. m. 6:30
p. m., 5:40 p.
Kf. P.—Caeselton branch, 8: SO a. m.
f. A s. W.—Going west, 8*50 a. m.
©. M. ft St. P.—Going aouth. 7 a. m.
and 8 p. m.
#, N.—Going east, «:46 a. m., 7:46 a.
m., 8:30 a. m. 10:85 p. m.
G. N.—Going west, 5:15 a. m. fcnd 6:58
p. m.
Moorhead Northern—Doparts I:
m.
It a.
& N.—-To Aneta, departs 8 a at
4k N.—To Grand Fork* 8:80 p. a.
GET THE VOTERS OUT.
The republican leaders feel abMtl
ttte confidence in defeating Bryan—
It the voters can be gotten out. They
fear more than all things else—the
agMithetic feeling that Strikes voters
at some presidential elections and ren
ders them absolutely indifferent to re
sults.
That will be one of the problems
Hi North Dakota, not only on the
presidential but on the state ticket.
No sane man doubts but that there
are more republicans than democrats
la North Dakota. The primary elec
tion law necessitated a bitter contest
ttt June. There were factional differ
ences and personal pledges to such a
high degree that •. large vote was got
ten out. Many voters feel they did
&eir duty then and are displaying
ladifference over^the election this fall.
The leaders have their wOrk cut out
for them in this state. The voters
must be aroused sufficiently to cast a
ballot somewhat near that polled at
tile primary election. If the proper
amount of enthusiasm can be created
the vote will be a large one and every
man on the republican ticket will have
a rousing majority.
The democrats—for the first time in
years, have a campaign fund—and
they are going to spend It in North
Dakota. The presence here of W. J.
Sryan tomorrow is a big stimulus for
the followers of the Nebraskan. His
addresses in this state will Incite
greater effort and the republicans
Hiust work correspondingly hard to
offset this democratic activity.
THE FARMER'S WORK.
The prosperity of the farmer la be
coming amazing. It marks hirh for at
tention. No longer is his prosperity
the theme and interest merely of the
politician and the statistician, it has
seized and held the attention of his
city neighbors. They who used to
laugh at the farmer now envy him.
The old farm has undergone a meta
morphosis. It is no longer a sorry
huddle If buildings on a stretch of
atubborn soil it is a country "place"
of broad, fat acres and buildings, elec
tric lighted from top to bottom. It is
no more a mortgage hole wherein the
toller must sink his money, but a
splendid freehold piling up money in
the farmer's bank.
The farmer, too, has undergone a
Change. He no longer wears chin
whiskers and chews on a Straw. He
has forgotten how to stuff his troueers
Into cowhide bootlegs. He is more
frequently to be seen In ah automobile
It the horse show than following the
plow he deals more in city real es
tate or the stock market than h« doee
in guanos fOr the south meadow lot.
The fact is, the farmer seems to
lead the l#ippiest and most leisuroly
•f lives. Those harried, Overworked
Hity men who visit him In his native
telds are constantly amazed. When
••es the farmer do his work? They
fcsk themselves and him the Question
frnow when he does it-yet the work 'Ing
ip don«, and the fields yield up their
harvest.
The truth is, most careful observa
tion leads to the conclusion that the
farmer is seldom on the farm. In the
i
V i i
The answer Is that the new farmer
has loft off being a laborer, and be
come a man of science. He works no
more with his hands, but with his
head. He is seldom in the field*, be
cause his presence Is seldom needed
there. Farming on scientific methods
consists chiefly in preparing the soil
for the seed, and then letting nature
do the rest. Nature and machinery
do more and better work than the old
time farmer could with all his eight
een-hour day and hla eternal round
of toil.
The result 1s that the farmer is rap
idly becoming the backbone of the
leisure clasB." Out of him may yet
arise a new American aristocracy,
which toils hot, nor yet spins, but
which partakes of the Increase of th«»
earth. It is little wonder that the
leisurely farmer with his fattening
barns and swelling bank account has
become the envy of his hard-working,
toil-driven city neighbors.
ft)G PROHIBITION VOffc
The prohibition party is the tongest
lived of the minor national political
organisations. Since '72 there hav%,
been candidates at each presidential
election. The first got only 6.600
votes. There were great gains fn "84,
and the biggest loss was suffered in
1890. The party has not since at
tracted the voters that it did in the
"80s. This year the cold water people
have a more aggressive nominee. He
is making a strenuous campaign and
the cold water people anticipate that
he will poll a larger vote than at any
time since the organization of the
party. This view seems the logical
one from the wide-spread prohibition
movement that has swept over many
states during the last three years.
They will be further aided by the un
settled condition of national party
politics.
Oysters are ripe tomorrow.
er The dfrectoire gown struck Far
go—and then the hail.
or Corn has grown so high tfk Kan
sas It will be hard to husk.
or If the council sessions get much
warmer a larger hall will be necessary.
tar The men who shave themselves
welcome the 200-page campaign books.
W Some people advocate naming
airships Time or Money—and believe
they would fly.
The husbands are rejoicing that
waists which button In the back are
going out of style.
tlf Make a criticism of 4 democrat
and get a whining protest from The
Grand Forks Herald.
car Lincoln's letter of ucceptance
contained 134 words—but Taft and
Bryan evidently forgot the number.
IOTA Taft marching club shows its
conflde|bce by securing accommoda
tions in Washington for the fun March
4.
OF A £fcf*ftde'Hphia« who drank fif
teen quarts of milk a day became In
sane. He should have tried the water
wagon.
(tar He that diligently seeketh good
procureth favor but he that seeketh
mischief. It shall come unto him.—
Proverbs sfl, 87.
Of Some of the people who had been
kicking about having the southside
sewers flooded—feel .better after the
deluge Saturday.
OF The editors of the papers in
Springfield may be expected to be
mild in their comments oa a lyaoblng
party in the far south.
«TThr? meteor that struck Sagamore
Hill must have blushed for its im
pertinence—when it found out what
precincts it had Invaded.
Kf If the ideas of the beef trust
could be applied to airships—they
would be a success. The trust believes
in things going up—and staying up.
tiar it is said that Bryan has organ
ized Pullman car porters to work in
behalf of his campaign fund. They
should certainly be able to gat the
coin.
MT The Mends of the Hains brothers
are busily at work, following the Thaw
precedent, blackening the character of
Annis, who cannot say a word in his
own defense. There has been a little
too much of that particular game.
A complete line of high school twoks
at McClane'e art store.
UVTRMORE'S REIGN OVKR.
Abandons Attempt to Make Himself
King of Cotton Market.
New Tork, Aug. 31.—Jesse Liver-
v,^ core's attempt to make himself the
sney pry upon him, and take note of king of the cotton market was aban
%is movements. In vain. They never! dined bedftnitely yesterday when the
«ce the farmer do his work they never Pric®
of thfl
J:
.•Hi »i( II||IMM
hitched to a light runabout that take*
titm Into town, in the afternoon, aays
an exchango, hla cap or coacti carries
him over to the fanners* picnic. In the
evening he la at the operahoase or
the clufc, or perhaps at the bridge
party over on the next farm. One
thing is certain, he fa never In the
fields. Search them through from
Maine to the Carolinaa, and out in
Kansas' cornfields, and you will sel
dom find a single human figure tolling
in the fields. Of course, somebody
must put the crops In and somebody
must gamer them, but when and how?
August option went crash-
,3"5°
a
,(horning he has his spanking bays: that the campaign Is ended.
,.v,
ba,e- ,ira*«lns
•1-^
other
a bale.
°P
tions down a dollar or more.
Livermore is said to have lost fully
$2,000,000 of the profits he had piled
up in hir remarkable campaign.
The young man preserves absolute
silence and his bankers refuse to dis
cuss his affairs, but there evidence
K
North Dakota Kernels
Wahlt couttty has *,T6t achool ehll
dren.
Colonel Hager of The St. Thomas
Times—who presumes to be a dictator
Of newspaper "fairness"—has been in
North Dakota a quarter of a century
and Is glad of it. Grant is a fine fel
low and has a voice that is the envy
of his friends and the terror of his
enemies.
Crosby t# to have a baseballfeat.
Gum tow is the name of a new land
lord at Nooaan.
The editor of The Oakes Journal
has some caustic comments on the re
cent shooting near there by a negro--*
and doesn't eeom to like a Snigger, no
how."
TCvery small boy with a muzzle
loading musket is preparing to kill a
few hundred prairie chickens.
As a result of the exposures at
Blaisdell—one man has been arrested
for violating the prohilbtion law and
another is said to be missing.
The News says Carpie la to have a
creamery.
Many newspapers that run the state
and county tickets ignore the candi
date for district judge.
White Earth is to ha*i A steel cell
for the city jail.
The News wants things
at Fessenden.
Crete is getting to be an Important
grain shipping point.
The Prairie Press rejoices that The
Havana Record has hoisted the demo
cratic ticket.
Four of the speakers of the Rich
land county fair will be Burke, Mar
shall, M. N. Johnson and McCumber.
$
If the price of wheat is maintained—
flour will be in airship prices.
4
North Dakotans are not clamoring
for bleached flour. The natural color
pleases the people of this state.
A petition has been circulated at
Brlnsmade for the appointment of a
night watch.
At Valley City the banner announc
ing the fact that Prohibition Candi
date Chafln would speak there—was
appropriately carried around town on
the water wagon.
The Jamestown Capital eafe't a*it the
necessity for a third dally at Valley
City.
Chafln, the prohibition candidate for
the presidency, is an old college chum
of Counsel Bunn of the N. P., and is
going to investigate through him his
alleged discourteous treatment through
Superintendent Burt at Jamestown.
$ S
Mlnot is the rendezvous for a num
ber of pugs. Whitehead, the nigger
scrabbler, who was chased out of
Fargo, is one of them
There has been a ruthless slaughter
of ducks at Rico Lake, Ward county,
according to The Mi not Independent.
The Minot Independent kicks be
cause The Grand Forks Herald doesn't
credit items. Colcord shouldn't kick.
After he has published an item it's
public property—unless copyrighted.
$•
F. C. Young ran The Blaisdell Bul
letin for Editor Smith of The Plaza
Pioneer. Young wrote an article that
Smith didn't like and was fired. The
iron entered Young's cardiac region
and he has purchased the opposition
paper at Plaza and proposes to make
Smith go—some.
The Minot papers are' ta|VfKtgr a lot
Of fun out of Biekford. the republican
nominee for state treasurer, who was
convicted of illegal ^hooting of game.
$•$*
Minot has hung up $2,500 worth of
premiums for its harvest festival—
Sept. 2i-2».
As a matter of precaution people
Should keep their doors locked at night
and otherwise guard against theft and
fcurglary, especially at this time of
the year, when many men of disrepu
table and criminal classes Invade the
state. Cases of assault, burglary and
hold-up are frequent throughout the
autumn, and small towns, with little
police regulation, should have the in
dividual protection, as much as pos
sible, of Its citizens.
&<*«
The Editor of The Prairie Press is
evidently not familiar with the kind
of water that flows in the Red and the
Mouse rivers, If he knew that it
would resiBt the attacks of a pickax,
resist the effects of dynamite and
things like that--he wouldn't be sur
prise.' an autc
T^F
cleaned
TH* FABGO RCKUM MTD BTA1LT TETPTTBTJCAH, MONDAY EVEKT5J0, XTJGTTST «. IMS,
up
The American reports three divorce
suits filed at Lakota.
The Bottineau Courant objects to
the accounts of the county central
committee that some of the Bottineau
county papers published.
The Bantry Advocate is long on
sports.
Editor Parries of The Courtenay
Gazette says that the "voters of the
state have decided that Tom Marshall
is the man who ought to succeed Sen
ator Hansbrough." Farries must be
suffering from the heat—or he thinks
other people are nutty. The voters
appear to have left the matter as be
tween—Marshall and Johnson.^
The efforts of Commissioner of Ag
riculture Gllbreath to Increase the
interest In winter wheat will undoubt
edly get good results.
Some papers think there is nothing
to this campaign but the senatorial
contest as the republican state ticket
will be elected beyond question?^
S $• •$
The home grown divorce crop in
North Dakota shows no sign of being
affected by the rust.
Governor Bnrke, C. A. Johnson, the
republican nominees for governor, and
President Worst 'of the A. C- will be
the speakers at the next market day
at Bismarck.
The time is about ripe
ing accidents.
Mother of
for
the hunt­
«£$
The democratic Devils Lake Journal
eagerly reproduced The Grand Forks
Herald's "knock" on National Com
mitteeman Kennedy and Senator Me
Cumber for visiting Taft.
S $
Ir Marshall puts up the money for
the purchase of The Devils I^aks Inter
Ocean—and has Col. Grant Hager
running the publication for him—
there should be something doing.
V
A
V
Lost Track of Baughter.
Buelah wis one of eight children,
all living, including ner twin sister,
Duela. For upwards of two years Mrs
Cox had been in compete ignorance
of Buelah's whereabouts, until a short
time ago, when Buelah managed to
post a letter, unknown to Mrs. Wright,
to her mother, who was still of the
opinion that they were in Indiana.
According to the story told by Mrs
COx, after securing possession of Bue
lah while at Wabash, Mrs. Wrtght re
moved to LoganspOrt, Ind., where she
opened a restaurant. Later she gave
up the restaurant and for a short
time ran a rooming house, but her
knowledge of this part of her daugh
ter's life is very vague. While Mrs.
Wright was still running the restaur
ant, Mrs. Cox learned of the serious
illness of Buelah and immediately
went to Logansport to see her daugh
ter. Buelah wos better and Mrs.
Weight was all packed up ready to
move, but stated that their future
plans were indefinite. At that time
she refused to allow Buelah to return
to Wabash for a few days' visit with
her mother, but stated that they
would both be there in a short time.
Mrs. Cox never paw Buelah again.
Before leaving home Mrs. Cox ob
tained a large number of affidavits
from various persons who were ac
quainted with Mrs. Wright and her
daughter, and who. in their affidavits,
claim that while Mrs. Wright treated
Buelah with consideration in public,
privately she abused her severely. So
much so, in fact, that at one time, at
least, complaint was made to the au
thorities and Mrs. Wright promised to
do better by the child. It was shortly
after this that the two left Logans
port and came to Lakota.
Her Record in Indiana.
The Tribune, of Logan«port, Ind.
published on Friday morning, Aug. 21,
the following highly interesting ac
count of the life of Mrs. Mary Wright
who Is charged with the death of her
adopted daughter, Buelah Wright, at
the King farm near Derrick over two
weeks ago. The article from The Tri
bune is published simply as a piece
of news and for the purpose of show
ing the standing of Mrs. Wright in
the community where she resided be
fore coming to Lakota. There is much
in the article that is not to her credit
and also some things which ml?ht
possibly require an explanation. The
article reads as follows:
The story In The Tribune Thursday
morning, telling of the alleged mur
der of Buelah Wright, adopted daugh
ter of Mrs. Mary Wright, created in
tense interest In this city and from
present indications Mrs. Wright has
a history which may rival that of Mrs.
Gunness, of LaPorte. The story of
yenterday morning caused speculation
regarding the death of George Welch,
who lived with Mrs. Wright at her
boarding house on Seventh street at
the time he died.
That Mrs. Wright profited by keep
ing Welch to the extent of several
hundred dollars, during hi* life, and
7
4
MISS ELSIE HERBERT, WITH A KNIGHT FOR A DAY CO.
S. COX WILL
INVESTIGATE
"Babe"
Wright Is
Heartbroken
Lakota, N. D., Aug. 81.—Mrs. Mary
A. Cox, mother of the girl known as
Beulah or "Babe" Wright, has arrived
in Lakota from her home at Wabash,
Ind. Interest in regard to the myster
ious death of Beulah Wright is still
iLB keen as the day it was first rumor
ed that her death was not due to nat
ural causes. In the meantime Mrs.
Wright ^remains in the Ramsey county
jail awaiting her preliminary hearing
on Monday next on the charge of hav
ing killed her adopted daughter.
Mrs. Cox made the long trip from
Indiana, although she could ill afford
the expense, determined to see that
justice is done her daughter. She is
accompanied by a lifelong friend, Mrs.
Elsie Clevenger, and since her arrival
the ladies have been guests at the Ho
tel Grace. Mrs. Cox is heartbroken
over the death of her daughter, and
her story of the child is in marked
contradiction of that told by Mrs.
Wright. Through a stress of unfor
tunate circumstances over which she
had no control, and despite her deep
est protests, the child, Buelah, was
bound out to Mrs. Wright until she
was 16 years of age. Buelah was 16
on her last birthday, April 30, but was
not at 'that time released by Mrs.
Wright. As far as Is known the adopt
ed mother had led the child to believe
that she would have to be 18 years
of age before she could leave Mrs
Wright
then got a small life insurance policy
which was made noyable io her after jing any but the genuine.
Jjis death, now seems certain. Wheth- ^selman.
BET
v
tfy? V
i e
.'
§#5
jgglg
er she hastened his death is a matter
which cannot be determined. The
death report as returned by Dr. B. D.
Bradford said that he thoroughly be
lieved, however, that the man's death,
from softening of the brain, was has
tened by neglect and Improper nour
ishment, while remaining at the home
of Mrs. Wright.
During the man's illness he told
the doctor that Mrs. Wright was pois
oning him. Whether this was true or
hot the doctor was Unable to tell at
the time, but he said that it could
have been possible for the woman to
have administered a "slow poison" In
small doses, which would have Weak
ened the man and hastened his death.
Welch Was Shadowed.
The fact that no matter where Welch
went during his last few months of
life, either Mrs. Wright or the adopt
ed daughter accompanied him, lends
credence to this theory and the fact
that the girl knew too much about the
affairs of the death of Welch may
have been an incentive for the murder.
Welch frequently said, according to
Dr. Bradfleld's statement, that Mrs.
Wright had gotten $1,000 or $1,500
of his money. Dr. Bradfleld said that
he did not think much about the state
ment at the time, but later grew sus
picious. He said whenever Welch
came to his office he said the girl
would follow. Friends of the man
claim that the deceased at one time
was worth $4,000 or $5,000. but he
had nothing at the time of his death.
His hospital bill about a year before
his death and part of the doctor bltt
was paid, according to Dr. Bradfleld,
by money orders being sent him by
his nephew or brother.
Although Mrs. Wright was paid
$100 on an Insurance policy by the
Prudential Life Insurance Co., the wo
man refused to pay the doctor. When
an attempt was made to collect the
money from the insurance company
she retained an attorney and got the
money, still refusing to pay the doc
tor. When suit was threatened she left
the city.
Although Dr. Bradfleld said he wis
under the Impression that there were
two insurance policies on the man,
one payable to the woman and one to
the girl, records of but one could be
found at the local Insurance office.
Shortly before the man's death his
brother from Winamac came here and
wanted to. move him to the hospital
At the time, however, the deceased
was unconscious and nearly dead, so
the brother informed him that it was
too late. He never regained conscious
ness and therefore could not tell of
the incidents leading up to his death.
•About a year before his death the
old man suffered from a stroke of
paralysis while at the park. At the
time it was thought that he fell from
a street car, but it was found later
that he had been stricken with par
alysis. He was taken to the hospital
then, but after getting better went to
live with Mrs. Wright.
After going to the h6me of Mrs.
Wright the man began to grow iJveak.
He was hardly ever permitted to get
out of the woman's or girl's sight, it is
claimed, from that time on. No matter
where he would go the girl went with
him. While at the restaurant the old
man worked at many things, Wways
appearing to be busy.
Where Is the Boy?
Mrs. Wright lived in this city prev
ious to the time she kept a restaurant
here. When she was first here she
was a dressmaker. She had a small
boy with her then, about 1 year of age.
This boy was supposed to be her son
but when she returned again he was
not with her. She had the girl then,
having come from Wabash. What be
came of the son is not known.
Child Wrote to Mother.
The girl's mother at Wabash re
ceived a letter from the child several
weeks ago in which she said that she
and her foster mother did not get
along well together. She said that
Mrs. Wright talked about the child's
real mother and they quarreled as a
result. The girl said Mrs. Wright had
forbidden her to write to her real
mother. Mrs. Cox is confident that
fhe girl was murdered for the insur
ance money.
Dr. Noland and other physicians
state that although Welch's remains
have long laid in the ground it would
probably be easy to ascertain whether
he died of arsenical poisoning, as the
poison would act as a preservative to
the stomach and would likely still be
discoverable.
As yet there Is no demand for the
exhumation of Welch's body, but cir
cumstances may develop that will
cause that to be done.
Millions of bottles of Foley's Honey
and Tar have been sold without any
person ever having experienced any
other than beneficial resuulta from its
use for coughs, colds and lung trouble.
This Is because the genuine Foley's
Honey and Tar in the yellow package
rontains no opiates or other harmful
djugs. Guard your health hy refus-
11
&
•5 U
'If
$
I
V*
1
mm-V** ££v''
t, I?*-
The Theatres
Fargo Operahouae.
Aug. 31.—Cat and the Fiddl#.
Sept. 6.—A Knight for a Day.
Sept. 7.—Coming Thro' "the ftya.
Sept. 10.—The Flaming Arrow.
The Cat and the Fiddle, the new
musical extravanganaa is underlined
at the Fargo operahouse this evening.
The big song hits which are so whist
lv and airy aire Lota from South Da
kota, Rosy Dreams, Modestlng Re
trains Ms From Adding Any More,
The Date Tree, The Mermaids, I Wish
I Were a Sailor, Won't fw Take a
Ride With Me.
.IK',",
To mark the formal opening oif 'the
theatrical season of 1908-1908 with
worthy elat, Manager Walker has se
cured what has been declared to be
the most successful musical comedy
I g:ven to the stage, during the past
two years, A Knight For a Day. This
work, which is by E. B. Smith and
Raymond Hubbel, will be disclosed for
the first time in Fargo at the Fargo
operahouse on Next 'Saturday even
u*g.
At the Grand.
The great Svingall, hypnotist and
aster of telepathy, In a mystifying
id sensational act, will be the head
ier at the Grand this week. Assisted
Mme. Svingall and company he
ves a wonderful show'. His work of
ind reading Is remarkable, complete
bewildering and interesting. The
dividual* of the class he hypnotizes
sfore the audience are made to do
„.unts that better the best comedy In
their fun-provoking power. The whole
act Is one of fascinating Interest. Dur
ing the week Svingali will do various
sensational things which will prove
his claim to being possessed of un
usual mystifj-lng power.
Mark and Bertha Monroe will he
seen in a roaring comedy, The Beauty
Doctor. This sketch Is a "screafn"
from beginning to end.
Leo St. Elmo, The Musical German,
will be a feature of the. new bill which
will add much fun and amusement.
There will be the usual illustrated
sonfra and motion picture sho^M
At the Bijou.
The Bijou reopens this evening after
a dark house for a month. The popu
lar playhouse has been enlarged, made
more comfortable and convenient,
more exits have been added and every
cary is taken for the safety of the
patrons. Noel A Thomas. European
novelty entertainers, will All a special
engagement for singing and dancing.
The motion pictures will be the latest
and best obtainable. Harry Pf. Suters
will do th*» ballad singing.
If you are a sufTerer from piles, Man
Zan Pile Remedy will bring relief with
the first application. Guaranteed.
Price 60c. Sold by McDonald Drag.
Co.
REPUBLICAN TICKET.
NATIONAL.
For President—
WILLIAM H. TAFT, Oil*
tor Vice President—
JAMES 8. SHERMAN, M»W Yerk.
For Presidential Elector*—
OLAK HAGKN. Kitiiisejr county.
HERMAN SCHEKK, WEI la coaaty.
NICHOLS, Morton county.
ANTON SANSON, Benson coaaty.
CONGRESSIONAL.
D. 8. Senatorial Candidate*
tVote for oaei
M. N. JOHNSON.
T. F. MARSHALL.
U. 8. Representatives—
A. J. GRONNA, Nelson.
h, B. HANNA. Case.
STATS.
°C*lA*,J0ltN8ON, Ward.
Lieutenant Governor—
R.
8.
LEWIS, Cass.
Supreme Court Justice—
B. F. SPALDING, GaiR,
Secretary of State—
ALFRED BLAISDELL, WaML
Auditor—
D. K. BRIGHTBILL, Towa«r.
Treasurer—
G. L. BICKFORD, Ward.
Superintendent Public InatrncttHfei»
W. L. STOCK WELL. Walah"
Attorney General—
ANDREW MILLER, Burleigh.
Insurance Commissioner—
E. C. COOPER, Grand Forks.
Oomroiasloner of Agriculture—
W. C. GILBREATH. Morton.
Railroad Commissioners—
:aiirQa
O. P, N. ANDERSON, Ramsey.
W. k. MANN, Mortos.
#. H. STUTSMAN. tfertoa.
JUDICIAL.
C. A. POLLOCK.
District Jud£e-
LEGISLATIVt.
Ninth district.
Senator—
AS. KENNEDY.
Representatives—
THOS. BAKER, fjl.
F. E. DIBLEY.
W. J. PRICE.
Tenth
district
Reprtsentatlvps
B. AKKESON.
A. A. PLATH.
Eleventh district.
Senator—
F. 8. TALCOTT.
Representatives— •.
J. F. COLLINS. .,
A. L. PEART.
coulrhv
Tf
BOYLB.
Auditor
A. O. LBWIS..J
Treasurer—
H. A. McCONVILLE.
Clerk of Court
E. C. GEAREY, JR.
fc* I V S
Register of Deeds
AN*
NGU8 FRA8VB.
C°IlBBRT
Justices—
H. F. MILLER.
A WALKER!,
OHILSON.
F. FNIGBT.
CohStaWes
J. ROSS.
JOTtv MORGAN.
H. H. Cas-
wvr* AfWrauw W*
I.
VU
v
*f.\ A V
.-.v -v
V^::.
,,v.- 'x vc *'.. 7v I J*
1
do the ffuttin*. If i
yon arc sure to get
workmanship. Call
New Fall Pattern*.
H'-
s
S
i
W. SKBr-SBlf,'
Superintendent of Schools*,.
J. W. RILEY.,
Surveyor—
U i 5,
SAMUBL *. C*ABBlk
bile Administrate*—
NRY KROGU.
County Commiscion
HENRY HEATM
v ,»W,
er,
County Commissioner, Fifth district—
W KELLX.
A. T! WOOD.
«ptf«iUNb'''w'
11 11
-—T'-' •..
&
SI
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
0r. P. B. B«n. r»r. J. L. Qravea
Dr. John R. Crowfc
DBMTISTS ..
8 to I First Nat'l. Bank Wfc.
Telephone 363-L
DR. H. L. STARLING, DENTIST
Office: Room 5, deLendrecie Block
Comer front and Seventh Street
South, Farsro, N,
Stern Block
Porfcerfleld
GREEN
BROADWAY
DR. J. E, FRENETTE
DENTIST
Eatrane* Mr
Broadway
Office over Bijou
Drs. F, H. Bailey & Kachelmacher
SPECIALISTS
EYE, SAB. NOSE AND THROAT
Fario, North Dakota.
0.
F.
Aadcrton, M.
D.
V.
VETERINARIAN
Graduate of McKillip Veterinary Col
lege, Chicago, III. Calls promptly at
tended to day or night. Call at Peter
son's Livery barn, op. Masonic Temple.
Fargo, N. D. Phone 802
Money on hand to Loan i
Improved Fargo City Property 1
Reduced Rates
Fargo Building Association
Room 4, Fargo National Bank Bnilding
EUROPEAN HOTEL
C. E. HALBERT, Prop.
Meal Tleketa, 21 Meala, $I.M
GOOD STEAM HEATED BOOMS
THE FARGO NAT'L BANK
FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA
i
President, Martin Hector
Vice President, O. J. de LeadrSeii
Cashier, G. E. Nichols|
United States Depository
PECIALISt
When ydu vrant yonr watch repaired'
you do not gotot 1*„1.
a day of specialists and the jack of all
trades is never a suocess. When you.-"
order a sait voa don want a prosper to'..
T*you
-i a Pictoa sait
most skilled
Peter Pickton
/lerchsnt Tailor
No. 8 Eighth St. S. Fargu, N.
McKettdry
Plamley
Temple
REAL BARON OF THE NORTH.
Freedericka, Secretary to
RUSSMM
iniater at Paris, Visits M?chigart»
Marquette, Mtch., Aug. 31—
quette had two distinguished visitwi
the past rew days. They were Baron
and Baroness Fredericks of Pariai
Baron Fredericks is secretary to th«
Russian minister of finance, attached
to the French embassy of the Russian
department of state. Baroness Freed
erickjs is a former Michigan woman,
her maiden name having been
Miss
Bertha Christy. She Is a grand
daughter of Governor Carpo, who
ferved two terms in the sixles, and
•ho built and owned the Flint A Para
Marquette railway.
Baron Freederlcks |g no stranger te
America, this being his third trip te
this country. His English is excel
lent, and he commands several other
languages. This is the first trip h«
has made to the Lake Superior region,
and he is an attentive student ox
everything he sees, and is particularly
careful careful to note industrial
djltlons.
Ida Mellne, at tig Broadway,
Corns and bunions and ingrown toa
halls. Corns extracted, 25 cents.
Veterans of *98.
Boston, Aug. 31.—Battle seared
veterans who chased the haughty dong
of Spain over the hills and through
the jungles of Cuba are gathering In
rendezvous today for the fifth na
tional encampment of the United
Spanish War Veterans. Historic Fan
auil hall will, be the scene of the for*
«ial business meetings of the convolu
tion. the first of which will open to*
morrow morning at 9 o'clock. A ban
quet, with baked beans prominent oa
the menu, will be given all the dele
fates this evening.
After tomorrow's inaugural aessfim
the delegates ^111 go on an excursion
to Nantaeket Beach, and in the even
tog a monster athletic exhibition will
he held. The grand parade of the en
campment is scheduled for Wednesday
afternoon.
Piles
60 oanta a
«lt Ufi
W# tSsi
Itching. B3e«aeiiasr MM
Protrudkur Piles mm
***.?» be raleveii aod *V
aoiutaU b* tkM
.t that we positives-
f*-' money nsfandhwJ
Dr.
A.W.Chase's
.Ointment
Ointment
Rn!f«lo,N.Y
fttUT A PORTBRFICUfc, j/
ill#
.V

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