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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, September 25, 1914, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1914-09-25/ed-1/seq-8/

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GROWERS
The college is getting into full swing
*rlth splendid classes, and promise of
Still greater classes when some more
Of the old students return who have
Written that pressing duties at home
-Will make them late.
Judge A. G. Burr, of Rugby, gave a
brilliant convocation address Sunday
morning to a crowded house. His
theme was Inspiration for Youth, ana
he held his audiem-e in a spell as ho
reviewed the remarkable achievements
of man and the still greater possibili
ties of the present and future. He gavis
a second address at chapel Monday
morning on Preparation, and the inter
est he has elicited has caused the
board to place him on the permanent
list of annual lectures. The other
lecturers for the year are Judge S.
Ellsworth, formerly of the supreme
bench. Judge J. Hemmi, and Judge
John Knauf, president of the state bar
association.
Friday night was the annual recep
tion to new students by the Y. M. C.
BIG EATERS GET
KIDNEY TROUBLE
#HE
When your kidneys feel like lumps or
lead your back hurts or the urine is
cloudy, full of sediment or you are
Obliged to seek relief two or three times
during the night: if you suffer with
headache or dizzy, nervous spoils, acid
•tomach, or you have rheumatism when
the weather Is bad, get from your
pharmacist about four ounces of Jad
Salts take a tablespoonful in a glass
of water before breakfast for a few
days and your kidneys will then act
Bne. This famous salts is made from
the acid of grapes and lemon juice,
combined with lithia, and has been us
ed for generations to flush and stimu
late clogged kidneys to neutralize the
acids in the urine so it no longer Is
a source of irritation, thus ending
bladder disorders.
Jad Salts is inexpensive cannot in
jure, makes a delightful effervescent
Lithia-water beverage, and belongs in
every home, because nobody can make
mistake by having a good kidney
Hushing any time.—Advt.
"TTT.r
General Selling Agents*
'71'^/.
A"
1(
&
THE PEOPLE OF FARGO AND MOORHEAD
AWT! CORDIALLY INVITED TO INSPECT
THE NORTHWEST'S MOST MODERN
GREENHOUSES, WHICH WE HAVE ERECT
ED TO KEEP PACE WITH THE EVER-IN
CREASING PATRONAGE OF THE FLO
LOVERS OF THIS COMMUNITY.
IT IS A PLEASURE TO ANNOUNCE THAT
THIS SPLENDID ADDITION TO OUR FACIL
ITIES WILL ENABLE US TO RENDER IM
PROVED SERVICE IN EVERY BRANCH OF
THE FLORAL ART.
STORE 68 BROADWAY.
GREENHOUSES, 5 SOUTH TERRACE.
AND RETAILERS OF THE FIN­
EST FLOWERS AND PLANTS-CREATORS
OF FLORAL DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS
MEMBERS FLORISTS TELEGRAPH DELIV
ERY ASSOCIATION.
Quality Value Service
Jamestown College Notes
8ALT8 AT FIRST SIGN OF
§fi#LADDER IRRITATION OR BACK*
£ACHE.
ti'
vThe American men and women must
ward constantly aginst Kidney trouble,
because we eat too much and all our
food is rich. Our blood is filled with
uric acid which the kidneys strive to
filter out, they weaken from overwork,
become sluggish the ellminatlve tis
sues clog and the result is kidney
trouble, bladder weakness and a gen
eral decline in health.
A new thoroughly tested, guaranteed, absolutely independent electric
syatem for lighting and power on farm, in the village or for the town.
We can give you a modern home on your farm at comparatively llt
tie cost. Hundreds saw this electric system in operation at the N. D.
State Fair at Fargo, and were convinced of its value and practicability!
A o o i A o y U e W o w n o o o k i n o u u o n
request.
A. and Y. W. C. A., in the Sanford hall.
The building was beautifully decorated
and refreshments were served. Games
for acquaintanceship were played and
a jolly good time was had. Mrs. Col
burn, the new teacher of voice sui£
some delightful solos, .he txpresslon
of appreciation for her singing was ex
ceptionaJ as she 1b the finest artist the
college has had.
The college library has just received
another gift of books from the splendid
library of the late Wm, Moore, the
former superintendent of schools of
Bismarck. This makes the second gift
from that library. They make a fine
addition.
Professor Blizzard has brought with
him from his vacation, a large number
of special plates illustrating the work
in biology. These and the new balopti
eon will be greatly appreciated by the
students.
The first autumn party was given by
Dean F. B. Taylor to the members of
the faculty In the Hall grove on the
river Tuesday evening. Lunch was
had and a launch ride up the river.
The dean is a splendid host.
Prof. Wm. B. Thomas reports a
splendid vacation studying field geo
logy in southern Minnesota where the
formations are especially interesting.
Tt added more than knowledge, it re
newed his vigor and health.
President Kroeze took Professors
Griner, Blizzard, Chamberlln and Col
burn out hunting in the college auio
Saturday, and they report sixteen
ducks and seven chickens, and tired
bodies.
John Fraser, of the class of '13, is
teaching in the department of human
physiology in the Iowa State Agricul
tural college at Ames. Charles Geake,
class '13, Is teaching in Regina at a
salary of $140 per month. Miss Anna
Wanner *14 is assistant principal of the
Oakes high Bchool Edna L'Moore, '14,
is teaching Latin and German in the
Cavalier high school Inez Atwood, '14,
is teaching music and drawing in the
schools of Sanborn Jennie McPher
son, '14, is teaching science in the New
Rockford high Bchool Emma Kribbs,
'14, is teaching as principal in the Wil
low City high school R. L. Colvln, '14,
is preaching at Adrian and taking
graduate work in college Eleanor Rig
gin, '14, is clerk in Mlnnewaukan
county court.
Over twenty-five boys responded to
the call for football practice and they
are going through hard training for
the first game on Saturday with the
Valley City squad. Next Saturday they
will play the state agricultural college
team on the local Allan Athetic field.
Coach Dougan hopes to whip a strong
team into shape by that time, a lot
of new men are trying for first team.
A Possible Parade.
Springfield Republican: Wall street
at any moment coxa Id get up a parade
of unemployed bookkeepers, brokers'
clerks and even brokers themselves.
The I. W. W. may yet organize them.
FOR STATE NEWS READ THE FORUM
&
.'.1 i
tip,ivi
i
'••"i k'.1,m
Fargo, N. D.
J.
1
FOR U. S. SENATE
(By
demomratic state central com­
mittee.)
WEB
ma*.
i wi 36:
i#s
William E. PunMll.
William "E. Purcell, who represented
North Dakota in the United States
senate from February, 1910, to Febru
ary, 1911, by appointment of former
Governor Burke, is the democratic
party's nominee for that exalted posi
tion this November.
In the person of the Wahpeton
statesman is offered to the voters of
North Dakota a man who is alive to
the needs and requirements of its peo
ple, a close student of national affairs
and one, who by virtue of his political
affiliations and personal acquaintance
with President Wilson, would perhaps
be able to secure considerable for his
state at this time when his party is in
power.
It was at the general upheavel of the
BaJllnger land scandals in Alaska, that
Senator Purcell made his advent into
national affairs. Though a member of
the minority side of the house, the new
North Dakota senator made his pres
ence so keenly felt in the upper house
of congress within a few days after he
took his seat, that he was appointed to
an Important post on the joint congres
sional commission, which investigated
the charges against Secretary of the
Interior Ballinger of the Taft cabinet.
Tho Wahpeton statesman's uncom
promising position on the Ballinger
question commanded national atten
tion. The balance of his career in the
senate was watched with interest and
it was generally noted with keen re
gret by the press of the country that
he so soon retired from service.
In his well known editorial, Mr.
Hapgood has said, under the caption
of "Paynter and Balllnger."
"The downfall of Paynter through
proof of his borrowing from the Lori
mer bank recalls another episode In
his career. When the Pinchot-Bal
linger case was beginning to attract
attention. It was quietly agreed by the
congressional junta, then in absolute
control, to have a nice whitewashing
investigation, and the members of the
Investigating committee were virtually
appointed before the resolution re
quiring the investigation was adopted,
and Paynter was one of the minority
members from the senate. But the
house unexpectedly rebelled and won
its first victory over the Cannon re
gime by agreeing that the majority
and minority in caucus should elect
their own representatives on the in
vestigating committee. The demo
crats chose as one of their representa
tives Ollie James, whereat there arose
an unavailing howl of protest. James
was Senator Pavnter's rival for the
senatorial nomination in Kentucky.
"Paynter sat with the committee
several times, found himself incapable
of carrying out his part of the pro
gram and resigned. The same day
Senator Purcell of North Dakota took
his seat by appointment of the gov
ernor, and was asked to take the place
Paynter had given up. Purcell proved
himself a master in cross-examina
tion, and it was largely due to him
and Ollie James and Representative
Graham of the house, that the facts
were brought out which eventually
caused Secretary Ballingor's resigna
tion and started the movement which
resulted in President Taft's securing
eight electoral votes in the following
presidential contest in 1912. Now Ol
lie James sits in Paynter's seat in the
United States senate, and Purcell is
a candidate for the United States sen
ate from North Dakota."
Senator Purcell needs small Intro
duction to the people of North Dakota
He has helped to build it and make
It what it is. In Richland county and
the city of Wahpeton he has lived for
more than thirty-two years. During
this time he has practiced law and
farmed extensively. He ought to know
something of the needs of the North
Dakota farmers when he has been for
years farming over 2,000 acres him
self.
His earlier political record in this
state 1b enviable. He was a member
of the constitutional convention. He
served In the state senate for many
years where he was one qf its most
efficient members. Later he was ap
pointed United States senator by
former Governor Burke to fill the va
cancy caused by the death of the late
Senator Johnson. He served one year
until the following session of the state
legislature. He is therefore totally
familiar with the duties of a senator.
Mr. Purcell was a delegate from this
state to the new famous democratic
convention at Baltimore in 1912 which
nominated Woodrow Wilson, with
whom he has been personally acquaint
ed for more than fifteen years. He
approves the Wilson administration in
every instance and if elected will give
the president and the administration's
policies his earnest, hearty, and con
scientious support.
A SIMPLE WAY TO
RtlMOVEDANMDFF
PREVENT FALLING HAIR AND
END ITCHING 8CALP.
There is one sure way that has
never failed to remove dandruff at
once, and that is to dissolve it. then
you destroy it entirely. To do this,
just get about four ounces of plain,
common liquid arvon from any drug
store (this is all you will noed), apply
it at night when retiring use enough
to moisten the scalp and rub it in
gently with the finger tip®.
By morning most, if not all, of your
dandruff will be gone, and three or
four more applications will completely
dissolve, and entirely destroy, every
aingle sign and trace of it, no matter
how much dandruff you may have.
You will tind all Itching and digging
of the soalp will stop instantly and
your hair will be fluffy, lustrous, glos
sy, silky and soft, and look and feel
a hundred times better.
If you value your hair, you should
et. Tld of dandruff at once, for noth
ing destroys the hair so quickly. It
not only starves the hair and makes
it fall out., but it makes it stringy
sraggly, .dull, dry, brittle and lifeless,
i i ljtwi pver'ybodv "notices it.—Adyt. (outbreak—to the bar
t-'V'-'''
'V*' 'iy ., fr"" ..'V -:. jt- '•. '... 'i,!' v 'V jii! 'f--
THE FARGO FORTTM ACT PAIL? RFPTTHTJCAy. FRIDAY EVEytNTI. 8EJTEiMT¥KR 2S. 1914.
1
u
5.
White Beauty
New Y#rtr, Sept 25.—More competi
tion between the railroads would re
sult in better service to
the
He stated that prior to 1901 the re
lations between the Southern Pacific
and the Union Pacific railroads were
friendly and that he believed traffic
arrangements at that time were satis
factory to both lines.
James C. Lincoln, former traffic
manager of the Northern Pacific rail
way, was questioned regarding com
petition between the Southern Pacific
and the Union Pacific before 1901. A
question by James W. Orr, of govern
ment counsel, as to whether the
Southern Pacific controlled traffic to
the Pacific coast prior to 1901 by "in
direct methods" brought an objection
by J. P. Blair, general counsel for th»
Southern Pacific in New York.
Mr. Lincoln, answering the question,
said:
"It could, because the road was su
perior in some ways, but I don't know
about 'indirect methods.' No company
could very easily dominate now."
Kings at the Judgment Bar.
From a sermon preached by Wash
ington Gladden: I doubt not this war
will bring to the world at large some
great gains—gains not sought by any
of these combatants—gains not desired
by most of them—gains won in spite
of them all.
It will bring, in the first place,
such a demonstration, not only of the
horrors of war, but of its futility, its
stupidity as the arbiter of interna
tional relationships, that there will
be a mighty revolusion against war,
and that we shall soon realise that
we have seeil! the beginning of the
end of it.
It will bring home to us, also, in
the sufferings which we shall undergo
through the rupture of all these in
dustrial relations, and the interrup
tion of human progress, and the dis
location of so much of the order of
the world on which we have learned
to depend, the truth that for this
world industry and world commerce
and world finance and world friend
ship we must have a world peace.
Jt will bring the kings of this
world and their ministers and their
chancellors—those of them especially
who arc rrjost responsible for this
of —the world's
iiwpfi'plfpjii jjm.i-i.ii,.4
mmmm
A FEW HOOSIER
CABINETS ARE LEFT
E^kolthese wilLbedelivered foriypgle Dollar
fh
This is "White Beauty," the new Hoosier ad
vertised in leading magazines.
Undoubtedly the most popular kitchen cab
inet in. the world.
40 special features. 17 entirely new.
Holds 400 articles—so placed that you can
work sitting down.
More than $1,000,000 worth of these new Hoch
siers were sold instantly after they were put on
saie.
Read now these liberal terms of the Hoosier
plan, offered for the last time this season.
fc' You may choose any of the new Hoosiers—
"White Beauty," or "Oak Interior" at
slightly less price.
$1 puts your Hoosier in your home at once,
$1 weekly quickly pays for it.
& The low cash price fixed by the factory pre
vails strictly—no extra fees.
This sale is under the direct supervision of
the Hoosier Company.
The sale is strictly limited to our small allot
ment of new Hoosiers.
Your money back if you are not delighted
with your Hoosier.
208-210 Broadway
•4«a*4-
COMPETITION OF
RAILROADS URGED
0-
public, In
the opinion of Thomas M. Schumacher,
chairman of the board of directors of
the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific
railroad. Mr. Schumacher expressed
this belief at the second day's hearing
in the suit of the government to com
pel the Southern Pacific company
to
give up its control of the Central
Pacific railway and subsidiary lines.
4
rorn
THE DUCHESS OF BRUNSWICK.,
Princess Victoria Louise. daughtW
of Kaiser Wilhelm, in uniform ot
Death Head hussars, of which she Is
colonel.
judgment. It will convict them of
the most stupendous blunder and the
most ghastly crime of history. It will
demand of them very pointedly what
reason they have to offer why they
should not have their power consid
erably restricted. It may not insist
upon .disc-row,ning them, but it is
MM
YOUR LAST CHANCE
OUR TWQ GREAT SALES CLOSE TOMORROW
A
i
700,000 women now use^Hoosiers--^most
them bought through the recommendation of
i e n s
Every to sare miilioni
of steps*
Our allotment will be taken by night. A good
many women will be disappointed by coming
too late. Yet you will agree you can only blame
yourself if you are one of them For there is
still time to get a Hoosier if you come tomorrow
early.
Pick your own choice. Have it delivered. If
by any chance you're not delighted with it, we'll
gladly take it back and refund your money.
dozen other women will be glad to get it.
ALL THE QUART ALUMINUM STEW
PANS WE HAVE LEFT WIU* BE SOLD TO
WOMEN AT
Each day we have limited the sale of these
pans. We could have sold hundreds. Pans of
this size when offered at3^ fin45Q(i-always find
a ready sale. /./*
For aluminum is the most perfcct 'material
known for cooking utensils. It distributes heat
evenly—prevents scorching of food—saves fuel.
It is clean, sanitary and practically everlasting.
Every woman would have a complete set if ex
pense did not interfere. Here is your last op
portunity to begin your set *t practically $p
expense. \:Vv: V
You need not buy anything else to
get one of these pans. This sale
is entirely independent of our
Hoosier Sale. Don't fail to come
in—Early.
1
THE PRINCESS AN THE PEASANT*
they have come into a new world
order, where nations are not plun
derers of one another, or overlords
one of another, but members one of
another—in which
Each christian nation shall take upon
her
The law of the christian man ^n vast
pretty sure to give them- notice that The crown of the getter shall1 fall to g)
i
rtrz-.snis
A PEASANT
a»^ /t"®,' \l I .« ^v £g S
it,i,,i|r'ri-f, i"lJ1't'l"jJ -J-
J- u
Fargo, N. D.
AVOMAN.
the donor,
last shall be flr»t, while ttnft
shall be laist,
And to'
love best shall
FOR STATE NEWS READ THE FORUM
y
II®
OF. EAST
PRUSSIA.
°n whom falls
the burden
of the war. i
1
"'P,1'f\*
..
--V
still be relArit
i.
unsurpassed.

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