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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, January 26, 1912, Image 1

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THE WEATHER
Snow tonight and .Saturday, pold
wave.
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General Who Failed Met
Fearful Death
Short Time Ago Was a Popular
Hero of Guayaquil
People Who Praised Him Tore
Life From His Boiy
Guayaquil, Jan, 26.—-Gsn. Pedro
Montero, who recently was tho
popular hero of Guayaquil was
yesterday shot by the angry popu
lace, dragged into the street*, be
headed and burned.
Montero in November last was pro
claimed president of the troops sta
tioned in Guayaquil, but handed oyer
the leadership in the provisional gov
ernment to Gen. Flavio Alfaro. The
revolutionary army went from Guaya
quil to meet the government troops
from Quito, who under the command
of Gen. Lconidas Plaza defeated them
and eventually forced Guayaquil to
capitulate.
General Montero. with the othor
leaders, was captured Jan. 22, and last
evening General Montero was brougnt
before a court martial and sentenced
to sixteen years imprisonment in the
penitentiary.
When General Flaza, who presided
over the court martial, announced the
sentence, crowds of angry people who
had surrounded the government palace
awaiting the result, shouted violent
protests. The excitement increased
rapidly and some of them rushed into
the courtroom, riddled Montero with
bullets, seized the body and dragged
it into the open. Then they hacked
the head oft the shoulders, gathered
fuel with which they started a lire,
and cast the head and trunk into the
flames.
The excitement lasted throughout
the night, and revolver shots occurred
in many parts of the city.
Gen. Elroy Alfaro ar\d General Paes.
captured the same ,tlme as Montero,
It is reported were sent to Quito last
night. They will be tried by court
martial .in the capital.
..-rf- f—rrll-
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I I E
a t«#i
i*0ne of Best Known Pioneers
of Northwest
Ml OF SOMAN'S STAFF
AMASSED A LARGE FORTUNE IN
THE REAL ESTATE BUSINESS IN
NORTH
DAKOTA—CAME
TO FAR­
GO 32 YEARS AGO—LIVED INST.
PAUL IN
PIONEER
DAY^
Col. Charles A. Morton died this
morning at .6 o'clock at the hospital in
Chicago. His remains will be brought
to Fargo tomorrow afternoon and tho
funeral will be held from his late resi
dence on Monday at 2 p. m. and will
be in charge of Rev. Dr. Beard. The
remains will be placed in the receiving
vault in Riverside cemetery.
Colonel Morton had a long and hon
orable service in the
army
and was as­
signed to General Sherman's staff »f
the commissary department, during
most of the rebellion, he was one of
the charter members of the officers
who originated the Society of the
Army of the Tennessee, in which so
ciety he has always been deeply in
terested.
The colonel came to Fargo thirty
two years ago( after having been In
business in St. Paul for several years.
He engaged in the land buriness here
and became widely known all ever the
country because of his distinctive ad
vertising. He amassed a large fortune
and leaves'a very large circle of friends
who greatly regret his demise and tx
tend the heartiest sympathy to the
widow and other members of tho fam
ily of the deceased.
KILLED
L-fegboro, 0a., Jan. 26.—Four train
men were killed here early today in a
collision on the Central of Georgia
railroad, between east bdund passen
ger train No. an^d a west bound extra
freight. v-:r
ANOTHER HAUL
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'"VlWMtt#, B. C., Jan. It ire
ported that tho Main street branch of
the Royal bank has been robbed of
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SPOKE AT PRESS
MEETING TODAY.
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mm.
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Clrary of The Edmore
who delivered excellent
this
E. M.
Herald,
address this afternoon at the
North Dakota Press association
meeting on Office Control of Ready
Priqt Advertising.
Missouri Factional Fight Wffl
Continue
CLARK HEN ARE OBDURATE
"PEERLESS LEADER"SUGGE8TED
A COMPROMISE BUT BOTH
SIDES REFUSED, CLARK LEAD­
ERS BEING EMPHATIC IN THEIR
TURN DOWN.
St: Louis, Jan. 26.—-The efforts tof
William J. Bryan to settle the conflict
between Speaker Champ Clark and
former Gov. Joseph W. Folk, for the! J^Uy.'
indorsement of Missouri democrats for
the presidential nomination, produced
no material result today. Bryan, while
here, suggested a division of the Mis
souri delegation as between Folk and
jClarlf, candidate to be dropped who
received the smallest number of votes
on the flrtt ballot at the.national con
vention at Baltimore. "r-
Former Gov. ,Lon V. Stephen*, a
follower of Folk, made the proposition
to Bryan, who in turn gave it to the
members of each faction. Each re
fused to consider any compromise.
J, Virgil Rule today Issued from the
Clark headquarters a statement to the
effect that no presidential candidate
has authority to try to divide that
which he doesn't own, and that the
managers of the Clark bureau don't
propose to compromise.
.TY HID
TAFIA
New York, Jan. 26.—His royal high
ness the Duke of Connaught came back
to New York this morning from a visit
to President Taft in Washington. The
duke was delighted with his reception
at the national capital, being especially
pleased with tne democratic simplicity
which marked the ceremonials at the
White House and at the home of Brit
ish Ambassador Bryce.
The royal visitor reached the city
early and quite in time, to take,the
early morning walk which he has tak
en daily since the vice regal party
reached here from Canada, Monday
last.
The royal guests of Ambassador and
Mrs. Whltelaw Reld wllleonclude their
visit in NeW York and plan to leave
for Ottawa at 7:40 tonight.
tONAlD
London, Eng., Jan. 26.—Along with
the suggestion by Postmaster Hitch
cock that the United States undertake
government ownership of telegraph
lines, it. is interesting to note what
other countries have done under gov
ernment control.
i$ogland, jtor example, faa*-cjut(.the
a
London, Jan- 26.—Israel Zangwlll has
finally decided to produce in America
his latest play, The New Keligion, for
which the British censdr refused a li
cense. The censor's action was taken
because of certain passages in the play
which he regarded in the light of re
ligious criticism.
1
Statement of Samuel Unter
meyer to House Committee
CONCENTRATION OF MONEY
BIO
FINANCIER ADMITS CAUSE
OF PRESENT FINANCIAL ILLS
THE CONCENTRATION OF MON
EY POWER IN NEW
YORK
THROUGH CORPORATIONS.
Washington, fan. 2&.—The house
committee on rules today resumed its
hearings in the Lindbergh resolution
for a. special inquiry into the "money
trust" with Samuel Untermeyer of
New York, aa a witness. Untermeyer
said he didn't appear as a sponsor or
champion of the Lindbergh resolution,
but he was satisfied congress couldn't
legislate intelligently with respect to
the trusts or to a monetary system
until the question of the concentration
of the "money power" was thoroughly
understood.
For that reason, he said, he favored
the proposed investigation provided
was "conducted in a conservati re,
systematic, painstaking, r.on-partlsan
spirit with the sole object of expos
ing the weaknesses and abuses of the
system and as a basis for contractive
legislation."
Untermeyer stated there was no
such thing as a "money trust" in the
88
aPP"ed
He believed however the proposed
investigation, would establish that the
present financial condition is due to
the concentration of the funds of great
corporations in, New York city.
SPEEfiHCTIOr
AMIiMTEO ON'
TARIFF BILL
Washington, Jan. 26.—Speedy action
on the steel aTiJ iron tariff revision
bill was foreshadowed in the house
today when Chairman Underwood of
the ways and means committee called
the measure up for :the opening de
bate.
.An agreement,for a,flve-ljour debate
I today was followed by a statement
from Underwood that he'd endeavor
to close the general debate tomorrow.
Government Telegraph a Success in England
The passage of the bill, tomorrow night
or Monday is eapected by the demo
cratic leaders. •,
G. 0. P. ED
OF KANSAS
K&nsaa City, Jan. 2&—Wltb «n at
tendance greater than at anv previous
meeting, tho republican editorial as
sociation of Missouri began a two
days' session here today. There will
be a banquet tonight. Among the
speakers will be Chajri$a Nagel of
Washington, secretary- of Commerce
and labor
KENNEDY OONE3
price of messages to her colonial de
pendencies over one-half on night-rlet
ter cablegrams and week-end cable
grams.
Henry Jones, E. Graham Lloyd and
Robert Ddnald are tht men who have
put through this movement in Kng
tand and are particularly responsible
Its WCCQBSful
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AND PAILY REPUBLICAN
FORUM ESTABLISHED NOV. 1?, 1891. FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 26, 1912. REPUBLICAN ESTABLISHED SEPT. 5, 1878.
RE-ELECTED HEAD OF PRESS ASSOCIATION
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Who waa again named to head the North Dakota Press association at
the convention here today. He delivered an able annual address this morning.
Child Labor Delegates Rush
Through Resolution
Louisville, Ky., Jan. 26. Julius
Myres, former Attorney general of
New York and Ktfd to be a candidate
now for a federal Judgeship, was
blamed today by B|lss Florence Kelly,
general secretary of the National Con
symer's league ror, tne !mpotency of
New Yonk's child l*%^r lawry
His Influence, Miss Kelly said., wa4
responsible for an amendment to the
bill when it was before the state leg
islature so that it Is made possible for
children 10 years old to begin work
as early as their parents wish in the
morning and work until 10 p. m.
Her remarks were made this morn
ing at the eighth annual conference of
the national child labor committee in
session here.
Delegates to the conference of child
labor, while they came here to discuss
problems, did not let theory stand in
their way and changed the entire order
of business to rush through resolu
tions urging congress to enact Senator
Borah's bill creating a children's bu
reau in connection with the bureau
of commerce and labor. Samuel Mc
Cune Lindsay left at once for Wash
ington to present a memorial.
Word was received at the time that
D. A. J. McKelvey had learned of the
pending measure, which is to be voted
on Thursday, and turned back after
starting for Louisville, in order to work
for its passage.
Seven busy sessions occupied the
attention of the delegates during the.
ensuing forty-eight hours.
A.SIllSE
Government Scored in Intro-.
duction of Evidence
Original Margin Sheets Sprung
by Pierce Butler
Judge Carpenter Allowed Them
to Go Into Evidence
tl
liX
J'an. 28.—The government
scored today in the trial of ten Chi
cago meat packers when Judge Car-j
penter allowed the introduction in evi
dence of thirty-five original margin
sheets of the National Packing Co. for p?
the first eight months of 1910. Uv
The defense denied all knowledge
of these original margin sheets until
suddenly they were produced in court
by District Attorney Wilkerson.
The government believes the margin
sheets will be an important link in
the *hain of circumstantial evidence
by which it expects to prove the pack
ers guilty. When Special Counsel
Pierce Butler oi St. Paul, represent
ing the government, started to read to
the jury the original margin sheeu
th© defense made no objection on the
ground that the evidence was .Tina
terlal. Stefngher G. Lahgher, who has
been on the stand four days, contin
ued his testimony at the morning ses-
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NORMAN B. BLACK,
Governor of Kansas Comes Out
for Strenuous One
Chicago, Jan. 26.—Gov. W. R. Stubbs
of Kansas dropped into the Roosevelt
national committee headquarters here
today to announce his willingness to
accept a membership in that body.
"Roosevelt would carry Kansas by
75.00fi, and1 Missouri, too," said Stubbs.
The governor Is on his way to
Washington. When asTted if the trip
had any significance in connection
with the Roosevelt movement, he
smiled broadly and said:
"Not a bit."
Governor Hadley of Missouri today
wired the committee he would accept
a membership.
EOF
CAN ASS'N
Chicago Jan. 26.—Work on the 1912
schedule ©f the American association
started today by President Ghiving
ton. He plans to have it completed
within three weeks, and then submit
it to the club officials for adoption
by a mail vote. The season will start
April 23, and 168 games will be sched
uled.
•SfepfMfer..
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Washington, p. Ci, Jan. 26.—William
J. Burns, the indomitable detective
who has run to ground more big po
litical mysteries and death mysteries
than probably any other living man.
seems to bob up wherever there Is a
big case. For months the government
has been seeking to get at the bot
tom of the Lorimer case. Now, at the
psychological moment, the detective
bob# up serenely with a witness and
what he aileges proof that one of the
Great hilarity was caused by the
mirthful mention of several leading
personalities of the convention. The
nomination speeches of Kdltor Charm
ley of The K^nmare News in second
ing the nomination of Secretary Hol
bein for re-election and In nominat
ing Vicqi President Richter were both
very well received and made & great
hit in the convention.
Minot Won Out,
At 3:30 o'clock this arternoon the
first ballot was taken for the place of
the summer convention and Minot won
by a majority of 17 votes. The result
of the vote was Minot 37. Valley City
20, Bismarck 19, and Grand Forks 12.
From the spirited rivalry exhibited at
the time the Invitations were extended,
it was thought at first that several
ballots would be necessary.
Several very interesting papers will
be heard, including that of H. C. Plum
ley of The Forum on Postal Laws Gov
erning Publications.
A synopsis of the address of Editor
E. M. Crary of The Edmore- Herald,
who spoke this afternoon on Office
Control of Ready-Print Advertising,
will be found on page 10. The other
papers of the programme will be by
Sec. W. B. Holbein of The Lansford
Journal on Effectiveness In Advertis
ing Display.
PRODUCES IMPORTANT WITNESS
The big banquet at Pirie's hall will
BURNS
former Lorimer witnesses committed
perjury. He states that hts evidence
is so strong that it will result In send
ing many men higher up over the road.
Complete mystery surrounds the Ca
nadian witness whom Burns has se
cured.
Those who are back of Lorimer In
his fight and who believe steadfastly
in his innocence, claim that it Is all a
foul conspiracy. Within a few days
the testimony will be in the hands of
the i/orimw investigation, committee.
LAST
or uty by or Lovell
A1*,*'«
t'M
THIS ISSUE 10 PAGiS
for Semi-Annual Meet
and Today Own Fargo
President Black Gives Good Advice in His Annual Address—
Advertising: Committee Reports and Advocates
Higher Flat Rates for Advertising
MINOT WON OUT FOR THE SUMMER MEET
OFFICERS ELECTED.
Irefldent—Normata B, Black, Grand Forks.
First Vice Prenklent—Percy Trubshaw, Cooperatown.
Second Vice President—G. C. Colcord, Minot.
Third Vice President—Ed Richter, LarimQj:*.
Secretary—W- E. Holbein, Lansford.
Treasurer—Harry M. Case, McVille.
Executive Committee—M. L. Ayers, Dicfcltison Grant
Grafton, and W. H. Francis, Velva.
MINOT
WON OUT.
MSnot won out in the big fight for the summer meeting.
Wahpeton gets the next winter meeting.
The election of officers was the first
order of business at the afternoon ses
sion of the Press association. The
election itself consumed more than an
hour's time, after which there was a
spirited contest over the place for the
holding of the summer convention.
The chief contestants are Minot,
Grand Forks, Bismarck and Valley
City.
Many witty speeches were made at
the time the officers were nominated,
and also when the invitations were ex
tended by the respective cities that
are bidding for the summer conven
tion.
be the chief feature of the evening,
following which all the editors will be
entertained at the Orpheum theatre
at the second performance. A1I the
editors present feel that they have been
royally entertained by the Fargo news
paper men who have been so well as
sisted by the members of the commer
cial club and the town's peo(fla.
Morning 8ession.
The assembly room of the commer
cial club was well filled this morning
with North Dakota editorial writers
when Pres. Norman B. Black of Grand
Forks rapped the gavel calling to or
der the mid-winter meeting of the
North Dakota Press association. At
the morning session about seventy
flic-kertail editors were present, mak
ing one of the largest attended winter
meetings the association has held Sa
many years.
Mayor Lovell welcomed the visitors
and gave them the freedom of the city
in one of his very happy speeches, so
characteristic of the man, in which he
said it was one of his greatest pleas
ures to welcome the men and women
of the state who had so much to do
with the framing of public opinion and
directing attention to the public needs
and welfare of the people. The mayor
was most warmly received by all the
editors who greeted his remarks with
much applause.
In responding to the address of wel
cime, Frank A. Willson of Bathgate,
editor of The Pink Paper, said that
the editors were very glad indeed to
have gotten on the good side of the
city's chief executive so soon after
their arrival, for it was sort of an as
surance of police protection whila
they were in the city. But he also
greatly regretted that President Hardy
of tiie commercial club was not pres
ent as it was generally to the business
men that the editors looked for their
money and they might need sonic cash
before they left the city, tnd if Pres
ident Hardy had been present it might
make them feel a trifle easier in tha
respect of negotiating personal loans.
"We are indeed glad to come to
Fargo." said Editor Willson, "for we
are very proud of this city, which is
the metropolis of the state. I think
every patriotic North Dakotan feels ft
great pride in Fargo."
Here Mr. Willson was Interrupted t»jr
a side remark from a Grand Forlts
booster who said something about the
lights of that city. But Editor Will
son's quick repartee was manifested
when he made a bright little retort
saying that "Grand Forks needed ja,
little more light to come up to Fargo."
"Fargo has many things of which to
feel proud," he continued. "It is noted
for its fine school system and its
splendid educational institutions, the
agricultural college, which my own
boy attended, and others. And with
the coming of the new railroad exten
sions this city will be one of the big
gest and best in the northwest."
Following Mr. Willson's response
Secretary Holbein called the roll of
(Continued on Page 10.)
CHURCHILL HAS
Tymdbn, 3Fan, 26.-—Wlnsrton Spencer
Churchill's action In giving up his in
tention to speak In Ulster hall, Bell
fast, Feb. 8, is commented on favorably
in today's newspapers. Only the bit
terest opponents of the first lord off
the admiralty chide him for retreating
from a position which he should never
have taken up.
The home rule meeting 1n Belfast
will probably now toe held in St Mary's
hall right in the nationalist quarts^
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1
London, Jan. 26.—The Chinese revo
lutionists "expeditionary" force at Wot 1
Chang will begin its forward move
ment toward Peking
today, according
to a Tientsin dispatch to the Exchange'
Telegraph Qfe, V «V

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