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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, January 12, 1912, Image 1

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1
THE WEATHER .„,
Generally fair tonight and
slowly rising temperature.
FORUM
1—
Saturday
Amcrican Troops Are on Way
From Manila
Ray Be Called Upon to Fight
Either Side
Will Guard Section of Pekin
Railway
London, Jan. 12.—The imperial Chi
nese troops are perpetrating acts of
'fiendish brutality at Lanchow, accord
feg to a news agency dispatch receiv
ed here from Tientsin. It is alleged
the Imperialists captured an of
ficer of the republican troops, whom
first .tortured and subsequently
ted
tinned him alive. They* al»0 shdt a
Cross assistant.
It is further reported they are shoot
ing without mercy all Chinese whom
they discover with queues. The lm
Jperial troops, it IS stated, are entirely
Hithout discipline and completely out
of hand.
Manila, Jan. 1SL~-The United -States
transport Logan left this afternoon at
1:30 with a batallion of the Fifteenth
Infantry and other details on board
the way to Ching-Wang-tao, north
ern China. The American troops are
be employed In guarding a section
€f the Peking railroad from Tang
flhan to Lanchdw against possible at
tf.ck of either Imperialist or repullcan
troops.
.. The departure took place in the pres
ence of a throng of civilians and sol
ifliers of .other regiments, while women
crowded the quay bidding many tear
ful farewells and wishing Godspeed
to the troops. No women were allow
4fed to accompany the expedition.
Maj. Gen. J. Franklin Bell, com
^«iander-in-chief of the army in the
Philippines, made a parting speech to
the officers and inen, in which he urged
them to show pride In their American
citizenship.
Capt. Peter W. Davidson of the
Fourth infantry, one of General Bell's
jfcides-de-camp, is accompanying the
"Expedition, but will return to Manila
#b soon as the troops have landed.
Throne Goes to Jshol.
Pekin, Jan. 12.—Manchu princes of
the imperial clan met today and re
vived to advise the throne to retire
Immediately to Jehol, about 120 miles
Northeast of Pekin, where the members
Jf the imperial family usually go for
the summer.
The whole Imperial army at Hankow
Started today on its way to Ho Nan
with the object of destroying the rev
olutionary column operating there.
The imperial troops intend to reoccupy
several towns In the province of Ho
Nan and southern Chi Li, which had
gone over to the revolutionists.
/LIFE"TOO BARB"
TOOK LIFE
San Pwtheieoo, Jan. 12 —l*iifi Don
ato Ventura, an Italian of noble birth
and ability as a writer and lecturer,
Committed suicide here last night by
thooting himself througn the heart*
tvhile despondent. Family trouble?!
tvere the cause.
In the room in which Ventura took
Ms life lay letter from Interstate Com
fnerce Commissioner Franklin K.
Jjane, who wrote:
"I hope that with the dawn of the
tiew year you will appreciate life as
tiot a dready blank for you."
But in a note for his daughter
tiillian, Ventura said:
•I "Life is too hard now I have no
trains, no ideas, and you will be hap
pier after this ordeal.'*
MILL WORKERS
A
i
$
T-iwrettfc'e, 5lass., Jan. t2.—Tne'gen
eral unrest among 35,000 textile work
ers In this city developed into disturb
ences at the Washington and Wood
!*nills
of the American Woolen Co. to
Jt3ay. The striking operators beccame
demonstrative in the spinning rooms
'^£nd a riot call for the police was is
sued. Several overseers were injured
#n hand to hand encounters.
The strikers, after leaving the Ayr
g|mills, marched to the Lawrence duck
jmills, where a clash with the police
'.occurred outside the gates. Missies
W all descriptions were hurled and
Peveral officers were hurt. During the
'jlisturbance a dozen arrests were
'. Jfiiade. At noon 18,000 operatives in
jihe city were idle.
Election in Germany.
{J* Berlin, Jan. IS.—Voting throughout
the empire for the election of members
"of the reichstag began here at 10 this
by the Chinese
4 "^yjjoya arriving here today told a
vofy
1
SIX COWBOYS, RIDING
TEXAS RANGES, FIGHT
PACK OF 1,000 WOLVES
Galveston, Tex., Jan. It.—Cow-
of a wild fight with a pack of
^(L 0 wolves while riding the
n in Lloyd county. There
Vs,v'*.. in the party sent out to
ca& cottonseed meal to starv
ing cattle during the recent bliz
zard. The wolves were half starv
ed and charging down upon the
party, engaged them In a running
fight for four hours. The cowboys
were finally forced to make a stand
and three of their number were
thrown from their horses, narrow
ly escaping death.
WHITE WAS
PAID FT
Lorimer Made Counter Accusa
tion on Stand
Chicago Tribune Hafcfug Fight
to Unseat Him
Says Ffgfit A'pfnsfBrowne for
That Purpose
Washington, Jan, 12.—Senator Lor!-1
mer continuing his testimony before
the senate inquisitorial committee to
day declared the real purpose of the
fight on Lee O'Neill Browne, -who is
accused of bribing the Illinois legis
lature to vote for Lorimer, and who
was tried twice on perjury charges
was to unseat Lorimer In the senate.
Lorimer said he loaned Browne $10,000
with which to defend himself.
"I never took his note nor any secur
ity for the money nor kept hooks on
It," said Lorimer, "because I felt he
was being attacked on my account and
I did not want him to lose on my ac
count.
"Lorimer testified he was convinced
The Chicago Tribune bought the evi
dence they used against Browne, with
the purpose of using it as the basis of
an atteippt to put him out of the sen
ate, and that the whole machinery of
the state's attorney's office was used
to destroy him and not to put Browne
in the penitentiary.
"I believe The Tribune suborned the
perjury of White, Beckemeyer and
Holstlaw," said Lorimer, "And I am
convinced that neither Browne nor
anyone else ever paid any money for
a vote for me.
"Lorimer declared he believed Gov
ernor Deneen and The Tribune in a
conspiracy get him out of the senate,
and that Charles A. White was bought
and paid for. It was the published
statement of White's alleging that he
had been paid to vote for Lorimer,
which began the inquiry into Lorl
mer's election.
The witness testified he believed
Beckemeyer made his "confession" to
escape the indictment pending against
him, and that Holstlaw's "confession"
i was obtained the same way by per
sons in employ of The Tribune- He
declared further the belief that Link
was indicted without any warrant of
law, and that-the Indictment was held
over his head until he made the state
ments they wanted.
"After he did. that," Lorimer said,
"the indictment was quashed. They
did the same with others."
FURTHER DETAILS
IF
BOOKKEEPING
V
BBHB
,morniaj:. A heavy votc w/m refuted lonstratlon in favor of the Turkish gov
:'vp to late hour teda'
v
n'
Chicago, TIT., Jan. isAr-iirtfier de
tails of the bookkeeping methods em
ployed in the fresh meat business were
given today in the trial of the Chi
cago packers charged with violation
of the Sherman anti-trust law. The
general ledgers of Morris & Co. from
i907 to 1910 were taken before United
states District Judge Carpenter and
the figures showing the allowances
credited for by-products read to the
•Jury by the district attorney in the
effort to prove the government's con
tortion that there allowances were in
adequate.
The government attempted to show
that tht. intricate method of account
ing systems employed by the defend
ent packers were practically uniform.
THROWERS
KILLED THREE
i-il 2 -3'i .'iV-fe'S
'yf
i
Vienna, Jan. 12.—A band of Bulgar
ians threw three bomds into an open
air meeting of the inhabitants of Zil
kowa, near Uskub, European Turkey,
yesterday,, killing three and injuring
twenty-two. The meeting was a dem-
jernmenfc Six 6s*eat» bftVe been toade.
i J1 I.*.1'1 .^1." ."
i i
•i
i
LUTHERANS—MADE POSSIBLE
•Y SUNDAY TABERNACLE.
Fargo gets another big convention.
The United Norwegian Lutheran
church of America will hold its an
nual convention here, either beginning
June 6 or June 13. This will be one
of the most important gatherings of
the year in North Dakota and will
bring from 2,000 to 8,000 people here
from every section of the United
States.
It was largely through the efforts
of Secretary Stlne and President
Hardy of the commercial club that this
meeting was secured. They have beep
in touch with the leaders of the church
for some time, impressing on them the
good points of Fargo as a convention
city.
The final decision was made yester
day at a meeting of the committee in
charge at Minneapolis. Pres. T. H.
Dahl of the church association sent
the Information today that Fargo had
been finally accepted as the conven
tion city.
The convention could not have come
to Fargo had it not been for the fact
that this city will have, at that time
a building large enough to take case
of their great crowds. This building
will be the Sunday tabernacle, which
win also be ueed for the -Saenq^feai.
Rio Janeiro, Brazil, Jan. 12.—The
situation irfthe state of China has be
come very serious. The federal gov
ernment yesterday' dispatched a war
ship to the city of Bahia* where the
fighting was reported to have taken
place. Business is at a standstill. The
people fear further disorders.
The governor of the state of Bahia
today resigned. His duties were as
sumed by the president of the court
of appeals.
Minister of marines, Adrrflral Leao,
has resigned. He will be succeeded
by Admiral Belfort-Viera.
DISASTROUS
^-r
At right, Franz Joseph,
ninn
LL
il
Fargo Lands Another Big
National Convention
UNITED LUTHERAN mm
NOTICE RECEIVED TODAY THAT
THI8 WILL BE THE MECCA IN
JUNE FOR UNITED NORWEGIAN
"t
FIRE
mm
AT
ftr&llfa*,"fa. S., Jan. which
broke out early in a dry goods es
tablishment here caused a loss of
$300,000 and gave the firemen the
hardest battle of years. The chief
loser in The Halifax Herald, whose five
story granite building was gutted. Files
and correspondence were saved.
The offices of several insurance com
panies, the United States consulate
and dft&en bu%ia^Lflnixa, byra
ed
.\...
.-.5... z4.,44.
AND DAILY REPUBLICAN
ESTABLISHED NOV. 17, 1891. FABGO, NORTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 12, .1912. REPUBLICAN ESTABLISHED SEPT. 5, 1878.
EMPEROR FRANZ JOSEPH IN VERY POOR HEALTH
v-, i\,vi
rLit
emperor of Austria: at left Franz
Reports from Austria are to the effect that Franz Joseph, emperor of Austria is in very poor health and it
is probable that the next change in rulers of Europe will be the succession of Franz Ferdinand to the throne
of Austria.
WALLACE A»
FATHER, At
80N OF DRAYTON BANKER AR
RESTED FOR THREATENING
HIS FATHER*
St Paul, Jan. 12 —Rex^B. Wallace,
son of a Drayton, N. D., banker, who
was taken from the T. M. C. A. build
ing was held at Central police sta
tion until his father who
Young Wallace was a former stu
dent at Hamline university, it is said.
A proposition was made to him by
his father, it is said, if the latter had
finished his university workfand made
good in some business his father
would present him with $26,000.
For the last two years Wallace has
been a clerk in the First National
bank of Minneapolis and Is said to
have drawn an excepionally large
salary for a clerk of his age. There
fore he believed he had made good
and it is said demanded that his
father send him the $25,000 as agreed
upon. His father, however. Is said to
have differed with him and refused
to honor his demands. He tlien be
gan to make threats.
Husband Dying Wife 8peak«.
Mayeville, Ky., van. 12.—Though he
left much land and other property to
his wife, Louis Roses, who died last
Sunday, had not spoken to her until
that day for twenty-five years- This
became known yesterday after his will
was filed for probate. It developed
that on Sunday morning Mrs. Roses
broke the silence, when she asked her
husband:
"Will you have a cup of coffee?".
"I believe I Will." was his reply.
In a few moments he was stricken
with heart disease and died.
W:
',v A'
V'5
lis .y,
%-f
^/v
v
Ferdinand, the next emperor.
1i«o*,*4'cen
telegraphed for arrived.
A conference was held btween the
young man and his father in the office
of Chief of Police O'Connors. A sat
isfactory settlement was reached and
the senior Wallace left for home.
•e •»—•—e—•- i y
PROMINENT DEMOCRAT WHO WILL
BE IN. FARGO, NEXT WEEK
GOV JUPSON IrlAKFLON
of the prominent democrats of the nation who will be In Fargo next
^reek" for the big get-together mooting will be Governor Harmon of Ohio»
who is prominently mcntioned figi a Candidat« to? the presidency.
YO'uNG WIFE
Pleads Guilty on First Anni
versary of Wedding
MOTHER WEEPS COORT
D& MARRY WEBSTER TODAY
WITHDREW HIS PLEA OF NOT
GUILTY AFiD ADMITTED IN THE
COURT THAT HE HAD SLAUGH­
TERED WOMAN HE MARRIED.
Oregon, IlTs., Jan.' 12.—Dr. Harry
Webster pleaded guilty to murder in
Ogle county court, here today, on the
first anniversary of his marriage to
Bessie Kent Webster, whom, by his
own confession, he killed near here
last September. WebBter withdrew the
plea of not goilty previoturiy made by
him.
Attorney John E. Erwln, of Web
ster's counsel, in a brief statement aft
er the defendant was taken before
Judge Farrand, announced formally
that his client desired to enter a plea
of guilty.
Webster made the plea In person.
Farrand asked Webster if the de
fendant understood he was entitled to
a trial by jury and if the plea of guilty
was made with Webster's own free
will.
To each question Webster replied,
"yes," in an even1 tone of voice.
After he had entered the plea, Web
ster seated himself at the side of hia
mother, who wept quietly throughout
the proceedings.
Washington, D. CL» Jan. 12.—Accord
ing to a bulletin issued today by the
census bureau, the population of North
Dakota from 1900 to 1910 increased
nearly four times as fust as that of
continental United States-
Bulletin Issued Today by the Census Bureau Gives Some In
teresting Figures on State
The North Dakota increase was 80.8
per cent, compared with 21 per cent
for the country generally. In 1900
North Dakota had 319,146 inhabitants,
against 577,056 In 1910, an increase of
257,910. The population has increased
202.2 per cent since 1890 when it was
190,983.
In 1870 there were only 2,405 peo
ple in what is now North Dakota.
WOMAN'S Ot A 111
SHE AND DAUGHTER FOUND
DEAD WITHOUT INDICATION
OF CAU8E.
Minneapolis, Minn., Jan. 12.—Mys
tery shrouds the death of Mrs. Edith
Phillips and her four months old
baby daughter, Grace, whose bodies
were found in their home today by
the woman's husband, J. R. Phillips,
a fireman in engine company number
5. No marks of violence or evidence
of poisoning were found. The gas
jets were burning and there was no
odor of gas about the place. Let
ters written by the woman last night
and plans for giving a party tonight
conflicted with the theory of suicide.
The husband, J. R. Phillips, found
the bodies when he went to his home
1428 Ninth street south, for lunch to
day. He had seen them last at sup
per tim» last night, when they dis
cussed plans for a party tonight.
Mrs. Phillips' body, partly clothed
was lying partly on the t»ed and partly
on the floor. The baby's body was on
the bed. Mrs. Phillips' garments
from the waist down were moist.
The faces bore no sign of pain, nor
was there the slightest trace of any
kind of a struggle. No poison bot
tles or containers were found on the
premises. Coroner Seashore, who
made a preliminary examination of
the bodies, declared he had found
nothing to indicate that Mrs. Phillips
had ended the lives of herself and the
baby.
Opposed to the theory of suicide
were the letters found on a table,
which evidently had been written oy
the woman last night, one of them
to relatives in Duluth. In this letter
Mrs. Phillips was the daughter jf
D. Miles, cashier of the Farmers'
Savings bank of Pioneer, la. It was
said that she had been married be
fore. She was 22 years old.
The back door of the house was open
at the time the bodies were discover
ed. It could not be determined wheth
er Mrs. Phillips had opened the door
to cool off the rooms some time during
the night, or whether an outsider had
been in the building.
she indicated that she and her hus- way from 15 to 40 below zero, and
band and child would visit them much suffering was reported by charit
sliortly.
Mrs. J. H. Larson, who lived up
stairs in the same house, said she had
heard no noise of any kind in the
Phillips home during the night. Mr.
and Mrs. Phillips were married about
one ptm! one half years ago.
7
Italians Wipe Out Part of
Turkey's Navy
The action occurred outside the hay
of Kunfida, a small walled town with
a garrison and two forts about 600
miles north of Aden on the east coast
of the Red sea.
A division of Italian cruisers whioh
had been scouring the coasts of the
•Red sea* in search of Turkish war
vessels and ships conveying contra
band goods destined for the Turkish
garrisons of Yeman province, Aabia,
encountered the flotilla of Turkish
gunboats and at once opened fire.
The Turks replied but their feeble
armament succumbed to the superior
Weapons of the Italian war vessels..
1 V
LAST EDITION
THIS ISSUE 10 PAGES
1N. D. Grew Four Times
Faster Than Whole of
U. S. Past Ten Years
North Dakota Increase Was 80.8 Per Cent Compared With
21 Per Cent for Country Generally
In 1910 Fargo Ciad a population of
14,331, an Increase of 4,742 or 49.5 per
cent over 1900.
Mlnot shows the largest Increase in
cities, having 384.6 per cent. Thj|
population in 1910 was 6,188 and thU
increase in numbers over 1900 wai
4,911.
The urban population In 1910—cities
2,500 inhabitants or more—was 63,286
or 11 per cent of the total. While
513.820 or 89 per cent lived in the
rural communities. In 1900 the urba*-„
population was 23,413 or 7.3 per cen^
while the rural was 295,733 or 92.7 per
cent.
mm
iiaiLi
UL
Relief From the Cold Spdl in
Sight
COLDEST OF YEAR HEBE
GOVERNMENT
REGISTERED
NIGHT At
S" v
THERMOMETER
38 BELOW LA8T
ABERDEEN
BULB WENT
LOW ZERO.
TH*
DOWN TO 46 B&
46 BELOW IN ABERDEEN.
Aberdeen, S. D., Jan. 12.—Ther-sJ
mometer dropped to 46 degrees:
below, here, last night.
Chicago, Jan. 12.—With promises by
the weather bureau of rising tempera
tures throughout the north central ai|*
northwestern states people living
those districts are looking forwaiil
for relief from what many cases havip.
been coldest spell in a quarter of a
century.
"Slowly rising temperature," tore
cast Iowa, Minnesota, Dakotas, Wis
consin and Montana.
Thermometers through the north
west last night registered all ttt*
able institutions. The federal weath
er bureau today gave notice that a
severe cold wave will spread over tJ#
southastern states during the nest
thirty-six hours.
Train service on all western lines Is
in chaotic conditions and some roa4*
are practically abandoned. Record
breaking low temperatures extended
throughout the upper Mississippi a#
Missouri valleys-
Thermometers at Winona, Minn., ahA
LaCrosse, Wis., registered from 35 jk
40 degrees below. Other places record
ed still colder weather.
Cold in Wisconsin.
Milwaukee, Jan. 12.—The thermome
ter registered 14 degrees below this
morning. The forecaster here wa»
unable to predict any relief today, bnt
offers slowly rising temperature tomor
row. Green Bay and Madison repatt
4 below.
YESTERDAY WAS
(OLDEST
1, low zero, which was the lowest that
Rome, Jan. 11—A severe naval ac-,
the mercury has dropped duriirjr the
tkm occurred I«n. W th. Rrf «e«, L, ,w4Bty.four houm ThuTorn™
when seven Turkish gunboats and an jt
The Italian warships recently bom
barded the towns of Sheik, Said,
Mocha and Akabah. They have been
cruising the Bed sea since the begin
ning of the war.
Diet of Heat in Spite of
Niagara Falls, N. Y., Jan. 12.—De
spite the bitter cold, the city records
of the last twenty-four hours here
show a death caused from extreme
heat. To escape outdoor rigors, D. J.
McCarthy went into the drying room
of the mill where he was employed.
The extreme heat caused his course
and death within ten minute%
was
armed yacht were destroyed by Italian which is the coldest it haa been dur
ing the daylight hours of the dj§y
warships
E
Yesterday and last night was the
coldest of the winter for Fargo. The
thermometer registered 88 degrees be^
32 degrees below at 9:30 o'clock
aince the present cold snap set in.
The weather predictions are fair to*
night and Saturday, with slowly rising
temperature promised. It lg hoped
from this that warmer weather is In
sight and that the coming week will
be of the nature of winter weather that
was experience^ during the month of
December before the holiday season,'
Last night at Jamestown it is report-*
ed that the thermometer registered 44
degrees below. Nearly all the travel
ing men are remaining in the city this
week, as they believe not much can be
accomplished over the state when the
trains are so tied up and behind tiuriff,
usual schedules.
SOUAliST KAYOS
WAS DEFEATED
3
Vm*. Cower, Jan. 1*.—Mayor
Taylor, who has declared himself a
socialist, was defeated for re-election
here yesterday by James F4&4&?* who
had a majority of 6,60Q»
'W
&
"•M
If
A 41

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