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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, January 28, 1913, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1913-01-28/ed-1/seq-4/

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e Fargo Fortim
Aa4 Rally
.I'"1
111
$ J. P. DOTSON, PUBLISHER.
Sntered at postoftlee as second dasa
Ik matter.
ImCUL PAPER CRT OP FARGO
VOLUME XXXVI, NO. 61.
The Fargo Forum and Republican is
fcllbMBhed every evening: except Sunday
ni The Forum Building, corner of First
avenue and Fifth street north, Faxgo,
a. ix
.. Subscription—The Targo Forum and
Daily Republican, by carrier, ISo per
Week, or 40e per month. In advance $4
per year. The Fargo Forum and Weekly
Republican, $1 per year. Single copies,
c. Subscribers will find the date to
which they have paid, printed opposite
their names on the address slips.
I Address all communications to The
Yorum Publishing Co., Fargo. N. D.
TUESDAY, JAN. 28, 1913.
IAILROAD EARNINGS INCREASE.
Recent gains in railroad earning*
a^re indicative of the properoue con
dition of the country. Scarcity of
Equipment which hal been permitted
to run down, following the panic of
p07 doubtless prevented larger in
creases.
The rci' 'r *f the in »rstate com
ifherce commission for the month of
November covering over 220,000 miles
dl railroad shows an increase in net
operating expenses as compared with
t&e same month of last year of over
$jpi 000,000.
Large orders for equipment are yet
Unfilled and later on it will be impos
sible to handle a greater tonnage dur
ing the busier season. Except for a
panic of which there is not the least
siRn at present or some other extra
Ordinary condition, no recession of
business below the present level seems
likely.
The great lines that run through or
tthter North Dakota are all especially
prosperous and will add greatly to
Chelr mileage and equipment during
the present season. This promises
tw be a busy season in every line
throughout the state. Great construc
tion schemes are under way, in city,
town and country and there should be
employment for every North Dakota
laborer, skilled and unskilled, and
thousands from other sections of the
country as well.
ANOTHER PERSONNEL BILL.
The Navy league of the United States
is working earnestly to secure the pas
sage by congress of the personnel bill
now before it, a bill which has for its
purpose a change in the system of
promotion so as to insure that officers
may reach command rank and flag
rank at earlier ages than they do at
present.
The objects to be accomplished are
certainly desirable, whether the present
bill
is the exact remedy to apply to the
condition or not. Promotion in the
navy is rigid and inelastic. It all goes
by straight seniority. The youngest
nan in hiB class at the naval academy
Is certain—if he remains in the service
and behaves himself so that he is not
reduced for misconduct—to reach the
highest rank and retain it longer than
any other member of his class, regard
less of his qualifications.
In the ordinary course
man in the navy can
command of
about 60
well
as
if
when he be­
comes a rear admiral, and then he will
retire at 62.
It may be stated as an axiom that
an
educated naval officer is
for
fully
ripe
command rank by the time he
reaches 30
or
35. Every year thereafter
tends rather to decrease than to in
crease his qualifications for command.
man who remains a subaltern, ex
ercising no initiative, until in advanc
ed middle life, is hardly likely to as
sume the sudden burden of responsibil
ities which comes with
such
he could
rank as
have
done
at
an earlier
age.
The bill proposes the compulsory re
tirement of a large number of officers
from time to time in the grades below
rear
admiral. It is a measure which,
It it passes, will create much heart
burning and on occasional injustice in
its application but no other remedy
for the situation seems in sight or has
been suggested, and the situation re
tires some remedy.
DRAFTING LA.W8 PROPERLY.
There
la
a serious proposal before
tjM New York legislature, which should
commend itself to the legislature of
this and of other states, to secure the
services of experts to draft in good
English the ideas for statutes formu
lated by members of the legislature, the
drafting, of course, to be In such form
thst the laws, when passed,
will
stand
constitutional tests in the courts.
7it is estimated that the legislatures
Which will sit this year will pass col
lectively something like 20,000 new
l*ws. The greet majority of these laws,
the precedents of the past are fol
lowed, will be loosely and crudely
drawn, in language which fails clearly
tb express their probable purpose, and
the exact meaning and effect
of many
of
bills,
ty
Itor
the laws will
not- be known conclusively until
the
courts place interpretations upon
them.
In Oreat Britain,
the
which
passes
parliament of
fewer
laws
than the
av­
erage American legislature, there are
lawyers whose practice is confinel to
the drafting of bills proposed to be
submitted to parliament. Government
which make up the great iiiajorl
of the measures which pass into
laws, are drafted under the direction
of the attorney general and the soli'
general after their general pui
pose has been agreed upon. The En,
lish laws are therefore, as a unifor i
rule, expressed in clear and lucid En,
lish. The legal phraseology, when u
ed, requires no Interpretation by
courts.
If the law* of American' leglslatur
ware as well drawn, the work of tl-
stiurt* would be greatly lightened airi
'l' iVldl
Item Welcomed
By Many Men
This recli '-an be i e at
home, so that no one need know
of another's troubles, as the in
gradients can be obtained sepa
rately at any well stocked drug
store. They are in regular use
and many different prescriptions
are constantly being filled with
them.
Thi* will prove
i
fc-
of events
no
expect to get
the
any ship
50.
until
He will be
well past
a
Overworked office men and the
many victims of society's late
hours and dissipation will, it is
said, And the restorative they are
in need of.
If the reader decides to try It,
get three ounces of ordinary
syrup sarsaparilla. compound and'
one ounce compound fluid balm
wort: mix and let stand two
hours then get one ounce com
pound essence cardiol and one
ounce tincture cadomene com
pound (not cardHn.ntn), mix all
together, shake well and take a
teaspoon fill after each meal and
one when retiring.
A certain well-known medical
expert asserts that thousands of
men and many women are suf
ferers all because of dormant
circulation of the blood and a
consequential impairment of the
nervous force, which begets the
most dreadful symptoms and un
told misery. —Advt.
there would be less occasion for popu
lar outcry over court decisions con
demning many statutes as unconstitu
tional, an outcry which should proper
ly have been directed against the
authors of the laws fur their mule
work.
ROBERT BURNS.
The 154th birth anniversary of
Robert Burns was celebrated last
week. In every land men have paused
to think of this Scotchman, to sing
his praises and quote hia word. The
editor of The St. Paul Dispatch, fired
by the inspiration of Burns' remark
able achievements has written the
following splendid tribute:
In all literature there Is no other
character like the .Scottish plowman
who. without rank or station, without
the adornments of culture or the ad
vantages of education, passed beyond
all the achievements of the elect by
his sheer manliness and humanity.
To this unlettered rustic, tutored by
a strange and mystic simplicity of
life, it was given to effect the resur
rection of the real man in the litera
ture of the modern era and prepare
the way for that spiritual democracy
which Wordsworth conceived as the
final heritage of an aspiring race.
Before Burns there had been men
who loved mankind, and who had
given verbal expression to their love.
But to this humble singer was It giv
en to first unite a passionate humani
ty and a deathless art, proving the
double truth that art is nothing if
it be not human, and that love is noth
ing till it is informed with a con
quering and pervading beauty.
It 1s significant that the whole mod
ern movement for a deeper and broad
er human fellowship has had its birth
and jrrowth since Burns died, and jet
a century after him there Is no word,
no song that gives so perfect an ut
terance to the hopes of man today as
the song he sang over 100 years ago.
This primal quality of his sympathy
and sentiment has set him apart from
all epochs and eras and made him the
possession of all men and of all times.
No poet ever wrought with such
simple and unvaried facts. He found
his inspiration in the common paths
of life, find built his glory on the clod
that every foot has pressed, because
his seeing eye found "naught com
mon on the earth," and his living
heart caught wonder from the simple
routine of the common day. "On his
lips the eternal themes again were
new," says Watson of him, and it is
this that has given him the world for
empire.
Wherever man has toiled and suf
fered and hoped and dreamed, the
lark-iike song of Burns has fallen in
benediction to raise man's hope to
ward the stars.
It has been no easy thing for any
n\an to cringe since Burns once sang
A Man's a Man for a' That.
Carlyle has spoken of the wonder
ment of all when Burns went up to
Edinburgh and moved among the
great and high without hint of
rustic awkwardness, as though he had
been born to shine amidst the social
ranks. It was nature's splendid lesson
to the world that gentlemen are born,
not made.
His inherent majesty of simple man
liness passed into his word to shame
a world of sycophants his bitter ha
tred of cant and hypocrisy enfran
chised thousands with a new and vital
contempt for the pretentions of tyran
nical institutions his passionate love
for his fellow man made his poetry
the password among those who plotted
for the freedom of the individual, and
his clear, lithe singing, born of joy
and faith, was wafted over lands and
seas to win the world from weariness
of futile doing and uninspired doubt.
And so, after all these years, he re
mains to man still a real and abiding
presence of uplifting power, and un
known millions of men scattered about
the cosmopolitan world take to their
hearts this darling of old Scotland,
and in his song grow blithe and young
again, easing their human hurts with
the soothing kindness of his pleas for
mercy and justice, and filling their
souls with higher and holier visions
of beauty as they
brood over
Rsleased On Murder Charge, But Ad
mits Attempted Jsil Breaking.
Kenmare, N. D., Jan. 28.—W. R.
Casey, arrested here for alleged com
plicity in the Carl Hansen murder on
ly to be released for lack of evidence,
pleaded guilty at Williston before
Judge Crawford a charge of attempted
jail breaking, being given a six
months' jail sentence. l»reviously
Casey, alias Kerr, was tried for purse
snatching, but was found not guilty.
Judge Flsk told the prisoner on sen
tencing him for the jail breaking of
fense that he deemed him quite lucky
in getting off on the other charge.
Don't YOU
•"Trust ti luck"'
to help your Stomach, LlTtr Mi
Bowels back to health. Nature
needs assistance and
HOSTETTEirS
Stomal Bi
it ill «iw iU« It i* iot ln
fllffrMttoa, (oasttpatloa. Colds,
irlppe and Malaria. Try It and
see.
THB fAR(30 FORTTM
welcome bit
of information for all those who
are overworked, gloomy, de
spondent. nervous and have
trembling limbs, heart palpita
tion. dizEiness, cold extremities,
Insomnia, fear without cause,
timidity in venturing, and gen
eral inability to act naturally
«nd rationally an others do, be
cause the treatment can be pre
pared secretly at home and taken
without any one's Knowledge.
Insurance
at Knox.
The
ft'"*
rATO
North Dakota
Kernels
Key tb success—advertising.
Only one more month of winter.
Wolves
are
plentiful near
Antler.
The ice harvest Is on In full blast.
The Soo depot at Pullerton was
burned.
adjusters have been busy
Have you planned your summer
garden yet?
Dr. C. P,
Bazelle
of
Napoleon
cided to locate at Cleveland.
The amount of probate fees in Traill
county in 1912 lotaled $4,230.
Grand Forks Knights of Columbus
had a big ceremonial session.
A
gas tank exploded at Hazelton and
started
a
fire that was quickly put out.
Kenmare wants a northwestern fair
established In that city by the state.
The Sanborn stores recently entered
into an agreement to close at 7:30
m.
hoots of Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Nelson Pettibone was destroyed
by fire.
Dr. Taylor Jamestown college will
start a citisen's class in sociology in
that city.
The Elgin Times calls attention to
the needvfor better fire protection in
that town.
The Hunter Herald thinks there is
"boose money" behind certain papers
in the state.
The UnlverssJ Concrete Pile Co. has
been organzed in Jamestown with a
capital of $100,000,
The Valley City normal debating
team will meet the Jamestown college
team on April
22.
The Order of liailroad Conductors
at Jamestown had an annual meeting
and banquet Sunday.
A bonsplel was held at Crystal In
which five North Dakota towns were
represented with rinks.
The Farmers' Grain Dealers associa
tion of North Dakota will meet at Val
ley City, March 4, 5 and 6.
Jacob Helm and his two little sons
were killed when a Soo train collided
with the wagon near Velva.
Jamestown is greatly interested in
the three-cornered Y. M. C. A. con
test with Grand Forks and Fargo.
Many towns in North Dakota are
supplied with artesian wells and a large
number of the wells have been balk
ing lately.
Editor W. P. Thurston of The Enn
mons County Republican thinks there
should be money In raising turkeys in
North Dakota.
The coal fields of North Dakota cov
er an area of 32,000 square miles and
the total tonnage Is estimated at (00,
000,000,000 tons.
The Foreman Independent says a
meadow lark was seen there recently
and that those who saw it had not been
on a lark either,
Mrs. Ole Paulson of Sioux Pass,
Mont., was run over by a load of Pay
and is in a critical condition in a
Williston hospital.
The Nome Tribune thinks the worst
sin in the newspaper world is for an
editor to clip an editorial and credit it
to the wrong paper.
A farmer writing to The Antler
American urged the business men of
that town to organize a. commercial
club and to get a up street fair.
Herbert Baker of Wheatland, N. D..
charged with robbing the postoffice at
Wing, waived examination and will
appear before the federal grand jury.
Herbert Glass, confined in the coun
ty jail at Jamestown for a year for
violating the prohibition law, is now
facing a charge of murder at Medora.
F. W. Mann A Sons, big merchants
of Devils Lake, will erect a number
of fine modern houses on some prop
erty just purchased at the Satanic
city.
Scott Cameron, formerly of Tyner,
Pembina county, has been appointed
to serve as treasurer of ISmmons
county
until
new law.
the im­
mortal loveliness of Afton Water,
Highland
Mary and John
Anderson.
PLEADED GUILTY.
May 1, because of the
A Minnesota paper in announcing a
change In time on one of the railroads,
said that it did not do so to accom
modate the road, but to accommodate
the public.
The Dickey Reporter believes in ad
vertising to such an extent that it uses
its own columns to call the attention
of its readers to some of its good
points—wise idea.
Hazelton is proud of the fact that
Chas. Geil, who saved the N. P. coast
train from a disastrous wreck at Mc
Kenzie by his prompt action in throw
ing a switch shut, resides there.
The Jamestown Capital thinks The
Forum Is right in predicting the great
est building year in the history of the
state—providing every town in North
Dakota that wants an insane asylum
gets one.
Editor
C. G. Boise, who was editdt
and publisher of The Steele County
Tribune at Sherbrook for fourteen
years, but who recently sold It to £*.
V. Anderson, announced that he has
quit the journalistic field for good.
Owen Jones of Jamestown suffered
a paralytic stroke while attending the
funeral of his brother-in-law, Owen
Richards, the latter having committed
suicide, and for a time it was feared
that there would be a second tragedy.
Knut Bakke of Epping, filled up
with Montana red eye at Mondak,
wandered out onto the prairie, crawl
ed into a straw stack and lay freez
ing for twenty-four hours. When
found he was terribly frozen but will
recover.
The Grand Forks Times calls at
tention to the waste that Is incurred
In paying freight on livestock to Chi
cago from North Dakota, having it
butchered there and paying the freight
on the dressed meat back to North
Dakota.
If the brothers of Clarence Bills,
wiio tried to commit suicide at Larl
t, ore, will promise to care for the un
rtunate, he will not be prosecuted
under the North Dakota law, which
provides for the punishment of would
suicides.
Many artesian wells have been sunk
1 iiis winter in North Dakota. Samples
of the water should be sent for testing
1
Professor Ladd at the A. C. before
is used as some of this water con
ins too much of aoli,da for p, health
I ful
drinking water*
Fussy Take* a Pansy
to the Squirrels,
has de­
than her.
own.
three
up and down
DAILY BEPTTBETCAN, TOMMY EVElttKG, JAMTAHY «8, 1913.
of & lot of little dogs.
"I
wonder if the
grow ap?"
not
oar
little
things
off with
a squirrel
p.
The Walsh county agricultural and
training school has been fully organ
ized.
"In a
these
AND
RHEUMATISM
PEOPLE WITH GOOD DIGESTION
DO NOT HAVE RHEU
MATISM.
The
blood is
These acids in the blood produce
a condition known as rheumatism.
The acids are liable to produce mi
croscopic crystals. These crystals
are deposited in the ligaments and
cartilages, causing rheumatism of
the joints- Sometimes in the bones,
producing periodic pains every time
a storm approaches. Sometimes in
the muscles, producing lumbago, stitT
neck, myalgia and muscular rheu
matism generally.
Ps-ru-na Corrects Digestion.
The reason that Pe-ru-na relieves
such cases is easy to understand.
Pe-ru-na corrects digestion. Pe-ru
na corrects digestion partly by hur
rying it. Pe-ru-na does not furnish
any artificial digestant, it simply as
sists Nature In doing its own digest
ing.
In this way the products of diges
tion are more normal. The blood is
not filled with imperfectly digested
food. No acids accumulate in the
stomach while Pe-ru-na is being
taken- Thus rheumatism is pre
vented.
it is a great deal better to prevent
disease than to try to cure it. But
even after rheumatism has begun the
condition that caused it ought to be
removed If possible.
Good Digestion Stops Rheumatism.
The first thing to do is to secure
good digestion, then if it is necessary
specific medicines for rheumatism
may be taken. But until the diges
tion is made perfect It is of little or
no use to take medicines for rheu
matism. To produce good digestion
Pe-ru-na should be taken.
Pe-ru-na, Man-a-lin and La-cu-pla
manufactured by the Pe-ru-na Com
pany, Columbus, Ohio, Sold at all
drug stores. No.
42.
Ask your druggist for free Peruna
almanac for 1913. —Advt.
AFTER FAIR.
Kenmare Will Ssek Northwestern Ex
position from Legislature.
Kenmare, N. D., Jan. 28.—Kenmare
will make a bid for the establishment
by the legislature of the northwestern
fair in this city. An annual appropria
tion of $2,500 for this fair will be ask
ed. A bill covering the proposed ex
position will be introduced in the state
senate by Senator Englund.
As an Inducement to the proposed
fair, Tollef Paulson has ofTered a for
ty-acre site, adjoining the city limits,
free to the state.
The Kenmare commercial club is
backing the project.
Bowels
The Flrat Necessity la to Keep the I
Bowela Gently Open With a Mild
Laxative Tonic.
Healthy old age Is so absolutely de
endent upon the condition of ttaft
owela that, gre&t care should be taken
to see that they act regularly. The
fact is that as age advances the stom
ach muscles become weak and inactive
and the liver does not store up the
juices that are necessary to prompt di
gestion.
Some help can be obtained by eating
easily digested foods and by plenty of
exercise, but this latter Is irksome to
most elderly people. One thing is cer
tain, that a state of constipation should
always be avoided as it Is dangerous to
life and health. The best plan is to
take a mild laxative as often as Is
deemed necessary. But with equal cer
tainty It is suggested that cathartics,
purgatives physics, salts and pills be
avoided, as they do but temporary good
and are so harsh as to be a shock to
a delicate system.
A much better plan, and one that
thousands of elderly people are follow
ing, is to take a gentle laxative-tonic
like Dr. Caldwell's Byrup Pepsin, which
acts as nearly like nature as is possi
ble. In fact, the tendency of this rem
edy is to strengthen the Btomach and
bowel muscles and so train them to
act naturally again, when medicines of
all kinds can usually be dispensed with.
This is the opinion of many people of
different ages, among them Mr. O. P.
Miller, Baroda, Mich., who writes: "I
am 80 vears old and have been consti
pated for many years. Since receiving
your
sample
& i
TT
Daddys Bedtime
FUD children tm! been loOfctatf*
it*
pretty picttne-of a pussy taking care
Jack and Evelyn wondered.
"When I waa a boy w bad a fine big tabby in oar family. One winter she
bad
fine kittens, and, as we bad all the pets that mother would allow us,
homes were found for the kittens when they were quite young.
"Tabby cried around and seemed much grieved. She looked everywhere
for
her 111.tie ones, but ncnild not find thsin.
"That day
father brought In some
bad
been found In a nest in
they seemed so thin and hungry that father thought the mother most have
been killed. Be laid the orphan squirrels In front of the fire.
"Pussy fflmc into the room.
No
to
minute she came back
When
"Now, what do you think of that?* onr father said. You see onr pussy
was a great hunter, and she had been known to come in with a dead squirrel
In her mouth. Who knows brit she may have
In the wildest spirits
INDIGESTION
the product of
?act
Get
bottle I have procured
two 60c bottles and find that it is the
best remedy I ever used and does just
what you claim for it to the very letter.
cannot recommend it too highly."
A bottlej?as be bought of any drug*
Pasty and
Her Adopted
Squirrel Children
little dogs will chase the pnssy eat when they
"Ho, indeed. They would be very naughty if they did," daddy replied.
"Do you snpposo the pussy ever scratches the Aogftfrnn?' Evelyn asked.
"Dear, no
nnless they are very
pussy makes one of the best of mothers even
naughty and
need to be punished.
when she adopts
children
one noticed her, though,
the basket where she had
kept
for
we peeped Into the basket she
coddling up to her
another, and then she carried
was
as contented
as yon please.
made
babies' mother. But she loved them very dearly.
"When they were big enough to go it was a sight to see them.
There were several tall
trees
"Pussy would run after the lively youngsters, meowing plteooaly for them
to come back. It did no good. She would sit at the foot of a tree as they
scrambled over It, crying as if ber heart would break. She thought the squir
rels were entirely too venturesome for little things of their age.
"Fussy had a hard time with that family. She did her best to teach them
all the things young kittens should know, soeh as how to wash their faces and
catch mice. They were soon beyond her, though When she caught them
as tin ir nuts and stealing birds' eggs she washed her paws of them."
diges­
tion. WhateVer sort of food is di
gested in the stomach is absorbed
into the blood. If the food Is badly
digested this
is
also absorbed into
the blood. If the food sours in the
stomach before digestion or during
digestion, the acids are absorbed into
the blood.
a meal off the squirrel
In the garden, and the squirrels would scamper
METHODS NEE!
OVERHAULING
INVESTIGATIONS OF UNIVERSITY
MAN REVEAL FACT THAT BET
TER METHODS OF CARING FOR
POOR AND DEPENDENT ARE
HIGHLY DESIREABLE.
The increase in the amount spent
for the care of the poor in North Da
kota during recent years is out of all
proportion to the growth in popula
tion. This is the conclusion reached
by Prof. John M. Gillette of the de
partment of sociology, state uni
versity after an extended study of the
facts in the case. Professor Gillette's
conclusion and much of the informa
tion on which they are based are con
tained in the current Ibsuc of The
University Quarterly Journal, Just
from press. During a period when
the increase in population amounted
to a total of 32 per cent, the amount
spent for poor relief in this state
nearly doubled. From June 30, 1906
to June 30, 1911, the total annual ex
penditure in all counties of the state
rose from 9123,917.15 to 1240,469.80,
which meant an Increase of 86.5 per
cent. This increase in expenditures
was 2.7 times more rapid than the
growth of the state in population.
Better Regulation Needed.
North Dakota is a young state. It
'has accepted its regulations of
pauperism and crime from older
states somewhat uncritically. Its own
experience has been similar to that
of other new states in those parti
culars. Matters have been allowed
to drift because they have not been
conspicuous. The increase in expend
itures has been steady, regular and
general. It Is not caused by the birth
of new counties, for their expenditures
swell the totals but little. Within the
period covered by the study, there
have been no extraordinary conditions
in the state to account for the heavy
growth. The explanation lies in the
that In every state where the care
of the poor remains unregulated
charity without careful regulation
makes paupers and rapidly Increases
poor-relief expenditures.
Study is Comprehensive.
Professor Gillettee has been working
on this problem for over two years
and in the course of that time he has
gathered facts from original sources
in different sections of the state. The
totals and percentages and based on
figures obtained through the Btate ex
aminer's office and from county of
ficers in several different counties.
In the same connection the care of the
insane and other defectives was In
vestigated and the conditions of jails
in the different cities and county seats
was observed. The tone of the article
is strongly for state supervision of
conditions and institutions concerned
with the care of dependents, defectives
and delinquents. The facts given
indicate that an improvment is needed
in many of the jails and poor asylums
of North Dakota in order that proper
pfevention may obtain and even for
the sake of decency and humanity.
Weak
As Age Advances
I
other
baby squirrels to show us. The
a hollow tree near the hod Be, and
1
MR. O. P. MILLER
gift
V
fifty cents or one dollar. Ifteo-
ple usually buy the fifty cent size
first, and then, having convinced them
selves of its merits they buy the dollar
size, which is more economical. Re
sults are always guaranteed or money
will be refunded. Any elderly person
can follow these suggestions with safe
ty and the assurance of giood results.
If no member of your family has ever
used Syrup Tepsin and ou would like
to make a personal trial of it before
buying it In the reguiar way of a
druggist send your address—a postal
will do—to Dr. W. B. Caldwell, 417
Washlngtbn St., Montlcallo, ill., and
free sample
a
bottle will he
mailed ybu.
I V
ii
tlfc
Hi
until she darted
her kittens.
off the third.
licking the squirrels, and they were
Physician Froze Medicine and Woman
Took It—Life is Saved.
Dee Lacs, N. D., Jan. 28.— By freez
ing the medicine to make the patient
think it was ice, both the sanity and
life of Mrs. Hegbcrt Holverson of this
place will be saved. She was driven
insane by her husband's long illness
and her own poor health. She re
fused to take medicine and would eat
RAILROAD TIME TABLE
NORTHERN PACIFIC.
In Effect Dee. », 1012.
Trains Arriving From £ast.
No. 1, North Coast limited.. 5:43p.m.
No. 8, N. P. Lxp 6 50 a, m.
No 5, Pac. Coast Exp........ 4:13p.m.
No. 7, Western Exp 7:30 a. m.
No. 9, Minn. Local 8:25 p.m.
No. 98, Staples Local 10:00 a.m.
Train* Arrlvlna From W»t.
No. 2, North Coast Limited. ,12:57 a. m.
No. 4, Atlantic Exp
No. 6, Twin City
Trains Going Eut.
No. 2, North Coast Limited.. 1:07a.m.
No. 4, Atlantic Exp t:45 p. m.
No. 6, Twin City Exp «:50a. m.
No. 8, Eastern Exp 10:50 p.m.
No. 94, Staples Local 1:20 p.m.
Trittns Going West.
No. 1 North Coast Limited.. 5:50p.m.
No. 3, N. P. Exp 8:57 a.m.
No. 5, Pac. Coast
Exp 4:17
Ipiitr
The most economical of all
Absolutely Pure
Royal Baking Powder is made from
pure grape cream of tartar, and is
the embodiment of all the excellence
possible to be attained in the high
est class baking powder.
Royal Baking Powder is more eco
nomical than any other leavening
agent, because of the superlative
quality and absolute wholesomeness
of the food it makes.
Mixtures made in imitation of genuine baking powders, but containing
alum, are frequently distributed from door to door, or advertised and
offered at a low price. Such are mixtures of unheakhftd ingredients.
In England, France, Germany and some sections of the United States
the sale of alum baking powder is prohibited by law. Alum is a cocn
sive mineral acid, and physicians condemn baking powders containing it.
Tho label upon baking
MORE THAN ONE WAY.
S:35
powtfsra
mhow the Ingredients*
READ THE LABEL
p. m.
Exp 8:35
a. m.
No. 8, Eastern Exp. 10:30 p.m.
No. 118, Fargo-S.-W. 7:00 p.m.
No. 114, Caeselton Branch... 6:15p.m.
No. 180, Leeds Branch 7:30 p.m.
p.m.
No. 7, Western Exp 1:50 a.m.
No. Ill, Fargo-S.-W.. 8:40a.m.
No. 118, Casselton Branch.. .10:05 a. m.
No. 11#, Jamestown Local... 6:05p.m.
GREAT NORTHERN.
In Effect Jan. 5, 1813.
East Bound Trains.
No. 2, Oriental Limited 12:46 a.m.
•No. 181, Moor head Northern. 6:30 a.m.
•No. 14, via Breckenridge.... 7:46 a.m.
No 12, via Fergus Falls 7:55 a.m.
No! 10, via Breckenridge 10:00 p.m.
No. 80, via St. Cloud 11:20 p.m.
West Bound Trains.
No. 9, G. F.-Winnipeg 4:50 a.m.
No. 29, G. F. fast train 8:10 a.m.
•No. 198, Aneta Branch...... 8:46a.m.
No. Ul, G. F. Local 2:40 p.m.
No. 1, Oriental Limited 6:16
p.m.
Trains Arriving.
(Tie up for the night.)
•No. 200, Aneta Branch...... S:05 p. m.
No. 11, St. Paul-Fargo local.. 5.-60 p. m.
•No 13, Fargo via Breck.... 8:20 p.m.
•No.' 130, Fargo-Crookston.. 9:30 p.m.
•Except Sunday.
CHICAGO, MILWAUKEE A ST* PAUL.
Trains Arriving From East.
No. 408 12:30 p.m.
Mixed train 5:45
p.m.
Trains Going Eaat.
No. 408 7:10 p.m.
Mixed train 7:00 a.m.
ARCHITECTS.
HANCOCK BROS.. ARCHITECTS, OF
flees Douglas Building. 113 Broad
way, Fargo.
ACCOUNTANT.
WALTER THOMSON—EXPERT AC
count
ant. Phone 393. 113# Third
avenue South, Fargo. N. D.
ATTORNEYS).
FRANCIS X. K1RSCH. LAW
Collections, Warwick. N. D.
AND
BEAUTY PARLOUS.
ItELINS CHIROPODY PARLORS.
Superfluous hair removed, electrio
scalp treatment, massage and mani
curing. 105 Broadway, Phoa® JOS.
DJKJST1STS.
DR. J. B. FBL^i^T'l iii, DENTIST, OF
flee Huntington Block, over Bijou.
Entrance on Broadway, Fargo, N, D.
physicians.
I |R P. H. BUK'i'UN, OFFICE HOURa
10 to 12 a. m., 2 to 6 and 8 to
9
p. m.
Office: Stern Building. Fnone 1/3-L
Fargso, N. D.
DR. J. O. DILLON, HOMEOPATHIC
Physician. deLendrecie Block.
iR& F. H. BAlLKlt at K.ACHJS
macher. (Specialists, eye, ear, ma,
and throat. Ortice hours: 9 to
iz nn
1 30 to 6. Oliicos in Stern Block.
DRS. DARROW St WfiUBLE, deL&ND
recle Biock. OiUce hours trurn 3 to 6
p. m. ______
PRS. WILLIAM a NICHOLS
Arthur A. Nlchola, Physicians acd
Burgeon, 60S Front Street.
DR. J. L. SAVAGE, PHYSICIAN AJND
Surgeon, 608 Front Utreat
J. W. VIDAL, M. D.. HOMEOPATH I
Physician and Surgeon. Eldwari
Block, Fargo, N. D.
PIANO TUNKIl A!SO TEACH mt
PROF. WM. KLIMMEK, 714 NlN,
Avenue
South.
Master tuning A&d tw
pairing Phone 1341-1*
mmat
nothing but ice. Finally the medf*
cine was administered in a frozen
condition. Her health began to Ink*
prove and her sanity returned.
1 /r
It is rumored that the dog biscuit 1
Paterson woman fed her guests wan
not dog biscuits at all. They were
simply her first attempt, and she hit
on that excuse to hide her failure as
a biscuit maker.
MOTHER CRAY'S
SWEET POWDERS
FOR CHILDREN,
Hoi Wf
fw i'-
v ertfth n
i on*! ipation, II it
Nt«mnrh Trooblen,
I i o tl e *,
r. -i
O rntrov
-m. T! f? Ureal*, itp ('nlis
v in x'i ourp. At all
Pont accept mailod FRFK. A11r«t»
•ny substitute. A. S. OLMSTED. LeRoy. N.%
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
DR. A. P. JOHNSON
E N I S
Licensed to practice dentistry la
Maryland April 8, 1897.
Licensed to practice dentistry In
Minnesota April 15, 1898.
Licensed to practice dentistry la
North Dakota Nov. 10, 1897. (Li
cense No. 173.)
Graduate of high standing (class
of 1897) of the Baltimore College of
Dental Surgery. This is the oldest
and is today the highest recognized
dental college in the world.
19
Office, TOT N. Broadway.
MS. BALL & GRAVES
DENTISTS
Over lat
Nat. Bank.
Pboae 318-L.
otflce hours: 9 to
13
and
3
to 6.
Office closed Saturday after&oons
nd Sundays.
DK. J. W. CAMPSULLL.
Specialist
RTB. KAU. Nosu and THRO AX
BdwnrOe
Bnlldlna Fargo, H1X
II. blndiauD, M. D.
•llMbetlk Klndlaub, 38. Dl
Martin P. Rlodlaob. g. Ok
t)RS. RINDLAUB, Special!*
EVE. EAK. NOSIC AND TBKOAT
deLeodrecle Elk., opp. N. P. Dseot,
Fargo, North Dakota.
Dr. Sten Hanson Osteopath
Graduate under founder ef
Osteopathy
Pioneer Life Bulldlif
DR. H. O. FJELDE
'Ul n-irj. Vv.VWfr
OBSTETRICS. f]
Office, 1© Broadway.
Residence,
Phone
1020
2027.
Tblrd
Ave.
SoutlfeN
Madame Harris Goodman
Foot Ailments Treated. Facial
Blemlshe* llemovpd. Itoom 0, KeS.
nedy Block. Phone 2284.
Miss Imopne Nichols
Graduate I('m'jj:o Conservatory.
Solicits a limited number
I
of
pupils In piano Instruction.
Address .163 Seventh Ave. Sonth.
Telephone 270.
.lon'M
iJTLt*! Jell
Inflamed tl
antl hoaSs the raw places. Don't
delay! Wow la thettiue to
get Kondon's. Sold
16,0001 druggists everywhere. SJ5c Rnd 60c Baai
t»ry tutKjg. Sample FKKb, from 110
now
teaftclis, ft! 'i?i w,
HUitlH

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