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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, October 07, 1908, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1908-10-07/ed-1/seq-3/

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AN ISTntrSTiNIi
SCHOOL IN MOO
#*EE KINDEQARTEN, CONDUCTED
BY Ml38 BIRCHALL, 13 AN IN­
STITUTION OF LEARNING THAT
18 ACCOMPLISHING A GREAT
WORK AMONG CHILDREN.
in educational Institutions, as lit
ttlfeny other of the affairs of life, It Is
nut always one finds the most practical
usefulness within the most pretentious
environments. Visitors in Fargo have
pointed out to them the several handt
some public school buildings, the agri
cultural college, Fargo college. Sacred
Heart academy and other places of
learning, all very useful in their way.
But there is one institution which the
visitor does not see unless perchance
he or she is under the escort of one
Who is particularly interested in that
one. It is a school very rarely men
tioned in the reports of educational
doings, yet in that one school several
hundred children of many nationalities
have, during the last eighteen years,
been given the very first insight to an
education which has been the means
of making a large proportion or them
bright aftd intelligent citizens.
Established Two Decades Ago,
The school is the Free Kindergarten
on lower Front street, housed in a
modest frame building right in the
Jieart of what is known as Shanty
town. The kindergarten Is maintain
ed by the Fargo Free Kindergarten
association, promoted nearly two de
cades ago by a body of humanitarian
uaeu auu women wno saw piamiy
gvuu woiK to uo &n<i unaertuOK ut ao
u and have voluntarily contrioutea uie
Minus cmuaauy i\j support uie wont,
i-utti', it vvao ~ouna uuti uus kiudet
a«Mteu waa a. vuiuaote aajuuct 10 uie
|«uuv scxiooi system u* tne cny, it wan
Oviufc primary worn wuic.x, unuei
Uiu uaiaru ot uinigs, uie uouiu ui oau
xoanu aimeuuy in cupiii^ with,
oia account ox peculiar conuiuuiia tutu
Ultimately tne uoaru oi education pro
viueu iui- a *maii annual appropria
tion ior its support.
Xfle population ia tne part of the
city where tne ecnooi is locateu is mauc
u* of uiuerent races and colors ana it
Has oeeu so since tne municipality
WU3 louiidea. isaturauy mere were
©touuren ia me community axiu a pio
ponion of kindly disposeu parents wno
ae^ireu tnat taeir Giidpriiis siiouid ue
vaugiK tnose tilings wmcn oiner clnl
oreu about tnew w«re oeing taugiit.
There were onicr parents, careless anu
uonundiui and aotoiuteiy uil not care
how their cnaaren were brougnt up.
Most oi the Ciiiiuren were tuose oi
foreign tongues. Xu teacn tneiu the
arfi&uan language ana tne uxree
Meant incuviuuai attention which couiu
not be guaranteed in. tne puoiic schools,
and nere was tne ruo. common nu
Htttniiy, not to say tnat it wa& tneir
ri&at, ior some of the parents were
taxpayers to a lesser or greater de
cree, demanded that the cniidren oe
given an education. The diiticuity was
tooivea by a number of Kindly uioposeu
persons caning bold of the matter and
estaoiishlng a kindergarten and Miss
jLaura Birchali, an experienced and
Uftivnal teacner along Uie lines to be
ppvered was placed charge of tne
school.
Total Enrollment 700.
To a reporter for Tiie .u'oram Mias
Birchail was unabie to give accurately
tJie number of children who have been
enrolled since the establishment of the
school as the records for the tirst few
years were unfortunately destroyed,
but as near as she can teii there have
been between 600 and 700. That num
ber of children irrespective of what
the mother tongue may have been have
been prepared by Miss Birchali for
reception into the primary grades oi
ge
Hi
e public schools and solely through
kindergarten method with the ad
Vantage iti a great many instances of
tbe little minds being in a great deal
letter condition than many of the chil
dren entering the public school from
J&nglish speaking homes where early
training had been faulty and public
•chool teachers called upon to undo
What some parents had done. Miss
"Birchali has had enrollments which
represented eight nationalities, other
than English speaking. Children from
S to 6 years of age are enrolled and one
Jyts to visit the school to really appre
ciate the value and interest ot the work
Which is being done. Miss Birchail
emphasizes the fact that for the month
Just closed there was an enrollment
of thirty-nine, with an average dally
lSttendance„ of twenty-six. The na
tionalities represented now are Hus
slan Jews, Norwegians, Scotch and
colored children.
Received Excellent Training.
Not only are the little tots taught
the alphabet of the English language,
and trained to think in that language
hy means of simple stories and plc
tures, but their other wants are deftly
supervised and relief necessary is sup
plied in the way of clothing, medical
attendance, and if needed, food is sup
plled in other words their home life
is improved in every way possible,
^uring the schooi season which con
""forms to the public school year there
Is just one dally session, in the morn
ing, and during that session the little
bpys and girls are kept interestingly
«Hd methodically engaged with a var
iety of work, with one end in view,
training them for entrance to the first
jjfimary of the public school. They
are taught sewing, weaving, drawing,
paper cutting, original designing, and
.• singing. Miss Birchali says that the
pupils nearly all leave the kindergarten
v
and become enrolled in the Washing
-•wlpn school the teachers of which are
^elected with regard to cope with tho
peculiar environments of that schooi
Which is located In the Shantytown
district and where the work initiated
lay Miss Birchali by kindergarten
methods is practically continued under
ytlie public school educational system.
Miss Birchali says that it Is ex
tremely gratifying that not only the
.. children anxiously look forward to the
lime when they may enter the public
schools but the parents display marked
enterprise in their desire to have their
children-advanced and in their crud«
Way, in so many instances they Jeal
ously guard well their rights in that
particular and to their best endeavor
they
co-operate
with the teachers in
promoting the best welfare of the chil
dren.
The board of managers of the Free
Kindergarten is a* follows President,
Mrs. J. P. Clapp secretary and treas
urer, Mrs, W. C. Macfadden and
Messrs, Ballon, Blakemore end Jfar
Mtnd, directors,
Beeg Laxative Ccmgti Hyrtij* ftfwiftjrit
brings quick relief to eotjghg, oolds,
hoarseness, whooping-cough end all
bronchial and throat trouble. Mothers
ally recommend it tor children.
FJeasant to take, gently laxative. Sold
hf M«loii»l« Prof 0*
n
*.
•n.A-a V*
NORTHERN TRUST £o. OP FAR
GO PURCHASED BIG BLOCK At
MEETING OF COUNTY COMMIS­
1
SIONERS LATE YESTERDAY
EASTERN MAN QET3 A 8HARE.
The Northern Trust Co. o t«his city
purchased the greater part of the
$45,-
000 6 per cent bonds issued by Cass
county for the nevviy constructed
drainage ditches at the arternoon ses
sion of the county commissioners yes
terday. Ohas. Tillinghart of Berlin
Heights, 111., purchased bonds for
$14,650 on which he paid $150 prem
ium and the Northern Trust bought
the remainder at par and accrued in
terest.
When the commissioners met yes
terday afttrnoon at z o'clock the*e
were at large number of prospective
bidders waiting for the meeting to
convene, several of whom were from
the twin cities and other more east
ern points. Some of tnese had handed
in sealed bids in accordance with the
requirements as advertised, but there
were also others who had not and the
commissioners exhibited business
ability when they allowed these to
make bids.
The bonds were sold for the pay*
ment of the construction of drainage
ditches NOB. 19, 20, 21, 22 and "23.
/. Ill i.
Good News for the Shopping Publle
,of Fargo and Moorhead and
Surrounding District,.-.
On Another page of this Issue will
be prlhted Information of great value
to every purchaser in Fargo and Moor
head. A plan whereby substantial
savings may be made on the daily ex
penditures. What do you think, Mrs.
Housewife, of getting interest on the
money you spend as well as that saved
in the bank? Does this mean anything
to you?
The Sperry & Hutchinson Co., a con
cern with a paid up capital of one mil
lion dollars and fifteen years' record
of square dealing, is placing this op
portunity before you and has apened
a permanent store at 521 Second ave
uen north, where ,is displayed a beau
tiful assortment of high-grade goods
which are yours for the asking.
Furniture, cut glass, china, rugs, sil
ver, bric-a-brac, pictures, etc., all to be
given absolutely free to purchasers
collecting thw famous "S. & H." green
trading stamps. The plan is simply
Trade with merchants advertised to
give green stamps. Pay cash. Ask
for the stamps and save them in the
little book given you for that purpose
by the stamp company. When the
book is filled take it to the stamp store
and select your premiumn. All lines
of merchants give them as an induce
ment for cash business. Don't wait,
get a book today—"tomorrow never
comes."
COR TAFT AND HUGHtS.
Congressman Calder Assures President
That Kings Is Safe for Both.
Washington, Oct. 7.—Two New York
congressmen today predicted to Presi
dent Roosevelt that Taft and Hughes
will both oarry that state by good ma
jorities. Representative Calder, of
Brooklyn, accompanied by Col. Michael
J. Dady, called on the president.
"There is not a shadow of doubt as
to Taft carrying New York,, he will
get a majority in Kings county^ posi
tively declared Mr. Calder.
"How about Hughes?"
"Well, he is going to be elected, and
will also carry Kings county. I know
hundreds of democrats who are for
Taft, and many who will support
Hughes. Brooklyn is full of democrats
who vote for republicans for president,
although affiliated locally with their
own party."
Representative Van Vechten Olcott,
of New York, another caller, was
equally optimistic.
"Taft and Hughes are sure to win
by good majorities," he declared, "and
I am saying this because I believe it,
and not for political effect. For every
vote Hughes loses among the personal
liberty adherents he will gain another
among church-going democrats, who
belong to the church," laughed the
New Yorker.
"Gov. Hughes has been doing great
work as a campaigner, and the presi
dent Just said to me that the New
York governor was the greatest speak
er in the campaign."
Mr. Calder came to Washington to
place his daughter, Miss Caldef, ftt Na
tional Park Seminary.
Of Interest to Mothers
There is one subject which always
interests the mothers of young chil
dren, and that is how to treat their
coughs and Colds, or to ward oit a
threatened attack of croup. For this
purpose we can recommend Chamber
lain's Cough Remedy. It always proves
beneficial- In case of croup it should
be given as soon as the croupy cough
appears, so as to prevent the attack.
Keep it at hand ready for instant use.
Many mothers do so, and it saves them
much uneasiness. For sale by all deal
ers. v
BIGGEST GERMAN STEAfMCR.
Typioal of Nation's Greetnaoa, iWiH, Be
Nartaed George W««h!hgton.
Berlin, Oct. 8.—The largest German
steamship ever built, which will typify
the greatness and power of the Ger
man nation, now is being constructed,
and when it is launched, Oct, 81, it will
be named George Washington,
Dr. David Jayr.e Hill, tho new Am
bassador to Germany, h&» aceejJtid the
Invitation of the North German-Lloyd
company to name the new liner,
The dimensions of the George Wash
ington are nothing short of marvelous.
It will be 777 feet Jong with a ton
nage of 27,000. The launchtoff will
take place at Bremen. v
FIR* PANICKY WOMAN
HURLS BABY DOWN STAIRS.
Chicago, Oct. 6.—-Women and chil
dren were driven in terror the street,
and many heroie rescues were made
during1 a flre which destroyed a North
Side Jjyery stables today and burned
sixteen valuable horses to death.
Three firemen were seriously bat not
fatally injured.
During the lire one woman became
so excited that she threw her baby
down two flights of stairs to a fireman,
who oMffet the (sfMrt j*at ia time.
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THB FARGO FORUM AND DAJ^Y REPUBLICAN, WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 7. 1908.
No public event ill Fargo ever
meant as much as the opening of
our Premium Parlor will mean to
you, especially from your pocket
book's point of view. It means
interest upon what you spend, if yoli
trade with merchants who give "S.
& H." Green Trading Stamps. It
means you can furnish a room or an
entire house, if you receive "S & H."
Green Trading Stamps with your
purchases. Just how much it means
can only be understood after you
have visited this Premium Parlor.
ART GOOD8, PICTURE8, FRAME8, ETC.
$%e Fargo Decorating Co., 610-12 Second avenue north.
CARPET8, RUGS, DRAPERIE8, ETC.
Herbst Department Store, 16-18 Broadway.
CLOTHING AND MEN'8 FURNISHINGS.
Alex Stern St Co., EJdwards Building, Broadway.
COAL, COKE AND WOOD.
Beidler-Roblnson Lumber Co., 810 N. P. !Avenue. Tele
phone N. W. 180-L.
CUTLERY, TOOL8 AND HOU8B FURNISHIWOS.
H. F. Emery, 604 Front street.
DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS.
Herbst Department Store, 16-18 Broadway,
P. G. Tosier, 114 Broadway.
FRUITS, CIGARS AND CONFECTIONERY.
Olympla (Geo. Meras, prop.,) 802 Broadwry.
FURS, SUITS, CLOAKS, ETC.
Hertost Department Store, 16-18 Broadway,
F. G. Toaier, 114 Broadway.
GROCERIES, FRUITS, ETC.
XBlefsen's Cash Grocery, 615 Seoond avenue nefCfc.
Fargo Grooery Co., BOS Front street.
Nelson A Ashland, Ninth street and Second •silttt
HARDWARE, STOVES, STO* i
XL F. Bmery, (04 Front street.
JEWELRY, CUT GLASS,
Vptersoa's Music House, 118 Broadway.
LADIES' FURNISHING^
Sterbst Department Store, 16-18 Brerviwa'',
P, G. Toaier, 114 Broadway,
7. Roen & Co., 118 Broadway.
MEATS.
Gk IA Sawyer, People's Market, 61T, Second avenue N,
3. Mottlton, 18 BBgbth street wtith.
MILLINERY.
J. Roen A Co., 119 Broadway.
THOS. A. SPE1
wiiiffliiW mmtmm
O
Presidents
Directory of Leading Merchants of Fargo and
Moorttead
Who Give "S. & H." Green Stamps with Cash Purchases
Ten Stamps Given Free to Every Caller at Our Store
Local Branch 521 Second Ave. North
The Sperry & Hutchinson
mm
V")
The extensive variety of splendid
merchandise to be given Free for
"S. & H." Stamps will speak for it
self. The merchants listed below
have contracted to give you at least
one stamp with each 10c you spend
with them, and as heretofore, will
permit no one to furnish better goods
or to sell at lower prices than they.
To help you fill your book more
rapidly we will give you stamps for
your Soap wrappers, Flour sacks,
Labels, Tobacco tags, Coupons, etc.
Ask for a list of the valuable ones,
PIAN08, ORGAN8, SHEET MUSIO, ETC.
Peterson's Music Store, 118 Broadway,
SUIT CASES, BAGS, ETC.
Herhst Department Store, 16-18 Broadway.
SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC.
A. M. fOnnear, 60 Broadway.
Alex Stern & Co., Edwards building, Broadway.
Herbst Department Store, 16-18 Broadway.
8PORTING GOODS.
H. V. Bmery, 604 Front street.
TEA8 AND COFFEES.
JBime Tea Co., 718 Front street (Bee also fTooers.)
TALKING MACHINE8, PHONOGRAPHS, ETC.
Peterson's Music House, 118 Broadway.
UNDERWEAR, H08IERY, ETC.
Herbst Department Btore, 16-18 Broadway.
J. Roen & Co., 113 Broadway.
P. G. Tosier, 114 Broadway.
WALL PAPCR, PAINTS AND OILS.
Xfcrgo Decorating Co., 610-13 Second avenue north.
MOORHEAD, MINN.
CLOTHING, 8HOE8, MEN,8 FURNI8HING8.
The Palace (Stern Field), Front and Fourth.
DRUGS, BOOKS, STATIONERY, ETC.
B. P. llarkall, 810 Front street
FURNITURE.
Beck A Wright, 614 Front street
HARDWARE, STOVE8, CHINA AND HOU8E
FURNISHINGS.
Mtoorhead Hardware Co., 422-84 Front street
JEWELRY, CUT GLASS, BTQ,
:&)m Swennlngsen Co., 407 Front street
MEATS AND PROVISION*
ftttiber Bros., 702 Front street.
WINES, LIQUORS AND BOTTLED GOODS.
tto Pederson Mercantile Co., 6, 7, 9, Fourth street south.
(Ne stamps en mall orders or s'oehol.)
PAID UP CAPITAL, •1,000,000.00 iH
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