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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, November 18, 1912, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1912-11-18/ed-1/seq-3/

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If your purpose has Vanadium
strength—and you go into the
automobile question without
prejudice and with a determina
tion to make your dollars serve
you to the best possible advan
tage—you'll come out with a
Vanadium-built Ferd.
Every third car a Ford—and every
Ford user a Ford *'booster." New
prices runabout $525 touring car
$600—delivery car $625—town car
$800-—with all equipment, f.o. b. De
troit. Get particulars from Ford
Motor Company, 209 N. P. Avenue,
Fargo, or direct from Detroit factory.
In the World
BASKETBALL AT
F«50 II] ETC
Mm VBTERANS GOJTK BUT THERE
IS PROMISING MATERIAL—AND
TIB HILL-TOPPERS ARES LOOK­
ING FORWARD TO A BIG YfOAR—
FOOTBALL SEASON IS OVER.
Now that the football season Is over,
the sporting fane are getting ready for
the coming basketball season, whicn
promises to be the hardest fought in
years.
Fargo college will be greatly "handi
capped by the loss of threp of the best
men who ever donned the short togs
at F. C. Fortin, Slingsby, and Thayer,
respectively guard, forward, and cen
ter. In spit of this fact, the "ever-Joy
ruls" on the hill are awaiting a stren
uous time when Coach Watkin'a little
ones brush up against the A. C. veter
1ns.
Of last year's letter men only Har
rington, forward, and Boise, guard, are
left. H. Haggart, who was out on ac
count of illness last year, will be back
this season Murray of last year's
iquad will be a valuable man, wherever
ne may be needed.
Of the new material, some is Indeed
•ncouraging to the wearers of the Blue
»nd Gold rags. Smith, a lengthy Indian
with experience from Carlisle, looks
good for the center position. Ellis
from Towner will also he out for the
pivot position. For forwards Thomas
and Ttllotson will undoubtedly give th«
old timers a chance to work, while the
material out for guards is liable to
surprise the veterans. Palfrev, Marks,
Rolf, F. Carpenter, and Allen Carpenter
are to try out for guard.
Practice will not be started at Fargo
college till the end of this month or
the first of next.
PRINCETON ANI
YALE PLAT TIE
ALLftilN'lS MADE OX GOAL KICKS
—YALE MAX BOOTED BALIi
FOR FIFTY YARDS.
Princeton, Nov. 18.—So evenly were
the Princeton and Yale teams matched
that neither had the power to make a.
touchdown today and played aft to
6 tie. All the scoring was done on
goals from the field or goals from
placement. The result of the struggle
was unsatisfactory to both sides.
Pumpelly of Yale, Was the hero, when
coming into the game for the secohd
Borton
-.^1
of
Sport
HARVARD DREAMS
OF CHAMPION8HIP
"...
akGo, rif.
J'**
toh
fZ^T
»irw».
Wsrwentafv
But Cam rivals stand In Harvard's
Way to tfia eastern Intercollegiate
football champ to vuih ip, Dartmouth and
2~aJe„ Crimson fans expect Harvard
to win both contests,
Tbe Cambridge Insolation has
unusual nurnb«r of stars this
Brickley has shone tbe brightest, but
Captain Wendell and Parmenter have
both given good accounts of them
selves, and are expected to be im
portant Santos in tba |H» «wi«lBliig
games.
time in the last few minutes of play,
booted the ball for a field goal from
the fifty yard line, tieing the score.
It was one of the most remarkable
goals from the field ever seen on the
Princeton gridiron. Giving the signal
1911
PRICE: The Cadillac will be sold at one price only—list, with freight
adcled. In selling you a Cadillac, wc honestly and most sincerely believe
that we are giving you by far the best value for your money you can pos
sibly obtain. We are also giving you a Service which we are determined
shall be unequalled inthe sUte,
If we cannot convince you that the Cadillac Car and the Cadillac service
is worth the price asked, then we cannot hope to obtain your business.
In asking us to make a concession from the price, you would be asking
us to either "skimp" on the car—which we can't: do—or to "skimp" on
our Servicc—which we won't do.
We can't afford to do either and you cannot afford that we should."
"Cadillac First Cost Is Last Cost"
it.
(SSI N, P. Avenue*
1
e
The fl*ht»«*
c&reer o£ Georg
es cat^*ttU®r'
iftrencfc nudiUe-
a a a y i a u y
COUltt to
jpit cruaOiiiK
ae~
e a a i o a
O
bauds of Billy,
jray*e yu«»
quietus 1 u
^ifi niLiona. .tJetorij
Victoiy
ww
jiOpe, ^al v»iiou
i^ayKe, a Uura
ibuc in uu«*
counxry, gained
y uiifjy dtKtuuu
over Uie a reitca
IPfu, tQ#
tignung pxeauge
4tnl mtO iJALtttlb.
W aeii C*ryen-
tler lacai&i k rank
Jtiaus iatic sum
mer lie gave a
good account OX
fljmaftit tor the
early part, at
the cunkeat, but
toward, the and
triphammer
punches
ot
the
jtfttaburg bear cat
begun to hurt
th« Frencanuui.
la the nineteenth
o u n w e a I
seemed that Car
pen tl«r was dan
gerously near to a
knockout, bis
a e a n a e
leaped Into the
ring and Carpen
tier was immedi
ately disqualified.
apparently for a punt, Pumpelly, who
had but a few minutes before taken
Markle's place at right half, dropped
back and received a perfect pass from
Ketcham. Pumpelly dropped the ball
and then booted it on the rebound. As
the ball cleared the bar, ReJeree Snow
of Michigan threw up his hands, in
dicating that the score had been made
and thousands of Yale followers, realiz
ing that the daring back had tied the
score, sent tap a. remendous cheer. Yale
substitutes turned somersaults on the
side lines and Pumpelly waa almost
carried to his position by his fellow
players.
For Princeton there was Hobert Bak
er. who made both of the black and
orange's field goals. Both were easy
chances and came in the second period.
Flynn, the tall fullback of the Yale
team, Was the first man to make a
score. In the first period he kicked
goal from placement from within the
twenty-five yard line.
Outside of the stubbornness of the
defense on each Bide and Pumpelly's
great field goal there was nothing re
markable about tbe game.
FOOTBALL RESULTS.
Westpoint, 16 Tufts college, 6.
Brown, 21 Lafayette, 7.
Williams, 13 Amherst, 0.
Vanderbilt, 23. Virginia, 1*.
Purdue. 91: Rose Polytechnic, 0.
St. Louis, 20 Marquette, #.
Chicago. 10 Illinois. 0.
Michigan, 20 Cornell, T.
Beloit. 40 Knox. 0.
Pennsylvania, 34: Carlisle, 2®.
Harvard, 3: Dartmouth, 0.
Pennsylvania State. 1. Ohio, 0. Game
forfeited, Ohio leaving the fleld in the
last quarter.
Oberlin. 10: Case, 6.
Missouri, at Washington,.
Konyon, *2 University Cmcinnati,
19.
Nebraska, 14 Kansas, 8.
Depauw, 17 Butler, 3.
Ames. 7 Iowa University, 20.
Kansas Aggies, 14 Colorado, 6.
Albion. 29 Olivet, 14.
Alma College, 28 University of De
troit, 20.
Lake Forest, 26 Monmouth, t,
WIMOAS
an
year.
TRIUMPHANT
Minneapolis, Nov. IS.—The title of
the "big nine" football championship
went to Wisconsin Saturday when they
defeated Minnesota, 14 to 0. A touch
down was made on a line smash by
Handberg early in the second quarter.
It was followed soon after by a touch
down bv Captain Hoffel on a forward
nmn^r
BEVtlS I.AKE, N. D*
Cllls Str«et
i-
THE FARGO FORTTM 1WD DAILY KEPTTBLICAK, MONDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 18, 1912.
CARPENTIER'S FIGHTING CAREER ENDS
ALL DUE TO PAPKE'8 SMASHING VICTORY
ok
V
e a i v e
Ik
o ,*
sJr
i
4—e—§)
pass from Gillette, on both of which
occasions Gillette's trusty toe added a
point on the goals kicked.
The teams were practically equal in
weight, but Minnesota displayed a
tendency to fumble and was weak In
handling the forward pass.
Wisconsin's driving backs, Bright,
Tandberg and VanRlper, are stars of
the back field. Gillette doing little
except kicking. While Wisconsin's
backs won the game, its line until the
last quarter was like a stone wall.
Only in the last ten minutes of play
did Minnesota's attacks threaten the
goal.
Gophers Stiffened la Last Half.
After Wisconsin gained fourteen
points the gopher line stiffened and
their tackling, which had been weak,
also improved between Gillette and
Schaugnessy and occasionally Hay
ward, with the Wisconsin man having
the better of the argument.
The gusty wind from the west fav
ored first one and then the other side
in the kicking as the sides changed
quarters.
Securing the ball in the last ten
minutes on its own twenty yard line,
when Gillette's try for a field goal from
the fifteen yard line failed, Minnesota
started a speedy march down the field
Hayward using the shift principally
and working McAlmon hard. On Wis
consin's ten yard line however the
cardinal line held for two downs and
then the timekeeper's whistle announc
ed the end of the game.
Never since the old time rivalry be
tween Michigan and Minnesota was
there such Interest in a Minnesota
game as was evidenced by a crowd es
timated at
20,000,
filling every available
spot at Northrop field.
Thousands of Wisconsin alumni and
undergraduates flung wide the cardi
nal colors while the "On Wiscon*in"
song jind sna£$y cheers were of stifch
volume as to balance the rolling "Ski
ll-Mah" yell. Minnesota's battle song
despite Minnesota's greater numbers.
IIOLiS TITLE
OF IfiSOLEWEIfiHT
THE CHAMPIONSHIP I* THIS WEL
TERWEIGHT CLASS IS UNDE
TERMINED, BUT IT IS STATED
THAT THERi IS JW-, LACK OF
CANDIDATES.-
What is probably the most difficult
and open question in the prize ring
affairs at this time is just who should
wear the middleweight or as it is some
times called the welterweight crown
Claimants have been many as have
been elimination contests, but still the
title cannot be brought to rest between
two men. It is the hope of all inter
ested in pugilistic affairs that the field
can be narrowed 'wn and the matter
settled. A number of aspirants for the
crown will clash In a series of bouts,
and when the smoke of battle 1b clear
ed away there may be someone who
can rightfully set himself up as the
champion
Eddie McGoorty is one of the fore
most middleweights, and many think
that he deserves the crown, but Mike
Gibbons, Jimmy Clabby. Chicago
"Knockout" Brown, "Cyolone" Johnny
Thompson, Billy Papke, the "Illinois
Thunderbolt," and a few others at once
raised a hue and cry when Edward an
nounced that he was about, to tuck the
title under his arm for keeps, and of
course the Oshkosh man could not get
away with his little game.
The foreign scrappers are not taken
into consideration. Georges Carpen
tler, with his terrible knockout record,
was given a severe beating in Paris
recently by Billy Papke. Jack Harrison,
who boasted possession of the Lord
Lonsdale belt and the championship of
Great Britain, sailed over to the United
States to do battle and met his Water
loo at the hands of McGoorty In New
York. Harrison was floored for the
count in the initial round.
Billy Papke, who was the logical
successor of Stanley Ketchei after the
great little champion was killed, has
not framed up to championship pro
portions. despite the fact that he at
one time defeated Ketchei. Papke, es
pecially since he defeated Carpentier, *s
extremely anxious to convince .fight
fans, however, that he is 'Still' the
"Illinois Thunderbolt."
MUSI ATHLETES
SUPERSTITIOUS
NEARLY ALL OF THE BIG CLUBS
STEER CLEAR OF THE FIGURE
IS AND THEY DO WOT LIKE TO
DO MUCH BUSINESS ON fB104¥~
OTHE SUPERSTITIONS. 7\
'?V
A great many athletic clubs In hold
ing contests omit the number 18 from
their list, as the great majority of ath
letes will not wear it. There are some
however, who have no fear of it as
a hoojloo number.
Alexander Grant, some ten years
ago Pennsylvania's best distance run
ner, used to request when he sent
in an entry for a race that he bo
given No. 13 to wear. His request
was always complied with. Grant once
won a national championship on Fri
day the 13th with a competitor's No.
13 on his back.
Field contestants are much more sup
erstitious than trackmen. Jumpers
place sticks, handkerchiefs, shoes, etc.,
all over the field and move a little
faster or slower as the case may be
ki it »J
FARGO'S
ONLY SPOT
CASH
STORE.
Oh
Dresses at $9.98
100 fine Serge Dresses in all manner of styles
which are sold up to $15 €|Q
regular at
Misses' Dresses at $2.98
100 misses' Heavy Flannel Druses
kinds of styles, sizes up to
14 years, at
20 fine new Plush Coats that a
regular up to $35.00
at
60 pair
Cotton Batting Cheap
Excellent Wh-e Batts at 9c
Good Batts, 12XA cent grade at 10c
Wool Batts, regular $3.00 grade 2.19
Large Comfort Size Batts at 89e
Cotton Blankets, 11-4 size. 98c
Extra large cotton blankets..•••.*• •••1.39
Woo) Nap blankets at 1*98
as they come across their own marks,
but as a rule, there are so many ar
ticles on the fleld that the contestant
can hardly tell which Is his.
Many of the best athletes of the
world are superstitious, although few
of them are affected by the same
thing. Some high Jumpers will not
make an effort to jump unless there
is a handkerchief over the crosspiece:
others will not jump if the handker
chief is on the bar. Some athletes
will not have their running togs
washed while they are training.
Melvin Sheppard is superstitious
about only one thing—the washing of
his clothes. He will not hav* any ar
ticles he uses washed while he is
In training or running. Only when
he retires for a month or so will he
have anything cleaned. He Bays that
washing may take his strength away.
Sounds ridiculous, but there isn't a
fUaiCL.^ BE'EAi
Wc ifaiil Your Eye
To Glance at the Bargains Offered in Seasonable Goods
Then Come this Week to
Fargo's Wonderful New Popular Priced Store
r^scs in all
$2.98
Fancy Trimmed Plash Coats
ll
All Wool Blankets $4.69
fine plaid all-wool Blankets, a
lar $6.00 blanket, large size, JSC!
this week at..
Good Comforts $1.19
1 big lot of silkaline Comforts, filled
white batting ATI HjQ
s i
I
House Dresses 69c
100 fine house dresses in regular $1 00 and
$1.25 grades while they last
Sateen Underskirts 69c
10 dozen Sateen underskirts in nil ^e?.
A dandy skirt
regu*.
with
Coals, Skirts, Dresses and Suits
Yon can bur from as this week at very low prices
cpance to clean any of nil outnt wnUo
he is going well.
BIRD ALIGHTED ON CAMERA.
But When the Shutter Clicked Ho
Foil Over Getting Away.
H. M. Lang in Outing: It Is not
often that the opportunity to get
among these birds and see them at
the closest quarters is given to a bird
student. Yet here they surrounded
me a pair of the "fat their capers"
in front of my nose, where I could
have touched them with a long straw,
and one fellow mounted the blind and
whirred just a few inches above my
head. The temptation to pinch his
toes was almost Irresistible and then
Here's Buck Herzog, Wwld's Scries Hero, Whose Early
Ambition
to
AJ&
fUi i evpw swuce tte CcvU
Pic* OP* 6**--'
r.
wuv
vfoffAi a ve3u/tfssrH^ fe»~tlip
CHfrrB- A Aeo»AJC
BdC'nMOQfg' AM04& TUF AWSty&S&S
Though the 1912 baseball season
fiow seems almost like ancient his
tory, the exploits of Charlie ("Buck")
Herzog, of the New York Giants,
(during those games and in fact
throughout the seacon, have not boon
forgotten.
i o i i i I i n iwiiiwwii»iwi~»bwiiiai*iinw^'iri imroifBrniD'Hirii' "wwrt'itfw
Ovhrltc
LIT TLB
FALLS,
MINN,
FARGKX K ZX
Coats at $9.98
Big lot of Ladies and Misses Coats which
were sold up to $15.00. Your 4* A |1|0
o i e o e o o
Remember these are all new—No last years
stuff.
Fine Silk Chameuse Dress Ssle
20 fine Chameuse dresses,
values to $30, your choice..
^4 A |]|C|
Fur Muffs at $2.98
Just arrived 50 nne fur muffs in
black and brown at $3.98 and
This week
69c
69c
wc
lot of infants bearskin
white, also red flannel coats
This week
$2.98
Fur Sets at $5.98
Special lot of black and brown QO
sets neckpieces and muffs only
White Fur Sets SI
will sell a dandy
Iceland fox white sets at
Regular $2.00 fine wool union fi*'|
suits all sizes this week
A
big
$12.98
Wool Union Suits $1.48
Bearskin Coats $2.48
ats
Shadow Work Lace 15c Yd.
All our regular 19c, 25c and 35c Sh^1
Lace this week per
yard
Silkaline remnants, per yard
Tennis Flannel, all kinds, per yard.••
Mctsaline, 28 in. in width, per yaxd»**«69c
111
$2.48
15c
8c
as if discerning my thought* he hoj~
ped up on the kodak itself' His toe
nails clinked upon the metal of the
finder and speed scale, and I fp^xM
every moment that his feet might
catch in the string and thus make an
ill chosen exposure. When I ,1«»rked
the string and the focal plane sihutter
banged under his feet, think he fell
over himself a time or two before get
ting under way in his frantic leave
taking.
Moody's, Moorhoad
Great 4 days sale, will be a winner,
the bargains are great, don't m!®s get
ting some of them. The sale starts to
morrow morning, take any street car
for Moor head, get off at Sixth St,
—Advt.
Bectme League Star Has Been Fully Realized
Bock 6err **rS A UQtfV
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tiff *ftS5 flftH'W
Bv a sccxrr
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tM
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