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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, January 15, 1912, Image 6

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1912-01-15/ed-1/seq-6/

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GRASS SEEDS..
Send for Our 1#1S
Catalog
Continued From Page one.
lay school workers and educational
uien.
The Tri-State Grain Growers con
vention, always the big annual event
of Fargo during the year, will not be
the lone attraction this year, for many
gatherings will be held in the confines
of Fargo this week, which is indicative
of the ever growing popularity as a
convention city and central point.
Every year the grain growers pour
into the city in large numbers and are
always welcome. They come to
change ideas on the growing of their
crops and how best to improve and
make this country, the northwest—for
they come from the three states of
North and South Dakota and Minne
sota—the very best agricultural sec
tion of the United States. An ex
change of ideas is always educational
and the Grain Growers' convention in
Fargo is one of the greatest educa
tional conventions held to the United
States every year.
Other Big Events.
Along with the grain growers this
year are coming the northwestern
democrats and the Sunday school
workers of the Fargo district—which
includes the counties of Cass, Rich
land, Traill and Steele—and they are
all just as welcome. The citizens of
Fargo have opened every door to make
all this great number of visitors com
fortable during their stay in the big
gest little city in the world.
Considerable time has been spent in
preparing for the arrival of these
guests. The energetic president and
secretary of the Fargo Commercial
club and the officers of its affiliated
organizations, together with the cour
teous managers of all the hotels and
restaurants and the newspapers, to
gether with the committeemen in
charge of each of the conventions,
have left no stone unturned to make
this week one that will be long re
membered in the annals of the city's
history and an example of what Far
go is capable with the hope that this
Will be only the beginning of big un
dertakings.
Grain Growers Tomorrow'.
Promptly at 10 o'clock tomorrow
morning the Tri-State Grain Grow
ers' convention will start at the
Fargo operahouse. In the entire his
tory of this great and important as
sociation, it has never failed to start
promptly on the stroke of 10, and
President Worot is not a man to fail
to comply to a precedent which he
has once established. Consequently to
morrow the sessions of the great meet
ing will begin at 10 o'clock.
President Hardy of the Fargo Com
mercial club will deliver the address
of welcome and the response will be
made by Prof. C. G. Selvig of the
Crookston Agricultural college, at
Crookston, Minn. The day's pro
gramme is one of exceptional Interest
and has already been given In The
Forum so that nearly everyone is fam
iliar with its details, the speakers of
the day and their subjects.
Wednesday will be live stock day,
and on Wednesday evening President
Worst will deliver his annual address
and will be followed by President El
liott of the Northern Pacific railroad.
These are the two chief speakers of
the convention and their efforts will
be perhaps the greatest speeches de
livered at the Grain Growers. No one
can afford to miss them.
Horticulture day will be Thursday
and Friday, and will be given over
to miscellaneous subjects and a resume
of the entire week. Thursday will also
be one of the big days of the con
vention, as the Farm Managers' as
sociation will hold its convention at
the commercial club rooms on that
day. Woman's day will also be Thurs
day.
Democrats Begin Wednesday.
The democrats of the northwest will
begin pouring into the city and taking
possession of the biggest little city in
the world Wednesday. All day long,
from the east and west, they will ar
rive from as far east as New Jersey
and Ohio, as far south as Iowa and
Nebraska, and as far west as Mon
tana, Idaho and Washington.
The big guns of the political pot
are expected and Wednesday night at
the prpheum theatre Gov. Judson Har
mon of Ohio, along with Senator Pet
tigrew of South Dakota, and Governor
Norris of Montana, and others, will be
lieard in big speeches.
Thursday the democrats will remain
in the city for another day of their
(love
feast and that evening at Pi-
•w fie's hall, William Jennings Bryan of
Nebraska will be the chief speaker at
big banquet.
Sunday School Workers.
The Fargo District Sunday School
dissociation will begin its convention
Thursday, and it bids fair to exceed
In magnitude the state association
Convention which was held in Fargo
&ist May.
The sessions will be at the First
"Congregational church and continue
iiritil Friday evening when the chief
l#peaker of the convention, Mrs. Mary
Foster Bryner of Chicago, elementary
UMperjn tend eat of the international as
ibciation, will be beard In an address
:-ta The Seven Spokes.
Educational Commission.
The orch Dakota State Temporary
Educational commieion, created by the
list legislature, will hold its first ses
sion, Thursday, at the Gardner hotel
The call was made by President Mc
Vey of the state university, who is by
Isw ». member of the board. President
Worst is the local member of this new
J^mmisslon,
IMPllIii'M'iwiwi'111 Wilms
F*rgo Mecca for Thousands This Week—
S Great Week of Conventions for Gate Gty
an(
Minn.
jg
fcTW
WHEAT
OATS
BARLEY
FIELD and GARDEN S
10:30—Windbreaks: Their Effects on
Farm Crops, C. B. Waldron, horti
culturist, North Dakota Agricultural
college.
11:00—Market Gardening, Oliver
Strand, Moorhead, Minn.
Afternoon Session.
1:30^—Address, Pres. W. J. Black,
president Manitoba A. C., Winnipeg.
2:00—Improving the Status of the
American Farmer, Col. R. A. Wil
kinson, Lake Elmo, Minn.
2:30—The Terminal Grain Markets, J.
M. Anderson, president Equity Co"
operative Exchange, Fargo, N. D.
3:00—Co-operation and the Farmer
Pres. F. I*. McVey, University, N. D.
Evening Session.
8:00—Annual meeting of N. D. Horti
cultural society in engineering
building, A. C. Special subjects for
discussion: Small Fruits for the
Northwest, and Ornamental Plant
ing. All invited.
FRIDAY, JAN. 19.
Morning Session.
9:30—Fixing Land Values, E. S. De
Lancey, Valley City, N. D.
10:00—Labor Saving Apparatus for the
Farm Home, P. V. Collins, editor
Northwestern Agriculturist, Minne
apolis, Minn.
10:30—Address, Dr. A. F. Woods, dean
agricultural college, University of
Minnesota.
11:00—The Country Life Problem, A.
E. Chamberlain, development com
missioner G. N. railway.
Afternoon Session.
1:30—Address, G. W. Randlett, direc
tor extension department, North Da
kota Agricultural college.
2:00—Human Nutrition, Prof. Jessie
M. Hoover, dean home economics de
partment, A. C.
2:30—New Crop of Corn and Diversi
fied Farming, Chas. C. Connolly,
Devils Lake.
8:00—Relation Between Rotation and
Fungus Diseases of Plants, H. L.
Bolley, botanist, A. C.
FARM MANAGERS' ASSOCIATION.
To be held at commercial club rooms
Thursday afternoon, Jan. 18.
1:30—Some Problems in the Manage
ment of Large Estates, Chas. R.
Wright & Co., Fergus Falls, Minn.
1:50—Management Under the Leasing
System, Chas. R. Wright, Fergus
Falls, Minn., and Walter R. Reed,
Amenia, N. D.
2:10—The Place of Live Stock in Large
Holdings in the N. W., J. A. Power,
Ellendale Stock farm.
2:30—Can Large Scale Farming be
Justified as a Benefit to Society,
Thos. Cooper, secretary Better Farm7
Ing association, Fargo, N. D.
WOMEN'S DAY PROGRAM.
Thursday Morning.
9:00—Meet at agricultural college
armory inspection tour. Livestock,
Pet Stock and Poultry.
10:15—Management of the Con
sumptive in the Home, Dr. Van Es, at
veterinary building.
11:15—Modern Conveniences for the
Home, a demonstration, Prof. JS. S.
Keene, engineering building.
12:00—Lunch served for out-of-town
women at Ceres hall by domestic
science class—free.
Thursday Afternoon.
1:30—Music.
The Farm Oardan—Wfea
vine, Maplfcton.
Children on the Farm—rMrs. J. R.
Oetehell, Valley City.
Home Decoration-—Miss Jacobfon,
agricultural college.
Music.
Good Roads, From a View
Pcint—Mrs. Mary Zetterberg, Valley
City.
%tit i Farm Woman Out of jxtor*~
Sirs. C. F. Amidon, Fargo.
Forum Want Ads Get Quick Results.
'A
£#3."
is the one crop you cannot afford to postpone plant
ing any longer. It affords abundant forage for the
long winters, all kinds of stock thrive on it as on no
other feed. Not only this, but it makes great pasture
a
,V
great tonic for the soil. Strictly Northern
Our pr(••!»•• n». tock is unexcelled in purity, productiveness and vltali
are also offering choice selected CLOVBSR, TIMOTHY gad oilier
COW
Dealers Is Strictly High Grade Seeds
FARGO. NOR1H DAKOTA
"V.V*
Programme for balstiee of Tri-State
convention:
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 17.
Morning Session*
9:30—Prize Grains in New Yorlt Land
Show, Prof. M. L. Wilson, Bozeman,
Mont.
10:00—Construction of Silos and Feed
ing of Silage, Fred W. Merrill, repre
sentatives dairy division, U. S. de
partment of agriculture, Grafton, N.
D.
10:30—The Feeding Value of Corn
Stover and Corn Fodder, W. B.
Richards, professor animal husband
ry, agricultural college, N. D.
11:00—Co-operation in the Marketing
of Live Stock, W. H. Tomhave, Live
stock specialist, Extension depart
ment, Minnesota college of agricul
ture, St. Paul, Minn.
Afternoon 8ession.
1:30—Live Stock as an Asset on a
North Dakota Farm, A. Devine,
Mapleton, N. D.
2:00—Address. H. H. Gross, president
National Soli Fertility league, Chi
cago.
2:30—The Production of Feeders, Capt
W. S. A. Smith, Sioux City, la.
3:00—Horse Raising as a Source of
Profit on the Farm, Thos. F. Mooney,
Fergus, N. D.
Evening Session.
7:30—Band concert.
8:30—President's address, Pres. J. H.
Worst, president North Dakota Agri
cultural college.
9:00—Relation Between Railroads and
Farmers, Howard Elliott, president
Northern Pacific Railway Co.
THURSDAY, JAN. 18.
Morning Session.
9Methods of Frost Prevention
Mr. DeSmidt, Battle Lake, Minn.
10:00—Progress in Northwestern Hor
ticulture, T. Brackett, Excelsior,
Genuine choice selected,
graded and tested NORTH
bAKOTA GROWN SEED
CORN, KILN DRIED. The
heavy demand for HOME. RAISED CORN this year will exhaust all
stocks long before seeding, so send in your orders for outr corn,
which Is noted for its perfection of type and quality. WE CAN
BUPPLY YOU if you get your order in now.
FARGO SEED HOUSE
Greatest Corn Show Ever Held
in N. D. Is Ready For
the Public
Continued From Page On*.
Here will be displayed the various
principles of moisture conservation in
the growing of corn and wheat.
Just opposite the main entrance, sd
that it will catch the eya of every
visitor the first thing on entering the
building, is the booth of demonstra
tion farms, which is one of the most
interesting and unique in the whole
show. The trimmings will be of green
and yellow, which is the prevailing
color scheme of the entire exhibi
tion.
The Farm, Stock and Home of Min
neapolis will probably have the largest
display in the entire building. It will
occupy fhe space of three booths and
will n» doubt be one of the chicf fea
tures of the show. Not all the decora
tions have been made yet, but it will
present a neat appearance in the morn
ing.
Mrs. Randlett, wife of the capable
director of the show, will conduct one
of the most unique booths in the show,
which will be of absorbing interest to
all the women visitors as well as the
men. Everything that a woman can
make out of corn will be found on dis
play in her booth. This will encom
pass most everything from corn husk
fugs to all the recipes for delectable
corn dishes for the table which are
so appetizing. Mrs. Randlett's booth
is trimmed in popcorn and fodder dec
orations made into appropriate and at
tractive designs.
The Northern Seed Co. will be found
right next and in that will be found a
general line of farm seeds. The North
western Nursery Co. of Valley City Is
another concern whose booth will be
one of the features of the exhibition. It
will contain forest treets, fruit trees,
commercial orchard trees, ornamental
shrubbery and special attention will
be given to the landscape department
of that company.
Northrup, King & Co. of Minne
apolis will have a general line of farm
and garden seed presented to the pub
lic in a most attractive manner. W. O.
Olsen of Moorhead will also show a
fine line of seeds.
Red River Valley Exhibit.
Another one of the big features of
the show will be the fine exhibit of
the Red river valley that was shown
at the St Paul land show. This will be
under the personal direction of Henry
Amerland, who supervised the exhibit
at St. Paul. Everybody will be inter
ested in that display and should see
It for It was one of the prize booths
at St. Paul and won the admiration of
every eye there.
Magill & Co. will have an exhibit
presenting all sorts of corn varieties,
which will be something entirely dis
tinctive. A number of machinery ex
hibits will also attract considerable
attention. These will include the fine
displays of the J. I. Case Co., which
will contain a corn shredder, gasoline
engine and a road grader, and the In
ternational Harvester Co., which will
offer a general line of farm machinery.
Right next, and directly on one of
the two main aisles of the show room,
is the display of the American Steel
& Wire Co., in which will be found
all sorts of steel fencing and concrete
work. Near the entrance of the exhi
bition rooms the J. j. Case Co. has
fitted up a fine automobile exhibit
which has already attracted the at
tention of the many visitors who have
thronged the buildings.
The general exhibit Is onO tf the
most attractive features of the show
this year. It will occupy the main
space of the exhibition rooms at the
rear of the building. One of the clever
exhibits in this will be the imitation
log cabin, built entirely of eara of
corn by John Freyberger, chief of
police of LaMoure. The corn is North
western Dent and was raised by Mr.
Freyberger on his farm in That section
of the state.
By this evening a big electric sign
will be placed over N. P. avenue in
front of the Case building, calling the
attention of the public to the location
of the show. The frame work of this
sign will be made entirely of corn, so
that it will be one of the novelties of
both the show and the convention.
This has been pronounced the most
successful corn show ever held in
North Dakota, even before the open
ing of the doors of the exhibition to
the general public, and the promoters
have every reason to feel proud of
their attempt and achievement.
The building and space is donated
the
case
company together with
the heating and lighting of the place,
something which is very much appre
ciated by everyone In connection with
the project.
The splendid prise of $1,000 offered
by the First National bank to the ^rn
growers is so well known over the
state and in all quarters of the north
west, that it does not need special
mention here to let the public know
about It. This act of generosity on
the part of the First National is done
purely in an educational spirit and in
the effort to encourage the general
growth of corn in this state.
Ot^er prizes will be offered for the
^chooi children's exhibits axjd other
likely contests by the Fargo Com
pjercial club and by the Fargo clear
ing house.
Professor Randiett is ably assisted
by Prof. W. R. Lanxon, head of the
.Hettinger sub-experimental station
who was in charge of the construction
work of the exhibitors today.
N. Y. canned squash, regular 20c
tlae for 10c a can. n
Pgr
Yema-Skinner's Tuesday,
Jo*, fit
iijs
N»J
TBM FARQO FOHUM AXD DAILT BEPPBUCA1T, MONDAY" *EVENINO.' JAOTART
TAKE8 MORE THAN SUBZERO
WEATHER TO FREEZE PRO
GRESSIVE SPIRIT OF NORTH
DAKOTANS MANY IMPROVE
MINTS FOR 1912.
Weather cold enough to suggest lit
tle in the building line, save the erec
tion of a larger coal bin for next year,
perhaps, has apparently not acted as
a damper on the plans of energetic
North Dakotans and in many of the
towns about the state plans were made
in the past week looking to important
and needed improvements.
It Is noticeable in the building an
nouncements that much attention is
being paid to the erection of new
schoolhouses and the improving of the
old educational buildings. Many towns
will expend considerable sums in the
building of new high schools this year,
among them being Casselton. This
hustling little city recently voted *37,
000 bonds for the erection of a new
high school building. .'The school
board will expend about $50,000 in this
improvement, which will be one that
Casselton has been looking forward to
for some time and which will raise that
city's educational stock considerable.
Sanborn is another of the good towns
of the state that will line up with
those taking seats in the improvement
band wagon. Here an addition of four
rooms will be built to the present
schoolhouse. The work will be com
menced as soon as school closes in the
spring and will be rushed to comple
tion. Plans for -the addition are in the
making.
Public buildings about the state are
also to come in for a marked share in
1912 improvements as well as the ed
ucational buildings. One of the most
important improvements proposed Is
that of the new Pembina county court
house at Cavalier. Architects have
drawn plans for the new county house
and jail that will cost approximately
$75,000.
The churches of North Dakota, too,
will come in for some improvements
and a few new houses of worship will
be erected. This state is fortunate in
having among its churches some of the
finest in the country, but there is still
room for much improvement in this
particular department. In the week
passed it was announced that Stanley
will have a new church. This struc
ture will be put up by the Baptist con
gregation. It will be a brick building
and modern in every detail.
One great Improvement that la be
ing given wide attention in this state
and one which will be a feature In the
upbuilding of this section is that of
parks and playgrounds. In many
flickertail towns, where only a few
years ago the stranger was welcomed
by a view of miles of prairie and most
likely a handful of dust in the eye and
that's about all, blocks of parked
grounds and boulevards now greet the
visitor and the youth of the place have
their innings on playgrounds second
to none in the northwest. Civic or
ganizations in many of the little cities
of the state have taken up the park
and playground idea and their efforts
in almost every Instance have met
with instant support and substantial
backing. Havana, one of the liveliest
young cities, was recently presented
with ten acres of ground at the north
end of the principal business street
for use as a park.
FIRE DESTROYS
BUILDINGS ON THE WILL ROOD
PLACE NEAR 8ABIN CLAIMED
BY FLAMES OF MYSTERIOUS
ORIGIN EARLY THIS MORNING—
Hit AW LOSS.
Fire of mysterious origin at an early
hour this morning completely demol
ished the big granary and machine
shed on the farm of Will Rood, about
three miles west of Sabin.
Mr. Rood was away from home at
the time, looking after business In
Canada. The farm was in charge of
the foreman, who cannot account for
the inception of the blaze.
Within the past five years Mr. Rood
has (sustained considerable loss on
his farm from fire. Two big barns
were destroyed in this time besides
the buildings claimed by the flames
today. The amount of the loss is not
known.
IN MATCHTOWN
Fortunately no Faith Was Required,
For She Had None.
"X no faith whatever, but on the
advice of a hale, hearty old gentleman
who spoke from experience, I began to
use Grape-Nuts about 2 years ago,"
writes an Ohio woman, who says she is
40, is known to be fair, and admits
that she Is growing plump on the new
diet.
"I shall not try to tell you how I suf
fered for years from a deranged stom
ach that rejected almost all sorts of
food, and digested what little was forc
ed upon it only at the cost of great
distress and pain.
"I was treated by many different
doctors and they gave me many differ
ent medicines, and I even spent several
years in exile from my home, thinking
change of scene might do me good. You
may judge of the gravity of my condi
tion when I tell you I was •sometimes
compelled to use morphine for weeks
at a time.
"For two years I h$.ve eaten Grape
Nuts food at least twice a day and I
can now say that have perfect health.
I have taken no medicine in that time—
Grape-Nuts has done it all. I can eat
absolutely anything I wigh, without
stomach distress.
I am a business woman and can
walk my 2 or 3 miles a day and feel
better for doing so. I have to use brains
in roy work, and it is remarkable how
quick, alert and tireless my mental
powers have become." Name given by
postum Co., Battle Creek, Mich.
"There's a reason,'* and it is explain
ed in the little book, "The Road to
WellvSlle," in pkgs.
Ever read tfte above letter? A new
One appears from time to time. They
*re genuine* *ry«t fi41 of bum*n
interest^
ii'i
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«n
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1912,'
First
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Altft
Booth No. 1—Fargo Heating & Plumbing Co.
Booth Iftfr^^-Oliver Denis.
Booth No. 3—Chaney-Everhart Co.
Booth No. 4—Wilbur Cigar Co.
Booth No. 6—Frank O. Knerr Dairy Co.
Booth No. 6—Monson Trunk Factory
Booth No. 7—American Gas Machine Oo.
Booth No. 8—Shotwell Floral Co.
Booth No. Fargo Milling Co.
Booth No. 10—Union Light, Heat & £ower
Booth No.
Ht—Pirle's
Cafe
A
j'w
ill DmUAIIC HUT
AH Arrangements Are Made for EMg
Love Feaat Of Democrats This
Week.
Fisting the
number of
JJlatea at* 400,
the general committee in charge of
the democratic conference' today de
cided to limit the sale of tickets.
While it Is desired to have, as large
a number as possible .hear Mr.. Bryan,
It was thought best not
to
Uncomfdrt-
*'v ft*"5 fH*vs 'lV *c V-'O^
Opcsns
At BiOQ
"The Following Firms Will Exlilit
Bakery
Booth NO. 12—J. D. Grant & Co.
Booth No. 18, 14—Joseph & Hoenck
Booth No. 15—Klinsman Furnace Co.
Booth No. 16—Fargo Foundry Co.
Booth No. 17, 18—Manchester Biscuit Co,
Booth No. 19, 20—J. A. Schlanser & Co.
Booth No. 21—Bristol & Sweet
Booth No. 22—Fargo Cornice & Ornament Co.
Booth No. 23—Fargo Ice Cream & Cider CSa,
Booth No. 24—Dakota Welding & M'f* Co.
Booth No. 25—N. D. Metal Culvert COw
Booth No. 26—L. C. Trunk Co.
Opposite Gardner Hotel
S,
ably crowd the hall.
Those desiring tickets must of
necessity reserve them at once in or
der to he sure of place. Only a
few will be allotted, to locaj citiaens,
as the delegations from other towns
must be taken care of.
,l*d'
A. M.
This Exhibition of Manufactured Prod-
ucts By the Manufacturers
Will Be One of the Greatest Shows
Ever Held In the City of Fargo
'*'i
1 1
.'
v
i W
of
Free-
Booth No. 87—Courier-New® Co.
Booth No. 28—Fargo Tannery Co.
Booth No. 29—North Dakota Harness Co»
Booth No. 80—N. D. Grain Door Co. ..
Booth No. 31—Miss Emily Wetzlg
Booth No. 83—Fargo Stamp Works
Booth No. 82—Miss Bertha Owen
Booth No. 84—Fargo Carpet & Rug Co.
Booth No. 36—Fargo Auto & Supply Co.
Booth No. 86—Fargo Marble fc Granite Worka
Booth No. 87—Bijou Candy Mart
Booth No. 38—Klinsman Furnace Cot
Booth No. 39—Stone Piano Co.
Booths No. 40, 41—McHose & Pardos
Booth No. 42—Fargo Bottling Worlia
Booth No. 43—E^xgo Forum
Booth No. 44—Mrs. J. Koppelman.
Booth No. 46—American Bottling C6.
Booth No. 46—G. N. Fuel & Concrete C®»
Booth No. 47—Dakota Sash & Door Far toy*
Booth No. 48—North Dakota Weaving
Booth No. 49—Knight Printing Co.
Booth No. 50—Albert Lee Gass Light
Booth No. 52—Porte Printing Co.
Kolicrfs Street
If
A private office for the representa
tives of the press has been ar
ranged in the Pioneer Life building
This room will be equipped with
typewriters, desks and phones in or
der that work ponnected with the
press may be fHUitated. The *oom
will be niv^Vy furnished so that it will
serve as a iest room as well.
Every det 1! looking to the comfort
Jul
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o the visitors has been arranged,
there is no doubt but that the
gates will depart enthusiastic
argo as a convention city.
CHANGES OFFICE LOCATI
Dr. E. M. Lier Removes to flaiVjk
somely Appointed Quarter*
Dr. E. M. Lier has removed lis of
fice from 614 Front street to Nlo. 10
Broadway. Dr. Lier is one of t&rg&a
leading dentist* and his new ,#«? of
business ir handsomely finished
throughout.
Forum Want Ads Get, Quick fcesulfe
If
v if*'/

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