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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, July 27, 1914, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1914-07-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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WRONG ADDRESS
FAMILY STRANDED
Grand Forks, N. D„ July 27.—Taken
to Michigan, N. D., when they wanted
to land some place In the state ol
Michigan, Alexander 3ergolitz and
family of JRfussia are stranded in this
city. Bergolitz, who can scarcely
speak English, claims that he told the
conductor on the train that he was
going to the state of Michigan and in
some way he was brought to this state.
He denies that he was sent for by his
brother-in-law in the wolverine state.
Bergolitz has a large family with
him. He has two sons fully grown
and six other children. The two older
sons are married and their wives are
Daily
Sleeping Car
SERVICE BETWEEN
Special train will be run from
Edgeley and Marion to Fargo and
return on that date. Convenient
Train Service from other points.
1
1
Fargo-Moorkead
and Aberdeen
lw Fargo 10:00 P.M.
Lv Moorhead 3 0:07 P.M.
Ar Aberdeen 7:05 A. M.
Secure tickets and additional
Information from
J. L. ROHAN, Agent
Phone 65
HEsrar*i
Panama -r,i iii--iut. rnational
Exposition Siiii Fraiit'luco, 1915
RINGLING BROS.
CIECUS
THIS YEAR at FARGO
July 29
J. E. Johnson, Agent,
Fargo
Northern Pacific Ry.
A. M. Cleland, G. P. A.,
St. Paul, Minn.
College of Saint Thomas
Under the Control and Direction of Archbishop Ireland
A CATHOLIC MILITARY COLLEGE
Collegiate Commercial Academic Preparatory
Careful Mental, Moral and Religious Training
Different* in fates accord'
ing to route selected east
of Chicago.
ISMI
I,
la t* i"
Mews of the Nortiiwest
also with the party. The youngest
child is aged 10 years.
It seems that Bergolitz had enough
money to get back to Grand Forks
from Michigan, but he unable to go
any further east owing to the lack of
funds.
He sent a telegram to his brother
in-law, but the latter sent .back word
that he was financially embarrassed
himself and could send no aid. The
answer seems to infer that the broth
er-in-law is not any too anxious to
have his relatives go to him.
The foreigners are now stopping
with Nablin Bros.,, 614 DeMers avenue.
In the old country Bergolitz and his
sons were farmers, and they are now
looking for jobs on farms hero,
WOMAN KILLED
BY LIGHTNING
Lankin, N. D., July 27.—While en
deavoring to get the cattle in out of
the rain, Mrs. Joe Vlcek, who resided
about ten miles west of here, was in
stantly killed Friday afternoon, when
she was struck by lightning. Mrs.
Vicek was alone when a bad electri
cal storm came up. and. realizing that
the cattle were out, she hurried to the
pasture to drive them in. When near
the barn, she was struck by a bolt of
lightning, which killed her instantly.
Mrs. Vicek was about 25 years old,
and was married a year ago.
GAS EXPLODED-TWO
WERE BADLY BURNED
Carrington, N. D., July 27.—W. E.
Ervin, proprietor of the cleaning and
pressing establishment in the Gale
house building, was badly burned in a
gas explosion in his place of business.
Jas. Williams, colored, who was ag
isting Mr. Ervin, received a worse
burn than did Mr. Ervin, the boy hav
ing a very deep burn on his left arm.
Mr. Ervins burns, while not deep, are
exceptionally painful,, and he is burn
ed on both arms, the left arm receiv
ing the brunt of the flames, and his
face is also quite severely burned. Mr.
Williams' burns do not cover so much
of his body, but his one burn is deeper
and will take longer to heal.
The men were at work cleaning with
gasoline and as the room is not very
well ventilated, the combustible gas
gathered and ignited from the flame
on the gas flat iron. In an instant the
small room was a mass of flames and
before the men could escape both were
quite badly burned. The builc*^ is a
brick structure, and the flames did~Fut
little damage to the building, although
there is a loss of about $100 on cloth
ing that was in the place being clean
ed. The fire alarm was sounded, but
onljj$|he chemical engine was used.
FACED CRUSHED IN WHEN
EVENER BROKE-DIED
Sherbrooke, N. D., July 27.—Charley
Lee, a young man who had been work
ing on the Fordet farm the past sea
son, met a terrible death. The young
man was bucking hay Onto a stack
with a three-horse team when the ev
ener broke and the end snapped back
with awful force, striking him in the
mouth and crushing the lower portion
of his face and jaws in a terrible man
ner. He was taken to the hospital at
Mayville by auto at once, but died
without regaining consciousness but
for a few minutes.
His home was in Wisconsin and his
death is made more sad because he
was to have been married this week.
His relatives were notified and his
father came to Mayville for the body.
SAINT PAUL, MINNESOTA
Six Hundred and Eighty Students from Eighteen States Registered'
Last Year. For illustrated catalogue address
Very Rev. H. MOYMilAS, D.
IX,
gMiiniiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiuDiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiigiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiEEiM
New Round Trip
Fares New York
EE You may purchase round trip tickets to New York
EE via
Chicago and North Western Line
SEE thence any rail route to New York, returning to S3
=E Chicago via
5
going trip.
Chicago and North
Western Line to
I A O
President
to Chicago, HE
different rail route than used on EE
From Minneapolis
and St. Paul
$52.00
$48.40
New York
and return
., The finest all-steel train of today
tLcfmrn
Boston and
return, one
way via
New York
$58.80
$57.40
$54.30
New York and return, going and returning same route
PjljprjrfA Lv. Minneapolis 7:55 p. xn. Ar. Milwaukee 7:45 a.m.
vJHICagU Lv. St. Paul. 8:40 p. m. Ar. Chicago 9:00 a. m.
Certain water trips are available In connection with these fares
Three Morning Trains to Chicago
Three Evening Trains to Chicago
For travel nformation and special pamphlet quoting
excursion fares call upon or address
E. A. WHITAKER, Trav. Passenger Agt., 8t. Paul
fSTERSON, Trav. Passenger Agt., St. Baql
TICKET OPFICESt
S96 Robert St., Si. Paul, Minn.
60ft Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis, Miaa.,
MacRAE, Pawen^r Agent, St Paul,
BOY'S LIFE CRUSHED OUT
BY A VICIOUS HORSE
Bottineau, N. D.. ,July 27, Willie
McKeen, aged 19, son of Charles Mc
Keen, was found lying in a side street
with his skull broken and his chest
crushed in. There is considerable
mystery connected with his death, but
it is believed he was the victim of a
vicious horse.
McKeen and a young lady drove to
Bottineau from their farm home to take
in a show. After the show a storm cama
up and while it was storming, McKeen
started out to get his rig which was
tied in front of the Patrons' exchange.
That was the last seen of him alive.
No alarm was felt when he did not
return as the storm proved to be
heavy and it was believed that he had
put up his horse and gone to a hotel
for shelter for the night. The girl
stayed with friends thinking that Mc
Keen had decided it was too stormy to
venture out. The next morning Mc
Keen's body was found and it was
then learned that the horse was vici
ous and when it was found it was
dragging Its tie rope, indicating that
the animal had made a break for
liberty, had knocked the young man
down and probably crushed his life
out by trampling on his chest.
HEAT BEGINNING TO BE
FEARED ON THE SLOPE
Medora, N. t., July 27.—Today was
the warmest of many hot days this
month, 105 in the shade. Very hot
wind, but slight showers in middle of
afternoon. Late sown grain and much
early sown cannot stand such con
tinued hot weather. No rain for three
weeks.
TEAM OF HORSES WERE
STOLEN NEAR KENMARE
Kenmare, N. D., July 27.—A black
team, gelding and mare, weighing 1300
pounds apiece, were stolen from Tom
Olson, who occupies the Bowman
farm, just across the lake from Ken
mare. The thieves took the team
some time during the night, leading
them from the stable, off toward the
ceetery, where the tracks were lost.
No trace of the animals has been
found up until The Journal Is being
printed Thursday afternoon, although
the authorities are making every ef
fort to apprehend them.
SARLES DISTRICT
HAS HAIL STORM
Sarles. N. D., July 27.—The Sarles,
Calvin and Clyde farming districts
were visited hy a lucky hail storm,
which did no damage. Shortly after
noon, a hail storm broke over this dis
trict, and traveled to Calvin and
Sarles. The hail stones were about
the size of peas, and fell straight
down. The storm was unaccompan
ied by wind. As far as can "be learned
no damage was done.
YOUNG MAN WAS DROWNED
WHILE TAKING A SWIM
Mark Lovett of LaMoure was
drowned in the James river while tak
ing a swim. It seems that his father
and mother had Just arrived from
Iowa and were visiting their sons,
who are in business in LaMoure and
Berlin. This young man desired to
take a dip, being a good swimmer. He
swam across the river once and start
ed to cross the second time. But it
seems as if he got some water in his
lungs and he began to struggle for
life. R. G. Drlpps, the hardware man
from Berlin, went to assist him and
brought him back nearly to the shore
when Lovett slipped from his grasp
and sank to rise no more until his
body was recovered. It was thought
he died suddenly before sinking ow
ing to breast action.
NO CHANGE IN
TAX SCHEDULES
Bismarck, N, D., July 27.—The state
board of equalization meets in this
city on Tuesday, Aug. 4. It is much
changing of schedules, as this matter
has been pretty well sifted out. The
railroads and other large corporations
have been pretty well satisfied with
their treatment, and seem to be will
ing to let well enough alone. The av
erage land valution of the state was
placed around 18 per cent last year,
and it is believed that this will be
somewhere near the figure necessary
this year.
IS ACQUITTED
OF GRAIN THEFT
Minot, N. D„ July 27.—The jury in
sss I the case of Ernest Ferris, charged
SSS with stealing wheat in the vicinity of
Des Lacs last winter, brought in a
SSS verdict of not guilty, having been out
exactly twenty-four hours.
The case went to the jury in district
court yesterday morning at 11:30
o'clock and the jurors have be£v in
continuous session since. Ferris is
said to have already served a term in
tiie state penitentiary on the tame
charge.
ENJOYED VI8IT.
Carl and Tom Amoth Have Returned
From Trip to Norway.
Lahgdon, N. D., July 27.—Carl and
Tom Amoth have returned from a very
pleasant three months' stay in Nor
way. They found the whole land do
ing their utmost to heartily welcome
home their sons and daughters from
America. Not only the big cities but
the entire country held a feast in hon
or of the moved-out Norway, who re
turned this year for the big celebra
tion. After an absence of twenty-six
years they found the welfare of the
country to have taken great strides
forward. The "big waterfalls have
been harnessed, furnishing electric
lights and power throughout the land
to farm population as well as towns.
The utilizing of the water power has
caused large industries to spring up
which furnish work for thousands of
people, and this in turn has raised the
«l' I't
*HE FARGO FORUM AND DAILY KEPTTRLKTATT, MONDAY EVENING, JULY 27, 1914.
farms, although small, compared to
what we are accustomed to, are very
carefully farmed, bringing the largest
yields possible. The country presents
a very thrifty appearance throughout,
all buildings, orchards, etc., being kept
exceedingly neat. The populace are
clad in modern clothes, have plenty to
eat and money to spend. A high wage
is paid the laboring men for their
work compared to twenty-six years
baok. The country is covered with a
network of railroads, which bring
country and cities nearer together,
aiding travel and transportation of
products.
CHECK PROTECTOR SELLER
CHECK MANIPULATOR
Mandan, N. D., July 37.—J. W. Mpr
rison of New York city, sojourned
here a little while and now his place
is vacant. So are a few pocketbooks.
Morrison was agent for the New
Era check protector and pencil sharp
ener, simple little devices for which
he claimed to have the sole agency in
this section and a few of which he
sold in Mandan during his several
days' stay here two weeks ago.
He stopped at the Inter-Ocean and
just before he left had Manager Mc
Quillan cash a check for $17. He was
not seen afterward and both the mon
ey for the check and the week's board
bill are what the pleasure of Mr. Mor
rison's company cost Mr. McQuillan.
A warrant has been sworn out but
the authorities entertain little hope of
locating the! man, as there is every
reason to suspect that he made his
living more
oft
of the checks he could
cash than off of the check protectors
he could sell. Consequently he very
likely took particular pains to cover
up his tracks out of this city.
Morrison is a medium sized fellow
with gray clothes and light soft hat,
neat in appearance, smooth faced and
smooth tongued, although very plaus
ible and congenial appearing. It is be
lieved he went west from here.
BOTTLE OF ALCOHOL
EXPLODED-MAN INJURED
New Rockford, N. D., July 27.—
While in the act of generating the
gasoline lights in the Stitzel pool hall
Harley Hartson received burns that
very nearly cost him his life.
As he was pouring wood alcohol
onto the generator which was not suf
ficiently warm, the alcohol caught fire
and went into the bottle he was hold
ing in his hand, which was about half
full. It immediately exploded and shot
alcohol over his clothes and head. He
was immediately a mass of flames but,
owing to the presence of mind of some
of the witnesses, he was covered with
coats and towels and the fire extin
guished. Dr. MacKenzie was sum
moned as quickly as possible and
dressed the burns.
It Is not possible at fhis time to as
certain just how badly he is burned.
His eyesight is no doubt not affected,
as a short time after the acicdent he
was handed a mirror and said he could
see himself, but not very clearly.
Crystal Notes.
crystal, N. D., July 24.—To The
Forum: Mr. and Mrs. Grant Fuller
arrived from Manitoba last week on
their way to their home at Orange,
Cal.
Arthur Waldo arrived from Minne
apolis and has been visiting his moth
er the past ten days.
The Crystal baseball team are giv
ing a bowery' dance in Crystal park
Friday evening. The Cavalier orches
tra will furnish the music.
Last Friday the people of Crystal
received a large surprise when James
Dewar and Miss Lillian Hunter, both
of this place, quietly slipped off to
Cavalier by auto and were married
there. Mr. and Mrs. Dewar are now
on their honeymoon but are expected
home this week.
Mrs. Andrew Widme returned Sat
urday from the Deaconess hospital at
Grafton, where she underwent an op
eration some time ago.
Julian Kline is visiting friends In
Minneapolis this week.
Mrs. Todd of Grand Forks arrived
Monday and is now the guest of Mr.
and Mrs. W. J. O'Sullivan.
Daniel O'Sullivan and sister Mar
garet visited friends at St, Thomas
last Friday.
Robert Woodg of Hoople was a bus
iness visitor in Crystal and vicinity
Friday.
Those farmers who raised rye this
year are now harvesting the crop,
which, in spite of the very dry weath
er, is very good. Cor. C.
l|
iik
Spend Your Vacation Xn
Yellowstone
k
THIS
YEAR
SEASON 1914
Joae 15 to September IS
No where else in all the world is
there a place so rich in natural
phenomena. Pulltnan Standard
Sleeping Cars daily direct to
Gardiner Gateway
This is the natural and logical jouie
to and through the Yellowstone. You
see it all—the painted terraces and
bison at "Mammoth the paint pota
end geysers, in regular order Yellow
stone Lake, a mile and a half above
the sea the Grand Canyon, the climax
of the tour. Through regular Train
Service daily, with Pullmans direct to
the Park boundary and North Pacific
Coast Points.
Bend for illustrated literature.
A.M. CUland, G. P. A., St Paul, Mm.
or call end see
J. f.
MM
Johnson
Agent,
Fargo
ranoMo-Paeific International Expositiom
Smn Frtncisco,
9emam«-Califiwnia Exposition
San 'y ,£-. If
EARTHLY WEALTH
HLllfiY Bf-IES
m.
in n i
Ion and Bsnsyoism Integral
i Parts ef Righteousness.
GOD'S BLESSINGS IMPARTIAL
Oura the Wealthiest Period of Hlotory*
But Faith and Godliness Are on the
Deoline—-Qreat Inorease of Selfish
naea—An Integral Pert ef ^in—Les
son to the Church of Chrlat—A Qood
Foundation Against tha Time to
Come—Changed Conditions Under
the Messianio Kingdom—Removal of
the 8tony Heart—Substitution ef
Heart of Flesh—Rloh In CHaraoter
Llkenees to Our Heavenly Fathers
(p-y§YWF%: wi
II
i
S J*
Clf
f[^ofW5slS
The speaker then asked a series of
questions such as appeal to all thought
ful persons. Are we as a race, he In
quired. growing rich toward God? Is
not the very reverse true? Are not
faith and godliness on the decline? Is
it not true that within the last fifty
years the love of money, which the
Apostle declares is
Ma
•^v*. T-
1
1"*', v'
July 28.—Reports
from more than
one hundred cities
indicate great pub
lic appreciation of
4
E O O
DRAMA OF CRB
TION. This noble
effort to turn at
tention back to the
Word of God to
having the desired
e£ect wherever It
is exhibited. No
one can see it
without having his heart irresistibly
drawn toward the Giver of every good
and perfect gift, who so loved the
world as to give "His Only Begotten
Son. that whosoever believeth in Him
might not-perish, but- have everlasting
life."
Today Pastor Russell preached from
the text, "So is be that layeth np treas
ure for himself, and is not rich toward
God.
"-Luke 12:21.
The Pastor began his discourse with
the declaration that ours is the day of
Wealth. Nothing to compare with it
has ever been known in the world's
history. Not merely have we discover
ed rich deposits of gold, silver and
precious stones not merely are these
being mined in a provident and suc
cessful manner, with which nothing in
the past could compare but additional
ly the world is growing richer in every
conceivable way.
This statement was illustrated by
reference to the growth of our cities
in size and beauty, in sanitary conve
niences, In spacious parks, in good,
paved streets and boulevards and to
our industries, which are multiplying
machinery perfected within the last
fifty years and turning out products of
convenience and value. These add
greatly to the world's comfort and ma
terial wealth, and are not merely per
ishable articles such as clothing and
bcica-brac, but substantial edifices,
etc. Vast libraries, both public and
private, are being acquired. Many for
mer luxuries are becoming almost ne
cessities, because of the facility with
which they are produced. All these
things, and many others, constitute
riches, one glance at which would
amuse our ancestors.
root of all evil,"
has intensified? Is it not trve that
financial greed has become so strong
as to make necessary Pure-food Laws
for the protection of the lives of the
people—because life and health .were
In jeopardy?
Attention was then called to the
fact thut, although we are better
housed, better fed and better clothed
than were our forefathers, yet there is
a general condition of unrest, due to
trust in riches. Deepite all our mod
ern safeguards of police and detective
systems, despite our telegraph, tele
phone, etc., hnman lives and prop
erty are still in peril because of the
hanger for wealth everywhere prev
alent.
"Whose 8haH These Things Bet"
The Pastor next discussed the para
ble from which his text is taken. In
It our Lord pictures a man whose
lines were fallen in pleasant places.
The smiling swn and the genial show
ers prospered his undertakings, and his
wealth grew apace. To him came op
portunities for helping friends, neigh
bors and relatives less favored—oppor
tunities for turning his material wealth
to good account in the cultivation of
the generous traits of his nature and
thus for developing more and more the
Divine character for God scatters His
blessings of sunshine and shower upon
both the evil and the good.
But instead of growing richer In
character through the cultivation of
noble qualities, this rich man permit
ted selfishness to dominate him. He
pulled down his barns in order to build
greater ones. Instead of dispensing
the wealth which Divine providence
permitted to flow into his lap, be ac
cumulated more. Many, alas! today
are following bis example. Tbese say
to themselves, "I will accumulate
wealth, end then will say to my soul,
You have plenty 'eat, drink and be
merry.' Think not particularly of your
less favored brethren and neighbors,
nor of the hopelessly poor live for your
self." Thus in the parable the faster
has drawn a picture of practically ev
ery man in the world, some of whom
ars veaily doing these things, and oth-
Contlnued On Page Nine.
IT MAKES A DIFFERENCE
'Yesterday my breast was aching
And the clouds hung dark above
Yesterday my heart' was breaking**
Not for unrequited love.
Yesterday I feared the morrow
And the ills that it would bring
Yesterday I sat in sorrow.
Now I'm pleased with everything.
Yesterday the world was gloomy.
But it's beautiful today
Things are looking rosy to me—
I'm to have a raise of pay.
K'fiMT-11 Tnilasi
Vl-.-.
v
1
1
9/
The word "psychological" has been
sadly overworked of late, but every
one will observe just the same that
the president's statement comes at a
"psychological moment." Business is
improving. "The corner seems to have
turned at last," cheerfully reports the
Iron Age this week concerning. the
steel industry. Steel mills are short
ening teh summer shutdowns in order
to get busy on the new orders now
pouring in. The big crops are vitaliz
ing the business world. But capital
needs confidence. At just this mo
ment the president, hitherto regarded
I
Indigestion,
€IR
•, ,,y*
I'M'-, Jii V*1
1 v
IPeit
The Largest Sale
6RCM£Sf
AERIAUSIS
ij
«$J ^L -C *r A, n ., ...^x*.. ...V
,"
Yob
Waif Sometlikg
Particular^ Nice—
provides
NOT "ENEMIES OF
You can always depend upon K not
disappoint you. The double raise makes
doubly certain—nothing is left to "luck." If the
batter is a little thin, K will raise it light and
feathery and it will be all the better. Jarring the
stove or turning the pan around makes no differ
ence—K sustains the raise until bakejp1
When there's a birthday. or wedding cake
ake, or refreshments for reception or party
chances—
Use K
65
-Q
BIQ BUSINESS
Editorial in the Springfield Repub
lican: The politics of the president's
public statement on the "Warburg
Jones incident will not escape atten
tion. Skilful political use of the af
fair has been made by Mr. Wilson in
minimizing the impression that he is
not a friend of legitimate business in
terests. To this extent, at least, the
senate opponents of the nominations
of Messrs. Warburg and Jones as
members of the federal reserve board
have played into the president's hands
by creating an opportunity for him to
seize. He promptly rushes to the de
fense of the senate—an amusing stroke
in its ironical embellishment—against
the charge that it is "an enemy of
business, big or little," "It (the sen
ate) knows that the business of the
country has been chiefly promoted in
recent years by enterprises organized
on a great scale and that the vast ma
jority of the men connected with what
we have come to call big business are
honest, incorruptible and patriotic."
And more of that sort pegged on the
estimate, the capable, the patriotic
Messrs. Warburg and Jones.
vdi
'"r
it were difficult to find a safe and reliable remedy for the
ailments due to irregular or defective action of the stomach,
liver or bowels. These ailments are likely to attack
anyone likely, too, to lead to worse sickness
of
The Only 6ig&ircus
Fargo
to
ISii
s
HOHU
A STUPENDOUS
J'H'llp
I!1 W'li
+£v
1 fV
rH"
as unsympathetic with business enter
prise on a large scale, champions a
director of the International Harvester
company and a partner of a leading
New York banking house as wholly
worthy of public confidence in posts
of great financial responsibility under
the government, "It is the obvious
business of statesmanship at this turn
ing point in our development to rec
ognize ability and character wherever
it is displayed, and unite every force
for the upbuilding of legitimate busi
ness along the new lines which are
now clearly indicated for the future."
It was well said. At the same time,
the high crime of inconsistency can
not be made to point a fresh accusa
tion. Mr. Wilson has never attacked
big business because it wa8 big. Big
to the conception of all the great po
buslnesa becomes a menace, according
Utical parties and their leaders, only
when it breeds private monopoly. Who
cares how big an industrial corpora
tion is If it does not control an in
dustry with monopolistic purpose, or
have the pwer to control an industry
with such a purpose? This is the crux
of the situation, although those who so
bitterly complain against the "war" on
business conveniently ignore the real
Issue. The mere fact that the presi
dent can make such a statement as
yesterdaj''s without a particle of in
consistency reminds one of what is su
perficial and what is fundamental in
the controversies over law enforce
ment and new legislation In matters of
the business world.
The Lateat.
Kansas City Journal: "Now an auto
mobile has been introduced which plays
tunes."
"MOTS expense. I suppose next any
man who pretends to be in the swim
will have to' own a grand opera ear, a
light opera runabout and something
sedate for Sundays."
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Any Medic
:ino irt lit* WarkL
Sold everywhere. In
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This Year
I.
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it
i
EPIC
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WONggRS
6REATESTCIRCUS EVENT
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BALKAN
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DOWNTOWN TICKET OFFICE—FOUT & PQRTERFIELD DRUG
CO, NO. 61 BROADWAY. Same Prioes as Charged at Grounds.

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