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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, January 16, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1912-01-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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I
THE WEATHER
Light enow tonight and Wednesday
colder Wednesday.
MORE 8HELVING SPACE NEEDED.
At 3 o'clock this afternoon, 600 running: feet of shelving space la
the exhibition rooms of the J. I. Case building had already been filled
by corn exhibits at the corn show and more shelving space is now
being rapidly constructed to take care of all the entries. This is an
indication that this is the greatest display of its kind ever attempted
in the history of the city and agricultural gatherings of the state*
Things started off with a rfish this
morning at the corn show. The doors
were opened to the public at the exhi
bition rooms of the J. I. Case building
precisely at 10 o'clock, as advertised.
It was stated that this was not only
the greatest and most successful corn
chow held In Fargo, but the greatest
free agricultural exhibit ever held in
the northwest.
Prof. G. W. Randlett of the agri
cultural college is in charge and has
prepared one of the greatest educa
tional treats for the northwestern
farmers that has ever been attempted
in this section of the country. He is
ably assisted by Professor Lanxon of
the Hettinger experimental station
and a corps of other helpers who will
also be in charge.
All the booths neared completion
when the uoors were opened and at
tracted much attention. A number of
signs were posted back in the portion
of the exhibition rooms giving data
of the corn produced in the state of
North Dakota for the past two years
and a comparison made with the yield
five years prior to that time. This
list also included data regarding the
number of pounds of butter made in
the state, of the number of cows kept,
the number of silos, the varieties of
corn grown, the number of corn ex
hibits at the show and the number
of corn harvesters sold in the state.
Following is a complete liat of these
facts:
8Moa.„
1805 20
1910 67
1911 114
Pounds of Butter Made.
1*05 11,700,597
1910 14,82S,9«f
Kinds of Corn Grown.
Flints—Gehu, Dakota White, Mercer.
Triumph.
Dents—Golden, Northwestern, Bus
tlers White, Minnesota 18 and Minne
sota 23.
Acres of Corn Grown in 8tata.
V $905
r.
99,28*.,
1910 (not given.)
1911 452,9$t
,-"'4912 (estimated) l,000,0(Kft
Corn Exhibit at Corn Show*
1
1908 149
1909 812
1 9 1 0 2 7 3
,1811 (estimated) .',1,000
•1911 Statistics.
Corn acreage itt
state 425,931,
-.Cows 168,2(^1
Hogs (not given.)
Harvesters Sold in North Dakota.
The following shows the number of
corn harvesters sold in North Dakota
by the International Harvester Co.
from its four branch houses at Fargo,
Minot, Grand Forks and Bismarck.
1905 179
,:*? jl910 718
1911 ,.w§ r*»• 2,400
Tfi every respect the show will he
handled with the best jnanagement
this year. Assisting Professor Rand
lett at the various booths will be L.
6. Thorp of Mayville, who will have
the odds and ends of the exhibit C. A.
Chinberg of Hankinson, president of
the Hankinson Nursery Co., who will
have charge of the horticultural
booth Prof. R. C. Doneghue of the A.
C., who will have charge of the agri
nomy booth Hugh J. Hughes of the
Farm, Stoc^ and Home of Minneapo
lis Mr. Porter, who will be in charge
of the American Steel & Wire Co.'s
booth Mrs. Randlett. who will have
charge of the women's booth A. K.
Bush, who will have charge of the
Northrup, King & Co. booth Theo
dore Christianson, who will have
charge of the demonstration farms
booth Oscar Churlie, who will have
charge of the Fargo Seed Co.'s booth
W. J. Olsen of Moorhead, who will
have his own booth Harold E. Soren
pon, who will have charge of the con
test for the First National bank.
The names of those in charge of
other booths will be given as they
are fitted up and ready for presen
tation to the public, Henry Amer-
i
X,r1f
vV*
it 1
rn
Has Leaped Into Favor
Magnificent Showing Hade of Typical North Dakota Varieties
of Corn-Everything Points to a Record Breaking Year
For This Industry During 1912
Approximately 1,000 Exhibits Are Shown, Throwing Every
Past Effort At Corn
Display
Completely
North Dakota
Into
Eclipse
land will take charge of the tteff river
valley of the north booth, which will
be found at the rear of the exhibition
rooms at the end of the main aisle
from the entrance.
The machinery booths are of espe
cial interest as they contain only
corn machines of various kinds, and
the main feature of the American
Steel & Wire Co.'s booth is a concrete
silo and a small model corn bin.
This is a corn show in every respect
and everything is made out of corn
that is possible. It is an education
in itself to see just how everything
is arranged and to view all the vari
ous exhibits.
OF
"Were Those
Here?"
Vlzii
the Universal
Question
Big Building Full of Beautiful
Displays
Permanent Exhibit May Grow
Outoi the iiittt
$
SURPRISES AT THE
PRODUCT8 8HOW
Products of Fargo manufactur
ers that are making persons who
have lived here all their lives sit
up and take notice are being ad
vantageously exhibited in the old
Everhart Candy factory on Rob
erts street. These exhibits will
be intact throughout the week and
include the following articles man
ufactured in the "gateway to the
bread basket of the world:"
Candy., fur garments, leather
goods and harness, crackers,
bread, ice cream, sash and doors,
show case and office fixtures, til
ing, concrete building blocks and
fence posts, flour, cigars, metal cul
verts, heating plants, mattresses,
calendars and novelties, tents,
awnings, wagon covers, wagons,
signs, rugs and carpets, bottled
goods, hair goods, electrical fcoods,
lighting systems, blank books,
floral designs, gasoline engines,
trunks and innumerable other
things that tend to make one glad
that he is living in Fargo, N. D.
Unmindful of the nipping wind that
shouted profane protests at frosty
windows and fur-lined overcoats 10Q
persons stood on Roberts street this
morning and waited for Fargo's first
home products show to open. Promptly
at 10 o'clock Sec, C. P. Stine of the
commercial club- called to the door
keeper to "open 'er up." The big door$
swung outward ana a second later
there was a rush for the exhibit stalls.
The show was. to all appearances,
complete when the first enthusiastic
spectator was admitted to the build
ii where on two floors are exempli
fied the spirit of progress that
characterises North Dakotans and the
evolution of Fargo manufacturers!*
subtilitv of contrivance.
During the forenoon nearly 1,000
spectators inspected the exhibits. By
closing time tonight* it is anticipated
J*
l~
ir v*
"f
mm*
fully 6,000 persons will have availod
themselves of the chance to see the
multifarious collection of things that
sit daily turned out in the shops of
the biggest little city in thew orld.
Probably no one in the city was hap
pier this morning than Secretary Stine
of the commercial club, through whose
indegatigable efforts the home prod
ucts show idea was launched and has
been successfully brought to its
present state of perfection. His face
all smiles, Mr. Stine said:
"Fargo should feel proud today. She
has a show here that does not have to
take a back seat for any similar at*
traction ever attempted in this sec
tion. It is a show worth millions to
the city and state. That It will be
popular there is no doubt. Look at the
people coming in now. They have been
crowding in all morning and more peo
ple will come tonight. I guess every
body is happy. I know I am. I hope
the whole town will see this how. It
is really an educational proposition
and an eye opener. The exhibitors and
the committees have worked hard and
m-i
Continued on Page Taa.
lii«
^1. ^1J W
First Democratic Rally Opens
Here Tomorrow
UMM COMES IN MI
80-Mfc W MdQCST 4*#- THC
DEMOCRATIC PARTY WILL
MAKE FARQO THEIR HEAD-
QUARTERS FOR THE NEXT TWO
DAVS-r-A&L IN READINESS.
The democrats will begin to pour
into the city early tomorrow morning,
commencing with the arrival of Gov.
Judson Harmon from Minneapolis on
No. 7, for the great democratic love
feast that is being held here tomor
row and Thursday. Some will arrive
tonight and everything Is in readiness
for the coming of the rooster voters.
The day will begin with an informal
reception tomorrow morning at 10
o'clock for the delegates at the demo
cratic headquarters which have been
established in Stone's old hall in
First avenue north. This will occupy
the entire morning and at 2 o'clock
in the afternoon there will be an or
ganization of the Cass county democ
racy at headquarters.
Tomorrow evening at 8:15 o'clock
the doors of the Orpheum theater on
N. P. avenue will be thrown open to
the general public to hear the ad
dresses of Governor Harmon, Judge
Martin J. Wade of Des Moines and
Sen. R. S. Pettigrew of South Dakota,
the chief speakers of the evening. This
will be entirely free to the public and
those arranging for the big love feast
desire the public to understand this
and to know that everybody will be
made welcome.
Sub-headquarters have been estab
lished today in all of the hotels in
the city, where information may be
obtained about the various meetings
in connection with the democratla
gathering. The general information
bureau will be at the headquarters in
Stone's old hall where the secretary's
office will be located. Private tele
phones will be placed in all the in
formation bureaus and headquarters
at the hotels and in Stone's hall.
It was stated today by Secretary
Hildreth that all those having tickets
for the big democratic banquet
Thursday noon at Pirie's hall will be
given seats in a certain reservation at
the Orpheum, and that all reserva
tions should be made for the banquet
at Fout & Porterfield's drug store not
later than this evening. This will be
the biggest democratic gathering ever
held in the city and state and will be
attended by many prominent demo
crats from various sections of the
country.
N
U r»
IN
Five titfle Ones Perlsfief on
Euan ia Washington
Prentice, Wash., Jan. 16.—Five chil
dren of John Deering, a farmer living
two miles east of here, were burned
to death last night in a Are which de
stroyed their home. Two boys and
three girls, ranging in age from 1 to
12 years were victims. Mrs. Deering
and her oldest son were at the barn
milking, and when they came out the
house was afire and the roof falling
ir
"4»
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AND DAILY REPUBLICAN
FOBUM ESTABLISHED NOV. 17, 1891. FARGO, NOKTH DAKOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 16, 1912. REPUBLICAN ESTABLISHED SEPT. 5, 1878.
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-I"*' if* -f ii-i T)
THE MAN BACK OF THE
TRI-STATE CONVENTION.
At****,*.
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WH
XV v
V4
7
rM
John H. Worst, the president of
the North Dakota A. C. and the
head of the Tri-State Grain Grow
ers' convention, is the man, more
than any one else, responsibie for
the success of these great gather
ings. President Worst opened the
convention this morning
presiding at all sessions.
and la
MF
National Grange Him
For Vice President
Washington, Jan. 15—Member*5 of
the National Grange in the east lire
planning a united movement to arouse
sentiment for the nomination of U.
S. Sen. Porter J. McCumber of North
Dakota for the vice presidency on
the republican ticket this year. In a
speech delivered a few days ago in
Connecticut by George Ladd, former
master of the Massachusetts stat&
grange, and one of the influential men
in grange affairs, he openly advocated
the nomination of Senator McCumber
saying in one place In his address:
"There is no man who has been
more loyal to the cause of the farmers
than Senator McCumber of North Da
kota, and it is my belief that the
farmers throughout the country would
be glad to support him for at least a
second place on the republican ticket."
Death Let Him Out.
Cincinnati, O., Jan. 16.—Thomaa F.
McClure, who was president of the
Metropolitan Bank & Trust Co. of this
city, when it was closed by the state
bank examiners two months ago, drop
ped dead in the federal building to
day. Following the failure of the bank
McClure was indicted by the Hamilton
county grand jury on 'charge of re
ceiving deposits when he kspw tile
bank was insolvent.
HEBE FOR MEET
ELECTION OF OFFICER8 OF THE
8TATE ORGANIZATION MOST
IMPORTANT BUSINESS OF THE
GATHERING LEADING PARTY
MEN ON HAND TO HELP.
Progressive republicans from near
ly all sections of the state are in Far*
go today to elect officers of the state
organization and to discuss proposed'
action in the coming campaign. Also,
indubitably, to listen to the prominent
democrats and to. perchance, get a
pointer or two on things political in
that party-
The convention of progressive# con
vened late this forenoon in the Sons
of Norway hall. After listening to
the report of Fred Traynor, the sec
retary of the state organisation, an
adjournment was taken until 2
o'clock this afternoon. At the time
for business this afternoon the dele
gates had not got down to work and
were still telling of the numerous big
things that of discussing political mat
ters in general.
Among the prominent progressives
here for the meeting are J. A. Buchan
an of Buchanan, oandidate for gover
nor A. B. Cox of Valley City, first vice
president of the state progressive
league Thos. Hall, of Bismarck, sec
ond vice president of the state league
H. M. Tucker, of CsLsselton H. N.
Johnson, of Lankin, treasurer of the
state league Tredwell Twiehell, of
Mapleton P. O. Torson, of Grand
Forks Carl Sorenson, of Grand Forks
U. Ia Burdick, of Willi ston, and Fred
Traynor, of Devils Lake, secretary of
the state organization.
Busily engaged making their out-of
town brothers feel at home are H. H.
Aaker, R. M. Pollock and P. H. Smith
of Ft
..
V *V-/.f
.. ...
$ $ &
•A jjk
•%«%.
m,
Indianapolis, InL, Jan. 16.—Three
explosions in Wisconsin, alleged to
have been part of the widespread dy
namite conspiracy, were Investigated
by the federal grand jury here today.
Two men of Portage. Wis., said to
be relatives of Ortie McManigal, were
examined in connection with the dy
namiter's transportation of explosives
from Chicago to points in Wisconsin.
The explosions were at Green Bay,
Nov. 16, 1909 Superior, Aug. 2, 1910,
and Milwaukee, March 21, 1911.
Formal Proclamation Said to
Have Been Issued
RULERS WILL GO TO JEHOL
ATTEMPT WAS MADE TO ASSAS
SINATE PREMIER YUAN SHI
KAI—BOMB HURLER'S AIM WAS
POOR AND MEMBERS OF THE
ESCORT WERE KILLEOk
(9
San Francisco, Jan. 14.—A proc
lamation was published by the im
perial Chinese throne today ac
cording to a cable message re
ceived here by The Chung Sai Yat
Po from Shanghai. The message
stated further that the empress
dowager and the emperor had an
nounced a willingness to retire to i
the summer palace at JehoL
Pekin, Jan. 16.—A bomb thrown at
Premier Yuan Shi Kal's carriage
while he was on the way from the im
perial court today, killed two soldiers
and injured seventeen other persons,
civilians and soldiers. Of these, eight
or ten are expected to die- Several
horses belonging to the military es
cort, besides those attached to Yuan's
carriage were killed.
The premier just had a long audi
ence with princes of the imperial
clan when the would-be assassins at
tempted his life. The men were cap
tured. The public executioner was
called, and with assistants awaits or
ders from the imperial authorities for
the execution of the assailants.
Yuan's assailants were three China
man, said to be prominent revolution
ists. They were standing on the side
walk when the premier's carriage ap
proached. When the vehicle was about
thirty yards from them, one of the
men threw a large bomb in Its di
rection, but his aim was so bad the
missle exploded twenty feet from the
carriage.
The vehicle rattled and shook from
the shock of the explosion but Yuan
escaped unscathed and appeared not
to be greatly perturbed. The force of
the explosion was so great many hous
es hundreds of yai d8 away were shak
en.
I TO DLL
Memphis, Tenn., Jan. 16.—John T.
Baernstein, manager of the wholesale
department of a local coal company,
was shot and instantly killed by W. T.
Avery, a former real estate dealer, to
day- The shooting ocurred at Avery's
home.
Avery, who is in jail, declined to
state the cause of the quarrel! but
stated he fired in self-defense.
I'l
IN BAKOTAS
La Crpsse» Jan. 16.—After having
traveled through five states in order
to find a place where they might
legally wed, Miss Anna Sietsma of
Woonsocket, 8. D., and Sietse Sietsma
of Forestburg, S. D., were married
here today.
The pair are first cousins, and be
cause of that were unable to marry
in either of the Dakotas, Minnesota,
Nebraska or Iowa. There is no ban
on the marriage o£ itrat cousins here
1
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Onened
WEDNESDAY. JAN. 17.
Morning Sessiory
9:30—How To Secure Good Roads in
North Dakota, T. R, Atkinson, state
engineer, Bismarck, N. D.
10:00—Construction of Silos and Feed
ing of Silage, Fred W. Merrill, repre
sentatives dairy division, U. S. de
partment of agriculture, Grafton, N.
D.
10:30—The Feeding Value of Corn
Stover and Corn Fodder, W. B.
Richards, professor animal husband
ry, agricultural college, N. D.
11:00—Co-operation in the Marketing
of Live Stock, W. H. Tomhave, Live
stock specialist, Extension depart
ment, Minnesota college of agricul
ture. St Paul, Minn.
Afternoon 8ession.
1:30—Live Stock as an Asset on a
North Dakota Farm, A. Devine,
Mapleton, N. D.
2:00—Address, H. H. GFross, president
National Soil Fertility league, Chi
cago.
2:30—The Production of Feeders, Capt.
W. S. A. Smith, Sioux City, Ia.
3:00—Horse Raising as a Source of
Profit on the Farm, ThoB. j?. Mooney.
Fergus, N. D.
-it-
Evening 8essioife
7:30—Band concert.
8:30—President's address, Pres. J. H.
Worst, president North Dakota Agri
cultural college.
#:00—Relation Between Railroads and
Farmers, Howard Elliott, president
Northern Pacific Railway Co.
Pres. John H. Worst was prompt in
calling the great Tri-State Grain
Growers convention to order this
morning in the Fargo operahouse when
over 300 farmers and grain growers
of the three states of North and South
Dakota and Minnesota gathered to at
tend one of the greatest agricultural
assemblies that is annually held In
the United States.
All the managers of the great as
semblage are well pleased with the
representation at the convention and
feel that it is going to be one of the
most successful in the entire history
of the grain growers. With the ex
ception of one, all the speakers whose
names were on the programme were
present and ready to give their ad
dresses at the stipulated hour. The
only absentee was State Engineer At
kinson who was unavoidably detained
in Bismarck but who will be here to
morrow and be the first speaker at
the afternoon session in place of Prof.
M. L. Wilson of Bozeman, Mont., who
was called this morning instead.
The whole lower floor of the opera
house was comfortably filled when
President Hardy of the Fargo Com
mercial club was introduced by Presi
dent Worst to deliver the address of
I—
Continued on Page Eight.
PHncets to Wed.
Berlin, Jan. 16.—The bethrothal of
Princess Victoria Luise, daughter of
the emperor, to the Grand Duke,
Adolph Frederick of Mecklenburg
Strelitz, is expected to be announced
on emperor's birthday, Jan. 27, ac
cording to report# here.
ui 7
fVjr
J*'
LAST EPI
of Gavel at
THIS ISSUE 12 PAGES
Pres. JL P. Hardy of Commercial Club, on Behalf of Mayor,
Turned Over Keys of Fargo to the Visiting Hosts
From All Over the Northweit
Superintendent Selvig in Response, Congratulated Fargo on
Royal Welcome Accorded Guests-Sees Great Pros
pects in Future of North Dakota
MEETING8 TOMORROW.
Tri-State Grain Growers at Fargo operahouse.
Democratic reception at old Stone hall at 10 o'clock.
Cass county democrats at old Stone hall at 2 o'clock.
Democratic gathering at Orpheum theatre at 8:15 o'clock.
North Dakota County Judges' association at Cass counjty COorthoUM.
North Dakota State Veterinary association at A. C.
SPEAKERS TOMORROW.
Pres. John H, Worit, annual address to Grain Growers, Fargo opera
house.
Pres. Howard Elliott, Northern. Pacific railroad, Fargo operahouse.
Gov. Judson Harmon of Ohio to democrats, Orpheum theatra.
Sen. R. S, Pettigrew of South Dakota, Orpheum thextre.
Judge Martin J. Wade of Des Moines, Orpheum theatre.
State Engineer Atkinson, Fargo operahouse.
Fred W. Merrill of Grafton, U, S. dairy division, Fargo operahouse.
W. H. Tomhave of St, Paul, live stock specialist, Fargo operahpuife.
A Devine of Mapleton, Fargo operahouse.
Pres. H. H. Gross of Chicago National Soil Fertility league, Fargo
operahouse.
Capt. W. S. A. Smith of Sioux City. la,, Fargo operahousei
Thomas F. Mooney of Fergus, Fargo operahouse.
8PEAKER8 TONIGHT.
Prof. J. V. Bopps of ^Minneapolis, editor N. W, Farmstead, Fargooparft
hou^e.
Rev. J. M. Walters of Fargo, Fargo operahouse.
The feature of the evening programme will be an exhibition drill
by the crack squad of the Agricultural college cadet corps.
orst
ig Session
I
S A
Indianapolis,
teen hundred
Ind., Jan. 16.—Thir
delegates representing
300,000 coal miners gathered in this
city today in one of the most impor
tant conferences in the history of the
coai industry in the United States and
Canada.
It is the twenty-third annual con
vention of the United Mine Workers of
America, and will formulate the de
mands to be made by the miners when
their representatives meet the rnina
owners to negotiate a new wage scale
contract to go into force April 1 next,
in both the bituminous and anthracite
fields.
80YCE IS ON
I
Winnipeg, Jan. lfc~~A. G. Boyoe,
jr., who it is alleged recently eloped
from Amarillo, Tex., with Mrs. J. B.
Snead, and whose father was shot and
killed by the husband of Mrs. Snead
last Saturday is on his way to Texa»
It is reported here. Counsel for Boyc#
stated today he had not seen Boyc#
since yesterday noon, when Boyce left
the house where he had been stopping.
It is said Boyce was accompanied by
a friend, left for the south Soo line.
An automatic revolver taken fro:tt
Boyce when arrested here, was re»
turned him by the police j'esterday.
Lorimer Tells of Hopkins*
Washington, Jan. 16.—Senator Lnrl
mer today told the committee investi
gating his election, the details of th#
ill feeling between himself and former
Senator Hopkins. He testified reluct
antly, declaring he didn't wish to wlde^
the "already wide gulf" between theni,
"After we had sent him to the sen*
ate," Lorimer declared, "he turned ofc'
every one of us. We felt we were un
der no obligations to send him baclt
He had no frierjdj and coiU4jQ.'t_ iA *.
elected again." fV,i
FOUND WHOLE
FA-MtLY DEAD.
Wadena, Saskatchewan, Jan. 1&—
Mrs. Duncan McNichol and six
children, ranging in age from S
to 15, were asphyxiated by coal
gas at their home here last night
Snow, which blocked the chimney
and forced the gas from the stjvo
into the room, was the cause of
the disaster. McNichol, who was at
Winnipeg at time of the tragedy,
broke open the door today and
found the seven bodies dead.
A
ft?
jami

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