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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, February 24, 1912, Image 5

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1912-02-24/ed-1/seq-5/

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The Jolly Country club held their
regular meeting at the home of Mr.
'and Mrs. Frank Harris on Monday eve
ning. The usual pleasant time was
fenjoyed with progressive euchre and
music, and a nice luncheon was served
.jat the close of the evening. "Mrs. J. A.
'ffconker and Prosper Yonker won the
ifMTulsnmfi prizes. The comic musical
Selections presented by four of the club
inembers was a decided treat and
jp*eatly enjoyed. An out-of-town guest
Was Miss Zinigner of Grandin, N. D.,
who Is the guest of Mrs. J. A. Yonker.
Miss Florence Green of Minot, N. D.,
%B the gueBt for a short time of Miss
Gladys Taylor of Fifth avenue south.
ift
Gray Holderman was a delightful
^Igpst last evening at his home on
v|§tghth
See our news
paper announce
ments for spec
ial offers.
street south to a party of young
•people, who spent & very pleasant in
informal evening of chat and music. The
^olderman home was very pretty with
•Jffcses, and as the evening drew to a
«9ose a very tempting lunch was
fferved. The guests included the Misses
Kathryn Rice, Maude
Hauskins and Mary Smart and A1 lin
ger, F. Deidrich and Ralph Strom,
The sunshine circle of the
jfPirst M. E. Sunday school in charge of
^*iss Mildred Wheeler, entertained last
Evening at the home of Miss Arene
JUchardson on Ninth street south.
Jjhere were twenty boys and girls
present and a very happy time was
•%ent with games. The rooms were
attractive with carnations and at a
convenient hour dainty lunch was
•Served.
Mr. and Mrs. J. h. Kmtun of Sev
enth street south leave this evening
On a week's trip to twin cities and
points east
Mrs- Ella Morris Snow, elementary
superintendent of the North Dakota
feunday School association, will speak
jfeomorrow afternoon at the regular
Vesper services of the Y. W. C. A. at
4 o'clock. There will be special music
fcy the Misses Beekman and Steele
and refreshments will be served. All
True
tea day after
1
Friend
WotiM not give jou .a drug
Ij* your food.
But many persons, of their
own
accord, drink coffee or
day—ignoring
the fact that there is a drug,
caffeine, in every cup.
True, you may be able to
"stand it" for a time, but tne
drug is there, and sooner or
later is pretty sure to show in
some annoying ailment.
There can be no relief- un
til the cause is removed.
Simply leaving off coffee
and tea wfli work wonders, but
it is much easier if you shift
lo well-made
P0STUM
It is made of wheat, and
contains no caffeine a? oilier
harmful substance.
It does contain the' phos­
phate of potash (grown in
the wheat) which Nature
requires' for the proper nour
ishment of Brain and Nerves.
"There's a Reason'
PostOm Cfcresl Company,
Battle Creek, Mich.
HljllfilTI.I.,.1^,111
»r V' 'V .'•* 'S .' V
Fascinating Fashion Features!!
YES,
THE FAIREST of all spring Suit showings are in evidence
here. Perfect beauties, perfect fitting and at prices that sweep aside
all thought or question of "doing better." Values as pleasing as the
models, and every Suit or Coat a model of style.
WATCH OUR WINDOWS FOR NEW ARRIVALS.
New Skirts
Jlist received by express a most
attractive assortment of separate
Skirts in black, plain and colors
and beautiful mixtures at most
reasonable prices. These Skirts
range in prices from $6.50, $7.50,
$8.50. $10.50
and
$11.50
Ribbons Monday
An explanation:
News for the Fair Sex—Society,
Fashions, Fads and the Home
women and girls are cordially invited®
to be present.
Willis S. Adams of Lisbon, N. D.t is
the week end guest of friends in the
city.
Mrs. A. E. Bestic and Mrs. M. Mac
Gregor returned Tuesday from. Fes
senden, N. D., where they were guests
of friends for a short time.
Among the pretty events of the
week are the events which have
been given for Mrs. Geo. Netcher of
Grand Forks, who is the guest of
her sister, Mrs. M. MacGregor of
Fifth avenue south. On Wednesday
afternoon Mrs. A. E. Bestic entertain
ed a party of ladies. Luncheon was
served first with pretty appointments
and was followed by a lively game
of bridge. Mrs. Wilder won head
prize and Mrs. MacGregor the con
solation. On Thursday evening Mrs.
MacGregor was hostess in compliment
to her sister and a happy party of
ladies and gentlemen played bridge
from three tables. The head prizes
were captured by Mrs. Netcher and
A. EJ. Bestic. The rooms were very
pretty with American beauty roses
and following the game a tempting
luncheon was served. This evening
Mrs. F- E. Corson will entertain for
Mrs. Netcher at 7 o'clock dinner. Cov
ers will*be laid for ten.
Murray Baldwin and Charley Ever
hart are the guests over the week end
of Rodney Reed of Detroit, Minn.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Howe of Win
nipeg left this morning for their home
after spending the week with Mr. and
Mrs. Geo. Howe of Fifth avenue south.
The Western School of Expression
will present, the play Gertrude Mason,
M. D., Friday evening, March 1, in the
recital hall, room 21, Laing building
at 8:15 o'clock. Admission may be
gained by means of tickets, which will
be issued free of charge. These may
be secured by applying at the office
of the school Thursday and Friday.
The cast will be as below:
Gertrude Mason ...., Eileen Sullivan
Sertha Lawrence Marie
Ethel Canniff
Ella Gray Miss Jane Simpklns..
Irene Liembacher
Mrs. Van Style Florence Gearey
Norah ........ Fanny Clapp
Miss Emma Mickkelson of Devils
Lake, who is a student at the A. C.,
is spending the week end with Miaa
Florence Sampson of Erie.
INDIANS AS ENGINEERS.
$-
•it}
Scientific American: Some inter
esting examples of Indian ingenuity
are afforded on the river Skeena and
its tributaries in North British Colum
bia. These waterways in their upper
reaches flow very swiftly and for the
most part through deep ravines. As
It is impossible for the Indians to
cross them by means of canoes they
have resorted to bridging.
Their bridges are interesting struct
ures from the engineering point of
view, inasmuch as the cantilever prin
ciple is adopted. A bridge of this
design spans the Bulkeley river where
it is about 120 feet wide, and the
height from the bridge to water level
is about eighty feet.
It is built of wooden logs, the logs
of the structure being formed of
slnglfe stout logs varying from sixty
to eighty feet in length. The task of
lowering them into position must have
demanded 'considerable ingenuity oii
the part of the builders.
They are burled about fifteen feet
at their lower ends and anchored by
the superimposition of masses of
large rocks rolled and carried to the
site. The longitudinal members of the
shore spang are similarly burled In the
ground and lashed to the ends of the
diagonal logs.
These main members corresponding
to deck- girders, are about 120 feet in
length, and to either end the A mem
bers of the superstructure are lashed.
Elaborate cross-bracing is resorted to
in order to secure greater strength.
When the bridge was first erected
the different members were simply
-secured together by willow thongs,
bi\t when the British Columbian gov
ernment erected *r more substantial
suspension bridge lower down the
4
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Interrogate
sales ladies for
fashion infor
maiion.
Suits $7.50 and $10
(CARRIED OVER.)
We have a small assortment of
women's Suits carried over from
former seasons, splendid materials
and tailoring these Suits sold at
prices from $25 up to $47.50 in
order to close them out at once,
you have your choice
See window display for samples ofthe fine lot of ribbons to go on sale promptly at 9:00 o' dock Monday
morning at 19c a yard. They are plain and bordered taffetas and moires 5 1-2 inches wide.
PLAIN TAFFETA SIX AND ONE-HALF INCHES WIDE
PLAIN SATINS SIX INCHES WIDE
These Ribbons were purchased at a remarkably low figure, and if you bay Monday you
can share the profits of the transaction.
river, the Indians assembled and fol
lowed the white man's operations with
great interest. They observed how
the thick wire cables were slung and
anchored, and accordingly decided to
introduce wire into their owii struc
ture.
They procured the material for this
purpos from wherever they could ond
introduced it in a most fantastic man
ner. Also when the Grand Trunk
Pacific engineers commenced working
on their track near by the Indians
procured odds and ends, such as bolts
and spikes, from them for introduction
in their bridge, so that now it is a
strange looking piece of work, though
the fundamental cantilever lines are
still distinct.
w
VICIOUS LAW
tins 1AM1
THE REFORM LEGISLATIVE AS
SEMBLY OF 1911 PASSED CLASS
LEGISLATION IN INTEREST OF
LUMBER TRUST, SAYS THE MI­
NOT DEMOCRAT.
Minot Democrat: Any person who
shall perform any labor upon, or fur
nish any material, machinery or fix
tures for the construction or repair of
any work of internal improvements,
or for the erection, alteration or repair
of any building or other structure
upon lands
or
in making any other im­
provements thereon, including fences,
sidewalks, pavings, wells, grades,
drains or excavations under a con
tract with the owner of such land, his
agent, contractor of sub-contractor, or
with the consent of such owner, shall
upon compliance with the provisions
of this chapter have for his labor done,
or materials, fixtures or machinery
furnished, a lien upon auch building
or improvement, and upon the land
belonging to such owner on which the
same is situated, or to improve which
said work was done.
The above is a portion of a law
passed by the last session of the leg
islature known the "mechanic's liens"
law, and its passage was urged as a
protection to contractors which, If ap
plied to them only, would be all right
and a just law. But in order to get
this law through, several riders were
attached, making it one of the most
vicious on the statute books and clear
ly class legislation in favor of the big
lumber corporations.
What can be done under this law
Was called to the attention of The
Democrat last week, when a farmer
residing a few miles southwest of
Minot, run into a "mechanic's lien"
against his land, filed by a big cor
poration from whom he had purchased
a few fence posts and had given his
note. The note is not yet due, but
this corporation has already filed Us
lien against the farm, and there it will
stick as a cloud on the title for all
time to comfc. Those who voted for
the law will say that the lien could
not be filed unless due notice was
given—but It can be, and has been.
This farmer, like thousands of others
in North Dakota, has no money to
fight corporations, and would be fool
ish to spend $50 br more to hire an
attorney to fight a $ft) case. What
other business is thus protected?
If a farmer or home builder buys
two fence posts on credit the lumber
trust can file a lien on not only the
posts they have sold but on the entire
real property. They take a note and
regardless of the time it may be due
they can file their liens. It is Just
such laws as those that are causing
distrust among the voters and turning
them into socialists. The trusts and
corporations are entitled to the same
protection as individual* and no more, i
Their business is entitled to the same It0
protection as the merchant and no
more. But this law Is one where the
farmer gets the worst of it regardless
of his reputation for honesty and'in
dustry*
Forum Want Ads Get Quick Results.
For&m Want Ada Get Quick Results, ticularly alarming,
THE FARGO FOHUM AND DAILY KEPT! BUG AN, SATUKDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 24, 191?.
/-V
*5# MgjMafca
^-y/r
4?
A A A
at $7.50 and v+UU
A
Great Offer!
B,"k
Site
ELECTRICAL
On exhibition at the engineering
building which the engineering facul
ty have donated, will be found inter
esting apparatus of all descriptions,
wireless telephones, wireless tele
graphs, isolated lighting plants lights
of all kinds, current rectifiers, bat
teries of all kinds including the new
Edison storage battery which the
great inventor has personally sent,
electro-plating outfits, medical instru
ments operated by electricity, free X
ray examination by a competent oper
ator, Geissler tubes of many kinds, a
Tesla coll. motor-generating sets of
several makes, some of college con
struction, etc., all in operation and
with engineers in charge who will!
demonstrate and give information to
all inquiries. Many of the busings
and professional men of Fargo *n,,f
Moorhead, have sent large exhibits
out and these will have suitable lo-m
tions. The lyceum of engineers cor
tainly appreciate the manner In whi
certain of these parties have donated
their apparatus so freely.
A moving picture show with lan
tern slides is one of the features of
this show, and included In the first
cost of admission 15 cents. There are
no sideshows everything can be seen
after first payment at entrance.
The Y. W. C. A. young ladies will
present a booth filled with refresh
ments. The engineers will
STATE
SHOW
EMSED BY CLUB
COMMERCIAL CLUB ADOPTED
E S O U I O N S E N O S I N
ELECTRICAL SHOW AT ENGI­
NEERING BUILDING AT A. C.
THIS EVENING.
The Fargo Commercial club has
adopted the following resolutions en
dorsing the big electrical show to be
given by the lyceum of engineers at the
engineering building at the A. C. this
Evening. A big crowd is expected at
the A. C. tonight and many of the
prominent business men §f Fargo and
Moorhead who are interested in elec
trical devices will attend. Following
axe the resolutions adopted by the
commercial club:
Be it resolved, in as much, as the
Lyceum of Engineers of the North
L»akota A. C. is presenting to the
public its first annual electrical show
on Saturday evening, Feb. 24, 1912,
and since they are laboring under ad
verse "conditions including suitable
dates while attempting to give this
show during the period of largest en
rollment at this aforesaid college, be
It resolved that the commercial club
of Fargo, give this enterprise all the
encouragment and advertising pos
•Ible to enable the financial end of
said show to be a success.
guarantor,
that the purity of said refreshment
conforms to Professor Ladd's stand
ard.
And the engineers hope and
have
tried hard, to have the first annual
electrical show ever held here to
hOML
ti[
be
worth while, and appealing to every
tftte, both young and old.
iiiOi'ii
HEART OF MEXICO
COL. MORTON PAGE 18 HOME
FROM MEXICAN CAPITAL,
WHERE HE MET FAMILY AND
BROUGHT WIFE AND DAUGH
TER FROM 8AN ANTONIO.
now
Mrs, Page and my daughter
at Mexico City and after remaining
there but a short while, brought them
back to San Antonio, where they are
5ocateV" 8aid
a
Morton Page
Forum representative today on hi
return from the heart of the Mexican
interior.
"Conditions ih Mexico are somewhat
uncertain." hfe! continued. "While per
haps a general feeling of unrest pre
vails in certain sections of the counttV,
personally I saw nothing that was par
and encouraged
V
mam
nf
OF
UTTER DAY SAINTS
6EIM-ANNUAU CONFERENCE AND
8UNDAY 8CHOOL CONVENTION
TO BE HELD NEXT WEEK-
SHOULD NOT SB CONFU8ED
WITH MORMON8*
Ill* Reorganised Church of Jeaus
Christ, the tpligious body which
claims to be the continuation of the
church founded by Joseph Smith, in
1830, will hold its state semi-annual
conference in Fargo March 2 and 3,
at the Assembly halls, on First avenue
north, near Broadway. Many dele
gates from the various local congre
gations and Sunday schools over the
state are expected.
This church has had a local organ
ization in Fargo for the past six years
and this is the second meeting of this
kind to be held in Fargo.
Five special lectures will be deliver
ed in Assembly hall, commencing Feb.
*28 and closing Sunday night March 3.
Such live subjects as The Oneness
of Christ, The Second Coming of
Christ, How to Successfully S.top the
Evils of Uta|h Mormonism, etc., will
be discussed. I
"The courts of the land, have re
peatedly decided this church to be the
iawful continuation of the church or
ganized in 1830." said an official today.
"Brighani Young and his followers
who left tlje original church and went
to Utah in 1847. were apostates," he
continued, "because of their introduc
ing polygamy as a doctrine in 1852,
and many other evils, and having
turned their religion into a sort of a
Mormon- kingdom and political graft.
"The Reorganized Church of Jesus
Christ has about 70,000 members, with
churches scattered over the different
parts of the country and worship in
the open like other people.
"The headquarters of the church Is
Lamoni, la., where they have a large
publishing house and bindery, an in
dustrial college, children's home and
two large homes for aged people.
"They also have a publishing house
In Independence, Mo., and a large
sanitarium, and old people's home.
"True Latter Day Saints dislike very
much to be confused with the people
Utah commonly called Mormons, for
they are very different.
"They believe in faith, repentance,
baptism, laying on of hands, the res
urrection of the dead, the eternal judg
ment of God, healings, the gifts of
prophecy, and new t&ngueB, and its
interpretation.
"Saturday, March 2, there will be a
business session held at 10 a. m. and
2:30 p. m. and Sunday, March 3, Sun
day school at 10 a. m., with a preach
ing service following, and social serv
ice at 2:30 p. m.
Week night evening services will
begin at 8 o'clock.
The lectures as well as all services
are free and open, and the public is
invited."
J. E. Wildermuth, 1348 Front street,
Fargo, is the state minister Wm.
Shockow, 1311 First avenue north, is
assistant local minister.
nothing hazardous or very exciting.
"One afternoon in Mexico City I saw
Madero driving through the streets in
his carriage. Madero himself is prob
ably 100 years In advance of the condi
tions down there and probably sees to
an extent that the people are not quite
ready for exactly the kind of govern
ment he had originally planned. We
drove about the city ourselves one aft
ernoon and everything was seemingly
peaceful.
"There are many Americans down in
the interior of the country and most of
the better industrial positions are oc
cupied by Americans. Just at the pres
ent time a change is being effected
on one of the principal railroads which
may materially change the personnel
of the train crews. I was gone just
two weeks, and I feel that the trip
did much for me In giving me a real
grasp on the Mexican situation better
than I have ever eunderstood it be
fore."
Football was prohibited in England
in the reign of Queen Elizabeth on ac
count of its extreme brutality. The
penalty was imprisonment.
When all Is said and done, why
should anybody want to go to Russia?
New
&
V*
S
"4
1 k
MOILE LOYALTY
NEEDED IN II.
WITH THE TRAVELERS
S.
MORE LOYALTY IS NEEDED BY
AMERICANS IN PATRONIZING
HOME PRODUCTS—TOO MUCH
8PENT TOWARD FOREIGN PUR­
CHASES SHOWN.
Vii* ..
The Scotchman swears by his
tweeds, and h© wears them too, even
though he might be able to get some
thing else that would do better service.
The Irishman and his good wife
glory in the linens from the looms of
the green isle, even though other
countries may produce something that
will answer the purpose Just as well.
The Englishman is proml of his loy
alty to his own country, and he wears
English clothing, rides in English au
tomobiles, and carries his English cus
toms and manners wherever he goes.
The Frenchman has no Interest in
any art but French art no interest in
any silks but French silks no liking
for any wines but the wines of France,
and no use for any styles but the
styles of France.
The German has such a sound and
strong patriotism for the fatherland,
that he insists upon the products of
^iis own country, even though he can
get some things from abroad that are
cheaper and better.
The Japanese engage foreign en
gineers and high-class mechanics to
show them how to make and use cun
ning machinery to lighten the toll of
the workers and cheapen products,
and just as soon as they have learned
all there is to learn, the foreign en
gineers and high-class mechanics are
sent home and their own countrymen
put in their places, says the automo
bils dealer and retailer.
How about the citizens of the Unit
ed States? Although they have a
closer relationship with their govern
ment and a greater reason for loy
alty to their own institutions and
products than any other nation is
there much evidence that such loyalty
exists? Well, here and there we hear
some Individual boast that he wears
home-made clothing and that he uses
nothing that is imported, but such in
stances are so rare that they are Im
pressive. The prevailing feeling is one
of pride for things "imported," even
though the home-made may be better
and more suitable.
Americans pay from 25 to 50 and
even 75 per cent duty on things fr^m
abroad when the home products would
answer the purpose oetter. in
TOO
many instances, even the manners and
intonations of voice of the foreigner
are aped to the point of distress.
There is a better and a more sen
sible way. If people in the United
States cannot produce as artistic or
high quality and as comfortaMe things
as can be produced
ahywher0
else
under the sun, let them finj out the
reason why. If our manners and tono
of voice are Inferior to anything eh-
where let them correct and Imprc v
them, but let them still be Unlt
States.
If American goods made under Am
erlcan conditions and paid for at 1'
American rate of wages are not gc
enough and cheap enough for Amen
cans, let Americans either find out ti
reason why, or leave a country I
whi they are far less loyal than
becoming or conducive to progress an
prosperity.
TRIP TIP8.
3
E. G. Smith, with the S. S. Wh
Dental Supply Co., is In the city o'
Sunday.
W. A. Hagan of the American
bacco Co. la a visitor in tha city ov i
Sundays
v
H. C. Rich, commercial traveler
the Waterman Fountain Pen Co.,
be a "Sunday guest in the city.
W. H. Way Is a guest In the City o^
Sunday.
F. A. Bragg and P. A. Confer, *rp-
far£o'sEjrcIusi\e.
Ladies Store
Monday and Tuesday
We will place on sale 25
Ladies and Misses
Spring
Made of light fine French Serge, strictly
all-wool in the very latest models, with
pretty hand embroidered designs. The
shades are the very latest in Tans, Cfiamois^
Glove, Cork, Reseda, Heather, Plum, Navy and
BrfcWn, Special for Monday and Tuesday
$11.95
SEE THEM DISPLAYED IN WINDOW 4
i &. W .( V.-WW 1 V »&. 5 ^1,
jr N, ft**"*
•tffm
atmMrm.
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mmmmmmarnmm
resentatives of the Chicago Glassware
Co., will spend the week end at the
Gardner hotel.
P. A. Hopkina of Jollet, 111., will Je
one of the commercial travelers wtio
will spend the week end in Fargo.
... 4r+
A. A. Bloom, representative of T-dfb
by, McNeill & Libby, is in the city !to
spend Sunday. ••m
Harry Will lama, representative of
the Clarkson Coal Co, will attend Sun
day in Fargo.
L. C. Courtney of the Cudahy ,*$ls
here to spend the week end. -U
Roy Williams, one of The Forum's
representatives oh the road, will
spend Sunday in the city.
Charles McCarty of Terr# Haute.
Ind., will mix with the commercial
travelers this week.
Charles Porter, representing Ftr
well, Ozman & Kirk of Minneapolis,
will be a Fargo guest over Sunday.
F. E. Robinson, representative of
the Rock Island Plow Co., will spend
Sunday with the Gardner lobby bunch.
George L. Samuel of the American
Tobacco Co., Ij In Fargo for the Sun
day respite.
W. T. West of the Minneapolis Iron
store, was one of the arrivals today
for the Sunday holiday.
Ward Smith came In yesterday to
attend the Blue Goose festival and
will spend Sunday In the city.
Scientists declare that the world la
over 500,000 years old. It will prob
ably be 500,000 years older before aft?
one man gets enough money to buy (t
F^rttm Want Ads Get Quick Result*.
Metropole Hotel
E. E. Cole, Prop.
AMERICAN PLAN
•••I Tabft S«nriot In Hwthwtat
Bates $2-25 to $8.00 Per Day
Centrally Located
The Cole Hotel
E, E. Cole, Prop.
European Plan
Special Theatrical Rates
ABSOLUTELY MODERN
71c to 92.00 Per Day
HARD COAL
BRIQUETS
HOCKING NUT
Phoae 39
ChESLEY
lumber and Coal Co.
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