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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, April 02, 1912, Image 1

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V
A
TIE WEATHER
Generally fair tonight and Wednea*
day warmer tonight.
& as
Hubbel Family Had Narrow
Escapc at Bismarck
Forced to Leap From a Burn
ing Building
Mrs. Hubbd May Not Re
cover-Big Property Loss
Bismarck, N. D.,. April 2.—Archie
Hubbel, formerly of Fargo, sustained
.a broken ankle, his wife had her left
arm broken in. two places and has in
ternal injuries and little Verner Hub
bel, aged 4 years, had her nose and
jaw broken as a result of jumping from
a second-story window in a burning
building this morning at 5 o'clock.
The family had rooms over the Kun
dert department store and were awak
ened by smoke and tried to get from
the building by the back way and
found the staircase burning.
Hubbel lea his family to the front
of the building where he kicked out a
window. Mrs. Hubbel became excited
and threw Verner to the stone side
walk and then jumped, sustaining the
injuries noted above. Hubbel had a
1-year-old baby in his arms when he
jumped
and
the child was uninjured-
Mrs. HubbePs injuries are so serious
that it is doubtful if she will recover.
Both the department store and the
adjoining pool hall were completely de
stroyed and with the stock makes a
loss of about JIB,000 with good in
surance. There is nothing known of
the origin of the fire except that It
started in the first flotor of the depart
ment store.
Archie Hubbel was formerly employ
ed at the Clow & Stewart grocery
store on Eighth street south. He left
Fargo with his family about two
months ago for Bismarck.
Marshal Emptied Revolver Into
Gang of Toughs
Centralia, 111., April 2.—Charles Brod
and Henry Grose were killed and
Bay Grose perhaps fatally wounded
today by George Wlngler, a deputy
marshal in a fight at Odin, seven miles
from here.
Brod and his companions were
creating a disturbance when they were
overtaken by the marshal, Brod ac
cording to report, knocked Wingler
down, who emptied his revolver into
the crowd.
UP IN CHICAlii)
Chicago, 111.,'April 2.—The municipal
election is being held today. The
voters will select thirty-six aldermen
and pass on- bond issues aggregating
$100,000,000 for tne construction of
an outer harbor, bathing beaches, new
contagious diseases hospital and other
improvements.
There is a spirited contest between
the supporters of Mayor Harrison and
friends of the national democratic
national committeeman Roger C. Sul
ttvftn ia pearly every war^
WAS Til El
St. Paul, April 2.—The presidential
preferential primary plan was turned
down at a meeting of the state repub
lican central committee here today.
On a motion to table the resolution
providing for the plan the vote stood:
Aye 28, nay 7, not voting 2.
The state convention will te held
in Minneapolis May H.
"VV
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W i
!'*K?*h
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I
4
n I i
Hystcrous Killing of Dr. Helen
Knabe Geared Up
KSeth
U.
8.
Nelson..
"5n page 3 ot this issue will be found an interesting ar
ticle on Lakota, the county seat of Nelson county and a fast
growing and prosperous community. Several views of Lakota,
together with cuts of a few of its most prominent and hustling
citizens accompany this write-up and all will be found of inter?
est to Forum readers.
r& r'
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A
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DESERTER GUILTY
MAN CLAIMED THAT HE WOULD
GO INSANE UNLESS HE GOT IT
^•9FF HIS MIND—SAID HE WAS
nBED
TO DO THE "JOB" FOR
\OF $1500.
Pori •i.'oi. N. H, April 2.—A pflo
tographx
Nichols, a sailor,
who, acccx to the police, has con
fessed We ^ed Dr. Helen Knabe
in IndianapoL $ October for $1500
and a copy of alleged confession
were mailed to the Indianapolis author
ities,
Nichols, who It is said is a deserter
from the United States cruiser Dixie,
came here last week, and was arrested
Saturday on a charge of carrying a
loaded revolver. The police say that
yesterday he confessed to the murder
of Dr. Knabe, telling them he would go
insane if he didn't get it off his mind.
Nichols has a sister living in Indian
apolis.
While in New York, according to
the story he told the police, he met a
stranger, who offered him $1500 if he
would commit the murder. He ac
cepted the offer and went to Indian
apolis, where he was joined by the
man. On the night of Oct. 23, they
went to Dr. Knabe's apartment.
There, Nicholas said the unknown
man handed him the knife, with which
he cut the throat of Dr. Knabe while
she lay asleep. He fled from Indian
apolis the next day.
The Knabe murder case is one of the
most mysterious Indianapolis police
have ever investigated. Dr. Knabe,
who was at one time state bacterid
gist, had no enemies so far as known.-
IEXICAN BAH
I s
WILL PROTECT I
CITIZENS ALONG THE
MEXICAN BORDER.
Washington D. C., April 2.—Taft
today promised Representative
Garner of Texas to take up with
the war department the question
of protection for the citizens of
Del Rio, Tex., on the Mexican
border.
Jiminez, Mex., April 2.—A battle for
the possession of the important city
of Parral began this morning. Gen
eral Campa posted his men in the hills
near the city ana ah artillery duel
commenced. The cits' is defended by
General Soto and General Villa with
federal forces estimated at 400 men.
Campa's column is fully twice as
strong.
E
IS
ACTOR, 1EAB
London, April 2.—-Edward Terrey,
the noted actor and author, who has
been suffering for some time with
neuritis, died today at Barnes, Surrey.
He was 64 years old.
IS
ESCAPE
St. Louis, April 24—Five men, one a
confessed murderer and four charged
with burglary, escaped from Judge
Taylor's court room while the court
was in session itt the municipal courts
building today.
TWO KILLED BY
GASOLINE EXPLOSION,
Meai!,* Kan., April 2.—Mr. and
Mrs. J. R. Miller were instantly
killed today by an' explosion of a
gasoline tank in their sod house.
The roof was blown off and the
interior of dug out demolished by
fire.
The Millers came eighteen
months ago from Atkli\son, 111., to
file on a claim,
fc— ),|»H
tm
1
FORUM ESTABLISHED NOV. 17, 1891. FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL
v«.
..ifr
w
GCM HAVLLY, GOV N0UBI& i
San FrancltK» 4ApriI 8. --Bvery
v4ifc«
tail is moving sfnoothly under The
generalship of Pres. C. C. Moore, which
will bring about the world's great.st
exposition in 1915. The Panama Pa­
Now They Have Started Strik
ing—Slow to Stop
WELSH ABE BACKING SOWN
VOTING SO FAR ON QUESTION OF
RETURNING TO WORK IS SUR
PRISINGLY CLOSE WITH THE
ENGLISH MINERS SHOWING
THE BIG SURPRISE.
London, April
The change of opinion has upset all
the calculations, and although the
public and the leaders of the miners
are still hopeful that the final result of
the voting will be in favor of calling
off the strike, the majority either way
promises to be a narrow one.
The returns thus far show only
about 200 votes difference, the exact
proportions for and against not being
known.
Suspension Still Holds in An
thracite Region
Philadelphia, Pa., April a.—-Colliery
whistles blew in all parts of the
anthracite region at starting time to
day summoning the men to work but
with the exception of the company
hands not affected by the suspension
order -of the United Mine Workers
none of the miners responded. Tta#
entire region is reported quiet.
JUDGE A. A. BP.yCE
N. D., April' A.
Bruce, justice of the NoTth Dakota
supreme court and former dean of the
law school at the state university, was
endorsed by the State Bar association
here this afternoon, for election to
the supreme court.
There were only twenty-four at
torneys present- The vote stood as
follows:
Judge Bruce ..». •..•. id.
F. E. Ellsworth'. ... I i 1
:/•.
John Carmodjr .•? ,1
D. B. Holt 2L
John Knauf .0. «i.. 1
Because of the small number present^
there was soxne talk of not taking a.
vote on endorsing a candidate for sii-,
preme bench honors, but this sentiment
was overruled. Pres. John Green of
Minot presided.
A resolution of regret on the resigna
tion of Judge Morgan was unanimously:
passed
"I*
4.
'%& ).'&'$&*? k
SHIPMENT
New York, April 2.—Six thousand
tons of potatoes, the largest shipment
ever received in New York, arrived
from London on the steamship Minne
haha. Roughly, there are enough of
them to supply 24,000,000 meals for an
adult. As potatoes were quoted here
today at }3.25 per bag of 168 pounds,
the shipment is valued at more than
5230,000. The government collected
1(0.009 In d^tlejj^
4
e j.-
Anu iiaiMr xiruniLfli: -.shfc
SELECTING SITES FOR STATE BUILDINGS
rf
., :m"
'JW&
cific International expoadtioa, govern
ors from many states have alrealy se
lected sites for their buildings. The
above picture shows four of the west
ern governors grouped just after the
Congress
&-
t.—English
miners,
who in the first instance were less
willing to strike for the principle of
minimum wage than their Welsh and
Scottish comrades, are now, as far as
the figures of the ballot tell, still less
willing to return to tnelr work. The
Welshmen, wno were the backbone of
the original strike, are voting strong-,
ly in favor of returning to the pits.
May
Trouble Feared in Vidnity of
Calgary
Calgary, April 2.—Rioting lr efcpett
ed when 5,000 mert sent out from Win
nipeg reach here for copstr^gUon
camps on the Canadian Northern rail
way to break a strike that has tied
up work. Ten thousand strikers are
pouring into Calgary as a result of
agitation of the Industrial Workers of
the World, a militant labor organiza
tion.
Last night gangs of men descended
on the construction camps of the rail
way and destroyed all the property in
sight. Supply wagons were held up.
The trouble, appears only to have
started.'.
I
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1
GOV. HAY GOV 5PRV
T|PILL
i V
HAVE MAJORITY
Washington, April —Secretary to
the president, C. D. Hilles, today Is
sued a statement declaring that the
majority of the republican national
committee is aligned with Taft and
against Roosevelt. The statement
was a denial of a, report to the con
trary.
-5*
San Diego, Cal., April 2.—Aside
from the international interest cen
tered in San Francisco exposition, to
be known as the Panama Pacific In
ternational exposition, particular in-
terest center* in the local exposition,
ceremony attending the selection had
been gone through with. The govern
ors are left to right: Governor Haw
ley of Idaho Norris of Montana Hay
of Washington, and Spry of Utah.
Make a Radical
Change in the Express Rates
Washington, April 2.—-The honse interstate and foreign commerce
committee today reported favorably on the bill to amend the law
giving the interstate commerce commission authority over express
companies.
Provision would be made for rate zones, the charges varying ac
cording to the distance the package was carried from the point of
origin. Close working arrangements would be provided between the
express companies and the fumi £ree delivery system of the post
office department. \.4
Four New Senators Sworn in
Today
Washington, April fe—TSfesenate
today became a body of ninety-six
members* new Mexico and Arizona
contributing war aflfdltional senators.
Thomas B. Catron and Albert B. Fall,
of New Mexico, republicans, and A. .\.
Smith ahd H. F. Ashurst of Arizona,
democrats, were the new members to
take the oath of office.
EIGHTEEN-POUND GIRL
BORN WITH ONE TOOTH
AT WILKE8BARRE, PA.
Wilkesbarre, Pa., April 2.—In
the morning hours the stork flow
over this section and left at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene A.
Morrow of 60 East Market street,
a baby girl which weighed eigh
teeh pounds. The weight was not
the only surprise which the little
stranger had in store, for after it
showed the first signs of distress
cried aloud, a nurse in attendance
discovered that the baby had a
tooth. The tooth is in the lower
jaw and it is the first time in the
hlBtory of the city that a birth of
this sort has been reported.
This Is the fifth baby in the
^Morrow home, and while all the
others have been large none ever
showed so much weight.
BEAUTIFUL ARCHITECTURE TO GRACE CALIFORNIA EXPOSITION
1MLB6
which, while not as extended in Its
scope, is nevertheless of unusual Im
portance to the west. It will have
thousands of interesting exhibits and
while the rivalry was formerly Intense
tor the
2, 1912/ BEPTJBLICAN ESTABLISHED SEPT. 8, 1878.
«j
Papers Predict Socialists Have
Lost Milwaukee
LA FOLLETTE IS LEADING
THIS. 18 CLAIM MADE BY GOV'
ERNOR McGOVERN—WOODROW
WILSON SAID TO BE LEADING
DEMOCRATS —TAFT SUPPORT
ER* MAKE COUNTER CLAIMS.
Milwaukee, Wis.) April 2.—An analy
sis of the returns at midday showing
an unusually heavy voo throughout
the city and in most sections of the
state, caused a local newspaper this
afternoon to declare that the socialists
are losing the Milwaukee municipal
election and that LaPollette and
Woodrow Wilson are leading in the
state presidential preft-T nee primary.
The early vote in Milwaukee was
particularly heavy. Reports from
Governor McGovern's office at Madi
son stated that LaFollette had secured
a vote of such strength as to Indicate
that Taft would lose all the Wisconsin
delegates to the republican convention.
These reports from Madison were
discounted to a degree by partial re
turns from Superior and Fort Atkinson
where Taft is said to have received
strong support.
The interest in Superior centered
around the selection of a mayor and
two councilmen under the commission
form of government.
In Racine the interest centers around
the selection of national delegates and
contests for various minor city of
fice.
WM. BARNES, JR.
WAS
New York, April 2.—Wm. Barnes,
Jr., of Albany was today re-elected
chairman of the newly elected repub
lican state committee which met to
day for organization as prescribed by
the new primary law.
Missouri Not Expected to Give
Any Trouble
Bismarck, N. D., April 2.—While the
Missouri river at this point has raised
an average of over a foot a day for
three days there is seven feet still
to go before damage will be done.
At Pierre the river is open, free from
ice and the water falling.
At Ree the river is open and a
small gorge has formed, the river
rising five feet last night. There is
a gorge above Williston and the river
is running bank full. The ice went
out at Williston last night at 11
o'clock.
It is not expected there will be
much damage this spring at apy point
along the river.
&
location here of, the Xnterna-
1 1 1 e A
3WTL CLDa*
tional exposition, this has given way
to full co-operatloh and a spirit of get
together which so predominates the
west. The buildings throughout will
be of mission style and thoroughly in
keeping with the Aphtj of «ta^|
tpsfanM
,v «. .-*.
nc-?* -t
LAST EDITION
THIS
l&SUL
id PAGES
Levee Gave Way About 9:30
Last Evening
Two Thousand People
Homeless as Result
Quick Work Saved the People
of the Town
U. S. TO HELP
FIGHT FLOODS.
Washington, D. C„ April 2.—
Taft today took Quick action to
bend the energies of the govern
ment toward stopping the threat
ened floods in the Missouri and
Mississippi river valleys.
Following conferences with Sec
retary of War Stlmson and Gen.
Wm. H. Bixb.v, chief of engineers
I and several senators and congress
men from the state bordering these
two great streams, he sent a mes
sage to congress urKing immedi
I ate appropriation of $500,000 to be
used in strengthening the levee*
I and trying to prevent further dam
I age.
(j)
Hickman. Ky., April 2.—Dawn to
day revealed something of the damage
done here last night when the flood
waters of the Mississippi river broke
the levee and poured a current
feet deep through the town. From
hill to hfll the river flows today,
covering farms and flooding stores
and factories.
Two thousand people are homeless.
With the coming of dayUght the work
of caring for the refugees was taken
up. Many measures were taken dur
ing the day looking to relief and much
suffering has been alleviated. The
refugees were sheltered last night by
the residents of the hlgbLands.
Tents shipped by the state militia
are expected to arrive today. The or
ganization of a commissary is giving
much concern. Much of the food sup
ply was destroyed in the rush of water
and there is not enough provisions
on hand to Jast the stricken people
a week.
The west end of the levee went
out at 9 30 last night at a point where
is was supposed to be the strongest.
Men who had been working in relays
for four'days to reinforce the levee,
stood by their posts all day in the
driving rain. Some of them had gone
to rest and most of the inhabitants
were in bed when the crash ciime.
Quick work by the patrol in giving
the warning signal made possible the
escape of all the workers and
those
whose hom^s were entered. There
was much distress amo^g women and
children, however, before they were
housed.
The residents on the Missouri op
posite Hickman have been warned to
flee, as the levee there is in imminent
danger of going out. The water is
two feet higher here than it has ever
before reached and is expected to rise
two feet more.
Rivers Still Risa*
Kansas City, Mo., April 2. Path the
Missouri and the Kansas rivers con
tinued to rise today. The Missouri at
tained a depth of 21.1 feet, but ha*
dono no damage except to flood the
basements of a few buildings. The
Kansas river has risen ten inches ainee
yesterday.
Improvement In Iowa.
Des M6ines, la., April 2.—The flood
conditions in central Iowa are report
ed greatly improved today.
Fighting the Floorfe.
Cairo, HI., April 2.—The railroads
and citizens of Cairo co-operated to
day In attempting to keep the Ohio
and Mississippi rivers out of town.
The citizens quit their business and
aided in patroling the levees. Th«
Mississippi has spread over the low
lands of southeastern Missouri.
Minneapolis, Minn., April 2.—Charg
ed with the murder, was arretted to
Frank J. Quartemont, was arrested to
day, a few moments after he had been
freed on a writ of habeas corpus.
Quartemont. who is a neighbor of the
Mathews family, was detained by the
police last Saturday. The warrant on
which he was arrested today w*«
sworn out by a detective.
LUCK! BALM'S
HEIRS WIN SUIT
MR9, TfcJRNBULL LOSES
TO $11,000,000
ESTATE.
CLAIMS
& .Vl¥
San Francisco, CaL, April J.—By
unanimous decision of the supreme
court here, the heirs of Ellas
("Lucky") Baldwin are confirmed in.*
the possession of his estate, estimated'
to be worth approximately $11,000,000,\
and the claims against It of Beatrice
Anita Baldwin, or Turnbull, as a• nre-fc"
tettnitted child
are
dismissed
,f

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