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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, December 23, 1908, Image 7

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1908-12-23/ed-1/seq-7/

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Markets
QftAIN MArtKci*.
(hWttliMi furnished by C. Uwll A
C«v Grain Commission*!-* Mli
Stock brwKsrs.
D)fr*mb«r *Vh*at.
Ctu. Trrtv Minn.
1.01%
1.02* 1.07H
.. 1.01% 1.07
.. 1.02)4 10711
i'«iMy WhMt
Opes
HlffH
Low
CH»*e
Low
4
Ope*.
Higfc
Low.
Cloai
Low
Clow
No. S northern "iff
No. 1 northern to arrive.
No. 2 northern t.p an^vej.
No. 1 durum ., 1. ,.. •. »/.*•
N o 2 u u 7 V i
No. 1 durum to arflva ...1.
No.. 3 white oats
No. 3 yellow corn
Barley
Rye ...»
Flax ..........
6ml
1.07%
Chi. MtnS.
1.08
Open
High
Low
Cfc*e
Dttl.
v
1.09
3.09%
1.09%
1 8%
1 09%
1.06% 1.091
1.05% 1.081
1.06% 1.0Mb*
July Wh5»t
Chi.
.#7%
.#8%
.»7%
Opea
Mlnpk
1.09%
1.09*
1.09%.
Clow ..... .98%
Chicago Corn.
Ma*
.60%
.61
.60*
.4i,r -'HT .61
July
.60%
.60%
.60%
.17%
,18
.ft7%
.87%
Chicago Oat*.',
Dec. May
.19% .51%.,
$o% .51%.
•.•9%- .61%.
j$0 .61%.,
Chicago Pck.
Otttn
High
LoW~.,
Close
July
.46%
.46%
.46%
46%
Dec.
'1*:?
Opeft
J*h. May
uM 16 .*«
16.82 16.56
.. -18.*?
16.26
1 6 .11 16.56
Close
Liverpool Wheat @%"c- lower
oohi %@%C higher.
Minneapolis Cash MtrkMi^
No. 1 hard
No. 1 northern «, 1 09%
No. 2 northern 'l.07%
Dec. flax 1.43%
May flax* »«». ».«,• 1 45%
Local Market*.
l'"ilorthern
"Nb. uorthernT
No. 3 northern.
No. 1 durum
Nc. I. durum
Cattle 23,000 steady.
''-^heep 18,000 strong.
Receipts at Omaha.
,J.„
4
1.05%
,-1.10%
"'1.07%
.92
4
.90%
B4%
."8%
.71%
-vi*
1.44%
Duluth Cash Markat
*1
1 northern .,?A............1.09%
No. 2 northern^
.*.]( 1.07%
No.-tl durum •«,*.'*«.'*.• .91%
No. 2 durum ..,..^^,...^.1*^
Dec. durum
May durum .....^*
Oata .... ..y
Barley ..«•. •«.
Rye ...rij.»-• ••..*!»«..,•••((,
Cash flaxi
89%
.90%
.93%
.48%
.68
.11
1.44%
1.02
1.00
.98
.83
n
»v»*»
Receiptk at Chkifl,'
'Wheat 12 ca^s corn 57^* cara odts
dars last ,yeart holiday.
lapaiptt at Mir»nea|olla.i ,^T
W e a i 2 1 & a a
str.t Recaipte at SuluUk
-Wheat 25 cars.
,..-vv Receipts c.t Winnipeg.
9
Winnipeg 142 cars, last year .***•
r*uta and Oatif,
Minneapolis Drivilegc.? May whaat—
Puts $1.09 calls $1.09%.
Chicago Livestock Market.
Hogs 35,000 left over 6,023 -proa
pects steady light [email protected]»60 heavy
$5.20g5.80 Wl::ed [email protected] rough
15.10 @5.40.
Hogs 6,500, cattle 1,800, sheep. 1,000,
Receipts at Kunsas City.
iffoers 10,000, cattle 4,000, sheep 4,000.
^3outh St. Paul Livestock Market.
Slogs 4,400 steady, $5.1f(86.3b.
attle 700 atrong.'.
hefp 400 strong.
it
Stock
h. s, WW i", Manager.
flartcn Block, Parg«b 4. ft
PHONl B1&
a 1.1 Hi —i—
HID£« AND FUKS.
Qvotec? by
*r-
"aw
Boiies dL Rogera,
Bide ja&rkat reached a ht*b level
§4vise prompt shipment
-Na
O. S. cured hldea ..... J10%9
8, B. cured calf skins .14
Q. S. cured bull hldea .08
S. S. cured horse..... 1.00
dreen hldea ic leaa,
'CI.- 8. palta. good Hlfc V"
1 akin*
»o.l.
•o»%
•iJ%
.0?
v
0
.ft
Tillow *ls 9
FuH,'
lUkunk .$§& 1.00
Muskrat •».«».«••.. •••«.. ,]IO .16
Raccoon .73® 1,7S
Mink S.DOQ 1,00
..04
l.eoff e.oo
Rad Fox
Badger ......
Wolf 1.009 $.00
Weaael ,..*•••«*'( .10® .10
Wildcat ......... ....... 1.(9® 2.00
Bearer I.W0 7.00
Otter ». 00*10.00
.. i.oo® 2.60
Market Arm oa hldaa.
*Bollai» 4k P)gwa.
Geraiity 4 Co.
CK^/iN STOCKS
ferial, Cotton, Cefto
0 and 4 Morton Slock, Farg*» N. D.
LON DISTANCE PHONiSl
ferthwettem Main "1 TH-Steta M.
?*a!ualva ?rlya*a Wiw.
flnMy BarraM A Co*
Chicago raapoadantib
MB3MBBR8 OF:
fefofcgo Tra ».
mm,
utMhU a
i,MS IN mint
PLA"H£ QLA38 INQOL i
WS
AT-
OON SMASHED BY "BILLY" MC
CARTHY, WHO WE*IT BROKE
LA8T NIGHT AND WANTED A
*fHIOHT CAP"*
"Billy" McCarthy asked for a free
drink at the Gold Mine saloon laat
night, and because he had no money
and it being considered that he had
a "load" of sufficient proportions, he
was refused. The refusal raised Ih'e
ire of the merry Irishman and to "get
even" fie smashed a large plat® glasr
window into smithereens. In lieu oi
the fine Imposed McCarthy was re
manded to the county Jail for ninety
days by Justice Malloy.
5
The police of Moorhead lost night
scoured the trysting place of unde
sirables and locked a number of thevi.
up^ They were remanded to jail for
various terms this morning, and some
were ordered to leave the city.
JAG FARM IS LOCATED
State Board of Control Make*
taction on Foots Lake Near
WiUmaft
Inebriates^
on. by the legislature two years ago,
will be located on Foote Lake About
two miles from Willmar, lh Kandlyoh
county.
A resolution to this effect waa pas-
ia i control yesterday
l-afternoon, but the definite location is
subject to adequate water supply and
sewage disposal, and the construction
of a spur track from the Great North
ern tracks. Subject to these require
ments the new state Institution will
b« located upon a tract- of 343 acres,
which has' been offered to the board
for $70 an acre. The land lies on the
northwest shore of F-ote Lake, a
small body of water, and will provide
an ideal location for the farm.
The expenses of the location, and
buiding is to be borne by a 2 per cent
tax upon all liquor licenses issued by
municipalities and counties. The fund
from this tox has been growing- for
several years and now amouata to
nearly $40,000.
Law Held Conatltutional.
Several months ago the supreme
court decided in a test case that the
law by which the tax was ordered is
constitutional. This suit delaped the
location of the institution, but several
weeki ago the board of control defi
nitely set a lihiit whert all proposals
for the location of the farm should be
before the board.
Ther^ were slk bids" for thfe home,
and the site hear Willmar'w«a deter
minfl upon in a resolution Introduced
by P. M. Rlngdal of the board of con
trol.
It Is claimed that the water supply
la excellent, but no analysis has yet
been made by th bo..rd. If the water
proves satisfactory and the spur track
can be constructed the institution will
go to Willmar. There is now BA
Institution in that district. A
.t V
VALLEY FARMERS
Red RSver Valley Tillera Capture Plrat
Prizea at National Corii
Exposition.
At the National Corn exposition re
cently held at Omaha. Neb., Red rivet
valley farmers weve considerably in
the limelight and they won first prise*
for clover, Wheat and oats In competi
tion open to Minnesota. Referring
to official reports of the exposition
The Crookston Times makes the fol
lowing brief summary:
"Reports have Just been received of
idme of the awards of prizes made at
the great National Corn exposition at
Omaha,and according to these reports
the farmers in the vicinity of Warren,
Minn., who sent exhibits of grain to
said exposition, have fared excedingly
well, in fact leading the world on
clover seed and barley. The March
farm captured the first prize on clover,
and J. W. Thomas, the third price on
WEEKLY MARKfeT LETTER.
South 3tJ Paul, Dec. 23.
Cattlo Hogs iBKeep
OA« day thfa ...
week ...... l,»fa 2,^00 100
Same day last 7! •'.
week 2,Wtr. M43 3f.H0
Jan., 1 to date 459,661,1101,863 35b,217
Same time last
year ...... 517,031. 837,800 507,153
•, Cattta.
Steers, to choice .$1.80^^.50
Steers, fair to good......... 4.80 @5.25
Cow heifers, good to Choice i.bOfoi.OO
Cow heifers .....i •... [email protected]
Cutter cows i.... '1([email protected]
Canner cowa .V.Yr l.'fc0®:2.00
Veal calves :."..!'... 5.00 6.00
Bologna bulls 2.20®2.75
Stockara and Panders.
Good to choice feeding steer*
800 to 1,000 lbs, .$3.50 4.60
Common to fair l.B0®3.00
Good to choice ateetw, 600
to *00 lba. [email protected]
Common to lair hetfera
O.arnb#? Commearaa. ,.r,
Stofe
4
,.V' .*•• K(''
/•.*
t,
1|003,2.3S
Good to choice heifers...*. *[email protected]
Hogs.
?rlce range Bulk range
vr*
Monday
Tu««daj
Wednesday *.
Thursday
Friday ......
Saturday. ,.j,
Monday -..
.-.
.lft.0&<§5.5 i.1605.36
06^5 55 [email protected]
1S&W3.70 6J,5
..JkOOaM5 [email protected]
'[email protected] 5.00m,15
4.7 fi'#5.60 5.10®B.30
4
4.75# 5.00 5,[email protected]
,V
Spfiit* lambs $IjW®6.75
Bwi H, "food to cholcd l.BO®4.00
Yearlings, good to choice* 5.00(^5.60
Wethers, food to choice |[email protected]
Buck lambs [email protected]
Cull buck lambs l.&[email protected] 00
Western Stookera and Feeders.
Wethers, good to choice... .11.85®4.00
Yearlings, good to choice... 4,16®4.35
Lambs good to #hoie*», [email protected]
ETwes, breedttt# 1.50#4 25
Comi -.•?& /b"*es, I,2b*'3
*Ki
ia icy. In compet! km*
world'. L. Larnberson has won the
first prise of' $100 on the best half
bushel of wheat, Jn competition open
to Minnesota only. Said wheat was
raised on the Riverside farm. He also
won the fourth Sweepstakes prise of
125 on what. In competition open to
northern states. A. D. Van Sickle haa
won the drat prise of S100 on oats, in
competlion open to Minnesota only,
H. "J. Beardmore getting the third
prise of 18 and Muhger & Soh, the
Objections AnaWeratf.
One of the most proclaimed obJe^-f
tions to the proposed charter amend
ment, providing for the paving of
Front street and other streets, next
spring, is the paving of the block on
Front street between Eighth and
Ninth streets, the objectors claiming
that there was an item of $10,000 back
taxes long past du$ far former, pav-
Ing assessments.
were explained. It was explained that
of the twenty-four lots between
Eighth and Ninth streets, nine had
signed to pay cash when the paving
was done. Upon three others there
were no delinquent taxes and they
are owned by parties, who, it .was,
declared, would pay. Six lots are^
owned by the Great Northern railway,?
and the general opinion was that they41
would pay the $1,200 or $1,500 requir
ed, considering the fact that the Nor
thern Pacific was putting up about^
$9,000. Five lots were shown to have
delinquent taxes against them, and
four to have assessments for the old
paving unpaid. The total bf these,
without penalty and interest, was fig
ured to amount to $1,815, from the
auditor's statement submitted, and as
to the interest and penalties the city
loses nothing, since the penalty and in
terest on deliquent taxes goes to the
county. It was further stated that of
the original tax, the county and state
are interested in a portion of it, so
that the loss to the city would figure
about $1,500, as against 410,000 which
was represented to be the loaa.
As to another objection, that the
passage of the amendment would r«
ard itll. other public improvements,
such a#.the building of lateral sewers,
etc., it was stated that this provision
was put in by the bharter ^ommlsslon,
to protect the owners of small homes,
as well as larger ones, by keeping the
city debt withlfj thf legal limit. It
was also figured that it would delay
improvements for but ow year.
I 8tole a Horae at Barnp«viHa.t- «r 1
Shortly after the time he left^ his
bed, early yesterday morning, John
Allen, a farmer living near Barnes
yille, heard a pomrn.otion, in. his horse
barn and as he left 'the* house to In
vestigate he saw one horse being taker,
out of the barn which the thief mount
ed and rode rapidly away.
Mr. Allen called to his wife to bring
a lantern and as she was crossing
the yard she shipped and broke her
collar bone. After the injured woman
had been attended to Mr. Allen started
off In pursuit of the thieves. The po
lice of Moorhead and Fargo, and sher
iffs of the surrounding country havf
been informed,s. but .^tQt ,a wo^J. ,,
been heard yet.
MARSHALL OIL CIJ
OOOliES NO FEES
STORY PUBLISHED fN MORNING
PAPER IN FARGO TO EFFECT
THAT MARSHALL COMPANY
HAD BEEN CAUGHT TRYING TO
EVADE FEES IS MISSTATEMENT
Under startling caption this morn
ing, the democratic morning paper
prints a story about the alleged eva
sion of fees due in Minnesota, by the
Marshall Oil Co., Fargo, for fh« In
spection of oils In the .former state
and that $718 had been wrung out of
the Marshall people by the alertness
of a Moorhead deputy inspector.
Manager MoCaw of the Marshall Oil
Co. of Fargo informs The Forum that
there is not an atom of truth in the
report and that the paper fn question
has badly crossed wires on the sub
ject, that his company meets all de
mands of the Minnesota oil inspector
promptly and there has never been a
disposition to dodge fees and if ther$
has been any oversights they are ig
norant of the fact,
The Moorhead deputy is Editor Me
lander of The Citizen and to The For
um this afternoon, he said:
"The story In that Fatgo morning
paper is all 'Greek' to me and I have
not" been 'wise' or 'unwise.' As far as
I know the Marshall -people have not
subjected themselves to- any com
plains by State Inspector McEweri.
Somebody has evidently been dream
ing, or else has been imposed upon. I
know nothing whatever of 7$7 barrels
of oil slipping Into Minnesota for sale
in- this distrinct I inspect certain
tanks belonging to the Marshall oil
Co. once a month and up to date I
have been paid my fees through the
regular source promptly."
\..'Z PERSONAL NOTKS.
00
THB fABOO fOSOK ASD BAILY HBPUBLICAlr, WEDNESDAY EVKNIITO.PECEMBKIF 23- l®0».
X'V^
George, Wilson of
.were among the ar-
Mr. and Mra.
Dickinson, N, D.
rivals..
J. W. Salndon Is ?p from Superior,
W-l»..
Mis* Sarah Lynch was i* from Com
sto£k*
T. Heigefoa. represent^ Crooks
ton In the city
Henry Tuft was in from Hawley.
W. G. Richards of Kragnes has .£one
to-Calumet, Mich., to spend Christmas
with friends at his birthplace.
Miss Anna L. Murphy of the normal
School has gone to her home at Fel-
a vlMf Utom fh«fr-*on, •Alfretf'tj. 'Murk.
M. P.. Spokane, Wash.
Professor ind JMfs. Boothroyd left
•'his morning for Northcoate, Minn., to
'•pc&t "CfrrlHtmnntid*.
fPre«byteri*i*
Churoh Tonight.
The Christmas tree, exercises of the
PrefHiyf^rlan church 'Sunday school,
open to the Moorhead, will be held this evening. A
number of the children will participate
in a seasonable and well arrar*eff pro
gramme and they will be assisted by
the choir of the church, and the pas
tor.
Miss Hilda AL,Strom, formerly of tha
state "hospital at Fergus Falls, but now
a professional nurse at MSnot, N. D.,
stopped over In the city between trains
on her way to her old home at Pelican
I ftaplds, wheFe she will spend the holi-
w1.^ h^f
fourth of 17. Mr. Van Sickle h1bo|^| V '?&!. JJj JfL'
carried off the Sweepstakes* prlae of U* Ty**1 7*%
|€0 on oats, in competition of northern
states. Reports of many of the con- i Justice Malloy made a North Da
kota couple happy yesterday when he
tests In which Warren farmers had
made entries had not yet been re
ceived, and it is confidently expected
that these will be even more credit
able. Nothing has been heard con
cerning the oat club exhibit open td
the world in which there were five
entries from this city. The first
prise in this contest is valued at }800.
In the wheat milling specials, open to
the world, best half bushel for light
bread flour, and best half bulhel for
pastry flour, Warren farmers also ex
pect to aeore." ,• •. .•
mother and family,
tied t:"c nuptial knot for Ed. S. Qil^
ber t»on Sargent county and Mi-si
Gsr-a OUcX- of Cass county. The pair
"eft t'-r Po'k county to spend Christ
inas. wih !"!enda.
Obsequies for Miss Clara 'Strata,
jWhose demise waa reported a day or
two ago, were held yesterday afternoon
at. Trinity Norwegian Lutheran
church, the Rev. John Peterson, pas
tor officiating. Many school and col
lege friends of. Miss Stratc attended
the services and contributed. beauti
ful floral tributea.
T. A. Thompson, register of deeda
el^ct at Crookston has announced that
he ,will appoint Miss Louise Mossefln,
an experienced abstracter, as his de
puty and she will assume here duties
the Arst of the year. Miss Mossefln
has many friends in this part of the
R» d' rtver valley.
The Congregational church pit Per
ijus I-alis has extended a call to the
Rev-
At the commercial club meeting Minn., to the pastorate of the church
Monday night this and other objections
Harris S. Wiley of Sprine Valley
at the ,ormer
Place-
He is a
youn«
He is a
man of remarkable pulpit eloquence.
Manager Brown of the ctreet rail
way company is being highly com
mended for his eye for business in put
ting the short line car on a few hours
earlier for the accommodation of the
Christmas .shoppers. j.
^EUliyAP K!FU?(i
"'v.
^torr^e yt*ars ago wrote a book for boys
relating to the fishing smack, "We're
Here," and various adventures on the
Grand Bank.
We wish to remind the older folk at
the present time that WE'RE HERE.
STONE PIANO COMFAN^.
ASYLUM TRUSTEES
SPECIAL MCETlNp OF JAMES
TOWN HOSPITAL BOARD
HELD YESTERDAY—THE
LEGISLATIVE APPRO
1* PRIA7I0N.
SfcU-There
Jamqrtown, 1. D., Dec.
was a 8p£ciaf meeting of the state
hospital board yesterday at which all
members wore present. .Rlans for the
institution improvement* ind to meet
the new demands that will be made
during the coming year were dis
cussed at some length. It is the de
sire of the trustees to secure an ap
propriation from the legislature to
complete the other half of the violent
ward building, first half of which waa
built last summer, but remains un
occupied and unused. The matetr of
a septic t^.nk to care for the sewerage
of the institution will also be necessary
as the present manner of disposing of
the same in the river south of that
institution cannot long be continued.
A properly constructed tank for this
purpose will cost about $5,000.
It is also necessary to have a house
separate from the asylum ward build
ings for the use of the employes and
farm hands engaged in work at the
institution. A "building where such
employes can be boarded and remain
apart from the patients will, be a
saving in time, and something that
is quite necessary.
It Is intended to improve the
grpunds around the asylum consider
ably (the coming year, setting out
more trees, adding additional lawr
and sidewalk.
The amusement hall which is now
too small, It is desired to have ex
tended, and two new boilers are re
quired for the boiler house to replace
those that have been in use for nbou*
eighteen years. There are now. 570 of
hospital population and new af. vu.,.
are continually being received.
Friends and relatlyes throifghout
the state have sent many donations of
Christmas present/j for the patients
and the "usual distribution will be
made this coming Christmas by Bippt
Baldwin and his assistants.
The awake person reads the want
ads every day—and answers some al
most as often.
CONSPIRACYAMONG
W. U. OPERATORS
Seattle. *#**!»., Dec
tlon by the auditing department of th
Western Union Telegraph Co., aided
by private detectives sent out along
the Northern Pacific and Great North
ern railroads from the Pacific coast
Minneapolis, has resulted in the arrefi
of the agent at Ritzville, Wash., th
discharge of twenty telegraph opera
o s a v a i o u s o e s a i o n s a n h
uncovering of what is believed by th
officials of the company to be a con
splracy systematically to rob the West
ern Union Telegraph Co. of toll receipt
on messages filed by passengers on
trains. !.
Superintendent Reed of the Wester
Union Telegraph Co. said today
"About a year ago our bookkeei in
and auditing department began to ex
perlence difficulty In tracing message
of which they had no record in check
lng accounts, but upon which conr
plaint had been received of noo-de
livery and delay.
"As high as 46. per cent of thei
messages were never reported lh tlb
monthly statements to our checking di
partment and further Investigation re
suited In positive proof that this prr
ceeding held good o|l mtoy message
filed with operators at railroad sta
tlons.
"The man arrested at Rltsytlle hi
confessed and hfs trial Is set for tlx
early part of the year. We cannot stv
yet what our losses as a result of
ther-v
ton for the holidays.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Mark are enjoying, peculations may amount to."
i is -vr nw-efif
i V
CATHOLICS
VlliMSl'MESI
Jfr-
AGAINST USE OF CERTAIN TEXT,
SCHOOLS—-CL41M THEY ARE AN
The Catholics of North Dakota- are
up In Arms a|alpst\thev*text book dn
the hlatory of Jpfedag rfyft tised by the
state normal scfeooli of tne state and
the first volume of the- collections 6f
the State Historical society of North
Dakota, and through Bishop Jotyn
Shanley of Fargo, a petition haa been
sent to Governor Burke protesting
against an expense, in taxation which
they claim makes them appear ridi
culous.
The petition, which has been signed
by 300 priests of the diocese of Fargo,
and sent to Bishop Shanley, who In
turn forwarded It to the governor, is as Box 418, Fargo.
follows
We, your petitioners, are the Catho
lic priests of your diocese, which em
braces the whole of the state of North
Dakota. We know your zeal for our
holy religion. We recognize the vast
work you have done In this state dur
ing the past nineteen years. Many of
us have received from you our priestly
ordination, and all of us lovingly ac
knowledge you to be our chief pastor.
If we now come to you with a pe
tition, believe u/*, It Is solely because
we want to Strengthen your arms
in your battle for truth aAd llglit—not
to find fault with the successful work
you have dohe.
With all due respect, we, your
priests, therefore lay before you the
following facts:
First, The Catholic laity of this
state and loicese numbers today up
wards of 70,000. Amang the citizens
of North Dakota there are none more
progressive and law-abiding than
those 70,000 who claim membership In
the Catholic church, aaxd We, ,votl»
priests, are glad to acknowledge "that
their good citizenship is in. a
measure due to your Influence.
Second. The Catholic priests In the
iiocese number 104.
Third. Priests and people In this
diocese and state have endeavored
to work for the welfare of the state to
the best of their ability. They are
everywhere respected.
Fourth. The Catholics of this state
pay heavy taxes. In many instances
Catholics are paying a double tax for
conscience sake,—the state tax and
the church tax for education. They'
pay both taxes cheerfully and when
they use the state schools they Ought
not to lie insulted.
s
Insult to CatholioS.
Fifth. The text book «on the History
of Pedagogy used in our state normal
schools is an insult to every Catholic.
Comparye, Its authdr^. was a hater of
the Catholic church, and of the man
who translated it from the French or
iginal, Payne of the University of
Michigan, not much better can be said.
Wo desire to protest against the
use of Comparye's book ia our.
state schools at the expense of our
Catholics.' We a#yrrjt watit our chil
dren to learn that the unutterably dirty
Rabelais (Compary* pp.' 91-10&), the
very dirty Montaigne (Comparye pfc.
101-111), and the unspeakable Jean
Jacques Rousseau (Comparye pp. 27,
36, 38. 87. 98, 110, 126, 171* 196, 197,
198, 202, 209, 210, 278-310, S32-337, 348,
363, 368, 415, 426. 442,448. 481. 486, 553),
are great educators of youth. Nor do
we want to have our Catholics pay for
such information as this. "The truth
is that the Jesuits neither desire nor
love the Instruction of the people^'
(Comparye pp, 148.) "In all things
the Jesuits are the enemies of pro
gress. Intolerant of everything new
they would arrest the progress of the
human mind §.nd make It Immovable."
(Comparye pp. 145.)
Sixth. We belleve/that action should
be taken also by the legislature of
North Dakota to suppress Volume I
of the Collections of the State Histor
ical society of North Dakota, inasmuch
as said volume contains most ridicu
lous stuff, purporting to be history,
from page 200 to page 292 Inclusive,
much of which Is detrimental to the
Catholic church. Let one quotation
•, THE
... v
V'
7 '.r^ t«£ ,t -v•• ,^Vvv\- •/. »•. vi i V' ,,!K
1
4page 2*3". sutHdfe: "A form of 'Pem
mloan' that was considered a gn'Ht
delictfcy was prepared by the Indian
women by melting the fat of the buf
falo and. mixing in It shreds of the
buffalo meat, pounded soft, and quan
tities of the wild cranberries. This
waa poured into buffalo paunches and
kept until It became hard and cold.
BOOK8 IN STATE NORMAL before the establishment of missions
BPHOOLS CLAIM THEY ARE AN i
INSULT TO \ALL CATHOLICS IN i annual hunts, used this species of
TMt STATE.
In the absence of bread, the priests
came
from Minnesota and Canada
thl*
8,de
°f
th*
the
t0 6rCOmpany
half-breeds and natives on their
pemmican as a substance for bread in
the administration of the sacrament
of holy communion while out in th»»
prairies."
Such silly stuff, with very much"tnore
of the same kind, $0*ta thia state 1,260
annually, and we prelsts with our peo
ple feel Justified In protesting against
such an expense, which makes us
ridiculous.
We ask you as bishop of this dio
cese, to forward this, our complaint,
to the governor of this state, and w#
remain, your obedient servanta.
i i ... Monuments.
Ar- W. Raymond, pioneer monument
ancTgravestone man,will call on anyone
wisning^anvthlng In his line. Address
GREAT COMMOTION
IN THEATRE FIRE
ACTORS AND CHORU8 FORCED TO
LEAVE HERALD SQUARE
THEATRE IN SCANT
COSTUMES.
New York, Dec. 23.—Fire broke out
in the Herald Square theatre at Thir
ty-fifth street and Broadway last
night, ten minutes before the close of,
the performajiee ^f The Three Twins,
and before It was brought under con
trol had dohe considerable damage to
the building, had driven the actors
and chorus Into the streets In their
scant costumes, and had caused great
commotion among tha theatre crowds
on Broadway. There waa no panic
and no one was injured, the audience
remaining in ignorance of the fire un
til moRt of them had passed into the
streets. The fire caught from a large
electric sign on the front of the theatre
building and spread to the executive
offices which are opposite the second
gallery of the auditorium. The dam
age done was about $20,000.
Miles standlsh.
Finest and mildest 10-cent cigar.
SIlilKE-bliLAtii.KS
OUT IN FORCE
SEEK TO OFF8ET ACTION OF NEW
YORK DRIVER8.
A large force of strike-breakers has
been sent to fhe stables of the New
York Cab TVr. and the'executive com
mittee of the livery stable keepers' as
sociation has decided to employ a still
larger force to take the places of Its
striking employes. A thousand strike
breakers, all told, have already been
engaged.
At the recent meeting of the Ameri
can Street and Interurban Engineering
association at Atlantic City, a new
system of street railway construction
was proposed. The idea was to form
the car wheels without flanges, but.
Instead, to place the flanges on the
rails.
"Every Day Is Xmas Day
Every day will be Christmas Day with your friend if you make
%is Christmas Gift
a
year's subscription to
FARGO
STATE MILITIA
FORUM
ANp DAILY REPUBLICAN
Per It will be delivered to him*by boy or mail for 313 days next
'year. He will have a daily reminder of the thoughtfulness erf
his friend. 313 CHRISTMAS GIFTS.
The cost ff a year's subscription to the daily edition is Four
r.
Dollars when paid in advance. If you would send the weekly
edition the cost is but One Dollar and the recipient would be re
minded fifty-two times of* your thoughtfulness. Attend to this
patter now.
*-rv
i
SUBSCRIPTION DEPARTMENT
HEFARGaFORUM
PHONE 1395 FARGO, N. D.
si
sijpriis Pit
ADJUTANT GENERAL OF N. O. fl.
a 8PENDS DAY IN FARGO ON
GUARD MATTERS OFFICERS
AND ENLISTED MEN WANT HIM
RKTAINED ANOTHER TERM.
When asked today wljo l.e thought
would be adjutant general during tha
next two yearB, Tho*. 41. Poole,' thf
present adjutant general, laid, '1 do
not know who."
"How about the endorsement of the
national guard of this state?" was
asked, and General Poole replied thnt
there was no doub tbut that he ha*
the support of the entire organiza
tion, both commissioned and enlisted.
"I have been informed by ottlctfn U
the guard." said General Poole, "that
at the encampment at American laks
practically all the committsionad cflks
ers of the organizations signed an en
dorsement of me asking that I be re
tained as the adjutant genercl of ?i»*
state. I have al8." beer tcfornw! t&at
a similar endorsement has be»n pass«d
recently by the enlisted men of the
guard and that practically the entire
guard has unanimously endorsed me.
This Is very gratifying to me
some of the officers who are now my
heartiest supporters did not vote to
endorse me at the time of my appoint
ment, feeling that I would bring poli
tics into the guard in the administra
tion of my office and all those inter
ested are not unanimously in favor
of my retention In office which is a
flattering compliment. The first and
unanimous endorsement of my ad
ministration came from Company
Valley City.
"I wish also to state that whether I
am retained In office or not I will
contlnup to do what I can for the good
of the guard of the state and will be
on hand at the next session of the
legislature to boost for the organiza
tion."
Adjutant General Poole came in last
night from Bismarck and spent today
In the city on militia matter*, tie Ml
stopping at the Metropole.
But two parts of the engine of the
liner Etrurla, built In 1885, have been
replaced.
TO RIDE NIAGARA'
IN liLliiill
It LEACH PLANS HAZARDOUS
TRIP OVER THUNDERING
WATERWAY. .4
Ottawa, Ont.^ Dec. 23.—A Niagara
Falls (Ont.) dispatch announces that
Robert Leach intends to go over Ni
agara Falls In June in a rubber ball.
N«w York, Dec. 23.—A general tie
up of all stables and garages owned
by members of the Livery Stable Own- I life, eleven feet in diameter,
ers' association is slated by the cab- ner ball will be ljeld in position by
men and chauffeurs on strike, whose four spiral steel springs and sufficient
leaders have ordered out the 1,000 men oxygen will be pumped into It to give
still at work in fifteen stables. This
means that 2.500 men will be on
strike
and forty-five stables crippled or idle.
Employers and strikers are confident
of victory In this, the second big cab
strike In New York city In three
months.
There will be two balls, one within
the other. The outer ball will be thir
teen feet in diameter and the Inner
one, in which Leach will hazard his
c.
The ift-
the man a bare chance for life if
anything goes wrong.
The ball will be placed -In the Ni
agara river at Chippewa, and will float
through the upper rapias down over
the mighty cataract.
Leach has been through the Whirl
pool rapids twice In eight days. He
went over the Cohoea falls, Albany
twice, and took a seventy-five foot
dive off a bridge at Arlington, N. J.
He is prepared to wager $1,000 to $500
that his June descent over tb
will be successful.
The servant who can read, reads the
help want ads—and those who can't
read are usually not good servants.
Weather Observer Grass* Is show
ing a little Improvement every day
now and It is reported at St. John's
hospital that Mr. Orasse may be able
to spend the first of the week at his
own fireside.
99
C"

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