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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, January 26, 1912, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1912-01-26/ed-1/seq-8/

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-Chicago, Jan. 26.—Wheat: Trade
was fairly large and undertone to the
market firm. We are inclined to think
•with continued Arm market that mill
ers will becom® free buyers. They
have been out of the market so long
Buenos Ayres, Jan. 26.—Wheat clos
ed weak %®lc lower than the open
ing on an improved outlook for the
strike and already freer arrivals from
the country. Corn was lower
on the favorable weather and crop
prospects. Broomhall.
Chicago Gossip.
Chicago, Jan. 26.—Gossip on wheat
f£st night favored buying on every
good setback of to 1 cent. Lych
«tern was credited with selling May
at $1.02 and is said to be willing to
sell wheat on every cent advance.
Traders said that the local short in
terest has been well eliminated, and
while traders are timid about follow
ing the advance, as there have been
Numerous setbacks from around this
flgure previously, the long interest is
larger than it has been and the com
mission house trading has broadened
so that the market is a better one to
be in. Those who study the bullish
figures from the northwest do not
place explicit confidence in them. As
one trader put it: "If there Is only
3.000,000 bushels in the three states
to come in at the present rate of re
ceipts all the wheat will be In the
market in the next nine weeks. Jt
was remarked that it was easier to
figure out a statistical scarcity of
wheat than It is an actuality at the
moment. Inter-Ocean.
Broomhall Estimates.
Liverpool, Jan. 26.—Broomhall es
timates the wheat and flour shipments
world's for the week exclusive .rf
North America at 4,000,000 against
i.888,000 bushels last week. Of this
lotal Europe will take about 3,600,000
bushels. He predicts that there will
be some increase in the quantity of
breadstuff* on passage to the united
kingdom.
Australia—Wheat shipments this
week 1,584,000 bushels last week
2.072.000 bushels last year 2,168,000
bushels.
India—Wheat shipments this we2k
824,000 last week 656,000 bushels last
year 1,352,000 bushels.
Argentine— Wheat
week 160,000 last week 352,000 last
year 3.360,000 bushels corn this week
nil last week nil last year 196,000
bushels. BroOmhail.
MARKET COMMENT OF THE DAY
Evening Grain Letteis
It- looks as though they would have
ttf come sooner or later. The flour
demand is likely to improve. We be
ITeve the amount of wheat in farmers
hands, both in the northwest and
southwest if small. It looks as though
thP market is shaping for an advance
and we advise buying on all little
setbacks. Chas. E. tiewis ft Co.
Beef Prices.
TSt
Paul, Jan. 26.—Cows and heifers
stockers and feeders, $2.75.
Broom hall's Report.
Liverpool, Jan. 26.—Wheat: Tha
late decline in America and the clos
ing weakness in Buenos Ayres yester
day were offset by light Argen
tine shipments and shorts covering
which resulted in an opening steadi
ness with prices ynchanged to
higher. Following the opening there
was buying by yesterday's sellers and
with offers light and a generally im
proved demand from the united king
dom and continent prices further ad
vanced with the principal
strength in March. Our estimate is
for light world's shipments this week
other than America and the growing
scarcity of contract is causing much
apprehension here. Plata offers are
firmly held and Australian shipments
for the week are lighter and holders
there are asking an advance. The
strength in coarse grain is also effect
ing sentiment and prominent interes.s
here are supporting freely. At 1:50
p. m. the market was firm and
higher with spot markets for red west
tern and Plata grades V3c higher and
ahorts nervous. Corn opened high
er and later advanced a further %®p%
with prominent buying of February.
The strength in American offers, firm
ness of spot and higher American
Markets caused renewed covering lv
Shorts. Argentine, partial showers In
south.
Clearances.
Wheat 48,000, flour 13,000, corn 621,
990 bushels oats 100 bushels, wheat
CHAS. E. LEWIS & CO.
Stocks, Bonds,
Grain, Cotton
tf
New York Stock Eickasgt
All Leading Ezctuugu
ItewYorkaa* Ckicai* T*«i 11 1e
Bartlcft, Fraser Co.
Harris. Winthrop & C*.
H. O. MOTT, Manager
Ptwae CIS Morton Block
Fargo, N. D.
Mala Oftlcc 412-41* Chamber «l
tacrcc. Mlancapelle
'-***•0 Quotations by Bodes & Rogers,
F*r8«»
8-
cured bides .lift
ireen bide* 10 V4
8. cured calf... .14
irettt cau skins..•••• .IS
8. cured horse.S.7&
^a«ep pciia. each.,..,,
fallow
All above quotations are
and flour 107,000 bushels.
Chas, E. Lewis ft Co.
Live Stock Receipts
Chicago, HI.. Jan. 26.—Hogs 32,000,
left over 6,293 prospects steady to
shade lower than yesterday's average
light, $5.65(i6.20 mixed, $o.85f#6.35
heavy, $5.95(®6.40 rough, $o.9F(£ (5.10.
Cattle 4.000, market weak at yester
Sheep 15,000, market weak at yester
day's close.
Omaha, Jan. 26.—Hogs 8,209. Cattle
400. Sheep 4.100.
Kansas City, Jan. 26.—Hogs 8,000.
Cattle 1,500. Sheep 3,000.
Harris, Winthrop it Co.
Cablss.
Liverpool, Jan- 26.—Wheat closed
higher corn higher.
Paris, Jan. 26.—Wheat closed un
changeS to higher flour higher.
Antwerp, Jan. 26.—Wheat closed un
changed.
Berlin, Jan. 26.—Wheat 'closed
lower.
Buda Pesth, Jan. 26—Wheat closed
higher.
Buenos Ayres, Jan. 26.—Wheat clos
ed yesterday to 1 cent lower and
opened this morning lower.
Chas. E. Lewis & Co.
Grsin Receipts.
Chicago, Jan. 26.—Wheat 11, last
year 19 cars corn 378 cars, last year
481 cars: oats 89 cars, last year 181
cars.
Minneapolis, Jan- 26.—Wheat 209
cars, last year 316 cars. Stocks wheat
increased 400,000 bushels for the week.
Duluth, Jan. 26.—Wheat 12 cars,
last year 55 cars.
Winnipeg, Jan. 26.—Wheat 431 cars,
last year 49 cars.
Chas. E. Lewis & Co.
Bradstreet's Clearances for the Week.
Wheat 3,043,000 bushels, corn 1,740,
000 bushels. Chas. E. Lewis & Co.
GRAIN RSCEIPTS.
Chas. E. Lewis A. Co., Grain and Feed
Brokers, Morton Block, Fargo.
May Wheat
Chi. Minn.
Open 1.02 1.07%
High .... 1.02% 1.07%
Low .... 1.01% 1.06%
Close .... 1.01%- 1.01-
Open 95%- 1.08
High 95%- 1.08
Low .... .95 Y- 1.07%
Close 95% 1-07%
Open .93%
High .... .93%
Close 93%
8t. Louis.
May July
Open 1.00 94%
Close 99%- .94
Open 1.00%
Close .... 1.01% 1.00%
Chicago Corn.
bpen
bpen 67% .67%
High 68 67%
Low 67% .67
Close 67%- •67%-
Open ..... 50% .4*
High ... .51% •6%
Low 50% 45%
Close 50% .45%
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
D.
No, 1.
.to*
Wo. I.
.12
•U*
1.7*
.16 to .|o
Vsss).
if (North and South Dakota.)
JfiUC ...... Iq jj
|i«avy Bps.
pitdiua .••»*••••••..........ij to
«, u u
«ufry wA •••••••»§«•«,, (Q
Wsry burry or seedy to
iCottwi and blscki....«al|((a to u
£:noic* Angora. •«..«.,X7 to 1|
JCouamon Angora 9 to 14
r.
a
&
II Interested In
POTATOES
Csrrespoad with
D. C. Ryan &
Co.
Minneapolis, Mlno.
'^4-.are In the market for an un
limited amount of table and seed
stock. References—Tour bank.
Dul.
1.06%
1.064
September Wheat.
Chi. Minn.
DuL
Sept
Kantas City.
May July
Open 1.02 .94
Close .... 1.01% .93%-.
New York.
Sept.
May July
Open .... 1.06%
Close .... 1.06% 101%
Winnipeg.
Sept
Old May New May
Jqly
1.01%
1.01%
May July
Sept.
.67%
.67%
.67%
.67%
Chicago Oats.
May July
Sept.
.40%
.41
.40%
«0%
Chicago Pork.
Jan. May
Open 16.27
High ...... 16.27
Low 16.22
Close 15.27 16.25
July
16.50
16.50
16.42
16.42
Minneapolis Wheat.
Puts
Cal,»
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
May.
1.06*s
1.07*i-
Winnipeg Close.
1 northern 94%
2 northern 98)4
3 northern 99
4 northern 82
2 cash oats 39%
No. 3 cash oats 84%
May oats 43^
July oats 43\
May flax 1.98
Minneapolis Cssh Close.
hard $1.07%
northern.
northern, to arrive
No. 2 northern
No. 2 northern, to arrtve
3 northern...
1 durum ...........
1 durum, to arrive
2 durum.
2 durum, to arrive
No. S yellow corn.*..
No. 3 yellow corn, to arrtve.....
No. 4 corn .....
No. 3 white oats.....'..
No. 3 white oats, to arrivo...
No. 3 oats .. .vV.
Barley *»,./...
F,ax
Flax, to arrive.
"••••.
Rye, to arrive
No.
No.
No.
VOO
Duluth Cash Cloe*.
.*
No. 1 hard
No. 1 northern
No. 2 northern
Cash oats
Rye
Barley
No. 1 durun\ v..
No. 2 durum
May durum -i............
Cash flax, on track .V...
Cash flax, to arrive
1.06%
1.06%
l.Q3%
•47%
.90
1.28
1.03%
97%
1.03%
2.17
2.16
Duluth Fiax^
Jan.
Close 2.15.
Looal Markets.
No., 1 n rthern
No. 2 n o e
No. 1 duruni ..*
No. 2 durum
May
»lj5
#8 .•
.•4
.11
M,
ALMOST CRUCIFIED
THEIR "8AVIOUR."
TjO&zI
Poland, Russia, Jan. 26.—
The timely arrival of the police to
day prevented a band of fanatical
women from crucifying a man
whom they had adopted as their
"saviour."
3h
Forum Want Ads Get Quick Results.
Forum Want Ads G*t Quick Results.
RECITAL
A li
COMING ENTERTAINMENT AT
GRAND WILL BE FEATURE AF
FAIR OF THE FREE LECTURE
COURSE—MR. STEELE TO BE
ASSISTED BY MISS BOHNSACK.
The song recital to b« given by
Frank V. Steele, assisted by Clara
Bohnsack, at the Grand theatre, Sun
day evening, will no doubt be the
greatest attraction that the Grand
Free Lecture association has offered
this season.
Mr. Steele, who has a voic« of rare
power and sweetness, has toured Am
erica and Europe in concert and in
grand opera and has been received
most favorably wherever he has
appeared. He has studied with L. Q.
Phelps, the late Wm. Courtney of New
Turk and in Europe with Randigges.
Heuschell of London and 'with Sblglia
in Paris.
No admission will be charged for
this concert and the doors will open at
7:30: The following programme will
be given, Profess®^ Boehmer serving
as accompanist:
(a) Nachstueck ..
(b) Waltz
Schumann
... Chopin
Miss Bohnsack.
Prologue from Pagliacci .. Leoncavallo
Is This Ty Love Tipton
Three Chestnuts Page
Song from the Turkish Hills. .Clutsam
Coach Song Old English
Mrs. 8teele.
Wiener Bon-bons Rive-King
Miss Bohnsack.
Mother o' Mine Tours
Philosophy Emmell
Lend Me Your Aid, Aria from Queen
of Sheba Gounod
Mr. Steele.
Rhapsody No. 2 Liszt
Miss Bohnsack.
The ^Toreador of Guadalajara. .Shelley
Mr. Steele.
KITE
Dul.
1.06
1.06%
1.05%
1.05%-
JuTy Wheat.
Chi. Minn.
10 liLIDUIES
Secretary Stine Invited Members of
Glidden Tour to Stop in Fsrgo on
Trip to Coast Next Summer.
Oil suggestion of the Faryo Automo
bile association and President Hardy,
Secretary Stine of the commercial club
sent a letter last evening to the Chi
cago management of the Glidden tour,
inviting the tourists to stop over night
in Fargo next summer on. their trip
through this part of the country en
route to the coast.
In case Fargo is honored with such
a visit the members of the automobile
association will endeavor to give the
visitors a royal good time while here
and provide a delightful evening's en
tertainment for them.
DIED OF PARALYSIS
Head of Insurance Department
WHeelock & Wheetock Died To
day at Local Hospital.
of
J. P. Puels, aged 64, passed away to
day at one of the local hospitals after
a stroke of paralysis. Mr. Puels was
one of the best posted insurance men
in the state and was very popular
kmong his associates. He has been
suffering from this ailment for over a
year.
He has made his residence at the
Waldorf hotel here for a long tim--.
He is survived fry two daughters who
have left Brooklyn, N. Y., today for
Fargo. It is thought that the remains
will be taken back to New York.
Mr. Puels at the time of his death
was manager of the insurance depart
ment of Wheelock & Wheelock.
OHIO WOULD JOIN
THE "BIO EliiiH"
Chicago, Jan. 26.—Only the applica
tion of the Ohio state university for
admission to the big eight conference
was taken up by the delegates at rh9
meeting of the morning session here
today. "Summer baseball," the «.im
feature
of
1.07%
1.07%
1.05%
1.05%
1.08%
1.01
1.01
.98
.98
.03
.02%
.01
,.48%
.47%
i47%
1.28
2.17
2.15
the meeting, is expected to
come up for discussion shortly after
the opening of the afternoon session.
The Ohio school representatives all
addressed the conference. They sec
forth that about 3,500 students were
enrolled in their school, and athlecica
were given good support. .No final
answer was given them.
Many rumors were current about the
readmisslon of Michigan, which left
the conference in 1906 following a
misunderstanding. Although the insti
tution had no representatives at the
morning session, it was said Ohio men
are ready to urge the readmlssion of
Michigan and making the conference
the "rolg ten" body. Michigan and
Ohio competed athletics many years.
I
,^E TOfcTEYDU
A5K WRY HJGtt WAGES,WHHM
XOV
\Ol)
ACKNOWLEDGE THAT
HAVEN'T HAD WJQI BXFFKIENCC
SW£ tlAF-H .AIN'T IT rlARDS
W.
McKinfey Heirs Lose.
Columbus, Jan. 26.—By a decision
of the supreme court the direct heirs
of former President McKinley cannot
C!7^«of
saker
Comstoek
Vn
t&a
Hawtey
participate in his estate, which goes
to Mrs. Mary #arher, the state at large the present prices
to the former president. jfor potatoes are the highest thej have
Rural school managers and patrons
may take advantage of one of the three
classes of state aid under the new law.
Class A provides state aid for a school
of four rooms, for which the state
pays $1,500 class B, three rooms, $1,
000 class C, two rooms, $750. In ad
dition the state will pay 25 per cent
of the cost of construction of a school
building, but no one payment can ex
ceed $1,500. The. consolidated school at
Comstock cost $12,000 for four rooms,
towards which the state paid the max
imum of $1,500 and in addition $600
a« a graded school, a total of $2,100
and besides that six miles of state
road was constructed, the maintenance
of which is paid by the state. To en
Joy state aid the schools must teach
elementary agriculture, domestic econ
omy and manual training. The build
ings must be subject to the regular
inspection by the duly appointed rural
school inspector. While one or two
districts tributary to Baker were in
clined to be averse to any change it
is thought when all the advantages
are properly understood there will be
a splendid equipped consolidated school
with the best corps .of teachers avail
able at Baker,
DIVISION OF TOWNSHIP FUND8
iVloQrhcad Department
"V3 Ifi
CO
SHOWING
IMPORTANT SHIPPING POINTS
k
Clay
bounty,
REB R,VER
I CO, i uima utr.tM
M00RHEAD,. MINN.
Trademark adopted by the Clay County Potato Growers' association,
only to be used on shipping bags containing No. 1 Red River Ohio seed
potatoes. The mark has been registered in fifteen states 1& Which are in.
e u e e i n i a o a o u y i n e n e s
FOB CONSOLIDATION
Mass Meeting at Baker Yesterday Aft
ernoon Considered Suggestions for
Consolidation of Schools.
The spirit of school consolidation,'
so that advantage may be taken of
state aid for public ^schools, under the
new law, has become awakened among
the school patrons at Baker and vi
cinity.
To consider the matter in all of its
phases a mass meeting of Interest was
held at Baker yesterday, at which con
siderable enthusiasm was show., as
well as a diversity of views on the sub
ject. There were present in an ad
visory capacity Miss Rushfeldt, county
superintendent, John Turner, a former
superintendent well informed on school
needs, and John T^ Lommen, who has
been active in the iestablishment of the
Consolidated school at Comstock which
has proven so distinctive a success.
for
Auditor Hoglum Prepares Order
Dilworth Vilage Board.
County Auditor Hoglum, complying
with a request of the boards interested
lias prepared an order providing what
he concludes is an equitable division
of the funds* due the village of Dil
worth from the township of Moorhead.
Before the order is effective It must be
properly approved and it will be done
in the iii^pe of a resolution. It pro
vides that there is* due the village, of
Dilworth 22.48 per cent of the money
on hand and belonging to the town
ship on Aug. 12, 1911, the date of thti
incorporation of the village, less out
standing orders and debts, if any, and
that the county auditor and. treasurer
of Clay county distribute the money
collected for taxes of 1910, appearing
on the township tax list In the same
proportion.
Moorhead Potato Market.
Browsing about the local potato
market today, following the arrival of
the representative of buyers centering
in Omaha, Neb., one thing was learn
ed, that despite the views expressed
by space writers at Crookston, Be
midji and other points, the situation
in a nutshell is the one of supply and
demand. It the stocks In Clay and
other counties in the valley turned out
to be larger than sufficient to supply
the demand for seed stock there will
come a decided slump. Today th«*
price for No. 1 seed stock, choice sort
ed tubers was 86 cents, but at that
leading buyers wrere not falling over
themselves in an effort to load un
A feature is, how to get at the ac
curate figures of the stock on hand
It is believed that there are big stocks
on hand at Baker, Sabin and Watt3
Siding and shipment of the Triumph
variety are now being shipped for th«
coming' seeding season in Texas.
Kothing is doing at other early Rant
ing points and it is not expected that
the large shipments of Red River Ohio
seed stock, from this county, will be
gin much before Feb. 15, if it is safe
shipping weatner and the outgoing will
continue possibly to March 20. For
Krapes
Rusfatf
145
MARK
been for twenty years. If a season of
absolutely safe shipping weather
should come the whole complexion of
the situation might be changed. The
wise grower is selling at present prices
if he can.
Opening of Rest Room Tomorrow.
The ladies of the Civic Improve
ment league of Moorhead will be host
esses tomorrow afternoon for the for
mal opening of the rest room which
has been established in a spacious and
very practically furnished room in the
public library building- The doors will
be opened at 2:30 o'clock and it is
hoped that the general public will-call
and vieW for themselves what has
been done for the comfort of out of
town people who come to Moorhead to
do their buying.. Every practical con
venience for the comfort and enter
tainment of mothers and children has
been provided and a competent matron
will be in charge with whom the pa
trons may consult on points of infor
mation needed. In the consummation
of the enterprise the women of the
league have been materially assisted
by the commercial club and the city
council.
EAST. SIDE NOTES.
Atty. and Mrs. Charles Loring have
returned to. their home at Crookston
after a month's absence in the sunny
south, which included a visit to the
Isle of Pines.
The daughter, 2% years old, of Mr.
and Mrs. William Videen, succumbed
to an attack of bronchitis yesterday
after a brief illness. The funeral will
be held from the home of the bereaved
parents, three miles south of Moorhead
next Sunday afternoon.
To assist her in celebrating the
15th anniversary of her birthday, a
number of the school friends of Miss
Anna Eklund made a surprise call at
her home on Wednesday night. The
callers were royally received and after
the expression of "many happy returns
of the day" a well arranged programme
of parlor games and music was In
dulged in and later refreshments were
served. Miss Eklund and her little
friends enjoyed a very delightful even
ing.
The Lally second-hand stock has
been bought by Mrs. James M. Brauer,
who will manage and conduct the
store herself.
The basketball quint of Concordia
college was defeated at« Valley City
CK
by the normal school team of that city
in a score of 48 to 8.
The newspaper boys of northern
Minnesota were royally entertained by
the "gang" and citizens of Long
Prairie^ a town long on hospitality.
The Olmstead County
The contract for the proposed Hoot
Lake project has been refused by the
city council at Fergus Falls.
Notes in the eauntry correspondence
of The Journal-Press of St. Cloud In
dicate that farmers are going to pay
more attention to the raising of po
tatoes, for eating stock and seed.
David Kingsbury, recorder of the
Minnesota Commandery of the Loyal
Legion, assistant librarian of the Min
nesota Historical society and an early
Settler in the state, died Wednesday at
fc!s home In St. Paul.
It was the lodge of Brotherhood of
American Yeomen which gave way for
the meeting of the commercial club
on Tuesday night, not the Royal
Neighbors as was stated in error in
this column on Wednesday night.
Leon McCubrey, son of the clerk of
court, sustained painful injuries yes
terday from the taking fire of a news
'paper which he was holding. One
hand was burned from the finger tips
to the wrist bone, but while the burns
are not deep ihey caused the youns
man a great deal of pain until the in
juries could be properly dressed.
Queer Instances of orthographv fre
quently come to light and one reached
the office of Judge Nye yesterday on
an envelope which was addressed 10
him. It was as follows: "JuDg N. Y."
A special term of the district court
for this county1 will be held Feb. 20,
but will only be for the trial of court
cases, there will be no jury. The gen
eral spring term of the Clay county
court will convene the first Monday
In May.
J. R. Plummer, representing a co
terie of potato buyers at Omaha, Neb.,
Is a guest at the new Columbia hotel.
Marriage licenses were issued yes
terday to John R. Anderson of Cass
county, N. D., and Hannah Falleso of
Clay county, Minn. and Meivllle N.
Brown of Multumot county, Or^.v and
Hortens* R. Levy of Jackson county.
Mo. v
"ttElLO ,HAP YOUR tWH ClTrr
"YE
J, I FOUND
A TLACE
WHERE TttEY CUT HAIR.
WHILE YOU WAIT
"THAT$ GOOD A BARBER
SHOT LS USUALLY A. TLACE
WHE.RE T/1-EYCUT SOnEOM&R
hans miR wtuu
[mint
Fair
associa­
tion vxi& able to pay its bills with the
state fund for societies of that char
acter and returned the guarantee ad
vanced by the business men.
1
In the school notes of The Journal
At Lake Park is' the following note:
The high school boys assembled Tues
day afternoon to re-organize the base
ball team. The following officers were
elected: manager, Leonard Wilson:
captain, Carl Ekern: secretary and
treasurer, Albert Snell coach, Henry
Nygaard. The prospects for a team
this year are very promising.
vehicles are now supposed to car
ty a front and rear light. Those who
do not wish to comply with the law
cannot, In case of accident, collect
damages, but are on the other hand
responsible for any damage done- as
result of such negligence.
xov
Church Opens Grocery*
New York, Jan. 26.—Rev. Madison
C. Peters, pastor of the big Pilgrim
Congregational church on Madison
avenue, will on Saturday open a gro
cery store as a part of the church's
work among the poor. It is the be
ginning of a campaign against ^he
high cost of living.
Xonger Pleaded Guilty.
Bismarck, N. D.. aJn. 26.—James
Conger, who murdered John Kurt in a
drunken row at Timmer In Morton
county last week yesterday pleaded
guilty to manslaughter in the first de
gree. The plea of guilty carries with
it a sentence of from Ave to fifteen
yeara.
Many an old man In years*
young man In mental activity.
KriynFft
is* a
INTERNATIONAL DIPLOMACY
Probable That Big Football
Teams Will Clash
vfit. Paul, Jan. 26.—Minnesota and
Haryard will meet on the gridiron next
fail if plans of the head football
coaches of the two institutions are car
ried out. In a letter to Coach DlCk
Grant of the University of Minnesota,
Percy D. Haghton, head coach of Har
vard, expressed himself as highly fttv
oring the opening of athletic relatidni
between his school and Minnesota.
According to Haghton, Harvard has
one open date, Nov. 9, for which Van
derbllt is trying. Haghton says, how
ever, he'd 3° his best to arrange a
game with Minnesota.
He asserts the athletic board of HaJi
vard will take up the matter at tli#
next meeting.
WISCONSIN FLOOD
SIT11M.H
I Madison, Wis-, Jan. 26.—Follow
lng a 'conference with Governor
McGovern, Speaker Ingram today
said the situation at Black River
Falls was more acute than press
I reports have indicated. He did not
know whether the governor would
call a special session of the leglsla
ture, he said, but personally hs'
believed the exigencies of the ait
uation demanded such action.
Glass Eye Bargain Day.
Chicago. Jan. 26.—Included among
numerous other articles which the
United States government will sell at
public auction here today are 2,166
glass eyes. It is the regular semi-an
nual sale of unclaimed, seized and
abandoned merchandise.
Girl Scouts Organized.
Chicago, Jan. 26.—The ftrst organis
ed company of United States girl
scouts will make its bow tomorrow
night at a special entertainment and
drill at Mark White square. The girls
will be commanded by a captain arid a
lieutenant of their own sex. The
"soldiers" range in age from 10 to 14
years.
Graduates to Greet Taft.
New York, Jan. 26.—Graduates of
practically every college in the United
States will greet President Taft, who
has accepted an invitation to Attend
the seventh annual Lincoln day diri'
her of the Graduates' club hereon the
evening of Lincoln's birthday anni
versary. 'f
•v
32,937 Stitches in a Coat.
•Kansas City, Jan. 26.—Herman
,®ne, a tailor, took time to count the
stitohes in the lsst coat he made. He
found 32,937—23,8,00 machine stitohes
and 9,137 hand stitches, he announced
last night. The coat was a four-but
ton sack, thirty-two inches. ton|hand
iBlngle stitched.
Success vs. Failure.
New York Tribune: "I met Thomas
A. Edison at the Carlton, in London,"
Said a New Yorker on the Ounard pier.
•'Edison astonished me with his ac
Count of the hard w'ork he had done
.in his time. Why. the man thinks
nothing of working twenty hours a day
jfor weeks on end!
"After luncheon one day Edison and
walked up the Haymarket. Edison
as usual, talked about hard work*- I
said, thoughtfully:
"T suppose success always
hard work, doesn't it?'
'Yes,' said Edison, It do«p/
"He nodded toward a 'poor old
sandwich man—a poor, thin, bent old
fellow of 70 or so, Btaggering along
the gutter under three heavy and
enormous sandwich boards—and he
iidded:
means
But failyre means harder.'
In. Franwe the bicycle has become
the most popular of all vehicles, while
the craze for the motorcycle is begin
ning to abate. You never can tell
what the French are going to do.
An insane man was found wandeting
In Wall street, says an-exchange. On
ly one

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