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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, March 31, 1909, Image 12

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1909-03-31/ed-1/seq-12/

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AN 800
AC HE
To be subpoenaed under the prohibi
tion law to submit testimony relative
to conditions as they exist with regard
to violations of the law at Tower City,
and to be placed under arrest on the
charge of bootlegging after his deposi
tion is taken is what happened yester
day to William Walton, a dray driver
+t Tower City. Dalton declares hi*
arrest unwarranted and promises to
put up a fight to establish his inno
cence.
The authorities have been active in
Tower City within the past week, no
1ms than three arrests on the charge
of bootlegging preceding that of Dal
ton. A hotel keeper and a Northern
Pacific telegraph operator were arrest
ed at that town Monday. That the
authorities might know more of condi
tions there four witnesses were
subpoenaed yesterday under the pro
hibition law to give testimony. They
were William Dalton, Arnold Beltman,
James Charles and Henry Beaasch.
These witnesses testified that they
were In the habit of making a pool for
the purchase of liquor. This liquor,
bought in gallon lots, was carried from
the railway station by Dalton, a dray
driver, to the blacksmith shop of
5Beltman.
«5iU.
Wt
"&
There it was poured into
•four bottles, each holding a quart. The
queries in the investigation were put
by State's Attorney Fowler. Other
testimony, it is said, came out. leading
the authorities to believe Dalton should
be arrested. Deputy Sheriff J. K
Bingham took the dray driver into
custody. Judge Miller set the date of
his hearing at 10 o'clock tomorrow
morning and placed his bonds at $250,
Which he furnished.
Dalton declares that he never
handled the goods without acting as an
agent.
Easter Silk Sa%
At deL»endrecie's. Read
page six.
kHibmm «ti*
i
IN
Morton B!Kk
GIVES TESTIMONY
mm
is
WILLIAM DALTON, DRAY DRIVER,
SUBPOENAED TO TELL ABOUT
CONDITIONS AS THEY EXIST AT
TOWER CITY, SURPRISED AFTER
DEPOSITION IS TAKEN.
ad. on
SPRING ADVERTISING.
-Publicity is just as important as
merit. Business men recognize this
more than formerly. Personal letters
are next to personal interviews. The
Dakota Business College expert will
heijp outline an advertising campaign
and furnish the stenographic help to
carry it out.
-A
City Property
$2700
i'ur tfood corner
property, 80x130
feet, room
huuoe, icu, cistern, electric lights,
fine trees, east'front, on car line.
Good terms.
$2300
feet, fine trees,
$500 cash, balance $25 per month.
Fifth avenue south.
is so easy to be well
dressed at so small a
cost, nowadays, that we
wonder so many men are
not better dressed.
When yon find it so con
venient to come into this
store and buy
Hart Schaffner
& Marx
fuits and overcoats, ready
to wear with a style and
all-wool qnality and tailor
ing, such as you find in no
other clothes it's strange
that anybody can be per
suaded to do any other way.
Here are the best suits and
overcoats in the world.
Suits $18 to $40
Overcoats $15 to $50
This store it the home
the very heart of the choicest of the
Red River Valley, a finely improved
farm with complete «et of buildings, con
sisting ot good comfortable nine room
dwelling, fine new barn, two good grana
ries with capacity of 15.000 bushels, good
machinery hall, blacksmith shop and un
limited supply of pure, excellent water,
Tws Hundred Aorss In Tlmethy and Ct«v*r
All the balance under cultivation and
plowed. No finer farm of its size in the
northwest. All high and dry. This excel
lent property to be sold before seeding for
$37.50 PER ACRE
One
Fourth
f'nsh Upotiirecl.
PAGE BfNEDICT USD CO
By the end of next week the Fargo
Commercial club will occupy the en
tire floor of its present location, in
creasing the present number of rooms
by two. These two rooms will be the
one now occupied by the Builders &
Traders' exchange and the large room
Immediately in the rear of the pres
ent commercial club parlor, which has
been occupied by the candy factory
of the Geo. Pirle Co.
The candy kitchen has been moved
over the bakery of the company lo
cated on Fifth street and this morning
force of carpenters started to re
model this room, which will be fitted
up as a card room for the members
of the commercial club. A door is
being cut through from the parlor,
near the north wall and the new room
will be nicely fitted up and finished.
Builders. Will Move.
The Builders & Traders' exchange,
which for several years has occupied
the small room just south of the sec
retary's office, will move to new quar
ters in the Henderson block. For some
time it has been considered that a,
change was necessary as the room
now occupied is entirely too small for
the purpose of the exchange, which
is rapidly growing.
The new room in the Henderson
block is now being reflnished and it
is expected that the exchange will be
able to occupy it by the last of next
week. These quarters are ideal for
the local exchange, as it supplies about
six times as much room as the pres
ent location and adjustable partitions
will be put In to furnish rooms for
those wishing to figure plans
In addition to other improvements
samples of building materials asd cat
alogues from the various houses It*
the country will be installed and will
give the members of the exchange
something for which they have been
looking for a long time.
For both the commercial club anc
the exchange the new improvementi
are ideal and will greatly enhance th
attractiveness of the quarters of both
Farmers Attention.
Loois Hotop is looking for falret
weather. He has a lot of men for al
kinds of farm work. Address him a
Savings and Loan Bldg., Fargo.
"Of ',).
of
Hart
Schaffner & Mux clothes.
J. F. BOI MF,S & CO.
100-102 BROADWAY
Mom
KxoeUent
Reasons for Sellinp. Easy Terms and Low In
terest Rate on Balance.
Fiioiie
\o. !W2
MORE ROOM FOR
IMREHL CIS!
TWO MORE ROOMS WILL BE
ADDED TO THE CLUB'S SUITE
BUILDERS AND TRADERS TO
HAVE A FINE 8EPARATE FV)OM
OP THEIR OWN.
j.ve Knight Prlntlr Co. orbit tt.
Farms
ISO
Rea river,
acre
320
For 6 room house,
cellar and electric
lights, lot 100x150
property fenced^
ntflea to
Fargo, 2H miles to
Harwood. Close to the
Rich, black soil. Per
$23.00
ACRES fine land, about
5 miles to Grandin. Fine
new house, large barn,
gir«r i: and out-buildlngs two fine
wells. Land all under cultivation,
practically all ready for crop. A
fine farm. Per acre $40.00
Easy terms to good buyer.
I have the following forms for rent:. 320 acres in Berlin townShlp.
with good buildings 160 acres in Clay county, all ready for crop 111
acres six miles west of Fargo, one mile to Canfleld.
Money to Loan and Houses ior Rent
W. D. Hodgson, Fargo, N. Dak.
"7.''. ,v ***'.
,•
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THE LIGHTING
i
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v
4
PpPPnS!TIflN
(lis IVnim has offered cltl
sens' committee space each day to
discuss the waterworks bond Issue and
municipal light proposition. The Fo
rum donates the space free of charge—
In a spirit of fairness to all inter
ests—and with a desire to enlighten
the readers. The following is one of
the articles furnished by the commit
tee. The Forum suggests that private
Individuals who have something of this
nature to submit, first turn over their
manuscript to W. D. Sweet, J. J. Jor
dan or Rt|y Jtfrwia of publicity
committee.}-
The littleVtty 6f DetroTt Winn., the
beautiful resort where hundreds of Fftr
goans And health, rest and recreation
during the hot summer months, has
demonstrated what can be done with
municipally owned and managed Insti
tutions. A clear profit of $27,000 over
and above operating expenses is the
record that has been established for
the waterworks and light plant of
that city in the past six years. The
fact should be considered that the con
sumption of electrical current Is limit
ed at all times of the year, on account
of the size of the place. If Detroit
can make this showing is there any
legitimate reason to believe that Fargo
with hundreds of industries to supply,
can not do still better. The publicity
committee has a detailed statement of
the water and light fund for the city
of Detroit. The following are the re
ceipts and disbursements:
o o
Water and Lignt PttM&
Reoeipts.
Cash on hand Feb. 1. 1908-.i7,02.08
Received" from heat and
power 1,826.40
Received from water 4,705.45
Received from light 10,966.73
Received from meter rent.... 430.00
Received from material 1,428.09
L. C. WEEKS.
MONUMENTS
Oeo. Cat uici ietor of the Far
go Marble and Granite Works has
removed his large stock to No. 201
and 203 N. P. avenue. Come to the
works and purchase for spring deliv
ery and save the agents' commissiop.
Catalogue sent free on request.
Have you seen Hatcher Bros.'
monthly
policy.<p></p>IUXMSB
THE
It's a peach.
Methodist Editor to Be One of th«
Speakers at the Convention
Here in May.
One of the leading speakers for the
Methodist Sunday School association
to be held In Fargo May 27-30, is Rev.
E. S. Lewis, editor of the Sunday
School Advocate of New York. Of
s. Lewis,
him, Joseph Clark, general secretary
for Ohio, writes:
"Few men In the Sunday school
world are heard more profitably on
Sunday school and Bible themes than
Dr. E. S, Lewis. He Is a Sunday Bchool
philosopher, a born teacher and a ver
satile scholar. He never speaks with
out causing his hearers to think.
"I congratulate any invention that
is able to secure him as a speaker."
This convention will be a great
therlng of the Methodist Sunday
sciiool workers. Every pastor, church
official, Sunday school officer and
teacher is expected to attend. It
means the inauguration of an aggres
sive work hi the northwest by the
Methodists.
V nr.mil
«.
iMPl|il|||ft)Pli(|gg|||piTif»IWWIIMWWMMMIMI»ro^
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$24,758.75
Disbursement*.
... -K....
Rjepatrs
Fuel and .oil....
Stock and materia *.......
*..
Waterworks extension.......
Miscellaneous items
Insurance
Books and stationery
Geo. Learman salary
Fred Edwards salary
Horace Bell, salary
J. H. Bastian. salary
Chas. Q. StuHevant, salary
Salary, extra help
Salaries, water and light
commission
Cash on hand Feb. 1 1909.. .11362.53
9 178.84
7,496.57
1,109.15
2,147.49
67.28
130.00
70.23
1,200.00
600.00
140.00
455.25
$99.96
98.45
3.00
$26,758.75
o
The following letter received by
Prof. P. S. Rose of the A. C. from
Mayor L. C. Weeks of Detroit, Minn.,
well known to many Fargoans indi
cates what he thinks of municipal
ownership:
Detroit, Minn., March 26.—Prof. P.
S. Rose: Six years ago the city of
Detroit purchased the electric light
system then in use, at a price of $16,
000. A system of waterworks was
owned by the city at that time and
the two systems were placed in charge
of three commissioners appointed by
the district court. Bonds were issued
to pay for the electric light plant, and
the only expense to the tax payer has
been the interest on the bonds. In the
six years these two ^systems have
earned $27,000. New mains have cost
$5,000 and $3,000 has been spent for
poles, wires, etc., to replace worn out
material. We have now on hand
$12,000 clear profit as compared to
.$7,0ftD last, year Respectfully,
v
THE FARGO F6RTJH AND DAILY REPUBLICAN", WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 31, 19J9.
AFTER MERCHANTS 'NORTH DAKOTA HAN
ww mnr cera
DAIRY G6MMI8IONER COMPILING
RULE8 TO GOVERN THE PRAC
TICE WHICH IS VERY DETRI­
MENTAL TO THE CREAMERY
BUSINESS I* THE STATS.
Assistant Talry Commissioner R. F.
Flint of Bismarck was in the city yes
terday on business and in an inter
view with Thfe Forum said that the
commissioner of agriculture and him
self have been working on a code of
rules governing the handling of cream
by the merchants in the towns and
cities of the state and that these rules
would soon be sent out to the mer
chants.
"It Is our intention to put a stop to
this business as much as possible,"
said Commissioner Flint this after
noon, "a it is a very disgusting prac
tice and has a tendency to reduce the
grade of cream as well as being un
sanitary. It is our business to promote
as well as govern the creamery and
dairy business of the state and at the
last session of the legislature a bill
was passed empowering the commis
sioner of agriculture and the dairy
commissioner to compile such rules as
were necessary for the good of the
business.
"This method of cream ^eing handl
ed by the groceryman Is not very pre
valent in the northern or central part
of the state but is being practiced
to a considerable extent in the south
ern part where dairying is quite ex
tensive and where there are a num
ber of creameries. It is largely car
ried on along the Soo railroad where
nearly every town has one or more
merchants handling cream.
Juggle for Business.
"The cream is bought from the'-ter
mers and then sold to the creameries
and where one merchant starts It the
rest have to adopt It to compete with
the other man or he would get all
the trade of the farmers bringing in
cream.
"This is the cause of considerable
juggling on the part of the merchants
to benefit their own interests in order
to draw the majority of the trade.
Cream is often graded higher than it
Is often worth and the consequence
is the creameries that get hold of this
kind of cream find it very unprofi
table.
"In addition it is -most unsanitary
and Is absolutely disgusting. I have
gone in the rear rooms of some of the
groceries in the small towns and found
the cream cans piled up on the floor
which is covered with decayed cream
taht has been spilled there and among
stale eggs and hides. We intend to go
after this practice most forcibly and
will do everything in our power to put
an end to it.
Contemplating Much Work.
"The prospects are that we have a
most busy season during the coming
summer as we intend to push dairy
sanitation strongly. Of course we can
not go to a farmer and tell him that
he will have to put a concrete floor
in his cow barn but we can see to it
that he keeps his cow barn clean.
"From indications there will be
many of the idle creameries opened
up during the summer and we are
going to do all that we can to pro
mote the business and raise the stand
ard of cream and butter all over the
state. The dafry papers say that the
new North Dakota is one of the best
in the country and are commenting
very favorably upon it and upon the
proposed reforms we intend to in
stitute."
Local Dairymen Make Good Move.
In speaking1 of the adoption of the
system of grading by the dairymen
of Fargo and^Ioorhead at the meet
ing yesterda* Commissioner Flint
said, "I was "I was talking to some of
the dairymen about, the proposition
and I think that it is a fine move on
their part and wiPi greatly improve
conditions. Of course it would not
work by adopting it all over the state
as a state ruling, but for 'localities' it
Is good.
"The system of grading will make
every dairyman strive to keep every
thing in the best of condition pos
sible for It is human nature for every
man to want to stand at the head of
the list. In this way it will worM
wonders."
SEED
TIMOTHY
I still have about seventy-five hush
els of line seed tinjothy for sale at
81.60 per bushel. First come, first
served.
Hans Larson,
Argusvllle, IT, D.
Easter Goods.
Howard fltfoody has a splendid show
ing of suits, coats, skirts and waists
for Easter.
APRON AND CQOKERIE SALE
By ladies of the Gethsemane guild,
Saturday afternoon at 610 Front
street. Beautiful to see and taster
Caster Silk SaUy.
At deLendrtcie's*
page six:
HIRW
BOSTON.
«&v *n
$4350
will buy a" fine, new, all modern
house of eight rooms, full base
ment, furnace, bath, electric
lights, gas, hardwood floors up
and down stairs lawn, cement
walks., Jk-ot ifcUWV ,1
tiNTRlS. n A n
$1500
will buy a fine six room cottage,
brick foundation, gas range,
piazza, trees, ehioken house.' A
bargain.
Houses for Ret#
Money to Loaft v «,/
Fire Insurance
W. J. LANE
Office Ov Fir mi National fMak
Phone* 80? and «S4
V v- J" 7 i v,: 7 1*
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•/-. /•"*. "-vy ^S* T» ~-^ik /V A.-. .i4'V* Ji,,
JOURNAL SAYS
Prof. Samuel WlTliston of the Har
vard law law school presided, and the
judges were Prof. James. F. Colby of
the Djartmouth law school. Judge H. K.
Braley of the Massachusetts supreme
court and Dean W. D. Lewis of the
Pennsylvania law school.
Harvard was represented bjr.
Foley's Honey and Tar cures coughs
quickly, strengthens the lungs and ex
pels colds. Get the genuine in a yel
low package. H. Casselman.
Hegge Quits
y.5 v
J. T.
O'CONNOR OF GRAND FORKS
TOWER8 ABOVE OTHER MEM
BERS OF YALE TEAM IN DE
BATE RECENTLY
HELD.
J. T. f1. O'Connor of Grand Forks ts
winning a splendid reputation in the
east for his forensic abilities. The
Boston Journal of March 27, has the
following account of a debate between
Yale and Harvard teams in which he
was one of the representatives of Tale:
"The negative side of the question,
•Resolved,, that all corporations en
gaged in Interstate commerce should
be compelled to take out a federal
charter,' proved victorious In each of
the three debates held between Har
vard, Yale and Princeton in the first
triangular debate between these uni
versities last evening.
"Each was represented by two de
bating teams, which took part at dif
ferent places. Harvard and Yale de
bated at Cambridge, in Sanders
theatre, and the crimson, representing
the negative side of the question, won
the debate. Harvard's other team rep
resented the affirmative side of the
question with Princeton at Princeton
hist evening and lost, while Yale and
Princeton debated at New Haven and
the blue won with the negative side of
the question, making each college win
ning with their negative team and los
ing with their affirmative team.
"Harvard and Yafe debated in Cam
bridge before a large crowd. O'Connor
of Yale was without doubt the b^st de
bater of the evening on either team.
His arguments were weighty and well
presented. So strong was he that he
even made the men on his own teami
appear weak and inefficient beside him.
"The judges awarded the decision to
Harvard for more resourcefulness in
argument and better command of the
issues. Yale laid stronger emphasis
on the point that under the present
conditions a single state or group of
states with lax laws for the Incorpor
ation and regulation of trusts can af
fect the Whole country In evil manner,
while Harvard argued fop the present
system as sufficient to cure the evils
of trusts.
Today.
Bismarck. N. D., March 81.—Land
Commissioner Hegge is today check
ing over the affairs of his office pre
paratory to transfering the depart
ment to. his successor, Senator Sam
MacDonald who assumes control to.
morrow.
Read the electric light advertise
ments both morning and evenlns.
WITH HATCHER BROS.
Roy Flagg of the Dakota Business
College has been assisting with extra
work in the busy office of Hatcher
Bros. D. B. C. training prepares
young men to be of great service In
such offices. Business men arrang
ing a spring advertising
campaign can
get help at the D. B. O.
company
will
o. i.
Lewis, 1L., of Wellington, N. T. M.
Gregory of Bordentown, N. J., and
J. Whiteside, 1 L., of Evanston.
The Yale debaters were H. deF. Wid
ger, '10, of Cortland. N. Y., W. W.
Patterson, 2 L., of Columbus, Ga., and
J. T. F. O'Connor, 3 of Grand
Forks, N. D.
jufrw '*"'.v
k
Three Days' Bargains.
Bargains galore at Howard Moody's
for Thursday Friday and Saturday.
Duggan la Wanted
Bismarck, March 81.—Sheriff Mc
Gillls of Burleigh county, is Keeping
the wires hot in search of H..A. Dug
gan, late of Mandan, whom it seems
now has developed into a bond floater
of some consequence, having paid bills
with bogus checks at Mandan, B&t
marck and New Salem.
with
Fargo, North Dakota.
of tartar.
THIRD JU6tetALJ DISTWCT PEN
CIL-PUSHERS TO HOLD A MEET-
ING IN FARGO SATURDAY FORE
NOON TO CON8IDER BUSINESS
MATTE**
President SafTord and Secretary
Montelth of the Third Judicial Dis
trict Press association, announce that
a meeting of the organization will bo
held at the Commercial club rooms
at 10 o'clock Saturday morning, April
8. The session Is called to consider
some important business matters and
every publisher in Cass, Steele and
TralH is requested to attend.
The association was organised last
fill and this is the first meeting called
by its officers. The president is pub
lisher of The Hillsboro Blade and the
secretary is the man at the helm of
The Finley Beacon.
Have Knight Prtntinc Co. print it
Capital $100,000.00
*7 *v
Made from''''I
cream of tartar, derive! solely
from grapes. All* the ingredients
of Dr. Price's Baking Powder
are printed on the labeL They
are pure, healthful and proper.
When baking powder* are peddled or
clemonsfxaled, examine their labels. You
find they are not made from cream
't want them
Cream.
EDITORS
ARE C(F\[i
n i 1 1 In Lumber, Building Material
Best uraoes Uniy H*rd
Ju»t Phone 39 for a board or a carload of Lumber.
Coal deliverd in large or tmall quantities.
Local Deliveries -Free Estimates—Prompt Service
A Good Grade of Lignite Coal
J. A. CHESLEY, Lumber
Near Corner Broadwav ani Fourth Aven«*' Nortfe. Farjo, N. D.
A#- L-.VVALIj
*.LUMBERr:DEALER
DOORS, WINDOWS AND INTERIOR FINI5J:
CORNER FRONT
ni
Time Tried: Time Tested!
Any financial institution SEEKING the SAV
INGS of investors can'make UNLIMITED,,
PROMISES as to the safe eourse it will pu%
sue, the wise policy it has-adopted, and the prow
its it will pay, but the institution that has for a/
PERIOt) of YEARS fulfilled its every prom*
ise, actually paid its investors a pro rata share off
the NET EARNINGS and has TANGIBLE EVIDENCB?
in the way of large income assets that it can pay large pro&
its in the futufe, is the institution that commands the atter**
tion and respect orf the man of capital, the man
income, and the man who labors. I i
If you have not stopped to think of that phase of it. we want'
you to think it over, and we are, confident that your attention^
and YOUR SAVINGS will be diverted to the time-tested
company—a company with a. continuous record of 11 par
cent profits since organization—a company that has doubled
the volume of its business over the same period ih
actual
assets of over
SEND FOR OUR NEW ILLUSTRATED BOOKLET
North Dakota Improvement Company?
"M"lt
V^ A WV.
mm w.
OLD FASHIONED
REVIVAL IN FARGO
RBV. J. H. FUfWER OF ST. LOUIS,
MO., WILL CONDUCT SERIES AT
THE GLAD TIDINGS MISSION
PROMISES TO STIR THE WrfOL3
CITY.
A
real old-fasfohed revival wFll b«
held^ at Glad Tidings mission on^|
Front street beginning Friday, Apill
2. These meetings will be conduct*
-by Rev. J. H. Flower of St Louis,
Mo., one of the most successful evan
gellsts of the Free. Methodist church
In the country and he promises to be
one of the best drawing cards that
has appeared In the religious world of
Fargo in some time.
The meetings will be hold at th#
mission for ten days with services be
ginning at 3 and 7:30 p. ifi. All are
cordiaHy invited to these meetings,
especially those who afe interested ifll
the real old-time revival meetings.
andSoft Coals. Pmes Right-
TWELFTH ST. SO. PHONE 386
of
Peserve
1
n
1
w"
moderate
1908—£'
One Quarter el a Miilioa.
$75,000.0$
*r.
At
.SM*
'7?M Minneapolis, Minnesota i

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