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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, November 19, 1908, Image 2

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1908-11-19/ed-1/seq-2/

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LADHS-
FUR LINED
COATS
tfarve a -ryU *nd Anltk
whidh «howi In cut and
Workmnnahlp alro In
quality of i. lath and akins
33 Ytara In
.(he Fur Tirade
Ws alio Hav# a fit!! lino of Plush Lined
Cart* that bar* won ervftt pepu*
*ty or account of 'heir ams
Ond «c#llt?nce in mah)HltU
•mi wofkmaiuhip
•yk poor daa!«r to *how you and gat prim
If your c)«altt does not tail
Lsnpher ur*.
writ* u« direct
LANPHER
SKINNER & CO.
far Mtail««(artrt
ST. PAUL ii MINNESOTA
Marfield, Tearse &Noyes
(Incorporated)
GRAIN
W
Consigned Grain Our Special
Correspondence Invited ii
MINNEAPOLIS MILWAUK1
DULUTH CHICAC i |gi
Address all correspondence to ($$'
^.Minneapolis office,
512 Chamber of Commerce
s 3 W .- i- n s v
Any boy or Kir! can s«t T*__
Wild A .'.inula by milting Pi fPA
their grocer
The bojm all ear aboat
Towle'i
I U S
Brand
Table Syrup
"Give me
more." The airls aay "Let's
have it
for br»:akfiiat, dinner and
per.
Prepared
sup­
It taBtes like maple syrup."
It is a delieiovB blend of Sugar Cane
Syrup, Corn Syrup, Honey and Maple
Syrup.
by our original and excite
•ivo process.
.1?, Tito Towle Maple Sjrrvp
r.
Cm.
BpMca.
The Cheap Fuel
It i ilic tucl iur North ]ji
kota people burns to a
white ash no waste and
costs but one third the price
of other fuel. We are pre
pared to deliver clean, dry
fuel in any quaurtity wished.
WASiifiH Wirt
COM CO.
PI?one 898-L
We also carry Lehigh Val
ley Hard Coal for those not
equlppi'd to burn .LifjiilU1.
JLET US LIGHTEIf
VOUR LOAD
r*
of care and protect your
iamilv by a policy in THE
PIONEER LIFE INSUfcL.
ANCK COMPPNY.
HEADQUARTEilS—
Magill
i*.
•.-
block
l-ARGO, N. DAK.
§f\V
sV
t-V-.i': iVSt people who advertise and who
answer ads. are never out of work long
~'=v .v i' anniiirli Xul Um "ufrxitB/*
1
ion
1**- jk'0****
4.*
•ftr
I
N. U. FAftMhttS ID
HAVE wmni
•OOIBTY OF IQWITY WIWW BU!t*D
fctfiVAtOfl At SUPtHIQft, Wi8v
T«fi YhvuMnd b»il«r» 'tifc*
•ertlMd f*t* fcl«v«%»r WM*h Wh«n
Oemplst*^ Will 0*»i Ak»n* llOtWW1-
Cvniral 11® ll»v«%«r» Irt W«lt»
Mtneti K, Di| MoT! I9—A mammeth
^rfatn iefmftJRi felpvattjf apa
proximately $f)0iU99 will bp (jtlttfltt'uptprt
by the AhlPi'U'&tt Sbplety 6* tttjult* al
rtupprinr, Win., ?of the benefit of th*
members of the seeiety In the three
Spring wheat fcrodaetng stated, Mnrth
ftnd ftowth Dakota and Minnesota.
Vh'.s
bepame
known
NeBBion of th^ North Snkdtft t«uven^
tinft of thf* f«tteletyi When it Vran an
nnynced that appr^klmAteiy liw.pttn
NTWT'k oi the THTAI IFESUE H? IbO,006 had
alreAdy been subscribed and that tn*»
moVthient In fW enough ttiehflf td M*
bui'p
its euopes^i The thrpe dthl(«^
JJofth and South Pak&trt find Minne
neta, hate farmed a dintri^t union or
thp uaoiety and th^ eUD^^isi ©bjeft ot
thin union will be to KGPUfe eqUltAbie
prieefl for the grain grower* of this
district,
170 Indiyin^int HUvatom,
The nociety ftlroftdy pontwl* 1H
furrn eluYatoro in North Dftkota, There
are in all 8?fi farmer* Independent ele
vatnn* in North Dnkot*. Th# plan
nf the BOelety lit to nerure either con
trol of or an ftgroemant with thos«
fclwratorg, whereby ail grain will b*»
mhlpped to th# tcrmlnai at Superior. In
the three atate* thar# are 1.100 far
m«ra elevator*, and when thono ar«
all united In one mammoth organisa
tion, covering tho thrto groat aprtng
wheat producing atat»«, th« iooioty
(Ururei that it will probably control
tho price of spring wheat and thereby
inauro good prices to tho farmer®.
"Thare la no question about the nuc
cesa of tho plan," aald ono of tho of
ficers this aftornoon. The mill* have
pot to have the aprlng whoat of these
ptatea. Junt aa noon as wo can go to
the mllla and absolutely guarantee a
eupply of aprlntf whoat at all time*
we will get the bu«lne»«. I wai told
by a representative of a large mill
In the caat that tho trouble In the
paat haa been that wo only had a few
car« of grain on the tracks at Internm
ent period*. When the miUa wanted
the grain, we were not at hand, and
they had to so to the board of trade.
Our plan la to have a mammoth ter
minal of our own and then we can
be aure of a eupply and when they
know that the excellent aprln* wheat
of the Dakotaa and Minnesota are not
mixed, aa it la done by the representa
tives. of the board of trade.
Why Farmer le King*
Why tho Farmer la King, was the
subject of a splendid address by Prof.
Arnold of the atate college of agri
culture* yesterday afternoon. Senator
Hansbrou#h spoke on federal Inspec
tion of grain, what Its advantages are
to the farmers of the Dakotas, how the
wheat drawback ruling of Secretary
Shaw Is detrimental to the farmers of
the nowthwest and what a splendid
futur* the American Society of Equity
has If it will continue Its efforts a!on»
the lines of organization and co-opera
tion. movements which are evidenced
In every walk of life and industry in
the twentieth oentury.
The annual report of Secretary Char
les U, Plerson of Casselton, showing
that 1272 new members had been ad
mitted during the year, that twenty
eight local societies had been organ
ised during the year. The society has
now 814 unions In the state and eigh
teen county organizations, resulting
from the dissension between the fol
lowers of former President J. A. Ever
ett of Indianapolis, Ind., and the newer
members, the society In North Dakota
has grown rapidly. This morning was
given to the hearing of reports of com
mittees.
Ryder Correspondence.
Ryder, N. D., Nov. 14.—To The For
um: H. E. Johnson returned from
Minot Wednesday evening.
W. J. Murphy of Grand Forks visited
his brother, Hugh, here the Or at of the
week.
The Misses Brunsead are here from
Wisconsin for a visit with their cousin,
Mrs. Chas. Powelson.
Oscar Olson left last Monday for
Canada, where he will look up a claim.
Peter Molmen has gone to Minot to
accept a position as clerfc if y the
Scandinavian hotel at that pffcee.
Clarence Graham returned to his
home in Michigan last Monday, where
his father is very 111.
A leap year dance is to be given on
Wednesday evening by the young lad
les in town.
Gus Llndgren left Wednesday morn
ing for a visit at his old home, Ortoiv
ville, Minn., also Slsseton, S. D., and
other places.
E. E. Paul is now located in the
basement of the First State bank. This
place makes an Ideal tonsorial parlor.
Peter Hanson Is in Jamestown and
Valley City on business this week.
Mr. Wykert is here from St. Paul.
He is moving Into his residence here,
recently vacated by E. E. Fredeen. Mr.
Wykert expect* to remain here per
manently.
Chas. Wiper returned from Bow*
bella Friday to take charge of the
Citixens' bank.
Mrs. Frank Kroman leaves today for
Bowbells, where they expect to reside.
Mr. Kroman will follow in a few days,
remaining here to pack up the house
hold goods.
Mrs. Roberts and family moved into
her house, which she recently pur
chased, this week.
A. J. Qranum, who la the new mall
carrier on the route to Hidden wood
and Roseglen, now makes regular
daily trips. The service having rer
cently been changed to a daily service
Instead of a trl-weekly. Cor. R.
N. D. Farmers Insitittos.
IDakota Farmer: North Dakota
farmers' institutes promise to be bet
ter than ever the coming year. We
met Prof. T. A- Hoverstad at the ag
ricultural colege in Fargo the other
day, and found him busy with plans
for the coming seasoa^S metings.
Nothing is being left undone to make
I this work more effective and helpful
iitea ewer-. Jfeef. 3?townee A**»
-i-i- .'
V' "nr-'l'JIfsr* '"•,« •••'.'Tf *•£& S?W!
at jreoierday's
'.'If ,c
if ill
Dakota New
RHa»n accn 9fr«recl aa a Jertar^r and
other fipmkeffi sp^-lrt} worth aivl
training wiii be eone^ted with th^
faree: We Hatf1 Kttswn Pref tifrrer
frtttd far tnftfi* irfars, and for ft ifmg
Wrip associated with hfrri in In*
srtUb*£ tororh( and knew he la a man
to WHoin the farmers a»n go with the
gjfettteftt psnftdenep icetititte
speaker^ ttrtd especially Rsnduetort
ar£ e*eep»iingbr fcettree and we feel
that bfihetrt is te congratulated
ttpoa the Worth ei tive m«H wc i* get*
ting inte thltf Wttfk:
BUDY OTIILD IS
FOUND BY l)0G
ANDY PIN
DUO Y, FTUR-YBAR
OLD
OHlLD
LIVING NRAH
qranvilLC,
W
ander®
FROM
HOMi
AND
DROWNS.
Minot, K, NoY. 1#. After a
seoreh lasting all last ttlght the dead
body 91 Andy l^endroy, tha four-year
old ehild of Mr, and Mrs, QhaS. P^n*
droy living near Granville, Was found
this tnemlng through the aid e£ ft
shepherd dog, th® pet of the little boy«
The ohild wm first tnlssed yester*
day afternoon about a o'otook. Plnca
noon ho had been playing In th«» yard
of the Pendroy fwrm with his P«t dog,
a faithful ahophord that had beowme i »ueh had
The Pendroy home ia about sixteen
miles south of Granville, where Mr*.
Pendroy, a widow, lived with her chil
dren. The child had evidently be
come Interested In a game with his
dog and had followed the animal on
to the ice in his play. Though the
Ice was solid in places, an air hole
showed plainly where the boy had
fallen through and his body was found
but a few feet from the hole.
STICK It) THE DAKOTAS
I Parmer: "I. a n surprised,"
said an observing traveling man to the
writer at Fargo the other day, "to see
seemingly Intelligent men paying
twenty-flve, thirty, even forty and fifty
defllars an acre for rather dry western
untried lands, tributary to untried
towns, when If only they will take time
to look for them right here In th^
Red River valley and eastern South
Dakota, with water, railroads, cities
and civilization all around them, the
richest kinds of land can be had for
the same or less money." This man
went on to tell of choice lands at
twenty-eight to forty dollars an acre
right In the heart of this famous val
ley.
We would not question his figures
for we are advertising land in these
columns in South Dakota, not two
miles from the Minnesota state line,
the same distance from town, and with
natural timber and living water flow
ing through it for considerably less
than thirty dollars an acre. A well
known dairy farmer not far from
Grand Forks told us not long ago that
he would sail a section of rich Red
River land not far from Crookston—
one of the finest cities In the north
west—for thirty-two dollars an acre.
We knqw these farms and many others
at slightly higher figures, to be rich,
black deep soil. Now, to be taken
in the way some of our, people are,
and to go to Canada or some other far
of uncertain section any pay these or
almost these prices because others are
"rushing" there, shows almost inex
cusable ignoranpe of the real value*
of land.
Wc know the prices quoted arc
cheap, and that In all probability they
will not remain long so low. We know,
too, that all through eastern Dakota
there are lands that cannot be had at
these figures, but this does not excuse
nor warrant parties leaving the Dar
kotas and paying eastern prices for
anything an agent has a mind to show
tliem just because they are asked to.
Eastern Dakota today la offering bar*
gains in splendid real estate we#
worth looking up for either homes or
for speculation. Those without land,
or undesirably located In the Dakotas,
should not think land values in de
sirable parts of these states are ber
yand them. The trouble Is those buy
ing are looking beyond these lands or
they would have them at a great profit.
i
WOULD MAKE CHANGS.
.* r"v i"V*
a fast friend of the little fallow. Fran- I against refutable men of the eom
tioally the anxious mother summoned munity and that her oonduct indicated
her neighbors »nd when no traee had I *bat she was in a demented cor.dlion.
boon found by aupper time, a hurried
call was sent to Ulemurck and Minot
for the bloodhounds. All night the
searching party scoured tho surround
ing fields and the banks of the river
on which the Pendroy farm is locat
ed, but no traee of the child oouid bo
found. It was not until this morning
that the searchers thought of the dog
that had been with him when last
seen and oaiied him to them. The dog
started on
a
run for the river and
within four hundred yards of the
house the dead body of the boy was
found near the banks of the river
where It had fallen through an air
hole in the Ice.
Land Cen Be Secured Hera a* Cheep
as it Caa in the Untried and
Dry Wast.
Lend
Petition Asking Reduction of
Prices to Be Filed.
Reeder, N. D., Nov. 19—The peti
tion to place all Leromon land dis
trict land at SO cents per acre for com
mutation purposes, inaugurated oy
Sidney Blekre, who lives southwest of
Haley, Is being received very favor
ably by homesteaders who are any
thing but slow in placing their John
Hancock to it. Influential men of this
district will use their Influence to have
a bill introduced in the next congress
accompanied by this petition, to have
the land in the Lemmon district west
of the 103rd meridian and north of
the Cedar redu^ed from $1.25 to &0
cents an acre. Should success crown
the efforts of the instigators of this
movement it will mean a great saving
to those who are proving up this land
and the money thus saved can be
spent for a great many necessities
which the homeMteadera need in the
way 9f farm implements to make
wsosfisri»
teneBvemeetei•»»
1
Janweteira, M, IX, Nor, tt~4fn.
William IBtoch fan ftminsfc hi the ftrit
ward Of this olty and compltviy t^r-"
rorieed the neighborhood Three rom
plaintn wsre made to Wtate's Attorney
Thorp that th« woman had unmeroi-1
fully beftton the •-year-old ehild of
a n^ljyhbor. had thrown stones through
window* ahd thrsatmed to shoot an*
other neighbor, When the poliee went
to arrest Mrs. flluah they were round
ly f»ursej and the woman put up a
vigorous fight, H«»r home was bare
and cheerless and six children were
in a destitute oondition. It was learn
ed that the husband of the woman bad
deserted her and made no provision
for the support of the family, Through
worry and «*posure the woman had
evidently become craaed.
Children Cared Far,
It developed at the bearing before
a local justicc of the peavn that Mrs.
publicly made charges
Her children were suppllod with
transportation to Mlohlgan wW* they
will bo oare for at the home of Mrs,
Bluoh's ptvr*n«i, and she will be cured
for here until such time as it ap
pears that she Is in a fit condition to
join her family. The case has aroused
considorabU interest hore.
Deer Lake Item*
Deer Lake, N. D., Nov. IT.—^*o The
Forum: Edward Pendergast and Miss
Vesta S*nith were married Nov. 1 and
went at one to keeping house.
D. D. Smith of St. Paul, but late of
this place, was here on business lately,
haviig just returned home. His son,
Dan, has invented a voting machine
that promises fair to be the leading
machine for that work.
John Irving has gone to the hospital
at Jamestown-to have his leg dressed.
He had the bone In his right leg brok
en to pieces between the knee and
thigh In the Philippines in one of the
engagements, making one leg shorter
than the other. This summer it broke
out again. Lately a small piece of
bone came out with a small piece of
braes jacked on it.
Both of Charley Pendergast's chil
dren are sick with diphtheria. Dr. Mc
Clusky of Cleveland is in attendance
and all precautions will be to
prevent its spreading.
The farmers about her^ Just got
their flax threshed last week, jest in
time to miss the recent storm.
Edwin Pendergast has given up the
idea of going to Minnesota for the win
ter and will devote most of his time to
resting this winter.
Lea Wright, jr., took a load of car
rots and rutabaga® to Jamestown Mon*
day lor lils father, returning Wednea
day. cor. D. L.
FI8E LOSS AT IJlitLANB
Eerly Morning Bfazs *t?tfusee Destrus
tlen of Pool and Billiard
Hail—Total Loss.
Sdgelaad Enterprise: At about
twenty minutes to 6 o'efoek yester
day morning the ftre department was
called out to fight the fire which was
fast eating up the Carly & Norton
pool room building, and threatened ad
joining property. It was only a few
minutes until the Are department was
in action, but the fire had gained such
headway before it was discovered that
none of the contents of the building
could be saved and the roof had al
ready begun to sink, and about all
that could be done was to keep the
flames from speadlng. When the fire
was put out, only the side of the
building remained standing.
The building was partly covered
with insurance but not sufficient to
Cover the loss. Messrs. Caryl & Nor
ton had just added several hundred
cigars and other stock the day before
the fire.
The origin of the fife is unknown
but It is believed to have started
from the stove sometime during the
night, and had probably been burn
ing most of the night.
WRITES SEOUT AFRICA
NortH Deketan
A^0 FOBUM AffD BArLT HBPFBMOAJf/ JnTCMBAY WrVXim, KOTKMBKB II, 1
TERRORIZED TOWN
JAMESTOWN WOMAN kOIlt HSU
MM* BY DSSPONDINOVI
Hfiitfl#nal Ohsrges ^gatnsl
Freminen* Oitlsens While OHM*
era ttervlng—Mr*. William
Blweh will We Kxaminerf far inssnlty(
Whf
•e^da Interesting Latter te
Jamestown Friend.
Jamestown Alert: R. E. Wallace has
received the following characteristic
letter from Ward W. Bill, an old time
resident of Jamestown, who has been
in Africa in mining and hotel business,
for a number of years. Mr. Bill, who
has been ^recently married, Is now on
his way to America and expects to
reach here some time next September.
The reference to the Knights of the
Red Cross society will recall that
festive organization to the memortep
of the older residents of the city. Thg
letter is as follows:
Lorenco Marques, Oct. 14. 1905.-*
My Dear Bob: Have Just come on
board and fjtpect soon to sail up the
east coast. Was agreeably suprised
to find such superior cabin accommo
dations. Wife and self have a very
large one, supplied with all the modem
conveniences, such as* electric fans,
etc. The chief steward has Just in
formed me that all kinds of American
mixed drinks can be had. I write you
this to show how civilzation Is spread
ing and that life in "Darkest Africa"
Will soon be made tolerable.
Will try and drop you a line from
time to time as we journey toward
"The land of the free and the home
of the brave."
Do you know. Bob, tfiat while at
Victoria Falls a few weeks arfo, I
saw a negro with the 3t. Vitus dance,
which to my mind, was proof positive
Atufct tbe 4^vdeF o|
h-
of the Hed Cross, St. Vhtis Bnatmp
rni-irt, once fkmrlshed in these wflds.
Kind regards to all aM fr^n4» and
me to subscribe myself f«i*r
wfta4erta§ brother Knight w*d men^i,
01D MAN BRUTALLY
BEATEN, MAY DIE
TWO FARMS* NEIGHBORS RICH
AND SBAT HIM UNMKH
CI FULLY,
Rlbe Art Srehen, IHwIrier BMeeaM
enI Head anrf B»4y Oevered With
Srwises, Than R«d»b*^| and Left to
Klfcr-'i-'
Dleklnsen Pesti One ef the mo*t
bretal assaults ever brought te tb®
attention
of
the poiiee effleers ef Stark
eeunty eee»rr«4 at an party hour Tues
day morning en Jaeob Centner's farm,
abovt a mile and a half north of ttleh
ardt«nt when Lewis ($, Ooilwitser, an
eld farmer! Was set upon, beaten into
Insensibility, robbed of $810 and toft
for dead on the sold prairie, Still
uneonseioiis, the old man was fount.
Tuesday morning abditt I o'clock by
Joe Foster, Steve Hrintor end Jake
Jarrioh, and removed to Dr( Strauss'
hospital at Aichardton, whore his
wounds were dr^«se(l. On hie return to
eonseiousness C}nilwita«r declared that
his assoidanta were John Orlndsteineri
a Dunn county farmer, unci Andres*
Fllnk, who farms a piece of land north
of Ricbardton, Warrants for the ar
rest of the two were sworn out Wed
nesday morning and their arrest by
Sheriff Hartung followed that after*
noon. The date of the preliminary
examination haa bern set for Saturday
morning in this vity,
Robbery Was a Motive.
Robbery appears to have been only
a secondary motive that prompted the
clime's commission. The primary
motive is rather hasy and indoflnit*
A wedding was celebrated at Jacob
Zentner's Monday morning and wo*
followed by the customary German
feaut, which lasted until a late hour
of the night. Among the guests were
Gollwltscer, Grindstelner and Fllnk. Bo
far as ... Is known no enmity exlsteS
between the old farmer fejid his allegeS
assailants prior to the wedding.
Gollwltser, it is said, lmblbwd freely
and became noisy. Grlndsteiner and
Flink resented bis exhuboranoe
a
robbed of *360.
Had
not he
Gollwitzer
le fteturning
Ml Ovm
W, fe!»L
wag
been found when he
undoubtedly never would
have survived his injuries. As It If,
while he is still in a dangerous condi*
tion there is a strong chase* t^M
old former will recover.
MAY 10MEST NEW
MRAILLE CO:
LEGALITY OF NEW N. D. COUNTY
WILL DEPEND ON CONSTRUC
TION OF LAW COVERING
SUCH ELECTION.
Minot. Kov. If.—Rumors «*e
rife in MIrtbt" concerning the propose
contest of Montraille county, which
carried at the recent election by a vot
of 4,215 for and 4,030 against. Whll
the proposition received a majority o:
the votes cast on the county division
matter, yet they failed to get a ma
jorlty of the votes cast at the election
The exact number of votes there wer
cast will not be known urttil the can
vassing board finish their work th
flrst of next week, but the preliminary
figures which were secured show that
there were 8,354 votes cast for presi
dential electors and 8,941 votes fa*
governor in Ward county.
The wording of the law la somewhat
vague on this matter and there Is con
siderable difference of opinion as to leg
construction. A similar case brought
before the supreme court from thle
county is that contesting the increased
jurisdiction of the county court which
carried a few years ago. Just as in
this case the change received a ma
jority vote of those voting on the In
creased jurisdiction matter but failed
to receive a majority of the votes ait
the election.
Stanley citizens are Jubilant over
the vote as it now stands and are
ready to fight for their new countjr
and fight hard. A big celebration
was held in Stanley the night following
the announcement of the finding at
the canvassing board.
It Is possible that an active oppo*
sition will be deferred until the dei
clsion of the supreme court in the in
creased Jurisdiction eaae le beaded
down.
FALLS 30 FEET WILL UVK.
Telephone Lineman at Grand Forks
Has a Miraculous Escape.
Grand Forks, N. D., Nov. 19.—Arth
ur Dumont, employed as an installer
for the Northwestern Telephone Co.,
had a wonderful escape from death
yesterday when he fell a distance o*
about thirty feet from a pole. He
sustained a sprained wrist and se
vere bruises on his body. If there are
no internal injuries he will recover
before a great while, It was stated
last night. It will take a few days to
determine if there are serious intern^
injuries. H* was taken to his home,
1024 International avenue.
The accident happened on Universi
ty avenue. Dumont had large coil
of wire on his arm and another wire
man was at work above. As Dumont
was adjusting his belt the workman
above pulled on the wtr* coiler over
Dumont's arm. This caused htm to
lurch and he fell.
tft
Dumont has hee^
o o 4 clothes
and poor—wool
eiotheg sr»d shoddy
—hsrs s WftY of
looking good In
th# sters«
But ttis Fell or
Winter suit or
oTsrcost *Mch
wears* stays fresh
looking, holds its
color unci its shapo
-—that will give you
the actual Worth
of you money—
must be genuine
wool*
No rooddy cot
ton takes Wool's
at
spirits, one of them, several of the
guests aver, going about requesting
someone to loan him a revolver so
that he might hasten Gollwltser's de*
parture from this earth. Shortly af
ter midnight Gollwltser tired of the
revelry and left for his home. Before
he had traversed Zentner's form twe
men sprang upon him. A blow frona
a blunt instrument, received on the
head, felled him. He then was sub
jected to a cruel beating that resulted
in
broken rib, a dislocated shoulder,
blackened eyes and countless bruises
and abrasions «bout
body.
He
the head
and
soon lapsed into unconscious­
ness and while in this condition
H.
wai,
''.f .f:
jTojttf
The
'itff I i
That Ht
the employ of
the Northwestern for a number of
ipe ie unmerrtee,
p'
GIOTHCRAFT PRICE
«V "s»-
If's fU after*
wan!
satis n i n
llgtiiM tbit pays.
place—that's flat
j—don't
If you do, then
ydu are just as lia
ble to be fooled on
linings, or right de-
sign or workman^
ship,
CLOT II CRAFT
elot'hes arc perfec
tion—wool and
otherwise. Then
besides clothes de
signed right, cut
right and made
right, you want
clothes of right
material—of wool.
CLOTHCRAFT
suits and overcoats
ars the only ones
In the United
ALEX STERN & CO.
N. P. Avenue ajid
»"pi.
is today known and used in all parts of tho
world as a standard remedy for Coughs, Colds,
Bronchitis, Inflammation of the Lungs and
Chest, Croup and Whooping-Cough. Keep a
bottle of this famous medicine in your home
and insure the health of your family. Sold
by all druggists, in three size bottles, $1.00,
50c. and 25c.
Dr. D. Jiyat's Tonic Vsrialfago is a gentle and
tonic for all the
ten tlic5
-. s\r~ v1* ^VV*Vv
~K «K
IP7CH fi
i/ I
Cul •»:v On maay s cold winter morning you
will wake to find the iires "out. Whs!
are you going to do about it—shiver
.Prepare now for the emergency with a
PERFECTION
(HI Healer
(Equipped
with
Smokele*
Lamp
V—^ light U re*im, or
lag. M*dt o! Wm. akkd pbtaJ and equipped vrilh Ac briot
hwreved eenlrsl draft burner. Every lamp warranto!.
yeur dealer Joesn'l carry fte Periedion Oil Healer aa4 Rape
IdMy, write our nearest agency ior detcriphve circular.
STANDARD OIL COMPANY
(Incorporated)
fhmru I'9 Only Ono
v
Always remember the fall name,
foe tU* signature on every bos.
1
States selling Tor
$io
to $2 and
guaranteed all wool.
get fooled..
Then they are
right in every other
way—in style, cut,
finish and nt«
You can be sure
that the CLOTH
CRAFT suit or
overcoat which
seems right when
you buy it will
prove right In the
wear—in your
wpar.
All wool tjtitolity
and low price.
This Is the win
ning combination
you'll fin in
CLQTilCRAFT.
r,,,\
i
*v i*
5
If D.JAYN'
arV* i*A'
.J}*' 1
•y*' ,/uS8&
v
1^.
jlxpectpra
V**''
ia
For Three Quarters of a Century
this fkmous remedy baa been successfully
employed in relieving and curing Coughs and
Colds.
Dr, D, Jayne's
.Expectorant
ft"'
v/V ,J ?.' St*
*•*.£
•*%£,
.V*,
Devtec)
and you'll have genial, glowing heat—instantly—wherever fff
want it—*witkout smoke or smell—smokeless de
vice prevents—turn the wick as biah or as low
you bke. Easily carried about. Brass font hoick
4 quarts of oil—burns 9 hours. Handsomely fin
ished in japan and nickel Every heater warranted.
%-?".%•
Laxative Bromo Quinine
OVER TO
£i-
f/.% i
•JP

•iV
it,-.-vy -V .•
AOOLO om DAY.
I..

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