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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, March 03, 1914, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1914-03-03/ed-1/seq-3/

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EMPLOYED BOYS'
TEAM SCHEDULES
The schedules of games and contests
in the Employed Boys' classes follows.
The basketball schedule Is: y
March 3 to April 7, Panthers vs.
Lynx Lions vs. Wild Cats Tigers vs.
Leopards. 1
March 10 to April 14, Lions vs. Lynx
"Wild Cats vs. Leopards Panthers vs.
Tigers.
March 17 to April 21, Leopards vs.
Panthers Lynx vs. Wild Cats Lions vs.
Tigers.
March 24 to April 28, Wild Cats vs.
Panthers Lynx vs. Tigers Lions vs.
Leopards.
March 31 to May 5, Tigers vs. Wild
Cats Panthers vs. Lions Lions vs.
Leopards.
The relay race schedule is:
March 6 to April 10, Indian clubs,
knapsack and basketball.
March 13 and April 17^ dumb bell,
track and bear.
March 20 to April 24, wheelbarrow,
crawfish and track.
March 27 to May 1, knapsack, dumb
bell and basketball.
April 3 to May 8, crawfish, bear and
track.
CHALLENGE TO N.
DAKOTA WRESTLERS
Nel's Moe of Plentywood, Mont., for
merly a local man, announces that he
desires to arrange matches with any
wrestler of light heavyweight class in
state. He particularly desires a match
with Henry McGurren, who at present
claims to be state champion at this
weight. Those desiring to correspond
with Moe may address him at Cook's
gymnasium ir» Minneapolis.
Mr. Moe it fo meet A. W.-Sullivan
of Christine, in a match in that town
on March 14. He agrees to throw Sul
livan three times in twenty minutes,
and the fans of Christine and the sur
rounding towns will see a warm con
test. Following the wrestling match,
the two men will meet in a ten round
boxing exhibition.
On March 9 Mr. Moe wrestles A1
Francis in St. Paul. He met Tom
Etiand three years ago, and in the
match Moe's leg was broken. Moe has
been trying since to arrange another
match with Etiand, but so far has been
\insuccessful. Etiand wrestled Chris
Pearson at Pago on Dec. 22.
Your
is
t,
VW~tfV ^r,-r
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mime
"Always Ready (or Company"
A bright, clean, glossy stove is the joy
and pride of every housekeeper. But it
is hard to keep a stove nice and shiny—
unless Black Silk Stove Polish is used.
Here is the reason: Black Silk Stove
Polish sticks right to the iron. It doesn't
rub off or dust off. Its shine lasts four
times longer than the shine of any other
polish. You only need to polish one
fourth as often, yet your stove will be
cleaner, brighter and better looking than
it has been since you first bought it. Use
'r on your parlor stove, kitchen stove or cas stove
(Set a can from your hardware or stove dealer.
If you do not find it
belter
ttovepolish ever made."
than any other stove
poliwh you have ev:r used before., your dealer is
authorized to refund your money. But we fee!
sure you will agree with the thousands of other
»ip-to-date women who are now uslcgr Black
Silk Stova Polish and who say it is tho
best
OR PASTE
ONE QUALITY
Be sure to get the eemiine. Black Silk Stove
Polish costs you no mors than tho ordinary kind.
Keep vour grates, registers, fenders and stove
nines bright and free from rusting by using
BLACK SILK AIR-DRYING ENAMEL. Brush
tore witbeach can of enamel only.
-.i Use BL ACK SSLK METAL POLISH for silver
ware, EickSOnwarc'or brassT It works quickly.
easily, and leaves a brilliant surface. It bas.nc
equal for use on automobilea.
Black Silk Stove Polish Works
^Ptw -^'•ff"^^-'
L*C/
*%. y.V Yyjv x* !•.--.%
It's the Ford age—the age of de
pendable and economical trans
portation. More than four "hun
dred and twenty thousand Fords
in world-wide service have chang
ed distance from a matter of
miles to a matter of minutes.
Buy your Ford-today.
Five hundred dollars is tho price of the
I'ord runabont the touring car Im Ave fifty
the town car seven fifty f. o. b. Detroit,
complete with equipment. Get catalog and
particulars from Ford Motor Co.» 209 N. P.
Ave.
wi.,ne^r.-^-o..(^.
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NORTHERN LEAGUE
GETTING IN SHAPE
Minneapolis, Mar. 3,—The selection
by Pres. John Burmeister of Bill Car
ney aa an umpire and the announce
ment of the managerial choice /or Su
perior has disposed of the prelimin
arics^and the Northern league is being
rapidly whipped into shape for the 1914
season. The loop, greatly changed as
compared with 1913, is alive with en
thusiasm over the prospects for the
coming season.
Following are the managers of the
clubs:
Duluth, Darby O'Brien
Winona, Lefty Davis Superior, Jack
Landry Grand Forks, Eddie Wheeler
Winnipeg, Fred Curtis Fargo, Bob
Unglaub Fort William, Art Lizzette
Virginia, "Kid" Taylor.
President Burmeister has selected
Claude Elliott, Bill Carney. Spike
bhannon and Tim Flood as nis staff
or umpires. Represented in the list
of managers and umpires are a group
of old heads who should lend strength
to the wheel during the coming season.
The staff of arbiters has been selected
with
great care and the four men arc
qualified to handle the indicator.
All th© clubs have signed a large
nujnber of youngsters. Several im
portant deals have beftj. closed or are
?®S°tiated which will bring into
the fold this year men who played
in the Three I, Central association,
Wisconsin-Illinois and other north
western leagues. The recruits will rep
resent a strong factor in building up
the teams in 1914, for it is evident
tnat the managers propose to have the
organization meet its mission in de
veloping players.
aiwS situation in Winona is unique.
All the members of last year's cham
pion team are still holdouts with the
o^ep}l°„n ?f Outfielder Collins, who
signed. d,uring the week.
WHITE EARTHHAN WON
BIG WppG MATCH
a
Whttfe mtth, N. D., March 3—
In the
finish match between Carl Hanson of
White Earth and Carl Anderson, the
latter won first fall in twenty-five
minutes, fifteen seconds with head
scissor and double bar. Hanson won
the next two falls, the second in thir
teen minutes with a foot, scissor and
V^
thircl fal1 in
s
Lovaas ...
eight minutes
and fifty-two seconds with toe hold.
It was the best match ever stagen
here, Anderson being thought by manv
vL£e J«h»son "The Terrible
viking of the Pacific coast under an
assumed name. Regardless of who ho
might be prestige is due Hanson for
showing championship form and win
ning the match. The match was re
foreed by Chris Person, light-weight
champion of the northwest, who in ex
pressing his view, declared it to be a
splendid contest of wrestling ability
with Hanson's herculean strength pre
dominating. Terson and Hannson will
wrestle a handicap match here..in. the
near future.
THE PRATEBNAt liEAGUE.
Games Total Pins
Modern Brotherhood ..24
Mootee ....24
Maccabees .' 24
Fraternal Union ......24
18,91 1
18,621!
.17,014
17,430
Individual Average!.
hoi zcr' '.'..'
Peterson'
Kdlund ...
Anderson
Kldrldge
Finn
Johnson....
Thayer.. *.
10. Smith
Arnold ...
Olson ....
Hies .....
Martinson
Wilson
Quamm *.
C. Ward
H. Ward
W. Smith
Wick man
Breklce .*
Westphal
Stevenson
Dougherty
Anderson
Thomaier
Gingery,
Kraby ,,
Gam«s Pins v' Ave.
.... 9 1675- 180
....21 3B32 168
....24 4030. .168
•....18 3012" 167
....14 2309 161
....21 3370 160
wi..22 3508-• 159
....12 1908 159
....24 3792 15S
..'..24 3752 156
'....11 1720 150
.14 2153 153
....23 3506
1
152
.V.. 5 756 151
.21 3164 150
....23 3449 14D
y.24
/...21
3599 149
y.24
/...21 3122 148
3 426 145
....18 2616 145
....21 3043 145
•....13 1766 135
..«-.81 2830- 134
.... 9 1190 133
.V.. 4 531 132
i... 6 785 130
....12 1653 130
.... 8 1036 128
NtiSTORS TAKE THREE.
^The Hestors ran away with the Me
trppole team last night, taking three
games straight. The first was close,
e o e w o w e e w o n y a s a e a
gin. The bowling of the Nestor boys
mmm&tmmsmmm&ssiis
ROW
COLLAR
CLUETT PEABODY G'CO.TROYN.Y
ft
W
was of the championship variety, aver
aging 200 or better for tho evening,
Ncstora,
204
v.:.iv.-^.190
198
Beuarfa
Pipe ..
Johnson
Merrill
Smith .• *172
v~
Handicap .'.V... .. 1
11
jjil
1
1
s i
IP
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I
Mttropole,
cole Wr .............171
Kiiehl'-.'i .1*9
Glesta .. 213
Arnold .........
.198
Eldridge ..165
Handicap .«.... 20
C. A. Alexander
H. T.: Alsop
L. E. Goodwin .,
Total 665 1175
LIEUT. J. C. PORTE, WHO
WILL FLY OVER ATLANTIC
j'Mfi FABGO -FOaWM AND DAii/f EEPtrfLICAN, TTO5DAY EVffifcrC, MARCH 3, 19'H.
204
277
176
117
137
,1
222
1S2
172
221
211
1
223
Total .988 1081 1009
159
1S2
225
187
180
20
Total .. 96G
!l 1
127
iao
202
150
195
20
884
~953
i HI SIM^S ?II:N\S I,I agi I
The Giraffes and the Lions took a
game each on the "Y" alleys yesterday.
The Tigers are in the lead in this
'league, with the Moose crawling up,
the Giraffes In third place, and the
Lions roaring at the bottom of the
heap.*'- '.'••}
I .. Tlgera,
C. P4ge'*-. ... .168 178 336
A. L. Dern 125 155 280
P. L. Godwin ........124 160 284
C. T. Foster ........ll'i 99 213
Total ^..... 521
Giraffes.
P. Bunce .....
692 113
k,
175 159 334
136 127 263
166 170 326
143 109 252
K
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.Lieut. J. C. Porte has come to
the United States to help build the
great airship of Rodman Wana
maker in which an attempt will be
made to fly across the Atlantic
ocean. The lieutenant will be ono
of the pilots if the start, Is ever
made.
"There ia no doubt.in my mind
that we shall be successful," said
he. "If wo did not feel sure of
making it, we would not attempt
the trip. Nothing is to be left to
chance, and every detail will be
carefully figured out before the
start.
"In making the flight I count on
my observations more than any
thing else. The idea of leaving
anything to guesswork does not
appeal to me. The use of ordinary
instruments in taking observations
will not be feasible, owing to the
altitude, and we are planning a
specially designed sextant, which
will render the use of the horizon
unnecessary."
Guy Bates Post Makes Omar
Khayyan a Lover of AH Mankind
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•c'WJ^rary circles in New York have
become greatly interested In Guy
Bates Post's remarkable presentation
of Omar Khayyam. While he has
made the old Persian something like
every one expected* he would, ho has
brought out a new element, He ac
centuates Omar Khayyam's charity as
the keynote of his character.
"I think of Qjnar as a philosopher
and a scientist, a man with twentieth
century ideas living in thw eleventh
century," said Mr. Post, "but ho ap
peals to me most because he, like
Abou Ben Ad hem,, loved his fellow
men. He had a great big human heart
that enabled him to look over the nar
row prejudices of race and creed to be
a 'lover' in the big sense. But thity
conception does not prevent him from
•being tho hero in the beautiful love
play which Richard Walton Tully has
written.
"As the man of worldwide sympa
thies, Omar protects a. christian knight
Who flees into his garden because that
same christian knight is loved by his
daughter. Omar submits to torture in
the great judgment hall so as to dis
tract attention while the knight es
capee. Later, when Omar has been
saved, and ax humble Bedouin slave
creeps back to him, wounded to death,
because he 'helped the christian- to
steal away, Omar kneels beside the
"i"
KOSSICK WINS EASY BOUT
Leo Kossick, tho local boxing cham
pion, took an easy victory from Roy
Cougell last night in Billings, Mont., In
a ten round fight. Kossielt showed hts
superiority from tho start, but, though
he waded into Cougell fiercely in the
last part of the bout, ho was unable to
land a knockout. ./
N. D. WAS WELL
REPRESENTED AT THE
NATIONAL CORN SHOW
Continued From Page One.
their national exposition to the satis
faction of all concerned. The expens
es of two demonstrators from ea*:h
state were borne by the exposition.
North Dakota's exhibit was in
charge of O. W. Dynes, associate pro
fessor of agronomy at the state agri
cultural college, and W. R. Porter,
superintendent of the state demonstra
tion farms. The exhibit was one of the
most attractive on the grounds. Two
notable features of the exhibit inter
ested all visitors to the booth. One
was a twenty-four-foot suspension
bridge built entirely of North Dakota
corn bearing the inscription: "Corn
Bridge Leads to Future Prosperity for
North Dakota." A train of cars pulled
by a locomotive and loaded with corn
is featured running over the bridge
into a tunnel. This bridge was design
er! and built by John Fryberger of La
Moure for LaMourc county. The other
feature was the college seal, made of
North Dakota grains and designed by
Prof. E. S. Keene. The seal is Eix feet
square and has upon its face a repre
sentation of an anvil and a plow, sur
mounted by a rising sun. Across tho
face of the seal appears the motto:
"Practice With Science." The seal
typifies industrial education. Its strik
ing beauty attracted crowds to the
North Dakota booth.
The corn bridge and the corn exhibit
v, as a sufficient answer to the question
to the oft repeated exclamation of the
visitors: "Why, I didn't know North
Dakota grew any corn!" An exhiibt
of primitive types of corn as grown by
the Indians along the Missouri created
much interest. According to reliable
chronicles the Mandan Indians when
Lewi.s and Clark visited them over 100
years ago, jvere growing nine separate
varieties of corn and probably knew
more about com breeding than many
white farmers of today Prof. E. G.
Montgomery of Cornell university, one
of the foremost authorities on corn in
America, stated that it was one of the
most interesting collections he had
ever seen. Arranged in ten ear lots,
were samples of .the standard varieties
of the state. The importance of corn
to a proper system of agricultural
practice for North Dakota was proper
ly emphasized.
In 1912 North Dakota ranked first In
the production of wheat, first in flax,
third in barley and fourth in oats.
Cereal investigations have always
been an important line of work on the
North Dakota Experiment station and
some of the projects were illustrated
and explained. The product of thai
crossing of wheat types was shown in
mounted panels. The work of the
Dickinson substation on alfalfa breed
ing was also shown by means of dia
grams and charts.
A milling and baking test of North
Dakota wheats was a feature that was
of particular interest to the women
Bread made from the several standard
wheats displayed the comparison in
color, size and quality of loaf.
The valuable work accomplished by
the North Dakota demonstration
farms during the seven years they
have been in operation was thorough
ly diagrammed and explained by a
series of elaborate charts. The rela
tion of moisture and yields, cost of
production, total income and typical
rotations adapted to TTorth Dakota
conditions weTe displayed In such a
way that they could be easily inter
preted by the average person.
North Dakota's showing in the com
petitive classes of grasses, grains and
corpse and offers a prayer, which I
have heard called the greatest dra
matic speech of the past fifty years.
It is: „.
"Oh, Thou great Jehovah, God of
Abraham and Moses, with my face to
ward Mecca and a christian cross in
my hand, I ask if Thou are there.
Have mercy upon this poor boy who
comes to Thee after a life of faithful
service and love. 'For greater love*
hath no man than this, that he glveth
his life for a friend.'
"Of such noble spirit was Omar. Is
it any wonder that I am proud of the
opportunity to portray the character?
Ono thing that endears me especially
is that Omar, while loving his fellow
men beyond the pale, did not forget at
the same time to love the woman be
side him who had given everything for
him. Perhaps the sweetest moment in
the play is when he draws her to him
reverently and says, 'Smile, mother,
smile!' She looks up at him and
smiles. He murmurs, 'Ah! There is a
tomorrow, a happy tomorrow, for us,
and then another" and another unto the
end.'
"Omar is one of the gentlest and
sweetest, and one of-the-biggest men
of history. If I have helped to make)
him a little better understood I am
very glad, and very humble, because
Dlavuoff Omar m^kes me
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Do you think you can
do as well elsewhere on
You can't
Just compare our prices with any
store in town.
Man's $5.00 O'Donnell
:-!ioes, now
n'fl $4.50 shoes, f?j|
Arthur News.
Arthur, N. D., March 1.—To The
Forum: Miss Anna Hansen returned
to her school duties Monday after an
absence of a week, caused by the death
of her brother.
Dr. Campbell returned Thursday
from a business trip to McHenry
county.
Miss Linda Viestenz is spending a
few days at the Lumvall home.
Miss Myrtle Farnahm is teaching at
Pelican, N. D.
Mesdames See, Farnahm and Bay
ard spent Sunday visiting in Fargo at
the homo of their brother, J. A. Bur
gum.
A number from here attended the
funeral of Mrs. Theodore Priewe. The
services were held March 2, at their
home.
Mr. Rutterfleld is spending a few
days in Minneapolis. During his ab
sence Dr. Campbell has charge of the
drug store.
Miss Lena Schur returned from a
Had Serious Lung
Trouble—Now Well
SUff* rers from Lung Trouble arc oft
en misled in the belief that nothing
will save them! Rest, fresh air, whole
some food and regularity in habits do
much in aiding to restore health, but
something else is needed. Many people
who have taken Eckman's Alterative
have testified that it was this medicine
which restored them to health. Read
thiB:—
PMSI
.tleflli
n's $4.00 shoes, f5|
now |Ks S
«n's $3*50' shoes, ill BL gj?.
ii'-w
Men's $2.50 shoes,
Hoys' $2.50 shoes, "yCf!
vutys' $2.25 shoes,
)!"W
Remember, every pair of these
.shoes are all new spring stook, and
every pair fully guaranteed.
1.4H
forage crops in competition with all of
the other states was very encouraging.
Her winnings in the seed sheaf alfalfa
classes were especially noteworthy.
Three of her farmers, John Christian
son of New Salem, Kurtz brothers of
Hazelton, and Chas. Roberts of Dalt
son, carried off all of the prizes in this
class. This is vory signiiicant in that
it. shows North Dakota has a climatic
and soil adaptation for the production
of seed alfalfa surpassed by no other
state in the union.
Weldon, 111.
"Gentlemen: Through your instru
mentality I have be«n saved from a
premature grave. On December 14, 1004,
I was taken with Typhoid Pneumonia
which developed into Lung Trouble. In
February, 1905, I went to Fort Worth,
Texas, and later to Canon City, Colora
do. After being thero two weeks my
physician infoz-med mo that my case
was hopeless. Three weeks later I re
turned home, weighing 103 pounds, the
doctor having given me no assurance
of reaching there alive. On July 14,
1905, I began taking Kckman's wonder
ful remedy for Lung Trouble. Today I
weigh 158 pounds. I am stout and
well and can do any kind of work about
my grain elevator."
(Affidavit) ARTHUR WEBB.
(Above abbreviated moro an re
quest.)
Eckman's Alterative has been proven
by many years' test to be most effica
cious for severe Throat and Lung Affec
tions, Bronchitis, Bronchial Asthma,
Stubborn Colds and in upbuilding the
system. Contains no narcotics, poisons
or habit-forming drugs. Sold by all
leading druggists. Write the Eckman
Laboratory, Philadelphia, Pa., for
booklet telling of recoveries and addi
tional evidence. —Advt.
4
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A record shipment oi
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iftin liitiiifrinfrnii M'U1
31 Pll
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Our great closing out sale of all fall and winter cloth-
mg, shoes and furnishings will positively close on Saturday, March 14. This is our
last announcement and we give everybody fair warning. The wide-awake man has
been here and profited, and gone on his way rejoicing.
If you let this golden opportunity escape you its your own fault not ours. If
you come in for a look you will buy—rejoice at your bargains and wonder why you
didn't come before. Here is a chance you don't get every day. Yes sir, it's now
up to you, for this great closing out sale will positively end on Saturday. March 14.
Are you going to miss it?
Notice: We have received several thousand dollars of our new spring stock of
lothing, shoes, hats and furnishings, and these also will be included in this sale for
the remaining few days.
Take a look at These Prices
Men's 10c canvas gloves,
now
Men's 15c gauntlet gloves, f8|
now & Hi
Men's 25c leather faced
gloves, now
Men's $1.25 spring union
suits, now
Men's $5.00 all wool
union suits, now
Men's $2.00 fancy shirts,
now
Men's 50c work shirts,
now
Men's $1.00 union made
overalls, now
Men's 35c wool socks,
now
Men's 15c railroad
socks, 2 pairs for
Men's $2.00 pants,
now
Men's $2.50 pants,
now
Men's $3.00 pants,
now
Men's 50c underwear,
now
IQ
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All mail orders promptly and carefully filled and sent by express or parcel post
prepaid on all orders of $5.00 or over.
502 Front Street, Fareo. N. D.
few months' visit in Montana with her
neice, Mrs. Rundel. Miss Schur is now
visiting relatives and friends in Ar
thur, N. D.
The Arthur Sunday school will give
a program at the M. E. church Wed
nesday, March 4. Miss Vosberg has
charge of the program. The Arthur
band will also add to the entertain
ment. The program will begin at 8
o'clock. Supper will be served in the
basement. Cor. A.
Pettibone News.
Pcttibone, N. D., March 2.—To The
Forum: H. H. McCumber and family
returned from Jamestown Saturday.
Miss Marjorie McCumber, who has
been in the hospital at Jamestown the
past nine weeks, returned home Satur
day,
The last three days of February
took the snow away cxcept very few
drifts. March came in rather cold
with a slight fall of snow last night.
Mrs. Carl Lydeen went to Fergus
niece, Mrs. Rundel. Miss Schur is now
relatives and friends.
Lydeen & Scehaver shipped a car
load of hogs Saturday.
The R. M. Brock sale held last Mon
day was not a success, most of the
stuff being bid in.
The dance held Wednesday night at
the George Snell home, southeast of
town, was well attended and all. pres
ent report a very good time until an
early morning hour.
John Adams and sisters, Jennie and
Jessie, of Marstonmoor, spent Sunday
at tho home of their brother, A. W.
Adams.
F. S. Adams of Marstonmoor was a
passenger from Jamestown Friday.
Leon St. Jacques was an east, bound
passenger Wednesday, returning Sat
urday.
Mi-s. A. W. Adams has been on the
sick list the past few days.
Mrs. J. H, Gambs was on the sick
list the fore part of the week.
The Ladies' Aid gavo a farewell
party far Mrs. R. M. Brock Saturday
afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ennis were
passengers to Jamestown Monday.
Mr. Ennis returned Thursday and his
wife expects to be back today.
Editor Hicks vacated Peerless Pct'
tibone and Mrs. Safford is now look
ing for another printer. Cor. P.
Willie's Confession.
Pearson's Weekly: Little1 Willie had
been very naughty. So much so, in
fact, that after having reproved him
several times his mother was at last
forced to severely punish him.
When his father arrived homo in tho
evening he at once perceived that
Willie's eyes were suspiciously red.
"What's the matter, sonny?" ho
cried.
"Oh, nothing," recponded Willie, un
easily.
"Come, don't be frightened," said
the father, In coaxing tones. "Tell me
all about it want to know."
Willie remained silent for some time,
then ho suddenly burst out:
"Well, if you must know. I've had
a thundering row with your wife."
0 ill
Buy Your
Easter Suit New
and save from $5.00 to $10.00
Just received a full line of blue
serge suits in the very latest styles,
which we will include in this
sal
Men's $20.00 and $22.50 blue kct^
suits, flj |B ES
now
Men's $25.00 blue »jl |P| jm
serge suits, now
Men's all woo! union fJE
mado suits, now
Men's $15.00 all wool gr
suits, now isCPelB
NEW SPRING HATS
Men's $2.00 and $2.50
shades and colors,
now
Men's $3.00 hats,
now
Men's $5.00 John B.
Stetson hats, now .....
AND CAPS
hats in all
I
tf&Wb
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2.S9
A WORD TO POLITICIANS. I
j)
New York World: Not in a person
al sense, but as a general rule of con
duct is President Wilson's remark at
Philadelphia to be considered—"If you
think too much about being re-clected
it is very difficult to be worth re-elect
ing."
To the practical politician this will
sound like hereey. He has small re
spect for the president who fails to
strengthen himself with his party, to
keep his ear to the ground and to court
popular favor for himself and his po
litical followers.
Mr. Wilson has In mind something
wholly different. He holds the presi
dency to be an opportunity for service
to tho people, not an avenue to popu
larity and self-promotion. His ideal is
that of an official whose acts aro gov
erned not by ambition and lovo of ap
plause, but by loyalty to his principles
and steadfast devotion to the public
interests.
It is the conception of a man who is
master of himself, not the slave of the
ever fickle and capricious multitude
who studies not how to make votes,
but to make his ofRcc and the govern
ment worthy of confidence in the eyes
of the people.
218 Broadway
(KING OF THEM ALL)
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
"Our Mutual Girl"
u. Z)
i j'-to-the-minute fashion, ma
t"'rlal and newest styles—all
rIt'i fashionable fallacies brought
-ether in a fascinating lov^
!'ry.
"Ilie Dancer"
SIrons emotional drama In two
reels, featuring
MARGUKRITE SNOW
"Little
cars oi Gordou ilftts direct iron the Goi'doa Factors in the iiabt to the new 9 story Gordon
Building in St. Paul. The biggest shipment of the best hat on earth to supply the Gordon Hat wearers of the Northwest,
Billie's
rollicking Keystone kid
comedy. \,d
QUALITY AND COMFORT
Admission
Adult# 10c Children 5c
$
ft v.*
if
u

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