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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, April 28, 1914, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1914-04-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE WEATHER'
Mostly cloudy tonight and Wednes
day probably rain or snow not much
change in temperature.
Funsten
Cruz w i
Vera Cruz, April 28,—The trans-
Erigade,
orts bringing the "Fighting Fifth*"
comprising the Fourth,
Seventh, Nineteenth and Twenty
eighth infantry regiments, under
General Funston, niado fast to the
docks shortly before 10 a, m.
General Funston, accompanied
by Capt. Harry JL,
p-.
Huse* chief-
of-staff of Rear Admiral Fletcher,
immediately came ashore to con
fer with Fletcher before calling en
Admiral Badger, the commander
of the Atlantic fleet.
Washington, April 28.—An official
dispatch to the war department, dated
.escue
I
I
FF
iiis
A
Washington, D. C„ Ajpril 28.—
lAdmiral Mayo reported that Admiral
Cradock of the British cruiser
Hermione had dispatched Major Clark
and a dispatchment. of British royal
marines forty miles inland from
Tampico to rescue eight Americans
at Orange Hill. They are expected to
return tonight. The Hermione sent
thirteen refugees aboard the Des
Moines.
Admiral Badger reported it would
be inadvisable to send an American
ship to the Yucatan district, "as It
might start anti-American demonstra
tions." In regard to reports from
Tampico that American citizens there
were indignant because of the de
parture of American battleships from
the river, Secretary Daniels said his
action was taken after Admiral Cra
dock had informed Mayo that he
Mediation Plan Is
Washington, April 28. "The con
sensus of opinion in Latin-America,"
said a statement from The Pan-Am
erican Union here last night, "seems
to be that the action of Argentina,
Brazil and Chile in offering to mediate
is in many respects the most signifi
cant and far-reaching even in the
'history of the American republics
since the declaration of the Monroe
doctrine, and it is hoped that the press
and people of the United States will
try to curb the rising war spirit and
'give the mediating nations strong
moral support in their efforts for
peace."
While Secretary Bryan and govern
ment officials expressed a disinclina
tion to discuss the mediation plan dur
ing its present stage, they said it had
not reached the point of actual "pro
posals." The American 'government
simply has formally expressed its wil
lingness to listen to any plan of inter
mediation which the representatives
of Argentina, Brazil and Chile may
formulate.
The attitude of the administration
has long been established that the
elimination of Huerta was an essen-
Arvold's Id
F*
Gheorge Creel, writer of national
note, writing in Collier's, says:
Now comes Hiawatha's Land of the
Dacotahs with a brand new remedy for
the deadly dullness that drives young
people out of the rural communities
into the cities, leaving farms untitled
and an even greater social stagnancy.
"A Little Country Theatre" has been
established in connection with the
State Agricultural college at Fargo,
N. D., and if the experiment succeeds
every village hall, district school and
farm house parlor may become a lab
oratory for the development of interest
and happiness.
colics*., has several hundred
J£t
'•A
erican
kg Every
'•V*? ..
at \^a
UCTJL,W££$?'"
Takes Co
•Washington, April 28.—Spanish Minister Rtano, In charge of
the affairs of Mexico in the United States, informed Bryan that
Huerta had unconditionally accepted the principle of mediation as
involved in the proposal of the governments of Brazil, Argentine and
Chile.
The envoys of Brazil, Argentine and Chile, whose good offices
were formally accepted by both the United States and Huerta, to
compose the crisis in Mexico, resumed their sessions at the Argen
tine legation, under circumstances which gave them much en
couragement.
With the acceptance of both governments before them In
definite shape, the three envoys occupy a semi-mediatory attitude
almost in a nature of an international tribunal, considering the at
titude and desires of each side and seeking to find some middle
ground on which both could stand.
The sessions are in private, surrounded by every safeguard
against a premature discussion of the plans. It Is known, however,
that the chief effort today was to try to perfect plans on which
they have been working ever since their tender of good offices
was made. This plan will be laid before the two governments at
the earliest possible moment. The sessions are expected to be con
tinuous throughout the day and night.
The White House declined to make any statement as to what
proposals the United States would submit as a basis for mediation.
It was announced that nothing would be said that might in any
way embarrass the mediators. At a regular cabinet meeting, the
formulation of the American proposals was the subject of discus
sion.
Vera Cruz and received at 11 a. m.,
stated that General Funston and his
American troops had arrived, and were
preparing to land.
Secretary Garrison insisted that the
mediation proposals could not affect
the orders to General Funston from
the war department. Funston's in
structions were to land his forces im
mediately upon arrival and assume
supreme control of the land forces.
Admiral Fletcher will return to his
flagship, the Florida, withdrawing all
of the bluejackets. That pant of the
marines now ashore at Vera Cruz has
been detached from the navy and now
becomes part of Funston's forces.
would undertake to receive Americans
from Tampico aboard the Hermione
and transfer them to the Des Moines
upon the American battleships takins
a position at sea. This arrangement
It was thought, Daniels said would
make anti-American demonstrations
less likely
"I will go and bring the refugees
to you" the British admiral
W
IB
re­
ported to have said to Mayo.
The gunboats Vicksburg at Puget
"Sound and the Machias and Marietta
at the New York navy yard were
placed in commission yesterday. They
will all be rushed into Mexican waters,
In pursuance of the navy department's
plans to utilize as many small ves
sels as possible In protecting Ameri
cans and foreigners in the shallow
Mexican ports where battleships can
not enter.
tial to any final settlement of the
Mexican problem. This view was
reiterated as recently as Saturday at
the White House, when senators and
representatives were consulted as to
the proposal of good offices.
In consular dispatches to the state
department and in reports from the
naval commanders in Mexican waters,
yesterday and today came reassuring
messages as to American refugees.
Arrangement were completed for get
ting all Americans out of Mexico, and
Rear Admiral Badger, from Vera Cruz,
reported arrangements for train serv
ice on either side of the broken rail
road between Mexico City and Vera
Cruz. Refugees were reported safe at
Tampico, Puerto Mexico and other
east coast points, with arrangements
under way to get them to Galveston
and Admiral Howard on the west
coast reported the monitor Cheyenne
on the way to San Diego with refugees
from Bnsenada.
Partial lists of Americans held at
Agnas. Calientes were forwarded by
Consul Canada at Vera Cruz, but he
Continued on Page Seven
V, "U k,.
students of both- sexes* and it is pro
posed that all of them shall be poured
into the jolly little dramatic crucible
during the course of the year, either
as actors, authors, stage hands, pro
ducers or choruses. There is no in
tent, however, to evolve the great
American drama or to uncover poten
tial Booths and Bernhardts. The sig
nificance of the "Little Country The
ater" is entirely sociological. All that
is desired is to have every young man
and woman "get the idea," so that
when they scatter at the end of the
term they can carry on the good work
Continued on Page Three^
SUPERINTENDENTS
AT DEVILS LAKE
Devils Lake, N. D., April 28.—With
the address of Hon. P. P. CJaxton,
United States commissioner of edu
cation, featuring the first day' pro
gram, the annual convention of North
Dakota county superintendents open
ed in Devils Lake today, with over
fifty educators in attendance. The
federal commissioner of education
speaks this evening and It is expect
ed the auditorium of the courthouse
will be Jammed to capacity as a re
sult of the interest manifest in the
event. Outside of the address by the
W1ashiritgton nam* the program this
evening is in charge of Devils Lake,
short addresses to be given by Pres.
A. L. Johnson of the city commission.
Pres. Jos. M. Kelly of the commercial
club. Prof. Y. G, Barn ell of the city
schools, Prof. J. W. Blattner of the
state school for the deaf and Rev. C.
L. Wallace. Gov. L. B. Hanna is on
the program Wednesday afternoon.
PRES
Cambridge, Mass., April 28.—"Let us
strive to have a little of the spirit that
fills the officers and men of the army,"
said President Lowell in addressing a
meeting of Harvard students called to
consider the Mexican situation last
night. "Regular soldiers," added Pres
ident Lowell, "do not hold torchlight
processions or make public demonstra
tions.
"Young men are all thinking of war
and of their duty to serve the country.
They would be unworthy if the call of
the bugle did not stir a longing to be
at the front and when war comes—
Harvard will send forth her full toll of
men as she has done before.
"We are told that we are not at war
with Mexico, and that we shall not be
Is by no means improbable. There is
at present no good ground for such a
war. The president has accepted the
good offices of the great South Ameri
can states. They will spare no effort
to secure terms which the United
States can honorably accept.
"These negotiations will take time
and in the meanwhile let us keep our
heads cool.
"If we were in danger of war with
a great power with our small regular
army, I should urge every young man
who could do so to set about prepar
ing himself for military service. To
be thoroughly effective, this ought to
be done long beforehand, and therefore
I have been deeply interested in the
plan for summer military camps which
will fit college men to serve as junior
officers, and thereby fill the greatest
need we should suffer in war on a
large scale. But, however large the
field of operations in Mexico may be
come. our country is in no peril.
"When an army is suddenly expand
ed, the most pressing need is for train
ed officers The nation maintains a
college for such officers, but I am not
aware that the government has yet
called to the flag the cadets at West
Point. It believes that it can render
a better service to their country by
completing their education, and I think
that until the call for volunteers
comes, the same is true of students in
college."
REFUGEES LA!
CALIF®
IN
San Diego, Cal„ April 28.—Following
is a list of the refugees brought here
last night from Ensenada, Lower
California, by the United States mon
itor Cheyenne:
Miss Adella Moorkens, David Stol
ter, A. Dunne and wife and four chil
dren G. E. Snyder and son, Carl Mrs.
Marie Pozz ^and child Consul C. E.
Guyant, wife and two children Mar
tha Ma, W. T. Neel and two sons N.
G. Sargent, wife and child W. F. Nel
son. C. M. Carr, C. H. King, L. Y.
Ketchum and wife L. P. Lawler, Mr.
and Mrs. Nfewtonhouse and two chil
dren Lenora. Carcia, A. Hebrecht, Vic
toria Marshall and son, Victor, jr. J.
Dubois, O. H. Vonsel and wife Alfred
Crosthwaite, M. Moffatt, E. W.
Tucker, wife and three children F, G.
Tucker, wife and two children C. B.
Valle, W. A. Roberts, David Smith, J.
H. Ely, F. H. Sawday, and wife E. A.
Sawday, Miss Anita Crosthwaite Miss
Sarah Crosthwaite J. H. Johnston,
Mrs. Susie Johnston, R. H. Benton and
wife A. L. Grainoff, Joseph Rogers.
Mrs. Anna Rogers, Max J. Webber,
wife and child: Maria Baltalaca, V# A.
Travis and wife L. E. Stelle, Mrs. M.
E. Bennett and daughter Mrs. C. M.
Carr and child, and Paula Salgalma.
STN
Dickinson, N. D., April 28.—Leslie
Simpson, former state senator, is out
in the open as a candidate for congreett
from the Third district.
Mr. Simpson opposes P. D. Norton
for the honor.
The fight this year will be decidedly
interesting, as in the last election, the
race between the two men was decided
by second choice votes, Simpson being
high on first choice, but losing on the
second choice votes.
Mr. Simpson is very well known
known throughout the state through
his long connection with political af
fairs.
Militia Drilling.
Minot, N. D., April 28.—The local
militia is drilling every night
an(*
accoutrements and equipment are be
ing carefully overhauled. The local
boys will all leave here with eager
ness, hardly a man expressing any de
sire to avoid active service. A call
is expected daily for mobilization at
Devils Lake.
AND DAILY REPUBLICANS
FORUM ESTABLISHED NOV. 17,1891. FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 28, 1914. REPUBLICAN ESTABLISHED SEPT. 5, 1878.
I NOW IN COMMAND
AT .VERA CRUZ.
I TT 7 7,
V,-. -K
m-
S€0|
K
Gen. Frederick Funston, who
won fame in the Spanish war, has
arrived at Vera Crur, and will
formally take comma rid of that
city, relirving Admiral Fletcher.
Funston has the famotis "Fighting
Fifth" brigade, composed mostly
of veterans who have been tested
under fire in many active engage
ments in the Philippines, to take
up the "white man's burden" with
him.
Funston and his Fighting Fifth
can be depended on to handle Un
cle Sam's affairs in a Sharp and
business-like manner.
a
V* i
IS. fWt
Washington, April 28.—Hearings on
the bill to repeal the free tolls pro
vision of the Panama canal act were
closed last night and the senate ca
nals committee today began consid
eration of a report to the senate.
The committee is said to be about
evenly divided for and against repeal.
Chairman Gorman thcugi^. 'he ex
ecutive deliberations might last tw&
days, but it seemed certain that a
majority will favor some sort of re
port so that the measure may be
brought before the senate the present
week.
Senator Simmons, one of the lead
ers in the fight for repeal, said the
committee might report the bill with
an amendment which would declare
in substance that the United States
waives no rights over the canal.
Others suggested that owing to the
division in the committee a report
without any recommendation whatever
could be looked for. In any case the
big fight on repeal will be made on
the senate floor, where the debate is
expected to last several weeks.
The hearings of the committee be
gan April 9 and continued without In
terruption until last night. Scores of
witnesses wore heard and many dif
ferent arguments, economic and legal,
were presented.
Joseph N. Teal of Portland, Ore., on
behalf of the Portland Chamber of
Commerce, and other Pacific .coast
trade organizations, protested before
the committee against the repeal, and
criticized severely the Taft. proclama
tion fixing tolls on the carrying ca
pacity of ships.
R. H. Phillips of Kensington, Md.,
expressed the opinion that the proper
Yankee way for the democrats to get
out of a bad hole the republicans had
placed them in was to exempt all
ships passing through the canal from
one coast of North or South America
to the other coast.
F. A. Jones, member of the Arizona
state corporation commission, said
that the inter-mountain country was
just as much interested in free tolls
as the Pacific coast. President Dod
son of the Pensaoola Chamber of
Commerce favored repeal of tolls ex
emption.
SAMUEL MARt¥n]
A VERA CRUZ VICTIM.
V A y S
'4JT
«r
V
Samuel Marten was Chicago's
contribution to the first day of
fighting with Mexico. He was
among the four killed when Capt.
W. iR. Rush of the battleship
lForida, landed marines to take
the city. The others were George
Poinsett of Philadelphia, Daniel
A. Haggerty of Cambridge, Mass.,
and John Schumacher of Brook
lyn,
ELLHMIE WILL HAVE
CHAUTAUQUA THIS YEAR
Ellendale. N. D., April 28.—Kllen
dale 1b to have a Chautauqua this
year in connection with the state
industrial and normal school. It will
begin June 30 and run through July
4. The events will be held in a large
tent and will be conducted in connec
tion with the summer school to be
held here for several counties in this
section'Of the state.
Washington, April 28. The two
federal generals and their commands,
who were driven back by the constitu
tionalists from the southern part of
the state of Nuevo Leon, are attempt
ing to cross the United States border
about thirty miles above Laredo,
Texas, according to a state depart
ment report. It is supposed that these
federals are part of the command
which dynamited Nuevo Laredo two
days ago when it was feared they
would destroy the international
bridge between the Mexican town and
Laredo, Texas.
1SSI0NARIES
IN
iXICO SAFE
New York, April 28.—John W.
Butler, the representative of the
board of foreign missions of the
Methodist Episcopal church in
Mexico City, with a number of
missionaries in his party, is be
ing prevented from departing to
Vera Cruz, according to a cable
gram received by The Christian
Advocate in this city.
The. cable was sent to Frederick
F. Wolfe and Raymond A. Car
hart, two of the missionaries who
contrived to get out of Mexico
City by taking advantage of
British protection. Last Satur
day after the two missionaries
had arrived in Vera Cruz, they
were joined by Dr. Butler's secre
tary, who, being a German, had
been allowed to leave Mexico City.
He said that Dr. Butler and his
(party were still being held, but
were unmolested and that the mis
sion property was still unharmed.
"On Friday," read the cable
gram, "many American business
places were severely damaged,
but there was much individual
sentiment friendly to Americans.
Various missionaries of other
churches are still in the city. The
authorities are trying to arrange
to bring Americans out. Ameri
cans are still refused passage by
the government."
New York, April 28.—That Metho
dist missionaries in Mexico are safe
was reported in a telegram received
here by the board of foreign missions
of the Methodist Episcopal church in
New York from Dr. J. W. Butler of
Mexico City. The telegram read: "All
well at Pachuca, Puebla and Guana
juato."
Orders have been telegraphed to Dr.
Butler for all missionaries to proceed
to Vera Cruz immediately. In a reply
just received Dr. Butler says: "Have
communicated with all our people.
Some en route now. We will leave on
the earliest possible train."
The Methodist Episcopal church sup
ports thirty American missionaries in
the Mexican republic, eighteen under
the general board and twelve under
the Woman's Foreign Missoinary so
ciety. The total valuation of Metho
dist property in Mexico is nearly
$1,000,0100. The church numbers 21,000
members.
A progressive work in Mexico Is also
carried on by the Methodist Episcopal
church, South, in cities and towns of
northwestern, central and border ter
ritory. This Is manned by a force of
thirty-nine American missoinaries.
The Presbyterian board of foreign
missions, in recommending caution to
its band of eighteen missionaries, wired
to the Rev. Charles C. Petran, Mexico
City: "In case of immediate danger
causing you to leave staation, cable ua
where you intend to go and in whose
care the property is left. Consult thej
American officials. We authorize you
to act according to your best judg
ment." Some time ago this board sent:
word to its workers in Mexico to leave
If there were any danger. They re
plied that they wished to stay at their
posts and that no danger seemed
imminent,
To its resident bishop at Guadala
jara, the Wight Rev. Henry D. Aves.
D.D., LL.D., the Protestant "Episcopal
board of missions cabled: "American
staff and Mexican church have our
deepest sympathy. You understand the
board will support you in taking all
necessarv precautions for safety of
Americans. You will know best wheth
er missionaries should withdraw. If
we can advise or help, please command
us." This board supports in tho Mexi
can republic a group of twenty-seven
foreign missoinaries.
The Baptist Home Missionary socie
ty, which has two Americans in Mex
ico, cabled to the clergyman in charge,
the Rev. Henry Brewster, Mexico City,
advising him to leave and saying that
funds had been deposited enabling him
to do so. From the other missionary,
located at Puebla, no word has been
received
The American board of commission
ers for foreign missions (Congrega
tional) has a force of twelve American
workers in the cities of Guadalajara,
Chiiiu&hua ajad Farral
iisurrecti
The Fargo Home Products dinner
will bo given this evening to tho retail
dealers of Fargo and Moorhead by tho
food manufacturers of the Fargo
Moorhead Manufacturers' association.
It is to be given at 7:30 o'clock at
the cafe of the Gardner hotel and will
be an elaborate and pretentious event
which everyone invited should, not fail
to attend.
Every dish served on the menu will
be a home j.roduct. It is the product,
of some one of Fargo's food manufac
turers. The event is in charge of E.
M. Wright of the Fargo Mill Co.. who
is chairman of the committee.
Tho speakers of the evening will be
Pres. Leslie Welter of the Moorhead
Commercial club and Pres. John S.
Watson of the Fargo Commercial club.
Pres. J. W McHose of the Fargo
Manufacturers' association will pre
side as toastmaster. The program will
i*:
i
Cm'istianla. 'JtpriU. 28/—"Thousands of
American visitors are expected here
during the summer to witness the cel
ebration of the centennial of the inde
pendence of Norway from Denmark.
The celebration will also commemor
ate 100 years of peace on the Scandi
navian peninsula.
An exhibition which will seek to
show the progress made in Norway
during the last century, will be opened
by King Haakon in Christiania on
May 15. Norse-Americans have been
invited to participate in the exhibition
and in the celebration generally. In a
special pavilion called "Norway
,Abroad"* the Norwegians who have
THIS ISSUE 19 PAGES
vernor
Troops to Quell War in
the Coal Strike District
WASHINGTON, APRIL 28.—PRESIDENT WILSON DECIDED
TO ORDER THE FEDERAL TROOPS TO COLORADO TO RE
STORE ORDER IN THE COAL STRIKE DISTRICT, WHERE VIR
TUAL CIVIL WAR EXISTS.
FOLLOWING THE ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE PRESIDENT'S
DECISION TO SEND FEDERAL TROOPS INTO THE COLORADO
STRIKE DISTRICT, THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE SENT A TELE
GRAM TO GOVERNOR AMNIONS AND REQUESTED THE STATE
LEGISLATURE, WHICH WILL BE CONVENED MAY 4, TO CON
SIDER THE WHOLE SITUATION. SO MEANS MAY BE PRO
V1DED FOR THE STATE TO REASSERT ITS AUTHORITY AND
LIMIT THE OPERATION OF THE FEDERAL TROOPS.
THE PRESIDENT ASKS THAT THE MILITIA BE WITH
DRAWN TEMPORARILY, WHILE THE FEDERAL TROOPS RE
STORE ORDER. A PROCLAMATION FROM THE PRESIDENT
IS BEING PREPARED FOR ANNOUNCEMENT.
SECRETARY GARRISON IS PREPARING AN ORDER FOR
TROOPS TO THE STRIKE DISTRICT. THE NUMBER OF
TROOPS TO BE SENT WILL NOT BE MADE KNOWN.
Denver, April 28.—A proclamation was issued by Governor Am.
morn to "all law abiding and peace lovinq citizenn" of Colorado, "to
give their moral and active support to tho effort to restore peace
in the strike districts." He called attention to the conditions which
the proclamation described as "a state of insurrection."
The proclamation said the state authorities had but one desire,
namely, "to restore peace and maintain order," and declared that un
til this was accomplished, "there can be no machinery .to .securo
justice in the courts."
The governor said the militia had been in the field nearly six
months and had no interest on either side in the outcome of the
strike. He cited th© fact that until he left Colorado for Washmnton
about ten days ago, "not a single person was killed by the militia
because of the strike and only two altogether—one by accident and
tho other a fugitive from justice."
The proclamation concludes:
"Tho peace officers throughout the state are urged to arrest and
hold for conspiracy every man caught collecting arms or ammuni
tion to ship to any part of tho state, calling for volunteers or or
ganizing companies of men to btt used against the constituted au
thorities of the state."
Boulder, Col., April 28,—Fighting between strikers and mine
guards, at the Hecla mine at Louisville, which began at 10:30 last
night, continued at 8:30 this morning. At that hour two mine guards
were wounded. No fatalities were reported.
A posse of Boulder citizens is being organized hy an under
sheriff in the district attorney's office, to go^to the relief of the be
sieged mine.
Sheriff Bi'stor, in an account of the fight, given by telephone,
said the strikers were using cabins and houses as protection frorri
which to direct a fire on the guards. For two hours iast night, ths
sheriff was caught between the two lines of fire and took refuge ill
a store building. Later, during a lull, the sheriff gained entrance to
the mine enclosure.
Women and children of the strikers have taken protection in
the cellars of their homes.
Sheriff
Buster reported he had ordered the machine guns not to
be used on account of the women and children. A brisk rifle and
revolver firo continues,
Walsenberg, Col., April 28.—Sheriff Carr reported Uk fighting
at the Walsen mine was growing more vigorous, with the fifty
members of the state militia, who arrived last night, outnumbered
ton to one by a band of arm^d strikers. The fighting continued all
Bight, but no further fatalities :iro reported.
Washington, April 28.—The president's {Irst caller today was
Senator Thomas, who discussed the Colorado strike situation. Fol
lowing Thomas's visit, the president and Secretary Garrison went
into conference to determine what would be done about tho request
from Oovernor Ammons for federal troops in the strike district.
Senator Thomas stated he believed troops should be ordered to the
scene of the industrial outbreak.
After talking with Secretary Garrison the president received a
report from Chairman Foster of the house mining committee on tho
lattcr's interview with John D. Roekfeller, jr., in New York yester
day. Foster said the Interview failed to relieve the situation. The
president declined action on the matter until it could be discussed at
a regular cabinet meeting.
GOffi E PRODUCTS
GIVEN
BY LOCAL
UFACTURERS TODAY
be as follows:
Toastmaster—J. W. McHose, presl-*
dent Fargo Manufacturers' associa
tion.
Two Communities That Have Grown
As One—Hosi Leslie Welter, president
Moorhead Commercial club.
The Retail Merchant's Relationship
to the Community—Hon. John S. Wat
son, president Fargo Commercial club.
Music by Stephens' orchestra.
March—Chesapeake Bay ... Botsford
Overture—Jolly Robbers ...... 'Suppe
Valse—June Baxter
Pansies Bendix
Selection—Robin Hood DeKovea
Spanish Sermade—LaPaioma .....
MEXICO CITY QUIET.
!Loncion, April 28.—-Mexico City is quiet according to a cablegram
received fnom the staff of a British commercial house there,
message said the employes were all safe.
Expecting'
to Welcome Thousands
e
Yradier
Intermezzo—Silver Star ..... Johnson
Spanish Dance Moskovvsky
Waltz—Spring, beautiful Spring ..,
Lincke
Selection—The Dollar Princess .. Fall
sought a horn* in Am»rle» will sliww|$
their home-staying countrymen th«$$f
life they lead in their adopted home.
The plans for the exhibition and fes«
tivities have met with great interest
and enthusiasm in the United States,
a substantial indication of which ife
the appropriation by North Dakot.i of,^
$10,000 for the expenses of the official^
participation of that state. Alfre|
Gabrielsen has arrived to take charg#$
of North Dakota's exhibit. Mlnnesot
and Wisconsin will also be adequately
represented, but in a less official wa?|^l
An interesting feature of the exhibit of|M
«lp.
if-
Continued on Page Threo,
,''1

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