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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, June 12, 1911, Image 8

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1911-06-12/ed-1/seq-8/

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Evening Grain Letter.
•t Chicago^ June 12.—Wheat: The mar
|Bit opened irregular. Armed temporar
ily and as on Saturday turned very
weak with the July delivery leading
the decline, with pressure in the same
Coming from all directions. There
^ere further timely rains in the north
western country, which continue to
jnake prospects in that section mora
favorable. At the low point of the day
July wheat sold within l%c per bush
il of the low point of the crop (April
while the September delivery was
Within 1 cent per bushel of the low
point of the same date, notwithstand
ing a decline so severe as that of the
past week, it is difficult to see where
any real influence, which should make
for better prices, obtains. Those here
tofore who seemingly were looking for
either an accident or a miracle per
manently to advance prices must be
rather discouraged and possibly realize
that nature usually is true to herself
and that the law of supply and demand
generally is the controlling factor in
price making rather than accident*.
Live Stock Price*.
j}t, Paul. June 12.—Cattle—Cows and
btlfer*, J2 40#5.25.. Steers—Stockers,
[email protected] feeders, $3.50a5-35.
Hogs—2,700 market 6c to 10c lower
Cqpge, [email protected]{6.05 bulk, [email protected]«.00
tattle—1:500, steady.
Hheep—200, steady.
Rogers & Rogers.
Visible Supply Chang*.
Wheat decrease, 867,fftl0 bushels.
Corn increase, 668,000 bushels.
Oats increase, 736,000 Bushels.
Total Visible Supply.
Wheat—Today, 25,971,000 last year,
16,886,000.
Corn—Today, 5,35*,000 last year,
1,084,000.
Oats—Today, 9,418,000 today. 5,54f,
900.
Rye—Today, 31,000 last year, 602.000
Barley—Today, 866,000 last year, 1,
784,000.
Broomhall's Report.
Liverpool. June 12.—Total world's
jhipments—Wheat last week, 12,512,
000 previous week, 16,584,000 last
year, 8.820,000 bushels. Corn ship
ments last week, 5,344,000 previous
week, 5,528,000 last year, 2,521000
bushels. The wheat market opened
Weak in sympathy with the decline
In American on Saturday with values
to lower. Following the opening
there was a disposition by shorts to
tover on the lighter world's shipments
than expected and the decline for a
Ume was checked. Later, however,
further realizing developed and the
narket further declined from the
Dpening. The united k'ngdom received
ft large percentage of the world's ship
ments and stocks held unchanged in
stead of a liberal decrease as expected.
Russian weather and crop news con
tinue favorable as well as general Eu
ropean crop advices and France is
jltering to sell nearby Australian car
joes at a decline. There is a very
imall inquiry for all positions and all
nearby stuff is rather pressed for sale.
Ji.t 1:30 p. m. the market was un
changed and to 1 penny lower than
Saturday. The corn maTket opened
lower and further declined on the
lower American cables and heavy ship
ments from Russia and the Danube.
kt midday the market was weak. Llv
srpool stocks of wheat, 1,960,000 corn,
44,000 bushels these compare with
wheat, 1,960,000 corn. 901,000 bushels
teat week. Broomhall.
Lfvt Stock Receipts.
Chicago, June 12.—Hogs 42,000 left
tver 1,782 prospects 5c lower Sat
urday's average cattle 23,000 steady
Iheep 23.000 weak hogs light 6.00(g)
J.80 mixed [email protected],6.3O heavy [email protected]
1.80 rough $5.85 6.00.
Omaha, June 12.—Hogs 6,000 cattle
1,000 sheep 2,400.
Kansas City, June 12.—Hogs 14,000
tattle 13,000 sheep 8,000.
v
MARKET COMMENT OF THE DAY,
B. F. Co.
Foreign Cablee.
Liverpool, June 12.—Wheat closed
01 lower corn lower corn.
Paris, June 12.—Wheat closed
.% lower flour 1 %@l lower.
Antwerp, June 12.—Holiday.
Berlin. June 12.—Wheat closed
higher.
Buda Pesth, Jttn« IS.—Wheat closed
UfbM«
Qrain Reoeipt*.
Chicago, June 12.—Wheat, 19 last
year, 12 cars. Corn, 431 last year,
181. Oats, 179 last year, 121 cars.
Minneapolis, June II.—Wheat, 894
tact year, 334 cars.
£uulth, Jun© 12.—42 last year, 80
ears.
Winnipeg, June 18.—Wheat, 135 last
year, 100 cars.
Wheat on Passage.
Wheat on passage this week 56,
188*000 last week 58,872,000 last year
CHAS. E. LEWIS & COj
Stocks, Bonds,
Grain, Cotton
New York Stoefc
*11111! I'
4
Ejd
All Leading Eaehngta
York Mc*fo "orr«i»po!
fcartletl, Fraurr Co.
Ittfrh, Wiaiiurop & %.a.
H. O. MOTT, Manager
ffeonc its Mcwtoa
Fartfo, N. It.
Mala Olfic* •&ts tumikev «fl ce«»*
sttcrc«% Wfimrnamiile
111 1
8.
•:if
W"!',
Hides.
Hl4la Quotations by Bolls* A Rogers.
Fargo, N. D.
Na
G, S. cured hides 9^
Green frozen hides 7%
G.
40,900,000. Com this week 12,810,000
last week 9,885,000 last year 8.602,000.
World's Shipments.
Wheat: American 2,368,000 Rus
sian 4,224,000 Danubian 408,000 India
1,928,000 Argentine 2,512,000
No. 3
No. 3 white oats, to arrive
No. 3 oats
Barley, malting
Barley, feed ...
Flax
Rye '4'
No. a.
8^
cured calf .....,..14
Green calf skins 11
&.• S. cured horse .2.75
Sheep pelts each 25 to
Tallow 4%
12
10
1 75
75
Woei.
(North and South Dakota.)
n ne
-Seavy fine
ifedium
hoarse
iurry and aeedy
fery burry or seedy
Sotted and black
Jhoice Angora
,'ommon Angora
.... 9 to 18
8 to 10
••••18 to 15
"••ill to 13
9 to 13
'•«.« to
.... 9 to 18
••..17 to 18
9 to 14
All alrove qxiotaJlKocui are T. O. B.
fil
•aMnasi
Aus­
tralian 984,000 Chili, N. A., 88,000
total 12,512,000. Corn, total 5,344,000.
GRAIN RECEIPT*
Chas. E. Lewie 6. Co., Grain and Stock
Brokers, Morton Block, Fargo.
July Wheat
Chi. Minn.
Open 88*
High 8® •»4%
Low 85% M%
Close 86% .92%
Sk
.94%
.93H
98%
September Wheat.
Chi. Minn.
Open 88%
High 88%
Low 86%
Close 86% •90*
Dul.
.91%
92%
.90%
.80%
Deeember Wheal.
Chi.
Open
High
Low
Open
High
Low
Minn.
.92%
.92%
.90%
.81%
.90
.90%
.88
.90
.90%
.88
Open
High
Low 1
.90
.90%
.88
Close ee .88%
St. Louie.
July
Open 84%
Close 88%
Sept.
.86%
•84%
Kansas City.
July
Am''
Open,
Close
Sept.
.84%
.82%
Am'' 84%
82%
New York.
July
Open «w* «... .96%
Close .93%
Close .93%
Sept
94%
.88
Winnipeg.
July
Open ••••#•*. ««esee 98%
Close ••ee -97%
Chicago Corn.
Oct
.87%
.87%
July Sept.
Open .66%
High .55% .57%
Low .14% .68
Close 56%
Opett 15.IS
Hlgi V 15.»
Low 15.12
Close 15.40
Dee.
.54%
.56%
.55
.65%
Chicago Oata
July Sept
Open ..... .17% .88%
High ..... .18% 89%
Low ..... .17% .38%
Close 38% .39
Dec.
.40
.40%
.40
.40%
Chicago Pork.
July
Sept
14.92
15.15
14.92
15.15
Minneapolis Wheat
^uly
Put#
Calls
Sept.
.89%
.91%
ts%
Winnipeg Close.
No. 1 northern 9(5^4
No. 8 northern .98%
No. 3 northern .89%
July oats .37%
October oata
.35%
July flax 2.20
October flax
Minneapolis Caeh Close.
No. 1 hard $ .95%
No. 1 northern 9434
No, 1 northern, to arrive
94%
No. 2 northern .93%
No. 2 northern, to arrive
.93
No. 8 northern
No. 1 durum
No. 1 durum, to arrive
No. 2 durum
No. 2 durum,
No. 3 yellow corn
No. 3 yellow corn, to arrive .1
No. 4 corn
.91%
.83%
if W •ill*®.
1,
.92
.81%
52%
.52%
51%
to arrlvtV........
ir com r.
jvhite oats 30^
.36%
.85%
.95
.75
8.88
.88
Duli^h Cash Cfoee.
•94%
.93%
•91%
•37%
.88
84%
82%
•84%
.82
No 1 hard
No. 1 northern
No. 2 northern
Cash oats ....
Rye
No. 1 durum ....
No. 2 durum ....
July durum ....
September durum
Cash flax, on track 2^82
Cash flax, to arrive 2.32
Duluth Flax.
July Sept Oct.
Close 2.38 1.88 1.83
Local Markets.
No. 1 northern .86
No. 2 northern ...............88-,84
No. 1 durum \n
No. 2 durum
Late Events
The Misses Mary and Dolly Askew
or Casselton are the guests this week
of their aunt, Miss Clara Nelson of
Sixth avenue north,
Roy Smith was arrested by Chief of
Police Bowers today, charged with be
ing drunk and sleeping on the streets.
The chief found Smith under a sleigh
on Second street and pulled him out
of his resting place. He will be ar
raigned in the morning before Judge
Miner.
wl C°l E- c-
Oearey celebrated his 70th
birthday anniversary with a quiet fam
ily reunion yesterday afternoon, when
the immediate family called to pay
their respects. A luncheon was served
at the close of the afternoon, the guests
departing shortly after with many well
wishes for Colonel Gearey.
Mrs. W. H. Comrie of Third ave
nue south entertained at dinner Satur
day evening in honor of her daughter,
Miss Alice, who will become the bride
of Ralph Sproul of Belfield, next Wed
nesday. The wedding will take plac*
at the home of the bride's parentsr
Covers were laid for eight of the bride
to-be's young lady friends and the ta
ble was attractively laid with roses as
decorations.
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. More of Wimble
don were the guest* of friends and
relatives during the XT. C. T. conven
tion last week.
Chas. E. Anderson and Miss Agnes
Alcox, daughter of Mr- and Mrs.
Henry Alcox of First avenue north,
will be married this evening at 5
o'clock by Father Egan, at his resi
dence. They will make their home in
the Wellington apartments- The mar
riage will be witnessed by James Ro
han and Miss Mae Alcox, sister of the
bride.
In some parts of Chicago people
continue to carry revolvers to dances.
We think we may, without showing
prejudice, say that it not polite.
If Horace Greeley were alive today,
would he advise California young men
to go west and grow up with the
irrr?
I W
IS Nil MSiOfiy
FARGO 8EEM8 QUIET TODAY FOL
LOWING THE "BIG NOISE" OF
THE U. C. T. CONVENTION-
CLOSED SATURDAY NIGHT IN
LITERAL BLAZE OF GLORY.
Fargo ia comparatively quiet today
following the great U. C. T. conven
tion which came to a successful close
Saturday night.
It closed in a veritable "blaze of
glory," the blaze being caused by pow
erful searchlights which were fastened
in such a way that they threw their
piercing glare down Roberts street, one
from N. P. avenue and the other from
Second avenue north. The two blocks
between the lights wore as light as
day.
In this bright light, capered and
danced the masked fun makers by the
thousand. The music was furnished
by the Lake Park and Putnam bands.
One of the most enthusiastic delega
tions at the big convention was the
Crookston 88. The Crookston council
spared no expense in boosting for the
convention. They won the prize for
having the best appearing lineup in
the big parade and tied with Duluth
for having the most men in line from a
visiting council. They had the largest
representation, in proportion to the
number of their council of any visit
ing delegation. They won the second
prize in the baseball tournament, a
prize of 850. Crookston also won the
first prize for having the largest
woman's delegation present.
They were headed by the crack
Crookston band which furnished
splendid music during the last day of
the convention and at the big ball
Friday evening. The Crookston dele
gation left on a special train yesterday
morning at 10 o'clock and before the
train pulled out the band gave a short
concert at the station.
Both Fargo and St. Paul councils of
the United Commercial Travelers re
ceived loving cups at the recent con
vention, as did Mankato council, which
captured the Woods loving cup for
having the greatest increase.
A mistake was made in The Forum
in its Saturday issue when it stated
that the Woods cup was taken away
from Mankato by Fargo. Fargo re
ceived a cup, along with St. Paul, for
taking in the largest number of mem
bers by individuals. These cups were
awarded to W. L. Grasse of Fargo,
first prize for taking in thirty-eight
members, and to A. W. Lingberg of Ct.
Paul, second prize for taking in
twenty-six members.
Mankato won the Woods cup for
increased membership.
Chief Marshal Praiaed.
Much praise has been heard for R.
M. Thomson, chief marshal of the big
pageant Saturday mori.ing, for the able
manner in which he conducted the
great procession. Mr. Thomson did
admirably and his friends all feel that
the greater part of the success of the
mammoth parade is due to him and
his personal efforts and supervision.
The parade went off without a hitch
and still is the subject of much com
ment among the citizens and business
men of the city.
A correction should be made in the
number of U. C. T. council No. 64,
which is Grand Forks instead of Min
neapolis. The Grand Forks boys were
prominent in the parade and looked
among the very best and nobby in their
spectacular long coats.
The big events of Saturday after
noon were the sports at Island park
and the baseball, game between Duluth
and Crookston. Duluth won this game
by a score of 11 to 1 and landed the
first prize in the tournament and a
purse of J100.
The full list of the prize winners
of the sports In Island' park have not
been tabulated as yet but will be given
in full in The Forum tomorrow.
ENGINEER ANDERS
MOULT iiBM
CITY ENOFHEEN OF FARGO IS
ELECTED TO MEMBERSHIP OF
THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF
CIVIL ENGINEERS ONLY
THREE IN THE STATE.
Frank L- Anders, city engineer of
Fargo has been signally honored by
being elected to the membership of the
American Society of Civil Engineers,
which is the most exclusive engineer
ing society in America.
The election of Mr. Anders to the
organization is one of the greatest
honors that has ever come to the city
engineer. The society is the dean of
all the engineering societies in Ameri
ca and is by far the best of itB kind
on this side of the Atlantic.
There are now only three engineers
In the entire state of North Dakota who
have been so honored as to be selected
as a member of the American Society
of Civil Engineers. T. R. Atkinson,
the state engineer was the first one
to be elected from this state, then Pro.
fessor Chandler of the state university
and Mr. Anders is the third man to
have received the distinction.
SLENDER GIRL,
GjLiOPGfc -'The QiM icim going
J0l
90 ifcj
«'u 5 35 grac^--
l, u-T*1
fui as
wiHow."
A Chicago pr ift iisor has won an au
tomobile in a guessing contest. Chi
cago professors have long been con
sidered tim world's best gueasefs.
'4--
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1 1
TOT FAHGO FOHTTO AND DAILY HEPTTBLTCAJT, MOTDAY EtTOTTO, .tTTTE IS, mil
mm\
Myers alleges that he was seised
by the men under arrest on the county
road near Glyndon about 4 o'clock yes
terday afternoon and according to his
story they were hiding in the bushes.
He says he was thrown down and
relieved of all the money he had_ $1.80
and a gold ring and that after they
had robbed him they bound him up
with wire and left him. Myers says
he was found by parties who came
along shortly afterwards and after
they had released him from his en
tanglements they began a search for
the robbers who were hiding in the
bushes a distance away and they were
held until the arrival of the sheriff.
The prisoners are exceedinlgly verdant
looking and are. unknown la this com
munity.
mmu is COMING
Head of Boston School of Oratory to
Visit the Normal School—Will
Give Shakespearean Reading.
Those who heard the masterful
reading of the Twelfth Night by Dean
Southwick, president of the Emerson
School of Oratorv^ Boston, at the nor
mal school a year ago, will appreciate
the announcement that he is on hia
way ~m the west and is going to
stoj at Moorhead and Fargo, and
it is presumed that he will give a
reading before th© students of the
summer school at the normal and it
is to be hoped that he will select one
from the works of the Immortal
Shakespeare.
A Big "Kid."
The* civic league of Fergus Falls
has been smelling among the saloon
keepers who were put into business
when the town elected to go "wet" at
the annual election and has centered
its actions upon an effort to catch
saloon men selling beer and liquor to
minors. A detective was engaged, and
as
a.
bait and stoolplgeon, he was giv
en the services of a respectable young
fellow, Decenius Olson, a new comer
to the city. Olson, technically, is a
minor, but he will be 21 years of age
before the end of the present month,
he stands six feet high and is well
proportioned, so that he was a likely
bait for the unwary seller of beer, etc.
Upon the evidence of this party and
the detective four saloonkeepers have
been arrested for selling to minors and
sentiment is divided in Fergus Falls
as to the wisdom of such methods.
The father of Olson is much incensed
that his son has been dragged into
the matter the way he has been.
A Very Interesting Point.
Fergus Falls Journal: G. W. Prank
berg left for St. Paul Saturday to
argue the Bender case before the su
preme court. This is the case brought
by C. J. Bender against the city for
the return of license money. N. F.
Field will appear for the city. The
council will probably return the li
cense money, but if the city wins the
case, it will not be compelled to re
turn the 10 per cent that has gone to
the county and the 2 per cent that has
gone to the state.
CONCORDIA COLLEQE.
Students Busy With Commencement
Activities end Examinations.
Commencements activities are para
mount at Concordia Lutheran college,
this week. Today and tomorrow th©
students are tussling with a series of
beautifully arranged problems which
have so deftly been prepared by the
faculty.
Class day exercises are programmed
for Wednesday and in the evening the
band will give a concert.
Thursday morning at 10 o'clock, the
alumni programme will be given, to
be followed by the annual banquet
and in the evening will come the cul
minating event of the year, the com
mencement exercises, the programme
to begin at 8:15.
Last night the baccalaureate ser
mon to the graduates was preached by
the Rev. Arnold O. Ulvestad of Fargo
who based his remarks on a text in the
Old Testament, using for his theme,
Those on the Lord's Side Come Forth,
from which he drew several practical
lessons for the benefit of those who
are soon to pass out of the college
portals. Musical numbers were con
tributed by the choral union of the
institution and two trombone solos
were excellently given by Prof. S. T.
Helseth, who has frequently assisted
in musical affairs of this college.
It is expected now that the new
president of Concordia, the Rev. J. A.
Aasgaard, will arrive to take up hi*
duties about the middle of July.
Fargoans Saw Good Flights
Mayor Davy: I desire to say that
the areoplane flights which people of
this city and Fargo saw at the state
fair grounds in the latter city last
Friday, under the auspices of the
v ^prjy*~7~
Moorhead Department
H!!H! ikv
IS THE UlAiM
JOHN MYERS SAYS HE WAS
ROBBED AND THEN TIED UP
WITH WIRE BY THREE MEN-
THREE SUSPECTS ARE CAP
TUREO.
Three men, Anton Smith Charles
Torrensky and John Konnant were
arrested at Glyndon by Sheriff Whaley
yesterday on a charge of highway rob
bery according to a complaint made by
a stranger, John Myers, and' they
were at once bgrought to Moorhead
and placed in the county Jail. The
prisoners were before the Glyndon jua
tice at the Jail this morning and the
hearing was postponed until 7 30 this
evening.
IT.
C. T's., were very fine exhibitions
compared with flights which friends
and myself witnessed at Sun Diego,
Cal., last winter, when the flights were
made by bird men considered the very
befet In the United States. St.
Henry,
in his Curtiss biplane was Just as
graceful in his starts and finishes as
anything I ever witnessed, in fact his
dips to earth were made more grace
fully. It was a wonderful exhibition
and it was gratifying to see that so
many took advantage of the great
privilege, especially so w$s it to the
people
4
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CA8E OF STATE VS. E. E. HAZEN
BEING TRIED IN THE DISTRICT
COURT TODAY MAY GO TO JURY
LATE THIS AFTERNOON—RAIL
ROAD WINS CASE8.
la the district court, tfiss morning,
before Judge Taylor of St Cloud,
County Attorney Johnson moved the
case of the state against E. E. Hazen,
The defendant is charged with a sta
tutory offense, Ella Conroy being the
complaining witness and the alleged
offense is said to have been committed
in the Rex hotel in this city. The de
fendant is represented by Petersondk
Adams, the case being conducted by
Mr. Peterson. The case is expected to
be submitted tq the jury late thia
afternoon.
The cases of T. B. C. Evans and
Rhys T. Evans against the Northern
Pacific Railway Co., an action brought
to compel the railroad company to es
tablish a crossing near the new cut-oft
at Stockwood was completed on Satur
day. The cases were tried jointly and
in one the court ordered a directed
verdict for the defendant company and
in the other the jury also found fox
the railroad company.
An important case which will be
tried in a day or two will be thf
one of Mrs. Ed Lungren against
Dwight M. Baldwin, jr., of the Moor
head mills. The plaintiff is suing for
damages arising out of the accidental
killing of her husband, a few months
ago, while in the alleged performance
of his duty, as night watchman at the
mill named. Ball, Watson, Young &
Lawrence of Fargo will appear for the
defendant,
Lawn Social-
The young ladies of St- Joseph's
church announce a lawn social to be
held on the church grounds, Wednes
day afternoon and evening, for which
an attractive programme has been ar
ranged.
Nupital Announcement.
Mr. and Mrs. E. Van Houten, 315
Eighth street south, have announced
the engagement of their daughter,
Elizabeth Adelina to Arthur C. Murray
of Wadena Minn. The wedding will
take place Thursday, June 29. The
groom-elect is a prominent business
man at Wadena where he conducts the
business of abstracting real estate.
Italians In Mixupt,
Sheriff Whaley arrested two Italian
laborers, at \11
worth, this morning.
They are charged with being impli
cated in a quarrel, yesterday, in which
knives or stilettos were used. One
man was wounded, but his injuries
were not serious.
EAST SIDE NOTtft
Senator Marden was a passenger to
Barnesville on business this morning.
A pre-nuptial affair, tonight, will be
sock and necktie shower, for Dr.
Hagen, at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
H. L. Flaten, Fourth street south. The
bachelors of the city are expected to
turn out in full force and they are
requested not to overlook the genial
medic's fastidousness in regard to the
kind of neckties he wears—his foot
wear gives him no concern whatever.
What has become of all the fly
swatters in Moorhead?
Curtis Pomeroy, just graduated from
the law department of the Minnesota
university, has entered the office of
Senator Marden as assistant.
Professor Reed of the normal school
returned yesterday from a short visit
at his home in Wisconsin and found
all members of his family well. Last
Friday and Saturday, at St. Paul, he
attended sessions of the annual meet
ing of associated Harvard clubs,
which he enjoyed very much.
The fair and cooler Weather signals
were hoisted today.
A marriage license has been issued
to David V. Lamb and Fredie M.
Kelting, both Dt Clay county.
County Auditor Houglum received a
large consignment of the official ses
sion laws of 1911, this morning, and
the same will be distributed to those
entitled to receive them in due course.
Pointed Paragraphs.
Chicago News: Every woman a
law unto her husband.
Oh, liberty! How many are unmar
ried in. thy name.
Love and hate always remember
only indifference forgets.
While trying to drown his troubles,
many a man catches at a straw.
Attempting to clip the wings of
riches has landed many a man in jail.
Self-praise is almost as valuable ai
the other things you get for nothing.
Many a man has made a good bluff
by looking wise and keeping his face
closed.
It takes an amateur photographer to
convince a woman that truth is more
terrible than fiction.
Every girl believes herself a sure
cure for inebriety until after she has
tried marrying a man to reform him.
Our idea of a woman with wonder
ful self-control is one who never buys
anything at a bargain sale that she
doesn't want-
Not Quits Exhausted.
Chicago Post: "You needn't t*y to
make me think you are so very Im
portant," sniffs the aggrieved wife. "I
happen to know that you have made
love to every girl in town and
Slightly Envious*
Washington Star: "I suppose you
are happy, with all the wealth you
have accumulated."
"There is only one man I envy/' re
plied Mr- Chuggins.
"Who is thnt?"
"The motorcycle policeman. Every
once in a while he gets a chance to
violate the speed limits without being
atfraated."
SSsiiiil
v* v v,{. *i*r
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IS CIWHiED WITH
SERIOUS CRIME
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BREAKS ABYL-V
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NATIONAL lilMSI
iiii'LE TEAM ORDER
ORDER ISSUED DETAILING THE
STATE SHOOT OF THE NA
TIONAL GUARD RIFLE TEAM-
MEN WHO HAVE BEEN TO NA
TIONAL SHOOTS HANDICAPPED.
An order was received this morning
by Capt. E. C. Geary, jr., inspector of
small arms of the North Dakota Na
tional guard relating to the selection
of the rifle team of the state to go to
the national shoot at Camp Perry. The
biggest change shown in the order is
that all men who have gone to the na
tional shoot heretofore will be handi
capped.
The state shoot will be held at the
Devils i^ake encampment and Capt. E.
C. Gearey, jr., has been named the
executive office of the shoot and he
will have the entire charge of the
range. Lieut. R. M. Still of Fargo has
been named the assistant executive
officer of the range. Other men n'lll
be appointed by Captain Gearey at the
time of the shoot, but the two local
men will be the direct supervisors of
all the work.
The list of events are as follows:
One skirmish run, target D.
200 yards slow fire, target A.
200 yards rapid fire (without bttjro
nets), target D.
600 yards slow Are, target B.
L000 yards slow flre, target C.
The state shoot will be open to all
of the men enlisted and officers, and
it promises to be a lively affair. At
this shoot the selection of the men who
will represent the state at the na
tional shoot, August 28 and 29. will
be made.
The handicapping of the men who
have attended the previous national
shoots has been done to stimulate the
interest in the state match. With the
real crack shots handicapped, the good
shots over the state will have a better
chance to get on the team and go to
the national shoot which will be held
in Ohio.
The rule handicapping the old na
tional shoot men, says: "Provided that
any competitor who has heretofore at
tended a national match, either as a
principal or an alternate, shall be sub
ject to a handicap of 20 per cent to be
computed on the basis of his total
score in his last competition for a
place on the team."
Some of the rules of the state shoot,
according to the order, are:
In rapid flre, and at all distances
except 600 yards in the skirmish, the
battle sight only will be used.
In all the slow lire events there
shall be ten shots for record, preceded
by two sighting shots, which are com
pulsory.
In all slow flre events the rifle shall
be used-as a single loader, with maga
zine empty,
-rtil.'Ss*
pro.
posed to all of them before I accepted
you- You ought to be grateful to mo
for—"
"Now, my dear," he interrupts, "Toil.'
are not quit© right In that. There
were three more girls I intended to
try for if I hadn't won you."
l-*i
1
WILLIE WISE
e
9^ r:f
Stone Found 111 Columbia River RivalsPyramids in Age
1 .Cr V*
v iy$&.
•1
V-A*.. "5
Hieroglyphics recently discovered, on
which it is claimed were
mace ovj
Portland, Ore., June 12.— Claiming
that hieroglyphics recently discovered'
on a huge stone, in the Columbia
river are almost contemperaneous
with the building of the pyramids of
Egypt, Fred H. Saylor of Portland,
has aroused considerable interest in
the discovery and the immense rock
bearing the mystic inscription has
been placed in the city museum.
Mr. Saylor claims to translate the
hieroglyphics saying they are in part
Uv,'
SHAM BATHE FUR
FARGO WIGHT
CAPT. a C. GRAFTON WANTS
GOOD ATTENDANCE OF COM#
PANY TONIGHT AT ISLAND
PARK ENCAMPMENT NEXT
SUNDAY AT SHEYENNE RIVER.
Capt, Gk C. Grafton of Co. of the
North Dakota National guard, 1«
anxious to have a full turnout of
members tonight at Island park.
big sham battle will be pulled offe
This will be quite a military event an$
the manoeuvers will 'undoubtedly be
watched with great interst &y a large
crowd of spectators.
Next Saturday evening the fcoya sf
Co. will gather at the armory t»
march to the Sheyenne river whert
they will go into camp over Sunda%
The Sheyenne encampment is expected
to be a very pleasurable affair an#
all the boys are urged to be on hand
early so that a good start may b#
made to allow the camp to be mad#
before nightfall.
A number of other events are
planned for this summer by Captain
Grafton who is looking out for th*
best interests of the company ant
provide his boys with sport that wilf
be pleasant and at the same tim#
profitable from the standpoint of mili«i
tary tactics.
LACK
.•* I V
11
HEAVVPLAY—-W«H,TH«YW ATTACHED
Our trunks at last.
-"Goodness'. What am I to do?'
Can't my clothes?*
*No, we must walk «ast as w*
The Modern, Girj,
Pittsbtirg Post: "Was that city girt
scared when she saw the snake?"
"No she picked it up and told ui
all about its genus, species, habits an|
habitat."
Texas proposes to have an onio®
day. That will be a splendid day not
to go to the theatre.
1 'Miim«i.|in\( i|1%'ii[|H mull 1111
Competitors will be eliminated bjt5
the executive officer as fast as it befc
comes apparent that tUey cannot quail*
fv for thA team.
I8M-'
7
*\*v ,k v*'
."'*• uv
MY
STOMACH TS1
WONT
'ZF/vr THROAT
15 CLX
BET
JUICY STEAK
AN"
i.
.'4
it
_- i"* Columbia r,»«rf
000 /ears zyo, fay
WW'
II Hi
I 111
Ifc:
astronomical records, while the re£'
malnder constitute a prophesy. H^l
says the markings were made ove#
3,000 years ago and are similar lflfc".
character to the hieroglyphics of th«$
ancient Mayas in Central America!.
which were the most highly civilized of
any of the prehistoric tribes inhabit^,'
ing the western continent. Mr. Say-i'.
lor'a discovery, if- It bears the clos«-'
scrutiny a£ scientists, wiil be of gre%4'.
importance to students of archaeology^
'W
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