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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, February 26, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1912-02-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE WEATHER
Unsettled weather and probably snow
flurries tonight or Tuesday rislnf
temperature.
Dickinson Will Be In Second
thu
.-
-wr?—
"Tic Must Be Shot Off to De
cide Fourth Place
St* Paul to Try For National
^Championship
Chicago, 111., Feb. 26.—St. Paul took
the championship of the western di
"wvision of the Interclub Rifle Shooting
-"fftague by winning its match last
v
If
Week, the official score for which was
given out here today.
In this last match, which was with
Adrian, the champions also made the
remarkably high score of 988, the
.largest team total made during the
entire series. St. Paul did not lose a
Match throughout the western, di
vision season.
It is now necessary for St Paul to
•hoot off with the Winnipeg team" of
the eastern division for the United
States championship.
New Haven and Bridgeport clubs
-'fCre tied for the leadership of the
Astern division.
Narum of the St. Paul club made
a perfect score of 200 last week, be
log the only man who has accompllsh
''•d this feat In the western division
tliis year.
The scores: St. Paul defeated
Adrian 988 to 969. Madison defeated
Helena 955 to 947. Tacoma defeated
tios Angeles 959 to 945. Dickinson
and the Badger teams tied at 967. Bis
bte defaulted to Minneapolis. Butte
defaulted to Milwaukee. The final
•tariding of the league cannot be de
termined until Dickinson and the
Badger clubs shoot off their match, ff
Badger should lose three teams will
be tied for fourth place.
The official standing today:
Woa
St. Paul *.«••
Dickinson ............. I
Adrian ., «.•»•*..»*.•*
Minneapolis'
Badger
Tacoma
Madison ................
Lot*
Helena ...
Milwaukee
Bisbee
si
1
V V
V
Lost
8v
10
Row in a Hotel at McHenry
Ended in Tragedy
HOTEL HAN DID SHOOTING
•T 18 ALLEGED THAT A QUARREL
STARTED OVER REFUSAL OF
HOTEL MAN TO ALLOW JOHN
M'LAUGHLIN, THE VICTIM, TO
EAT SUPPER.
McUenry. N. D.. Fefc W.—Frank
Sroufe, proprietor of the U. C. T. hotel
liere, shot and instantly killed John
McLaughlin, an elevator agent, in the
Hotel office Saturday evening Mc
laughlin and his wife had separated
month ago, she insisting on him
'taking the three small children.
He with the children asked for sup
pier at the hotel, offering to pay, but
.tyjas refifsed by Sroufe, which started
U&e trouble. McLaughlin carried no
•Weapons.
ODLI HAVE
I). S.
Washington, Feb. 26.—Senator Gard
of Maine, Introduced a bill under
rfchich the government would take over
j#l the properties of the express com-'
Itonies and operate them as part of
.^e postal service, extending the serv
4pe to the rural- delivery.
yU Gardner indicates the probable cost
taking over the properties as nearly
^i*0,000,00&.
The Tlirlvlng
*A 44M
V, v.
wi1
mwum I
Fiercest Storm of Winter Ties
Up Traffic
MILWAU
PLE WA "t
PILfeD v
AND RACINE PEO
W THROUGH GREAT
DRIFTS —CHICAGO
rji
ALSO GE1 PLENTY OF THE
"BEAUTIFLy
•A
V
Milwaukee, Wis., Feb. 26.—The woflgt'
blizzard of the winter swooped down
on Milwaukee afted midnight today.
The street car company was taken
unawares and thousands of persons
were compelled to wade through the
snow*to their places df employment,
several street GK lines being block
aded.
The storm continued furiously
throughout the forenoon, with prom
ises of no let-up for several hours.
At Racine.
Racing %s., Feb. 26.—Street car
traffic, suspended by the worst biia
eard of the year which hit this city
during the night, was not resumed
until a late hour this morning. Tele
graph and telephone wires are down
all through this locality and interur
ban and railway schedules have been
abandoned generally.
At Chicago.
Chicago, 111., Feb.
26.—All
classes
of traffic were severely delayed
by a snowstorm which began here
shortly before midnight and which
bids fair to continue throughout the
day.
Hundreds of unemployed men were
given work clearing the streets of
huge drifts. There waa but little
fall in temperature.
357 000 LossFrom Two Fires
in Business Section
Minneapolis, Feb. 26.—Two fires
which raged simultaneously in the.
business section here
today
caused a
loss of $57,000.
The losses: Gem theatre, $30,000
Joseph H. Smith, hardware and seeds,
$20,000 Geo. Benz & Sons, wholesale
liquors, $1000 McCall & Blood Pure
Food Manufacturing Co., $2,500 The
Inland Printing Co., $5,000 the Twin
City Paint Co., $3,000.
AT
Crisis Has Arrived On Mexican
.Border
M0l U. S. TROOPS OUT
UNITED 8TATE8 WILL HESITATE
TO THROW TROOPS ACR086
THE LINE TO ENFORCE NEU­
TRALITY ZONE TO PROTECT
AMERICAN8.
Washington, D. C., Feb. 26.—A crisis
has arrived at Juarez. Official reports
to the government say 700 insurgent
troops have landed from a train on the
Mexican Central railroad, ten miles
from that town, and that hostilities
already have begun. During a skirm
ish last night one man was killed and
two wounded.
Additional advices received at the
war department shortly before noon
stated that a battle was raging in
Juarez and several persons already had
been killed and many wounded.
The immediate effect of this news
was the cause of the dispatch of some
further messages from the war de
partment to certain military posts
looking to a further movement of
troops toward the border. It is admit
ted the troops will not hesitate to cross
the International boundary line to in
sure the maintenance of a neutrality
zone broad enough to insure the safe
ty of persons on the American side.
City
i ot Willow City
\&n interesting article, telling of the resources and advantage* of
fered by the prosperous city of Willow City, together witlf cuts of a few
of the boosters to whom the town owes a great deal of its progress will
be found on page 6 of this issue. There will atao be founc^fc-number
of local scenes, all of which will be of interest to Forum readers.
iii fjjlifriiiaaiTliiirili^^
v
TWO LOST LIVES
IN OREGON FIRE.
Portland, Ore., Feb. 26.—Two
men are known to be dead and sev-'
eral others are said to have per
ished in a fire which broke out in
the Gilmore house today. Edward
Gilmore, aged 50, dropped dead
from excitement and an unidenti
fied man leaped from the fourth
floor of the building and was dash
ed to death on the pavement. Fifty
men and women and children had
narrow escapes.
Washington, D. C., Feb. 28*—
Gifford Pinchot will be in North
Dakota March 4,5 and 6. He will
make at least three and probably^
five or six speeches in the interest)'
of Colonel Roosevelt's candidacy
for th« republican nomination.
It is expected that Governo*^'
Hadley of Missouri and Stubbs of*'
Kansas and other prominent pro-~
gressives will also tour the state for
Roosevelt at a later date.
Strikers Shot at Police
Returned Fire
BIG DEMON8TRATI6M. THI8
MORNING BECAU8E OF REFUS
AL OF POLICE TO LET STRIK­
ERS' CHILDREN LEAVE THE
f«%Tmga£& .:
TAFT TO CAUSE
INVESTIGATION.
Washington, Feb. 26.—Repre
aentative Berger of Wisconsin aft
er a call at the White House to
day said that Taft had promised
him to take up with the attorney
I general, the Lawrence,. Mass.,
strike.
$
Lawrence, Mass., Feb. 26.—Stormy
scenes marked the beglning of the sev
enth week of the Lawrence textile
workers' strike. In an early morning
affray nearly a dozen shots were fired
from tent houses on a squad of Metro
politan park police, and the officers
returned the fire.
Two strike sympathizers were ar
rested as the result of the shooting,
one of them being taken to the hospi
tal with a bullet in his neck.
The principal thoroughfare of the
city was in a state of disorder for
half an hour while 1,000 men and wom
en strikers and sympathizers paraded
along the picket line jeering the police
and mUitia and singirig the revolu
tionary song L-Internatlonal.
The demonstration was against the
action of the police Saturday prevent
ing the sending of a company of chil
dren to Philadelphia. After thronging
about the railway depot the crowd be
came so noisy that police reinforce
ments were called out and the officers
arrested a dozen who appeared to be
leaders. There was a demonstrati.ai*
when the police charged the crowd.
Conspiracy Alleged By U. S,'
Officials
That there la a widespread con
spiracy to def-aud, on the part of a
number of Soo railroad conductors, is
charge of United States officials.
Deputy U. S. Marshal Hochman re
turned to the gate city this morning
after placing Iver Simnes and Hans
Hockel, two bartenders of North Por
tal, Can., under arrest. They were
nabbed at Portal, N. D.
It is alleged that these two men
along with L. A* Tripp, T. J. Ryan,
F. R. Foster, H. P. Woods, John G.
Toms and H. B. Angler, all conductors
011 the Soo, violated the act of June
29, 1906, on interstate commerce by de
frauding the company out of full fare
toy carrying passengers from North
Portal to the twin cities for $9 and
the regular fare is $l4.b0.
It is said that Iver Simnes and Hans
Hockel would round up transients who
were going to make the trip and oh
the quiet would give the mthe tip that
they could "square it" for them for
$9. SimneB and Hockel were employed
as bartenders in the Grand View hotel
in North Portal, Canada. While on
duty it is said that thye, would gen
erally "feel the strangers out" and in
Continued on Cam JBMAfc
.^39rs^_
AKD DAILY REPUBLICAN
FORUM ESTABLISHED NOV. 17, 1891. FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA, MONDAY" EVENING.. FEBRUARY 26, 1012/ REPUBLICAN ESTABLISHED SEPT. 5, 1878.
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Who
LAWRENCE STREET
i4North
THE INSURGENT
President—Fred
HE WILL RUN FOR PRESIDENT
rf
i k
&
k
di
')t'« &
Washington, I.' Feb. 26.—Congressman HaVma made the fol
lowing comment on the announcement of Colonel Roosevelt that he
would accept the nomination for president if tendered. This announce
ment of Roosevelt is an absolute declaration that he is a candidate
for the presidential nomination. I believe the people of North Dakota
as a whole are in favor of his ndidacy and I believe they will at the
primary on March 19. declare In •iyrj»f-him by their votes.
San Francisco, Feb. 26.—The refer
endum vote on nomination of officials
of the International Typographical
onion here resulted in the triumph
of the insurgents. Pres. James W.
Lynch of Syracuse was defeated for
renomination by Fred L. Barker of
Spokane 232 to 132, and the remainder
of the ticket by a large majority.
The Fargo local of the International
Typographical union, took a similar
action to the San Francisco local as
given in the above dispatch to The
Forum, at a meeting yesterday. The
Fargo local voted for the following of
ficials:
Barker,
11
& & i
vr
v
4
'j*
1
f-rr
•-WM.
4/
A
UKDEteWOOL
A UNDERWOOD
XHtODQRL 1200SLVI.LT
Hanna Believes People of N* D.
Favor Roosevelt's Candidacy
Dakota is tiTB" ril'Sf'SttWf 'V 1r«v« a presidenus*l-rpref#lr-
ence primary. Much depends upon its ^cttcome. My hope is that our
people will show their faith in Roosevelt by giving him a substantial
majority of the votes and electing solid Roosevelt delegation to the
Chicago convention."
At LaFollette's headquarters Col. John Hanna, who is In charge dur
ing the absence of Walter L. Houser, declared LaFollette's campaign
would be pushed forward as if Roosevelt had made no announcement
and will continue until the convention nominates a candidate.
Spokane,
Wash. *.
Vice President—Jametf Duncan, New
York.
Secretary-tfreaBtirer—C. M. Cobb,
Cincinnati.
They also voted the entire Uit of
insurgent candidatee.
TO NOTIFY YUAN
6F I:
n
crcii IviC,
London, Feb. 26.—Tang Shoa Yi with
a delegation of republicans represent
ing the southern provinces of China,
arrived at Tientsin today, according to
a news agency despatch received from
that city. Tang Shao Yi will procerd
to Pekin to notify Yuan Shi Kai of hi«
election as president of the Chinese
republic*. V
sir
I s i
TAKE OVER MINES
London, Feb. 26.—It is reported in
radical circles that Premier Asquith
is determined, in the event of national
coal strike, that the government take
over and work all coal mines and thus
prevent panic prices.
"MY HAT IS IN THE RING
»r»*
1 mu
aaimim
jj
t-
I
Johnson said: "The statement of
Roosevelt Is what we expected. We
S knew he would come out in the open
i and now that he is to flght we believe
he will make the strongest fight in
history. We In the west are confident
of his nomination and after that the
battle is practically over."
iRoospvelt's letter to the governors of
seven states, stating briefly he would
accept the nomination for president if
it was tendered to him created no sur
prise here in political circles In view
df his laconic remark in Cleveland,
"My hat is in the ring".
Roosevelt's letter to the republican
governors who desired to know his
position with respect to the nomina
tion for president waa given out by the
colonel's secretary last night and'waa
as follows:
Roosevelt's Letter.
New YorK, Feb. 24.—Gentlemen: I
deeply appreciate your letter and I
realize, to the full, the heavy respon
sibility, It puts upon me, carrying as
*t does the carefully considered con
victions of the men elected by popular
vote to stand as the heads of the
government in their several states.
"I absolutely agree with you that
this matter is not one to be decided
with any reference to the personal
pipiiuuiiii Jtuuii-
Norman Mack Says It Is 'Tine Thing For Democrats"~the
Situation In New York
Teddy Hopes That People Will Have Chance to Express
Choice Through the Primaries
GRONNA FOR LAFOLLETTE.
Washington, D, C., Feb. 26.— I
Senator Gronna said: "I am for
LaFoIlette and North Dakota is for
I LaFollette."
Representative Helgesen said:
"I am for LaFollette as long aa he
I is a candidate." i
New York, Feb. 26.—Governor John
•on of California says that now that
Roosevelt has come out in the open
for the presidential nomination, thous
ands of new admirers will Join the
colonel's friends.
"WE'RE IN THE FIGHT, THAT8 ALL."
Boston, Feb. 26.—"We're in the fight, that's all," said Roosevelt
today.
It was his only comment upon the statement issued yesterday
that he would accept the presidential nomination if offered to him.
A CANiiiATE
Casselton, N. D., Feb. 26.—Petition®
for Smith Stimmel of Fargo and CaS
selton for delegate to the republican
national convention, were circulated
on the streets of Casselton today for
signature.
Mr. Stimmel's many friends In this
city are glad to support him and there
will be many signers to all the peti
tions. ,•
s,
i
'W-"J V '•'•'•'•iiplp1
THIS ISSUE ii PAGES
istory Says
of
Formal Reply to the Letter From Seven Governors Asking Him
to Make Statement Issued Last Night
preferences or interests of any man
but purely from the standpoint of the
interests of the people as a whole.
"I wilj accept the nomination fuf
president. If it is tendered to me, and
I will adhere to thij decision until tltdb
convention has expressed its prefer
ence.
"One of the chief points for wh!ch
I have stood and for which I nov
stand and which I have always stool
and always shall endeavor to re
duce to action Is the genuine rule of
the people and therefore, I hope that
so far as possible the people may be
given the chance, through direct pri
maries, to express their preference a«i
to who shall be the nominee of tlu»
republican presidential convention.
Very truly yours, Theodore Roose
velt."
The eight governors who made the
request for a statement and to whom
the Roosevelt letter waa addreased
are:
Hon. William E. Glasscock, governor
of West Virginia, Charleston, West
Va.7 Hon. Clyster H. Aldrich, gover
nor of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. Hon.
r.obert P. Bass, governor of New
Hampshire. Concord, N. H. Hon.
Joseph M. Carey, governor of Wyo
ming, Cheyenne, Wyo. Hon. Chas. K.
Osborn, governor of Michigan, Lan
sing, Mich. Hon. W. R. Stubbs gov
ernor of Kansas, Topeka, Kas. Hon.
Herbert S. Hadley, governor of Mis
souri, Jefferson City, Mo.
Still for Taft.
Republican county chairman, Samual
Koenig, today said Roosevelt's an
nouncement did not affect the situation*
in New York county. New York coun
ty is and will be for Taft, he said.
National democratic chairman, Nor
man E. Mack, said, regarding the an
nouncement, "It was a fine thing for
the democrats."
Amos Pinchot, brother of Gifford
Pinchot, said Roosevelt would get most
of the delegates from New York.
This is the Belief of Senator
Talcott
"HOfJSEVEiT IS THE MAN"
8EN. FRANK 8. TALCOTT THINKS
OYSTER BAY 8TATESMAN CAN
DO MORE TO UNITE PARTY
TTHAN ANY OTHER MAN—
THINK8 HE WILL BE NAMED.
"I feel now as I have felt for some
time that Theodore Roosevelt la the
one man who can do more to unite the
republican party at this time than any
other," said Sen. Frank S. Talcott of
Buffalo, today to a Forum represents
tive in speaking about the answer
of
the former president regardless his will
ingness to accept the nomination for
another term this year.
"As is well known among my friend*
1 have always been a Roosevelt nuua
and am quite in accord with the gen
eral prevailing movement to urge hijfct
to accept the presidential nominating
if it is tendered him by the people^*
continued the senator. "Not only par^
conditions at this time are imperatives
demand Colonel Roosevelt's acceptans^
of the nomination, but it seems to te
the prevailing wish of the people in
parts of the nation. Recent reports
have received from Minnesota, Illinois
and New York state that his strength
has grown considerably within the
last few days since he decided at
Columbus to seriously consider the ajf*
peal of his friends, the number of go*»
ernors of representative states an*
prominent men who have spoken r|p
gardless of previous party affillatlonf,^
"There can be no mistake about the
attitude of the North Dakotans r&*.
gar ding the foster son of this state
!n whom every man in this country
has a great personal interest. Thgfc
:m
flnnllwintfl nn Pa go Wight.
mil
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