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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, January 13, 1912, Image 6

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1912-01-13/ed-1/seq-6/

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Make this
and take
January
In accordance with usual proceed
ings at this time of the year, we offer
you the tremendously advantageous
Bargain Sale in Women's Under-Mus
lins. Tou have had it at this time for
thirty-two years, and following our
established custom, we will place ex
cellent articles on sale Monday morn
ing. These are not only the daintiest
garments in appearance but they are
the beBt in points of styles and quali
ties. They are new and in every way
quite the best. The assortment Is a
good one and your satisfaction is as
sured.
Women's Night Ctowns ilk bice
embroidery trimmed—slip over
high neck styles—in all sizes.
Each, 50c, 69c, 7&o, &9o»
98o to*• 4*
Women's Combination Corset ('oxers
and Drawers—designed fronts of lace
and embroidery yokes.
Bach, 98c, $1.49, $1.98 to....Oatf If
Women's Princess Slips of Nainsook—
yokes of embroidery, outlined with
lace—flounce of lawn, with cluster of
pin tucks—others have scalloped em
broidery trimmings. Each
Fargo conservatory, recital,
Tuesday, Jan. 16.
Tri-Stata Grain Growers' meet.
Wednesday, Jan. 17.
Tri-State Grain Growers' meet.
Thursday, Jan. 18.
Gustave Holm^uist, song recital.
Tri-State 3rain Growers' meet.
District Sunday school convention.
Friday, Jan. 19.
District Sunday school convention.
Tri-State Grain Growers man,
Monday, Dec. 25.
G. A. R. ball.
Friday, Jan. 19.
U. Gi T, "snow-ball" party K. of
C. halL
Friday, Jan. 26.
North Dakota Press association con
vention.
Third annual high school declama
tory contest at A. C.
Tuesday, Jan. 30.
N. D. Tax association meeting*
store your
advantage
and
and
8.50
m9
CHAS. MITCHELL'S
Union Barber Shop
.sement Scandinavian Ameri
ttrat Class Work"
Coming Events
Monday, Jan. 1b.
Ef
98c, $1.50, $2.25 to O IF
deLENDRECIE'8 32ND ANNUAL
LINEN SALE
is now on—taJie advantage of the big
reductions offered on high quality
Table Damask, Napkins, Lunch Cloths,
Tea Napkins, Madeira Island Hand
Embroidery Doilies and Scarfs, Towels,
Dresser Scarfs, Beddings, etc. Don't
neglect buying your Bed Spreads dur
ing the big sale. We have scalloped
and fringe in cut corners also line of
"plain hem spreads. Big variety to
choose from.
Closing Out Sale of Ready Trimmed Millinery, Hats
w o o S 3 5 0 o $ 1 5 0 0 a
1
Wednesday, Jan. 31.
tN,
N. D. Tax association meeting:
Thursday, Feb. 15.
D. and western Minn. Bottlers'
onvention.
Wednesday, Feb. 21*
N. D. retail hardware dealera' con*
vention.
Thursday, Fab. 22*
N. D. retail hardware dealer? con*
vention.
*v Friday, Feb. 28..
N. D. retail hardware de§)prtf con
tention.
Friday, Jul^r 12.
Norwegian Singers of America.
Saturday* July 13.
Norwegian Singers of America.
Sunday, July 14.
"Norwegian singers of America.
Monday, July 1.
Sons of Norway, grand lodge.
... Tuesday, July 16.
W" Sotis of Norway, grand lodge.
IN THE HOTEL LOBBIES
A party from Hope la registered at
the Gardner hotel today. The party
ornprises A. and G. A. Karner,
Hugo Gunckel, Charles Muhson, and
f'Kd Schuldt.
-K
1
1!1
.» «.
'SW-'
Want to buy Canadian Marconi No. & gntii JWiect Soma. Har^j.
~^C^?,*tOck,5 Address Box 28, Fargq.
i Svj f* i
wwpiiiwii^w1
The adjourned session of the Cass
county commissioners will convene
next Wednesday, Jan. 17. They will
have before them for consideration the
reports of the county officers and will
continue with all unfinished business.
Word has been received from Patrick
W. Kennedy who formerly resided in
this city and who went several years
ago to Seattle to make his home, stat
ing that he will return to North Da
kota next June and will spend the re
mainder of his days here, as North
Dakota is good enough for him.
DR. BAIT WILL SPEAK
W|H ,Deliver the Department of Edu
cation Lecture at the A.
C., Monday.
Dr. Batt will lecture at 8:80 on
Monday, Jan. 15, in the physics lec
ture room at the agricultural college,
on the Study of Foreign Languages.
This lecture continues the series of
educational addresses given during the
fall term, and is open to all students,
especially those interested in teaching,
and the public generally.
London proposes to build a .liner that
contains everything but an aviation
field.
GOOD CLOTHES
Arc the product qi j^ood
materials and .skillful
tailoring.
The clothes make arc
good clothes.
PETER PICKTON, WereWftilw
deLENDRECIE CO., FARGO O. J. deI.HNDRIiCIE.CO., FARGO
?n's
25c
City in Brief
Stacey Adams & Co. Shoes for men
sold exclusively at deLendrecies".
A marriage license was today issued
to Claude A. Taylor and Mabel Inez
Barnes, both of Page.
Sam Sauer, a proeperous farmer of
Cronwell, Minn., was a business visitor
in Fargo, Friday and Saturday.
After a short and breezy meeting
last night the city council adjourned
to meet again on Tuesday night, Jan.
16. The purpose of the meeting is to
take final steps regarding the paving
of the Third ward.
Suits,
Waists, Skirts and Dresses
At Special Prices
All Strictly Up-to-date Garments. We
Invite you to look and be assured.
8UITS—Made of novelty suiting's
plain serges—misses' and worn
sizes—worth $13.50 «"S mm
to $18.00. For fl«fO
DRES8 SKIRTS—New fall skirts—'
made of all wool chiffon, pannmas
and serges—all lengths and waist
measures. Regular $6
to $7.50 skirts for
SHIRT WAISTS—Mendels & Geisha
waists—made of fancy madras—a.ll
linen, English percales, etc.- Our
•ntlre stock has been divided into
,two lots—regardless of
nnd
'n"s
6.
Cost—to sell at 98c and... I• «3r Cp
/Values—$1.75, $2, $2.50, $3.50, .)
WOOL ANSILK DRESSES—Smart
and tailored models and dressy ef
fects—high waisted, n a
and set-in sleeves— «g g*
Values $20 to $25 for.. i
FURS—Misses' fur sets—good quality
—browh coney muff and
scarf—worth $7.50. Set.
LONG COATS—Ail our misses' anrf
women's polo, heavy mixture* and
plain colored serges—worth *1 "0,
§16.50, $17.50, to $20. MM €|R
4.00
We will close out at.... I I 3F O
LONG COATS—Made of imported
double faced fabrics, black broad
cloths, chinchilla and heavy serges—
full colors—a good range of sizes—
-Worth $25, $30 and A f}
JTfc
$35. For 1
vFaVlF
(This is an unusual op.
LINGERIE WAIST SALE—High neck
and long sleeves—a few short sleeves
In the lot—all perfectly good styles
for coming season—made of fine
batistes—trimmed with fine laces
and embroideries—
$2.50 and $2.75 Waists $1.95
$3.50, $3.75 and $4.50 Waists $2.95
$5, $6 and $7.50 Waists $3.95
HOUSE DRESSES—Special gingham
and percale one-piece house dresses
•r-dark and light colors—sizes 34 to
44. Price, ^|f|
98c and.
100 doz. All Linen Huck
Towels, In both hem
stitched and plain
On sale
at
&
All Wool Blankets and
Comforters at 20 Per
Cent ofc'^'0|*-w4n&n*
display.
The Weather
FAIR AND COLDER.
Decided rise in temperature through
out the west and northwest is shown
this morning, but a high pressure that
is developing over Alberta and tha
low pressure in North Dakota, will
cause a continuation of cold weather
in this vicinity tonight and Sundav.
with sno^y. tonight and generally fair
Sunday
«v
Temperature
STATION8
Bismarak....
Calgary
Devils
«a
headquarters while in Fargo,
of puf JANUARY SALES
fi-B.
wo
i-O
SB 4
rs
Hi
fs®
38
31
-8
Lake.
-10.
-12
34
Edmonton. ..
Grand Forlcs
llavru
Medicine
-8
4
-8
-l!
-14
12
-10
-10
Hat.
12
82
S
Moorhead..
Wo'Appelle.
t. Paul
WilliBton
Winnipeg
SO
28
-10
-10
-18
-10
14
0
-10
12
W. D- Maxwell,
Temporary Official In Charge.
Piotura ind Favorable Mention of Faf
go Ford Branch Manager in Lat-v'
est Number of House Organ,
The Ford Times, which is the house
organ of the Ford Motor Co. of De
troit, Mich., contains a likeness of the
building of the local branch of that
concern together with its manager, C.
F. Reynolds. Most favorable notice is
made of Mr. Reynolds and his work
for the Ford people here in Fargo and
this territory.
The picture in The Ford Times shows
Mr. Reynolds perched up on top of his
building, on N. P. avenue, and the
statement is made that "Clarence Rey
nolds is mighty proud of his new Ford
quarters in Fargo, and has made it his
personal duty to see that all depart
ments are kept in the finest order."
In commenting upon the Fargo Ford
branch, The Ford Times says: "The
outward appearance of the salesroom
is very plain, it being absolutely free
from the useless ornaments which so
often attract the attention of the buy
er to the appearance of the building
instead of the car being offered. Mr.
Reynolds is indeed vc*:y proud of his
new quarters and is exerting evorv ef
fort" to put Fargo in the front ranks as
ord branch house. Keep it up,
a Fofc
F,y
\7'
y
x*
Omr Great Sale if
Dress Goi
Our methods of doing business is
hot to carry over ally goods from on©
season to another. We have learned
bV years of experience that the first
loss is the least loss. Now is your
time to learn, if you haven't already
discovered that when we offer a special
sale it means something to you. The
values are self-evident to everybody.
The undermentioned are only a few
•of the many bargains we are offering—
all broken lots to be cleaned up re
gardless of profit or cost. An early
call will save disappointment, as a
good many are only small pieces and
won't last long.
Your Inspection cordially invited.
Upwards of 100 pieces of fine All Wool
Dress Goods in a broken assortment of
styles and colors—widths run from 42
inches to 54 inches—values worth up
to $2.00 per yard. Pre-Inventory sale
price, take your
choice at I'SFO
25 pieces fine Chiffon Broadcloth, *ll
sponge shrunk and ready for the
needle 20 pieces of Scotch and English
Tailor Suitings, in mixtures and plain
colors 15 pieces of fancy Chain Stripes
and heavy Diagonal Suitings—all this
season's newest and most up-to-date
goods—the proper material for now
and early Spring wear—note the
widths, 52 to 56 inches—regular vrtlitc*
from $2.25 to $3.50. Fre-Inventu v
sale price, your
choice for
THE PA31G0 FOKUM AiH) 'DAILY itEPUBLICAK, SATTODA^ EVENING,MNTJABY 13, iMfc V*4'v v V^V
1.60
10 TO 15 PER CENT DISCOUNT ON
ALL BLACK GOODS DURING
THIS SALE
All our immense stock of High Grade
Black Goods, including the Celebrated
B. Priestley's make, will be subject
to a cut of 10 PER CENT to 15 PER
CENT on every dollars worth from
our original low prices.
Remnants and Odds and Ends of Dress
Goods—Silks and Linings-tall mark
ed at HALF PRICE.
FARM
Railroad News
IfflMFMiT
TRAIN ON TIME
ALJL TRAINS 0N THE N. P. ARE
PICKING UP IN TIME MADE
SINCE COLD SNAP PASSED—
GREAT NORTHERN TRAINS ARE
AL80 ON TIME.
Niarly all the train* oh the North
ern Pacific railroad were on time to
day, jwith the exception of No. 6 from
the w est, which was two hours behind
the regular schedule. Since the cold
snap has virtually passed much better
time is now being made by the trains
and all but the through coast trains
hae regained their former schedules.
On the Great Northern railroad, all
trains were on time, with the exception
of No. 2, which was several hours be
hind time. All the local trains were
prompt in pulling into Fargo.
On account of the storm which
swept a portion of the southern part
of the state last night, some of the
trains on the Milwaukee wl)4 tea some
what late today.
TRACK AND TIE,
r-
E. H. Whitteker of the Northwestern
railroad spent the day in the city.
W. L. Waltersdorf, traveling passen
ger agent for the Burlington route,
'mingled in Fargo railroad circles to-
..TEST FILTRATION PLANT*
Professor Ruediger of the 8tate Uni*
versity Will Make Test.
Prof. G. F. Ruediger of the Grand
Forks state university sent a letter to
the city council offering his services
to the city to make all tests of the
new filtration plant here after it was
completed, at no costs to the city.
Professor Ruediger is employed by the
state and his offer was gladly accept
ed and Alderman McDonald was asked
to get into communication with him.
Lost—Between S. & C. clothing
store on Front street and Feller's
store on Broadway, a silver watch
with gold fob and chain attached.
Liberal teward for return to Forum
ofli
s 4
up*-'
4
S
t' i
i.t\ 'a v i4 1
A W I
f,•%"
NEXT WEDNESDAY AND THURS
DAY FARGO WILL BE MECCA OF
ALL DEMOCRATS OF NORTH­
WEST—MANY .POLITICAL FIG
URE8 TO BE HERE.
Fargo will be the mecca of the dem
icrats of the northwest next week, as
i he much-looked-for democratic love
'east and conclave of the disciples of
Jefferson and Jackson will be held
lext Wednesday and Thursday, Jan.
If and 18.
Democrats are coming from all parts
the country, aside from the lead
ng spirits from this section of the
United States. In addition to the large
lumber of visitors from other states,
:here will be 175 democrats from North
Dakota in the city. They are going to
rowd the hotel lobbies and line the
streets for two days while the great
Tri-State Grain Growers' convention
8 in session-
The Big Lights.
The big llgnts of the democratic
fathering are Gov. Judson Harmon of
hio, William Jennings Bryan of Ne
braska, Gov. Edwin L. Norris of Mon
ana, former Sen. R. S. Pettigrew of
South Dakota, Gov. John Burke of
\Torth Dakota, George Pv Jones and
Wesley C. McDowell, two strong gub
ernatorial possibilities in the flickertail
itate this yeatv
This group contains many interest
ng figures who are prominent in
he American public gaze at the pres
ent time. Governor Harmon is proba
bly one of the two most prominent
nentioned possibilities for the demo
ratic nomination for the presidency
lext June. He is the leading demo
rat of the central west and his can
lidacy has been received with favor in
many parts of the country as a candi
date to be reckoned with both in June
ind November. He is now serving his
(econd term as governor of Ohio and
was formerly attorney general of the
Jnited States.
Mr. Bryan has .three times led the
iembcratic party to defeat as its
standard bearer, and it has been
umored in certain advices from Lin
oln than an effort will be made to
and him the nomination again this
'ear. He is looked upon by a great
nany as one who plays the role of the
watchful parent of his party, while by
others in the democratic, ranks he is
regarded as a has-been who has had
nough. The Nebraskan is conceded
:o be one of the most brilliant orators
n America.
Gov. Edwin L- Norris of Montana Is
ne of the progressive western govern
ors who made a good impression on the
recent executives' eastern trip. Sen
ator Pettigrew's fame in national pol
itics is known the country over, and
has not been forgotten since his re
tirement. He was a prominent f.oor
member of the United States senate
more than a decade ago and his
speeches were very frequently quoted.
It will be recalled that Senator Petti
grew was tUe man Marc Hanna declar
ed he thought was insane, an incident
which caused much amusement the
country over at the time.
Governor Burke will be one of the
prominent luminaries at the big love
feast. He has not only been elected
governor of North Dakota three times
but has Wfeen mentioned quite promi
nently lately as the running mate of
Governor Harmon on the national
ticket this year, an announcement
which has pleased many of he ilick
ertall democrats who feel gratified that
a North Dakotan's worth has been so
recognized as to make him a national
figure and considered material for the
vice president o nthe ticket with Har
mon.
Senator McDowell and George P.
Jones of. this state will also be con*
spicuous figures at the meeting on ac
count of the prominent mention their
names have been given for the demo
cratic gubernatorial nomination of
North Dakota this year.
Other Distinguished Guests.
The other distinguished guests who
will be seen at the democratic conclave
will be JUdge Martin L. Wade of Iowa
City, Judge T. B. Sullivan of Des
Moines, Judge O'Brien of St. Paul,
former member of the Minnesota su
preme court J. E. Kelly of Coleman,
fe. D., former congressman from that
state N. C- Reed of Des Moines, chair
man of the Iowa democratic commit
tee L. W. Lyons of Vermillion, S. D.,
chairman of the South Dakota state
democratic committee J. Bruce
Kremer of Butte, democratic national
committeeman from Montana.
Others in attendance from out of
the state will be C. J. Walsh of Helena,
Mont. Fred B. Lynch of St. Paul, Min
nesota democratic leader T. M. Sim
mons of Huron, S, D- Fred Whiteside
of Kalispel, Mont. Dan Lawler,
former mayor of St. Paul, and Dick
O'Connor, chief of police of St Paul.
There are several democrats of na
tional prominence, some of whom may
yet be here if previous engagements
will permit. This list will Include
Gov. Thomas R. Marshall of Indiana,
Mayor Carter H, Harrison of Chicago,
Senator O'Gorman of New York,
Judge Alton B- Parker of New York,
Gov. John A. Dix of New York, Gov.
Simeon Baldwin of Connecticut, Gov.
Eugene Foss of Massachusetts, Sen.
Atlee Pomerine of Ohio and Lieut.
Gov. Hugh L, Nichols of Ohio.
..«" /,c ••. .' ,,
North Dakota Democrats.
There will be 175 North Dakota dem
ocrats in attendance at the meeting in
addition to all the other visitors from
other states- These will include such
men prominent in state politics as F.
O. Hellstrom, warden of the state pen
itentiary, Sen. George E. Duis, candi
date for national committeeman, Chief
Game Warden H. N. Stenvick of
Minot, mentioned for governor Pat
Byrne, secretary to Governor Burke
Rep. Jos. Doyle of Carrington, state
democratic house leader and mentioned
for governor former U. S. Senator
Purcell of Wahpeton, another guber
natorial posibility Ole Hegge of Min
newaukan Col. Joseph Kelly of Devils
Lake, president of the Farmers' rail
road Col. Ben G. Whitehead of Wll
liston, candidate for democratic na
tional committeeman Rep.W. G. Bay
of Dickinson and John Bruegger of
Williston, candidate for U. S. senator
in 1910.
Among the Fargo democrats of state
prominence who will be much in evi
dence daring the big love feast will be
State Chairman McArthur, who is the
persent national committeeman, and
GtovL Warden Fred McLean,,
I
•. 1
s
-v
u"5jf
candidate for democratic national
Committeeman.
Lovell Head* CommittMr
Mayor V. R. Lovell heads the gener
al reception committee and will give
the gathering his supervision. State
Chairman McArthur and Chief Game
Warden McLean deserve mucji credit'
for all of the work in getting up this
big gathering and bringing so many
people to Fargo, which assists the
business of the city.
Many big events are planned for the
two days. Governor Harmon and oth
ers will speak Wednesday evening at
the Orpheum theatre and on Thurs
day evening there will be given a big
banquet at Pirie's hall at which Mr.
Bryan will be the principal speaker.
These two will be the chief events of
the love feast.
Hotel Headquarters.
Democratic headquarters will be es
tablished in every hotel in the city
for the convenience of all guests.
Governor Harmon and party will have
headquarters at the Gardner hotel
where a suite of six rooms has al
ready been engaged. Governor Burke,
Senator McDowell, Mr. Jones and oth
er leading state democrats will be lo
cated at the Gardner hotel also.
Mr. Bryan will be at the Metropole
hotel a® previously stated in The Fo
rum. Others who have made reserva
tions at the Metropole hotel are Dan
Lawler and Dick O'Connor of Min
neapolis.
Senator Pettigrew jvill probably
have headquarters at the Waldorf
hotel, as will a number 6t others.
Tickets at Porterfield's.
That the get-together banquet
which will be held Thursday of next
week and attended by democrats from
all over the country will be the big
gest event of its kind in the history of
Fargo, is evidenced by the fact that
already over half of the places avail
able at the big feast have been re
served.
Yesterday tickets were placed on
sale at Font & Porterfield's. A limited
number will be sold to local demo
crats and then the list will be closed
and only visitors will be allowed to
purQhase tickets. The attendance at
the conference will be far beyond that
first expected. Orders for plates and
rooms are constantly being received,
in one mail of yesterday Chairman
Porterfield received requests for near
ly fifty plates and over a dozen rooms.
Every little detail that will aid the
comfort of the guests Is being arrang
ed by the various committees. Every
hotel in the city will have an informa
tion booth where free phone service
will be maintained, tickets issued, and
delegates assisted in finding their way
about the city. Every guest will be
met at the train and escorted to his
hotel. True Fargo hospitality will
prevail and the visitors will be en
tertained every minute they are here.
The entire second floor of the old
Stone building has been reserved as
a meeting place for the democrats.
Secretary Hildreth and other officials
of the conference will have offices
there for the arranging of matters
concerned with the big gathering.
Delegates will also have the opportun
ity of meeting and talking with the
many distinguished men who will be
present.
IN
FIFTH
TION
OF
Thomas F. Powers appeared by proxy
for St. John's hospital and said: "In
conversation with the mother superior
of the hospital she preferred to have
the block cut out lying south of the
hospital and if it was done the hos
pital authorities would take care of
the street with a cinder bed or any
thing the board would suggest.
Alderman Frenette made a substitute
motion to eliminate all of Fourth
street that heretofore was unpaved.
This motion was lost.
City Engineer Anders stated that
the cost of paving the Third ward
would be $5 cheaper to the foot than
it would to pave the Fourth ward. He
figured about $7 a foot in the Third
ward, while he stated that It would
cost something in the neighborhood of
$13 a foot to pave In the Fourth ward.
He also stated it would cost the city
something like $10,000 to build a wall
that would be supporting across the
river on Fourth street.
MMtf4aa 01 v -SttSSV -v*
1.
IAS DELAYED
WARD PAVING PROPOSI
ADOPTED LAST NIGHT
BUT ACTION ON THIRD WARD
PROJECT DELAYED BECAUSE
PROTEST.
The city council passed a resolution
last night to adopt the plans and speci
fications for repavlng the old paved
section of the fifth ward. The proposi
tion of paving part of the Third ward
was deferred because of objections.
The meeting opened with consider
able discussion regarding the paving of
the Third ward. Alderman Greene
made a motion to strike out that part
of the resolution of Fourth street south,
beginning at a point 140 feet north of
the north line of First avenue south,
and running to a point on said Fourth
street south 150 feet south of the south
line of Sixth avenue south.
It is said that the property owners
and people of that district are in favor
of paving with the exception of Henry
Hector and William Early. Alderman
Harrington said that In an interview
with the hospital authorities they said
in regard to the matter, "If it was for
public improvement and for the good
of the city they would not hold back
and that they would help out and do
their share."
Alderman McDonald moved to defer
the action regarding the Third ward
paving proposition until the next meet
ing. This action was carried 1?y a
majority of seven. Action on the pav
ing matter regarding the Fifth ward
was up for a short discussion and a
motion for the adoption of the plans
and specifications was made and car
ried to repaVe the old paved portion of
the Fifth ward.
^ids for Fire HoseK
Three bids were submitted4'to the
city council to supply the city fire de
partment with 600 feet of new hose.
Charles H. Dixon, Fargo agent for
the Bi-Lateral Hose Co. of Chicago
gave three prices on different kinds of
fire hose, two at $1 a foot and the
other at 90 cents a foot.
W. M. Dainer, representing the W. S.
Nott s Co. of Minneapolis presented
two samples, warranted for thirty-six
months at 80 and 90 cents a foot.
Mr. Gibson appeared for the Eureka
Fire Hope Co. of New York and pre
sented one «aa»9le, this sample
A
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11
i"
PETER PASTORET," A RESIDENT
OF THE GATE CITY FOR MANY
YEARS DIED AT HI8 HOME LA8T
NIGHT—DEATH DUE TO COM
PLICATION OF DISEASES. 1
Peter Pastoret, 920 First avenue
south, an old resident of the gate city,
.died at his home last night from a
Complication of diseases. All his fam
ily were present when death occurred
with the exception of his daughter,
Mrs. H. C. Corrigan, who is in Cleve
land and a son, Phillip who is in Hof«r
Springs, Ark. They were unable to
reach home before he died.
Mr. Pastoret came to Fargo in the
spring of the year of 1879 from Du
luth, Minn. He was born in Luxem
bory, Germany.
He is survived by a widow and three
daughters, Mrs. Thomas Nanson, Mrfc.
H. C. Corrigan and Rose Pastoret, and
two sons, Thomas and Alfred.
Before Fargo's big fire, Mr. Pastoret
was engaged in the mercantile busi
ness on North Broadway. Funeral ar
rangements will be announced later.-
mi
President of A. C. Will Address
President Worst has had many
years' experience in guiding the char
acter of young men and has had much
influence with a large majority of the
younger generation of farmers in this
state. His experiences along that line
are exceptional and perhaps greater
than anyone else in North Dakota, so
that his address tomorrow afternoon
on the Elements of Succes will be
well worth the hearing, as are all
President Worst's speeches.
A fine musical programe will also
be rendered tomorrow afternoon
Those whose voices will be heard are
Mrs. H. H. Wheelock, Mr. Varnson
and G. D. Davis. It is expected there
will be'a large attendance, especially
so since the weather has moderated to
such an extent.
known as the Paragon brand at $1.1®.
These bids were referred to the chief
of the fire department and the Are
commission to report at the next meet
ing. The council adjourned until next
Tuesday, Jan. 16, when the paving
matter will come up for what is
thought will be its final hearing.
Following are the two resolutions
thai were under dlscugsioq:
Resolution.
It resolved by the city eovtidl..
of the city of Fargo, that the city
engineer be and he is hereby directed
to prepare planB, specifications and
estimates of cost for repaying and
curbing with concrete block, vitrified
brick, sheet asphalt, bituminous, con
crete, dollarway, blome concrete, bltu
lithic, cemete concrete and westru
mite, all upon a concrete foundation,
the following described streets and
avenues of Fargo, all in paving dis
trict No. 3, to-wit:
Ninth avenue south, beginning at a
point 600 feet east of the east line
of Fourth street south, and running
to a point 150 feet west of the weBt
line of Eighth street south
Eighth avenue south, beginning at a
point 675 feet east of the east line
of Fourth street south, and running
to a point on the east line of Eighth
street Bouth
Seventh avenue south, beginning at
a point 800 feet east of the east line
of Fourth street south, and running to
a point on the east line of Fifth street
south
Fourth street south, beginning at a
point 140 feet south of the south line
of Ninth avenue south, to a point 140
feet north of the north line of Sev
enth avenue south
Fifth street south, beginning at the
middle of block "W" of Charles A.
Robert's addition to the city of Fargo,
and running to the north line of Eighth
avenue south
Seventh street south, beginning at
the middle of block "B" of Charles A.
Robert's addition to the city of Fargo,
and running to the middle of block
"H" of said Charles A. Robert's, ad
dition
Eighth street south, beginning at the
south line of ^Ninth avenue south and
running to the north line of Eleventh
avenue south
Fourth street south, beginning at a
point 140 feet north of the north line
of First avenue south, and running
to a point on said Fourth street south,
150 feet south of the sc&ith line of Sixth
avenue south.
Resolution*
Be It resolved by the city council
the city of Fargo, that the city en
gineer be, and he is hereby directed to
prepare plans, specifications and esti
mates of cost of repavlng and curbing
with creosote block, vitrified brick,
sheet asphalt, bituminous concrete,
dollarway, blome concrete, bitulithic,
cemete concrete and westrumite all
upon jx Concrete foundation, the fol
lowing described streets and avenues
in the city of Fargo, all in paving dis
trict, No. 8, to-wit:
First avenue north, beginning on the
west line of Roberts street and Win
ning to the west line of alley in blocks
26 and 27, Robert's second addition to
the city of Fargo
Second avenue north, beginning at
the west line of Broadway and running
to the east line of Roberts street
Second avenue north, beginning at
the west line of Roberts street and
running to the west line of alley in
blocks 27 and 28 of Robert's second
addition to the city of Fargo
Roberts street, beginning at a point
150 feet south of the south line of!
First avenue north and running to a I
point 150 feet north of the north line
of Second avenue north.
Ninth street north, beginning at a1
poiht 150 feet south of the south line'
of First avenue north and running to
a point 150 feet of north line of Sec
ond avenue north
Tenth street north, beginning at -ai
point 150 feet south of the south line
of First avenue fcorth, and running to
a point 160 feet of the north llae
ot Second avenue north,
,V
.-t
1
I
Mmi!«
Meeting Tomorrow Afternoon at
the Y. M. C. A.
The address at the regular Sunday
afternoon men's mass meeting at the
Young Men's Christian association
will be delivered by Pres. John H.
Worst of the agricultural college. His
on the Elements of Success tvill be
•W
it
4*
p.

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