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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, September 26, 1917, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1917-09-26/ed-1/seq-2/

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through bit* of woods choked with
quick flres. They might fall of their
object and yet cover themselves with
glory.
It seema that much sanguinary
fighting is to follow. The Germans
have been bringing up reinforce
ments for several days.
GREAT FALLS SHERIFF
IS EXPECTED TODAY
Retm With Coaldraee Ilea Ar
retted by Far
(to Police la a
Ltril HeteL.
Sheriff Lou Is Kommers, of Oreat
Falls. Mont., is expected to arrive in
Fargo this afternoon or this evening
and r.laim Frank Moran, alias Frank
Moore, and J. J. Gurke, allaa Edward
C. Ray, held on fugitive warrants for
operating a confidence game in Oreat
Falls.
The men were arrested by the po
lice in a local hotel Sunday morning.
Bail was fixed at
$2,500
RmIoi
Fttagerald
Vlpt Street Pavraftroker Face* Ra
%oklntc of Ida Licrnae for Fail
ure to Report to Police.
Jos. TV Shallt. pawnbroker at 410
Front street, must fppear before the
city commission at a special meeting
Thursday morning to show cause why
his license should not be revoked fo»
taking in pawn goods without report
ing to the police as required under
the ordinance.
S^aiit was to have appeared before
the commission today, but was ex
doing «o because of a re
observance incident to a Jew-
the com
uiied fr
UffOUS
ielgfcolk
1,403 LICENSES
A|0Hcatloii» Are mn!ag la far
Huatiag Lleeaw*.
Jbplications are still being receiv
edmnd licenses issued at the court
house to hunters, permitting them to
shoot in the state. This noon the to
tal number of licenses to date had
reached the 1,403 mark.
PLEDGE $25,000
TO HILL SCHOOL
Continued Prom Page One.
at 8 o'clock in the auditorium.
TMands of the college, the alumni,
students, those who are In sympathy
with higher education, fathers and
mothers who are looking forward to
the time when they expect to send
their boys and girls to Fargo col
lege. all are urged to be present and
protest against permitting the col
lege to die automatically with the
closing of the meetinp. For this is
about what it will amount to as it
is intended to close the institution at
tho end of the first semester if the
people of Fargo do not immediately
get behind the campaign and aid
in the effort to raise the $100,000 or
more. Tomorrow 8.000 "dodgers"
will be t- ent throughout the entire
city, notifying the citizens of the
seriousness of the situation and put
ting the matter squarely up to Far
go. These "dodgers" bear the follow
ing call:
"Shall Fargo college live or die?
A maas meeting to determine this
vitfcl question will be held tonight
at the auditorium at 8 o'clock. Posi
tively no solicitation of funds. It is
to your interest to be present. Come
and brinic all your friends.
EVENCROSS, SICK
PILDREN LOVE
I SYRUP OF FIGS
«_•
lf*|*EVEftlSH, BILIOUS. CONSTI
PATED, GIVE FRUIT LAXA*
1* TIVE AT ONCE.
on't scold your fretful, peevish
4. See if tongue is coated this
is a sure sign its little stomach, liver
and bowels are clogged with sour
waste.
Wfcan listless, pale, feverish, full
of cold, fcreath bad, throat sore,
4cMU*n't eat, sleep or act natural
ly, has stomachache, indigestion,
diarrhoea, give a teaspoonful of
"California Syrup of Figs," and in a
fpw hours all the foul waste, the
tanr blie and fermenting food passes
out of the bowels and you have a
well and playful child again. Chil
dfifcn love this harmless "fruit laxa
tive," and mothers can rest easy aft
er giving it, because it never fails to
make their little "iiusides" claaa and
W£6t.
Keep it handy. Mother! A "little
gfvon today saves a sick child to
raorrow, but get the genuine. Ask
yQtir druggist for a 50-cent bottle
of "California Syrup of Figs," which
li6* directions for babies, children
i't aJI and for grown-ups plainly
off the bottle. Remember there are
OunterfeitH «old here, so surely look
ant) *ee that yours is made by the
California Fig Syrup Company."
Hand back with cofitamptaajrotiba*
fig ajrrup.—Adv*.
e?J
mm
each, which
was not furnished. The men, it is
said, will return to Montana without
requisition.
INJURY HAY RESULT IN
fARGOAN LEAVING CAMP
to the On­
cers' Board After Cntttag
Ml* llaad.
Stay E. Fltssrerald. of Fargo, In
trdning at Fort SnrUIng, may forego
his work because of a severe cut on
the right hand received in an accident
Sunday night.
According to advices from Fort
duelling this afternoon. Fitzgerald is
confined in the camp hospital. It is
said that he will he unable to use his
hand for at least ten days or two
weeks.
It has necessitated his resigning to
the officers' bojyd, which will take
sexton upon bis case within a few
days.
CHANCELLOR'S ELDEST
SON AMONG MISSING
Banar Law Notifiad That Captain J.
K. 'Law, Can Not Ba Accounted
For.
CFy Associated Press
London. Sept. 26 —Andrew Bonar
lAW, chancellor, says a newspaper,
has been informed that his eldest
son. Captain J. K. Law. R. F. C., Is
missing. His second son, Lieut. C.
J. Law, has been a prisoner of the
Turks since last April, and .a third
son, Anthony is a private.
SHALIT MUST APPEAR
BEFORE COMMISSION
MY CALL OFF
WORK ON ALL
PAVING JOBS
City Commissioners Are
Dissatisfied With Pres
ent Progress
PLAN TO CANCEL
SOUTH SIDE JOB
Ask City Attorney to Ad
vise Them of Method
Of Procedure
An order to discontinue work on
all paving contracts may be the re
sult of a discussion of tho what,
when and how of the present paving
situation which occupied practically
all of the time at the regular meet
ing of the city commission this
morning with but one conclusion be
ing reached.
'omrnissioner R. B. Blakemore
Introduced a motion, which was sec
onded and unanimously prevailed on
call of the roll, to Instruct the city
attorney to advise the commission
how to cancel the big paving con
tract in the Third and Fourth wards
on the south side, held by James
Kennedy, on which, it was said, lit
tle or no work had been done.
Members on the commission ex
pressed themselves as beinsr highly
dissatisfied with the progress of
paving work at this time, and declar
ed that in the best interests of the
city and the taxpayer® it would be
inadvisable to allow work on any
other pnvlng contracts than those on
which work was being done, and th.^i
it was highly improbable that any
of the contracts could be finished
this fall.
"ity Engineer F. I#. Anders
declared that he would not accept
paving which had been laid nft
frost had come, even if the commis
sion decided to allow work to con
tinue, which is not likely.
Several of the members of the
commission expressed themselves as
being in favor of iallinir a halt on
all work which cannot be finished
within a short time, and to order the
contractors to put the streets in
passable condition for winter.
The course of action to be follow
ed will be determined at an adjourn
ed meeting this afternoon.
Hancock Makes Protest.
George Hancock, of Hancock Bros.,
architects, appeared before the com
mission to protest aeainst allowing
a continuation of paving work on the
north side, and particularly apainst
the excavation work being done on
Seventh street north by James Ken
nedy.
"There Isn't a chance", said Mr.
Hancock, "that the work on Seventh
street north can be completed this
fall, if It is to be done the way it
should be done.
"The laying of concrete, four to six
inches thick, on newly disturbed dirt
is absolutely absurd. Exposed as it
would be, it would b® ruined by the
first frost.
"1 come to protest against this
work in the interests of the innocei%t
taxpayers who would be called upon
to foot the bill". 7
Mr. Hancodk
alaa aske® that some­
thing be done to relieve the condi
tion of the street in front of his home
at 718 Broadway. Here, Mr. Han
cock said, the base hae crumbled,
allowing: the concrete blocks to set
tle, forming pot holes for the water.
"That is an example of allowing:
concrete to be laid in freezing wea
ther," said Mr. Hancock. "I remen\
ber that when that paving was laid,
Mr. Kennedy, the contractor, put
straw and manure over it at night,
but you see how much good it did".
The, matter was placed in the
hands of O. M. Strate, commissioner
of streets.
Open Paving Bid.
The bid of the S. Birch A Cons
Construction Co. to pave one block
between Tenth and Eleventh streets
on Third avenue north, which was
not Included in the big west end
contract, was opened by the commis
sion, and turned over to the city
engineer to check. The estimated
cost of the work is $3,400.
The commission probably will not
let the contract for completion this
fall.
Other business included allowing
an estimate of $19.02 in favor of ths
Red Wind Filter Sand Co.. represent
ing per cent deducted from a
previous estimate in favor of the
company, but not due the city.
MEMBER OF KITCHENER
INDIAN STAFF KILLED
Report From London Announces
Death of General F. A. Max
wall in France.
(By Associated Press.)
London, Sept. 26.—Brigadier Gen
eral F. A. Maxwell, a member of the
late Earl Kitchener's Indian staff,
has been killed in action, according
to a newspaper report. With the ex
ception of General William R. Bird
wood it is a remarkable, fact that
all of Earl Kitchener's Indian staff
have lost their lives in this war.
Pope Disappointed.
Washington, Sept. 26.—The Vati
can will send verbal answers to the
Berlin-Vienna peace notes, accord
ing to official cables received from
Rome. The messages emphasized the
bitter disappointment of the Vatican
at the Central powers' attitude.
FATAL EXPLQ8I0N.
Disaster at Ammunition Factory
Kills One and Injures Eight.
(By Associated Press.)
Lowell, Mass., Sept. 26.—One man
was killed and eight others injured
Tuesday by an explosion at the plant
of the Newton Manufacturing com
pany which is engaged in making
shells for the government. Officers
of the company said the explosion
was probably caused by a flare-up
while workmen were filling shells.
——0
90,000,000 CARGO
OF 81LK TO PASS
THROUGH THE CITY.
Thirty-two cars of silk, valued at
$9,000,000, will pass through Fargo
over the Great Northern this after
noon and Thursday morning, it was
announced today. The cars will be
in three trains.
The silk is consigned from Yoko
hama, Japan, to New York.
LIFE SENTENCE FOR
EX-RUSS MINISTER
GUILTY OF TREA80N
Petrograd, Sept. 26^—General
Soukhoulinoff, former minister of
war, was today sentenced to hard
labor for life after conviction of
high treason. His wife was ac
quitted.
&
.IIMI.I I Wl I..W
Cleanup Work In
Red Cross Drive
Increases Fund
Thirteen of 25 districts reported
133 pledges for $122.40, and 41 serv
ice pledges up to noon today, bring
ing the grand total to date to 2,959
pledges for $3,809.14 a month, of
$45,709.68 a year, and 830 service
pledges.
The cleanup work continues today.
EXPORT FLOURC
PRICE IS FIXED AT
$13.25 FOR 220
POUNDS BYBOARD
Patents Run About $11.80 a
Barrel Under Newly
Announced Figures
(By Associated Press.)
New York, Sept 26.—The flour
distributing committee of the New
York Produce exchange, appointed
by the United States food admini
stration, announced today that the
follov#ng prices will apply to flour
to be sold by the food administra
tion through this committee:
For all export patents. $13.25, per
sack of 220 pounds, which is equiv
alent to about $11.80 per barrel. All
first clears, from $11.90 to $12.25 per
sack of 220 pounds, according to
quality, which is equivalent to $10.60
to $10.90 per barrel.
R. A. Claybrook, president of the
Produce exchange, and chairman of
the committee, expressed the belief
that this action Irould keep down tha
price of flour, which he predicted
would have gone much higher be
fore Jan. 1 had there been oo food
control legislation enacted.
KEGWORTH CAMP
Twenty-two Prisoners of
War Make Daring Es
cape—Nine Recaptured
(By Associated Press.)
London, Sept. 26.—One of the most
darng escapes from internment camps
was effected yesterday at Kegvvorth,
Nottingham Twenty-two German
prisoners, including Captain Muller,
who commanded the cruiser, Emdefl,
and Lieutenant Thelan, disappeared
through a tunnel extending from a
hut in the camp to a point outside
the barbed wire fence. How the tun
nel waa dug is a mystery. Nine of
the prisoners were recaptured in
cluding the two officers.
COLE TO MINOT
Judge A. T. Cole, of the Third judi
cial district, leaves this evening 10*
Mi not to sit as trial Judge in a court
case, being called In by Judge J. K.
Leigh ton.
Upon the return of Judge Cole to
Farjfo Friday, he will make ar
rangements for his trip through tM
southwestern part of the state to
speak on Red Cross work and the
war.
..TOMORROW..
THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER &
iM7 SEPTEMBER i»w
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
2
HOW THEY REPORT ED TO NOON TODAY.
Monthly Amount Service
District. Chairman. pledges. per month. pledges.
No. 1—W. H. Burnett $ 4.76
No. 4—F. V. Hutchinson .... IS IS.
60
No. 9—W. I* Stockwell ...... t.OO 1
No. 10—P. J. Burfenln^ ...... 7 its
No. 11—A. O. Divet 7 6.65
No. 14—Rev. Thos. .Graham .. ..... 7.00
No. 16-17—Smith Stlmmel ..., 2* 17.0S
No. IS—J. I., nine 15 IS.41
No. 19—ltev. F. S. Hollett ... 14 16.26 0
No. 20—C. E. Nugent ........ 1 1.00
Cleanup work in Fargo's monthly
Red f'ross budget campaign for the
American Red Cross, pending the re
turn of J. P. Hardy, chairman of the
Furgo branch, from f'hicago and the
formulation of details for a drive on
slackers" and for pledge increases
to bring the monthly income to $5,
000 a month, or $60,000 a year, was
productive of results Tuesday after
noon and evening.
No. 21—Matt Carnitsch ...... 1 1.00 y 1
No. 24—1. W. Smith 1. .60
2S.11
Total 1SS 1 122.40 41
Reported to noon Tuesday ... 3,643.91 784
Reported Tuesday afternoon 87.82
Pledge increases today ...... 6.00
Grand total to noon today MS» *3,809.14 8S0
Annual Income for Red Cross at noon today, $46,709.68.
1
3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19
20
21 22
23 24 35 26 q! 28 39
30
Wash Day
—AT—
RED RIVER
LAUNDRY CO.
'FARQO'8 OLDEST LAUNDRY*
27 Ninth Street North
Phone 18
Lace Curtains should be wrfetwd
before the cold weather. Send
them to us now and they will be
returned promptly with all the
life, beauty and freshness of
when they were first purchased.
4or jpo^ern. equipment spells
service and satisfaction.
V
A 1
Workers' lists are being checked
with the city directory, and the
name of everyone who has been
missed is being listed.
The reports today, considering the
scattered nature of the work, are
considered good by the campaigfi"
directors.
Increase Pledges $6.
Several persons increased their
pledges for a total of $6 a month to
day. One of the number waa a girl
earning less than $50 a month, who
increased her pledpre from 50 cents
to $1 a month because, she said, she
felt she had not been liberal enough
when she signed the card.
The largest Increase waa from $1
to $2 a month.
INSTITUTION
FOLLOWS FLAG
After marching under the colors,
bearing the Red Cross flag Sunday,
Rev. William Edwards, minister ot
religion of Christine, addressed the
soldiers at the armory last Sunday
morning after the drafted men en
trained.
"Comrades at arms, you have been
called to defend the United States'
honor before this nation and the
world," said the pastor. "The enemies
have invaded our commerce on the
high seas and aim to pauperize our
country.
"You are a noble body of men. Co.
and its efficient officers volunteered
in the service long before this war.
You have a record to be proud of.
"Go forth to duty, and may the
Great Master Builder of the Universe
lead you in the love of humanity and
right to victory. The constitution of
the United States will follow the flag.
The Red Cross will be ever at your
side."
Hon. Morton Page spoke in behalf
of the Red Cross to the soldiers and
explained to them the happy medium
by vhich they could be and would *e
protected.
TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY.
LOST—Bunch of keys, between P. O.
and 14th St. on 1st Ave. N. Reward.
Return to Forum office.
J&k,JiUfc A.
THE FARGO FORUM, WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 26, 1917
pledges.
$
OLIVER COUNTY
MAN JAILED ON
FEDERil CHWE
Peter Hotchkiss Said To
Have Threatened To
Foment Blot
POUR OTHERS
ARE ARRESTED
Dunn County Men Accused
Of Registering In the
Wrong County
Federal authorities today announc
ed the arrest of Peter Hotchkiss at
Price, Oliver county, for a series of
alleged utterances and threats an
tagonistic to the war principles of
the United States.
It was stated at the office of the
federal marshal this afternoon that
Hotchkiss threatened the life of the
President, threatened to foment a
revolution and to "blow up the coun
try,'' besides other acts of insubor
dination and interference with the
military laws.
Hotchkiss was arraigned at Man
dan and furnished $l,ooo bail for
his appearance at the Bismarck term
of United States court.
Register in Wrong County.
A new method to evade the draft
was disclosed by the federal officials
today in the arrest of Martin Larud
and Henry Erbe, residents near
Killdeer. They are charged with con
spiring to evade the draft in regis
tering in another county than the
one in which they resided. Because
Stark county has a larger population
than Dunn county, the men, it Is al
leged, registered in the former coun
ty, thinking that the large registra
tion would not make them subject
to draft as soon as in Dunn county.
Bail in each case was fixed at $500.
They demanded a hearing which was
set for Oct, 10.
Balzer B. Scherr of Linton, and
Emil Net of Hazen. have been ar-,
rested for violation of the act of
congress of May 18, 1917, in failing
to register. Bail in both cases was
fixed at $500.
A seven-pound baby girl was born
to Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Hess Tuesday.
The birth was at St. John's hospital.
Mr. Hess is a draftsman at the office
of State Architect Sam Crabbe.
y
J*
Buy your Saxon "Six" now and you
buy at the bottom of a market that's
going up shortly.
Wait and you'll pay for it.
All motor cars must soon increase
their prices to cover the extraordi
nary rise in cost of labor and mater
ials. Many have already done so,
$935 is probably the lowest price at
which Saxon "Six" will be sold for
a long time.
Perhaps you are thinking of buying a
car costing $200 or $300 more than
Saxon "Six".
If you are, then by all means see
Saxon "Six" first. And you'll save
the $200 or $300.
For we can prove to you—or you can
prove to yourself—that there is no
car costing
$200
or
V V i
$300
more than
Saxon "Six" that will match it in
fine-car quality.
For instance. One of Saxon "Six's"
important features—Fedders radia
tor—is also found on 8 cars selling for
.-V
»sp
WILL ENROLL
DAKOTANS IN
CONSERVATION
Big Drive *To Be Put On
Oct. 21 to 28, Dr. Ladd
Announces
6n« hundred thousand or more
North Dakota families will be en
rolled in North Dakota for the "army
for food conservation and tlie elimi
nation of waste during the week of
Oct. 21 to 28. Dr. E. F. Ladd. Fargo,
federal food commlsstocol- for North
Dakota, has announced.
Dr. Ladd is pr^iaring for the big
drive by sending out letters to wo
man's clubs, merchants, stockmen
and others to unite in the effort to
secure signatures on the pledge,
which commits each signer to the
campaign for saving food that the
United States and Its allies may be
fed in the world food shortage. There
are no dues.
Newspapers and moving pioture
houses will co-operate in the move
ment.
Dr. Ladd has already named the
livestock committees, as follows:
Thomas P. Cooper, general chair
man, Fargo J. A. Power, secretary,
Leonard, ex-offlcio, president of the
North Dakota Livestock Breeders*
association.
Committee On Dairy Animals.
John Christiansen, chairman. New
Salem J. D. Bacon, Grand Forks
Major Persons, Minot Sam Crabbe,
Fargo.
Committee On Sheep.
Philip B. Moun, chairman, Buffalo:
J. E. Eastgate, Larimore R. E.
Struts, Bismarck.
Committee On" Hogs.'
Geo. (Enyart, chairman, Edgelc\
Matt Duffy, Esmond Aaron Ijecr.
Forest River.
Committee On Beef Animals.
W. L. Richards, chairman, Dick•
son Arthur White, Kramer Ch
Davidson, Williston J. f\ Hern
Sykeston V. L. Burdick, Williston.
SHOOTING^ GOOD
Se Says B. F. Waseia, Back Itom
Rnntlnc Trip at Botttnean.
Chickens are not plentiful,
shooting is good around Bottinei
according to B. F. Wasem, who, w
Mrs. Wasem, returned today fr
Bottineau, in the northern part
the state, where he spent a Wee'
hunting with his brother, C.
Wasem.
Mr. and Mrs. Wasem made the t'
by automobile, making the retu
322 miles, in thirteen hours.
Union Transfer Building
jiaZiz.
J? 'V n. 'it JL S A.
A big louring car for five people#* *.
..wmmmmmmrnmi wmmm^rn* i in
Buy Before the Boom
i
Motor Car Prices Sure to Advance
more than
costs $935.
Again, another of the important fea
tures of Saxon "Six"—Timken axles
~~is also found on seven cars selling
for more than $1,700.
One more. Still another important
feature of Saxon "Six"—Spiral bevel
gear—is also found on 12 cars selling
for more than $1,350.
And there are 7 other of the big fea
tures of Saxon "Six" such as Tim
ken bearings, Timken axles, Conti
nental motor, Stromberg carburetor,
Remy ignition, Fedders radiator,
Spiral Bevel gear, found on 30 cars
telling for more than $1,150.
Now consider the matter of upkeep
cgost. You will find the cost of run
ning Saxon "Six" quite visibly less
than the cost of running a car priced
ieveral hundred dollars higher.
Its six-cylinder motor has been so re
fined and developed, and vibration
and friction have been so largely
eliminated that you get full mileage
DEALER WANTED—A competent business man to handle Saxon cars in this territory. Write ton*-
Northwestern Automobile Company
..m*.
$3,000. Saxon "Six" from each atom of gas and oil.
Fargo, N. D.
HP
PORTER DEAD
DRAFTMEN HELD
(By Associated Press.)
Tmeoma, Wash., Sept. 26.—With
437 Montana men for the draft army
and the body of a dead negro porter,
a special train arrived yesterday at
Camp Lewis, American Lake, Wash.
The men were held in quai/crs while
an Investigation into the cause of
the porter's death was made by army
officers. According to Captain Welty
the men had been noisy on the tra®
and the porter, after seeking to quiet
them, was overpowered. He returned
with a drawn razor but before he
had time to use it one of the men
floored him with a blow from his
fist. In falling the porter struck a
seat and fractured his skull, causing
de&tfc.
ARRAIGN WILLIAMS
AND COULTER TODAY
Paul D. Williams and Eugene Coul
ter, of Grand Forks, charged with vio
lation of the white slave act and con
spiracy with thre other young men in
the alleged assault on Adelaide Chap
man, a Larimore young girl, were ar
raigned before Judge Charles F.
Anndon, of the federal court, late this
afternoon. The men are scheduled
for trial at the Grand Forks term.
Henning Gustaf Simon Anderson, a
naiive or Sweden, declared his inten
tion of becoming a citizen of the
United States at the office of the clerk
of the district court this morning.
GERMANY WILL
FREE BELGIUM
OS CCVWTP
Must Be Allowed To De
velop Economic Enter
prises, Report
(By Associated Press.)
London, Sept. 26. Germany ha«
agreed to evacuate Belgium condi
tionally, it is declared in a German
official statement, according to a dis
patch from Berne, Switzerland, to
day. jriven out by the Wireless press.
Germany, it is stipulated, must
have the right to develop her
economic enterprises freely in Bel
glum. especially in Antwerp.
The proposal was made in a sup
plementary note to the Vatican, re
plying to the peace initiative of Pape
Benedict. It was in the form of a.
verbal communication made by For
eign Secretary Kuehlmann, to the
Papal representative at Municlj*
wherein the foreign secretary specifi
ed the conditions under which Ger
many was willing to conclude a
peace on the basis of the evacuation
of Belgium.
•I
Card of Thanka.
We earnestly wish to thank the
many friends for their expressions of
sympathy to the bereaved family of
our dearly beloved daughter, little
Pearl also for all kindnesses shown
in any form or manner, for the many
beautiful flowers, etc. Mr. and Mrs.
M. E, Goodwin, Mrs. Dayton.
To buy your Fall Merchandise early. Our stock
are now complete. Make you seleotioiui before
they are broken up.
1 Men's Suits and Overcoats
Arriving Daily*
Our prices are right.
See them Before Buying Yours
YOU CAN ALWAYS DO BETTER AT
^i^Penney LaJae»s
228 BROADWAY
"W 8r-«r# df'"^ "Mra*1 'Hl.
JScdfe EH JK3P1 JL. JC% MZ*
It is important to consider that Saxon
"Six" is a six-cylinder car.
For with four cylinders any motof?
naturally has far more vibration and
friction than a "Six".
And it is this vibration and friction
ceaselessly tearing at the motor an4
parts that impairs flexibility, slow#
up acceleration, makes a difference of
degrees in the quietness of its opera
tion, increases repair-service costs,
and finally takes nearly 50% from the
standard efficiency of the motor.
These being facts—and facts gener
ally known now—it is obviously not
the best of business judgment to pur
chase any "four" priced between
$800 and $1,000 when Saxon "Six"
can be purchased at $935 f. o. b. De
troit. It may not be that low for
long, so buy now.
Saxon "Six" Sedan, $1395 Saxon
"Six" Chummy Roadster,
Saxon Roadster, $396. Prices, f. o. b.
Detroit.
"K, V.
^/f
ttii
$935
f-
I

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