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The Fargo forum and daily republican. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1894-1957, September 28, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042224/1917-09-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE WEATHER.
Fair tonight and Saturday* lCRft«^«
erate temperature.
Mrs. Roy Walker, 17, Dis
appears From Home on
Wednesday
UNKNOWN MAN IS
BEING SOUGHT
Kidnapping Theory Ac
cepted by Mother and
Husband
moy Walker, 17, missing sines
Wednesday afternoon, ia believed to
have been the victim of kidnappers
her mother and her husband clinging
firmly to the belief that an unknown
man, a visitor at the Walker tj'art
ments two weeks ago plotted with
two other men to ateal the girl.
The mother, her fears aroused at
Hie time of the unknown man's vis
to the Walker apartments, in the
B. Loucks block. Second avenue and
Third street north, told the Fargo
and Moorhead police today that two
days after the mysterious one's visit
aha overheard him tell two other
vnen that they "would have to kidnap
the girl, because she was too good
lee king to live with that man".
""Where does she live"? one of the
men asked of the alleged plotter, aa
they were seated on the stepa of the
Amerioan cafe en Front street.
''Second avenue and Third street
f«|lied the supposed leader of the
crowd that Mr. Walker and the girl's
other are certain stole her soon after
aha left home at 3 o'clock Wedneeday
afternoon of this -weak.
The mother, her fears thoroughly
aroused by the conversation ahe had
overheard went to her home with the
story, only to receive assurances from
koth Mr. and Mrs. Walker thai she
«qjrgs unnecessarily alarmed.
Followed Two Other Worn
ell.
Tuesday of this week, a man de
scribed aa the samp man who visited
the Walker apartments, followed two
women In the vicinity of the Walker
home The women sought protection
la a residence, and the tagging man
4tpappsareti.
Mother Maintains Vigil.
iince the girl's dtsappearano# 68
Wednesday, tne mother has main
tained a constant vigil in the Front
trtreet district, where she overheard
the conversation, hoping to find the
mysterious man, but so far without
result.
ltu
Mrs. Walker, 17, comely, and with
practically no acquaintances in the
city of Fargo, having resided here
onlv a few monthly set out from her
home about 3 o'clock Wednesday
afternoon, according to a neighbor.
Bar mother had previously departed
flpipm the residence.
Left Best Cloths# gt Heme.
The girl carried only her handbag,
With $35 in it., and was dressed in a
pip in black gown, a navy blue serge
Jacket with belt, a Leghorn hat with
an extremely broad rim, and she wore
light tan shoes and white hose, when
she left home on an errand to a
grocery store, from which she has
not yet returned, and so aa
'officials and her husband and
mother have been able to ascer
tain she didn't visit either of the
stores where she was accustomed, to
deal.
No Thought of Leaving.
The theory that she might have«H»
•Way from home is dispelled, the
mother and husband believe, because
of the fact that the clothes she wore
were of the most simple of her ward
robe, while absolutely nothing was
taken from the house except a small
box of face powder which she was
accustomed to carry.
Inquiry at every depot in Fargo and
Moorhead has failed to elicit any in
formation concerning the girl, whose
appearance because of the wide rim
med hat she wore, would very lifcely
attract attention.
No Hint of Goinf.
•"My wife had always seemed happy
about the home, and there ww.s no
trouble of any kind", said Mr. Walkej
to The Forum this morning. "I can't
understand what has happened. I
feel sure ghe has been stolen".
The mother, whose vigil for the
man who she believes stole her
girl, after two sleepless nights, was
all but broken down this morning.
*1 am sure she met with foul play",
aaid the mother.
"Why, the girl would never leave
home alone. 8he wouldn't go away
from home any time. The longest
ahe ever staid out in an afternoon
was one day she went to a shoy.
Other times, she was absent only an
hour, or less than that".
Husband Employed By Kennedy,
v Mr. Walker is employed by Jamea
Ifehnedy, contractor.
He and his wife have .made their
home in Fargo and Casselton about.
Six or seven months. The girl's
farther "resided with them,
The Man's Visit/
Two weeks ago, the unknown man
for whom the police are. looking,
went to the Walker apartments, there
meeting Mrs. Walker's mother. The
man said he had found a diamond
ifng, and thought it belonged to a
girl whom he described as very
much like Mrs. Walker.
When Mrs. Walker returned to the
apartments a few minutes later, the
man declared Bhe wasn't the girl.
Then he made an effort to have the
Kstaurant,"
I take a position in the "Eureka
on Front street, declar-
Continued on page five.
•ft
v '4
IN
m* Asaociated Preaa)
Biloxi, Miss., Sept. 28.—The worst
storm in years is reported from Ship
Island, which is almost covered with
high seas. Five fishing schooners
are reported out and a steamer has
been sent in search of them
Mobile. Ala., Sept. 28.—With the
tropical hurricane again swerving
towards the Florida coast. Mobile to
day prepared to face the storm. All
shipping was in shelter and the rail
roads were moving all cars from
wharves and sidings.
The barompnter fell steadily all
morning.
ARE
QENERAL CROWDER INSPECTING
CAMPS OF NEW CONSCRIPT ARM?
INFLAMED
igt t'jk
4||!|p j|t"
V r,
,v
jw-is*-1-* if K.
YEASS
Tropical Hurricane Sweep
ing Along Coast of
v
Mississippi
FIVE FISHING
UjSCHOONERS OUT
Railroads Mot® Freight
From Wharves as the,
Barometer Falls
•T
4 -WZ-" i 1
ft -Jl ,#**'
V
««dl T~fr
ff
i
fHmwt Manhal General Crowder (rijrhO aad General J. Vhakfln Bd al
Camp Upton.
Provost Marshal General Crowder, chief of the new national army,
paid a recent visit to Camp Upton, N. Y., to Inspect the progress of the
new conscript camps.
HITS
GULF COAST
BY
DEATH fLEADER
Sinn Feiners Let To Be
lieveThomas Ashe Dieft
of Voluntary Starving
(By Associated Press.)
London, Sept. 28.—The death in
Dublin on Wednesday of Thomas
Ashe, a Sinn Fein leader, reported to
have been due to voluntary starva
tion, according to a dispatch to The
Daily Mail from Dublin has accen
tuated painfully the difficulties un
derlying the surface of Irish politics
and Sinn Fein opinion is- inflamed
seriously.
Ashe's body, dressed In the uniform
of the Irish volunteer*, lies In state
in a Dublin hospital and there may
be a public funeral on Sunday. It. is
said that other Sinn Fein leaders in
the hospital prison, where Ashe died,
are in a dangerous condition.
At the inquest Thursday into the
death of Ashe, Professor McMeeney
testified that the post mortem exam
ination, at' which several other doc
tors were present, showed that Ashe
did not die of hunger. The body waa
not emaciated and there was an
abundance of food in the stomach.
Death, he said, was due to syncope
arising from heart trouble and part
IB from an intense congestion of the
lung. Ashe's heart, he added, was
abnormal and he would be apt to
succumb to any su4d#a shock or
prolonged struggle.
8HOOT8 TOE OFF.
Minot, N. D., Sept. 23.—Lying on
the ground and taking aim at a flock
of ducks, E. A. George, a linotype
operator, accidentally shot off one of
his toee when the hammer of the
shotgun caught in hie clothing
throwing the muzzle of the gun
directly In range of the member.
ititijjfaif 1 *i -'a"T- 'n-'
1
i
ii.-.i i
FAKGO'S RED
CROSS
Practically all of the 25 districts
have been thoroughly covered.
Thirty-one hundred eighty-five
pledges for 14,083.19 sf month, and
921 service pledges have been re
ported to date, insuring an annual
Income of $48,398.28 for Red Cross
work from Fargo.
Outstanding reports are small, and
are not expected to materially in
crease the totals.
Details in the proposed drive on
"slackers", and for pledge increases
to bring the amount to $5,000 a
month, or $60,000 a year havf not
been 'made pending the return of J.
P. Hardy, chairman of the Fargo
branch, who has been attending a
convention in^ Chicago. He la ex
pected back Saturday morning.
HARD LUCK" STORY
BRINGS LIGHT FINE
CMi CMe Sentenced- te Pay Fine of
$1'1n Federal Court For Violating
Bone-Dry Law.
A "hard luck" story told to Judge
Charles F. Amidon in the federal
court this morning resulted in a fine
of only one dollar being imposed on
Chris Eide of Fargo, charged with
transporting liquor into the state in
violation of the federal bone-dry
law.
Eide la the father of the four-year
old boy drowned in the Red rivor,
near the south bridge last summer.
He claimed that after the
drowning he took .to drinking.
He claimed that at the time of his
arrest he was in an~ intoxicated con
dition and didn't remember whether
he had one or two bottles of liquor in
his possession when stopped by an
officer and taken to the police station
which was about a week apo.
The defendant was represented n
court by Attorney Harry Lashkowlt*.
who also informed the court that the
prisoner did not kndw he waa being
taken over to the Fargo side.
The court told the father that there
are thousands of mothers and fathers
who are sending their boys to the
front these days and that they may
come home dead and for him to brace
up.
Eide was unable to pay the fine, so
the amount was paid by his counsel.
MAY NOT BREAK
Pnaklent of Argentine Preparing An
Answer to Congress.
v
(By Associated Press.)
Buenos Aires, Sept. 28.—President
Irigoyen is preparing a message in
answer to a request by congress
that the diplomatic relations be
tween Argentine and Germany be
broken. The President, it is under
stood, contends it is impossible to
break off relations with Germany be
cause of the Count von Luxburg in
cident, considering this affair to have
been adjusted by the German foreign
office's explanation.
THE FAUGO
DRIVE
RESTS TODAY
No Further Work Until
of J. P. Hardy,
Chairman- of Branch
Fargo's monthly budget campaign
for the American Red Cross is at a
standstill today.
Two small reports were turned in
by district chairmen this morning,
but will not be listed and checked
until Saturday morning.
AND DAILY REPUBLICAN
ESTABLISHED IN 1878. FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 28, 1917. VOLUME XXXIX, NO. 268.
Whole City Will Join in Saying Farewell to Company Saturday Afternoon
is
HISSING: MOTHER
TELLS OrriCERS
SHE BEARD PLOT
FARGO CITIZENS
JOINING TO GIVE
COMPANY BOYS
GREAT FAREWELL
Various Bodies Make Prep
arations to Participate
In Ceremony Saturday
MERCHANTS VOTE
TO CLOSE STORES
Indications Are That Tre
mendous Crowd Will Fill
Downtown District
Fargo's, farewell to the members of
Company B, First "N. D. Infantry, la
but 24 hours away.
Saturday evening between 9:40 and
10 o'clock the members are expected
to entrain on a special train over the
Great Northern for Camp Greene,
Charlotte, N. C.
Th! entire morning was spent in
packing boxes and freighting them to
the baggage and cook car which will
carry the equipment for the local or
ganization.
At 2 o'clock this afternoon the
check roll call was given.
156 Men to Entrain.
One hundred and fifty-four
will entrain from this city with the
two officers of the company, Captain
'Reginald Colley and Lieutenant Earl
W. South. Preparations were being
made by select committees from the
&
POLICE TO HEAD PARADE
IN FARGO'S FAREWELL TO
DEPARTING MILITIAMEN.
Chief of Police Louia Dahlgren
and his officers will head the par
ade to be held Saturday in honor
of the members of Company B,
First N. D. Infantry, according to
the official line of march an
nounced late this afternoon,
which follows:
Police department, city offi
cials, band at Fifth street and
Third avenue Company B» at
Fifth street and Third avenue
Company Auxiliary at Masonic
temple G. A. R. at Masonic tem
ple W. R. C. at Masonic temple
Spanish-American war veterans
at Second avenue and Fifth
street Sons of Veterans at
Masonic temple Red Cross flag
at First avenue east of Fifth
street, and Home Defense league,
Fifth street and Second avenue.
It was the request of Captain
Colley today that the band be at
the Auditorium at 9 o'clock Sat
urday evening and march with
the members of the company
the Great Northern station.
ifferent patriotic and other organi
zations in Fargo this afternoon to
join with the Fargo Rot,ary club in
staging the farewell.
The executive committee of the
Fargo Retail Merchants' association
went into session this /norning and
went on record a« favoring the clos
ing of all stores during the parade
for Company B. tp enable the em
ployes to participate and be on hand
to make liberal donations to the Com
pany fund. 0
The retailer* adopted the following
resolution:
"Resolved, that the Fargo Retail
Merchants' association goes on rec
ord for the closing of all stores dur
ing the parade for Co. B, Saturday
afternoon, Sept. 29, to enable em
ployes to participate and be on hand
to make liberal donations to the Co.
fund. Executive committee*.
Meetings Are Called.
E. G. Thompson, commander of flne
Sons of Veterans, issued a call this
morning to the members of that
organization requesting them to meet
at the public library Saturday after
noon at 3 o'clock for the purpose of
participating in the farewell parade.
Mra. Edra Patterson, president of
the
issued a call tor all members
to "report at the public library at
S:40 o'clock, and all color bear
era are particularly urged to be prea
ent
Harry M. Rudd, bandmaster, re
quests all members of the Fargo city
band and all band musicians to re
port at the Masonic temple Saturday
afternoon at 3:45 o'clock. He asks
that musicians bring cap and uni
form.
Parade to 8tart at 4 O'olook.
Fargo's parade will leave the Great
Northern railway station at 4 o'clock,
and will move south down Broadway
to Island park where short, snappy
exercises will be held. Amons the^
organizations that will participate
are the city police department, city
band, Fargo Home guard. Company
auxiliary. Red Cross? W. C. T. U.,
G. A. FL, Spanish-American war
veterana, Sons of Veterans, scho^
children and residents of the city.
The parade wirl be the piain fea
ture of th« celebration irf hopor of
the men who are leaving to go into
higher training in the modern meth
ods of warfare berore they embark
for France.
Chief of Police Louis Dahlgren to
day gave orders to his men that not
an automobile or vehicle would ba
permitted to use Broadway during
the hours that the parade is held.
The exercises are expected to last
one hour and a half.
Five Specials Due Saturday.
Five specials will carry troops Of
the First regiment under the com
mand of Col. J. H. Fraine of Graf
ton, through Fargo Saturday, three
over the Great Northern and two
over the. Northern Pacific. Four
companies consisting of 500 men will
reach Fargo about. 4 30 o'clock over
the Great Northern. Another train
consisting of two companies will ar
rive over the same road about 9 or
10 o'clock on which the Fargo com
pany will entrain. The special will
also pick up the members of the
company at Wahpeton. The two
specials over the Northern Pacific
are due to arrive between 9 and 10
o'clock.
Continued on Page Two.
OSEi' LI llOi£KClvS.
I
Noras* in
^4
uniform
getting instruc­
tion
from
an
officer.
Preparing for active war service
several hundred nurses from Ohio.
Indiana and Michigan are drilling
two hours dally while waiting for the
word that will send them to Europe.
Army officers are teaching them the
manual of arms and some infantry
drill so that they will know how to
march, how to salute and how to
execute military formations.
TEN NEW HEN
TO HELP DIRECT
LOAN BOND SALE
Fifteen District Chairmen
Called To Report In
Fargo Oct. 3
WILL OUTLINE
STATE. CAMPAIGN
A. R. Rogers of Minneapo
lis, To Attend Farga
Oonforpnpp. V
Conference
4
L. S. •ftantra, chairman of the
North Dakota executive committee
for the Liberty Loan bond sale, is
sued a call this afternoon for a
meeting of the executive committee
to be held in the directors' room of
the First National bank In Fargo on
Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock,
Oct. 3, to outline plana for the sec
ond issue, which will ba offered the
public, Oct. 1.
Rogers to Attend,
A. Rogers of Minneapolis, gfn
eral chairman of the Ninth Federal
Reserve bank district loan eommit
tee, will be in attendance at the
meeting. The bonds, according to
announcement made by Secretary
McAdoo Thursday night, will be of
fered as before at par and accrued
interest and will be in denominations
of }50 and multiples thereof. The
sale will close Oct. 27.
In calling the meeting. Mr. Hanna
announced the new district chairmen
who will compose the executive com
mittee of the second Liberty Loan
bond aale in the state. Recently Mr.
Hanna recommended to the Ninth
Federal Reserve bank of Minneapolis,
that he he permitted to Increase the
personnel of this committee in order
to bring about more efficient and
better team work in the state.
Five on Old Committae.
There were five members on the
old committee which was in charge
of the first issue in the state, being
C. R. Green of Cavalier A. I. Hunter
of Grand Forks: T. L. Beiseker of
Fessenden E. J. Welser of Fargo,
and L. B. Hanna, chairman.
To this number have been added
the namea of ten new members, in
cluding W. J. Morrish of Fargo,
as the state secretary. These
members of the executive com
mittee, or the new district
chairmen, are W. S. Davidson of
Wllliston H. R. Porter of Minot
J. E. Phelan of Bowman J. L. Bell
of Bismarck Charles H. Doyon,
Doyon Harry Lord of Cando Wes
ley McDowell of Marion J. H. New
ton of Mandan W. L. Richards of
Dickinson, and W. J. Morrish of Far
go, state secretary.
ffiv-
Card Index Of
U. S. Soldiers
Will Be Kept
*W
(By Associated Press.)
Washington. Sept. 28. A card
Index of all American officers and
soldiers at home and abroad is to be
compiled by the war department.
Congress has appropriated money for
the purpose in the general deficiency
bill. Every man will be indexed by
name and the records filed in alpha
betical order for immediate, refer
ence should he appear in army orders
or casualty lists. With the descrip
tion of each soldier will be given the
name of his next of kin and emergency
address.
The plan of giving each man a
number virtually has been abandon
ed and it is understood each soldier
instead will be supplied with a small
aluminum tag bearing his name and
company to be worn around his neck.
Plans have been completed for the
creation of a "atatisUcal division"
with a branch in Paris to compile
records.
Shrewd Buvers of Furs, Coats, Suits and Dresses Are Doing Their Shopping
vJaJsii..jl.
NURSES FROM MIDPT/F, WEST PBKPAHE FOR WAR SERVICE
'i-
e-
*4
i i i i
BIG CONSPIRACY
BY
I.
W.
W.
:v W
4Wf
if
BASIS
OF INDICTMENTS
BY GRAND JURY
More Than 150 True Bills
Will Be Returned In
Chicago
EVIDENCE WEIGHED
MQ&E THAN A TON
k
4^1
Conspiracies and Plbts To
Hamper The Govern
ment, Charged
(By Associated Press.)
'Washington, Sept. 2S.—Mors than
150 Indictments have been found by
the federal .grand Jury in
Chicago.
Investigating I. W. W. activities on
evidence secured In the recent federal
raid.
The Indictmenta which actually
may exceed this number, have been
drawn and voted upon, it Is under
stood and all that remains Is to re
port them to the court which may be
done at any time.
The evidence upon which the grani
Jury has acted is said to show con
spiracles and plots to hamper the
government In its war activities and
to show connection with German
sources.
The evidence laid before the grand
Jury was of such volume a« actually
to weigh a ton or more and is said
to show a nation-wide conspiracy to
hamper the government in almost
every conceivable way with ramifi
cations into almost every state.
It concerns anti-draft demonaii ra
tions, crippling of war industries by
BO-called strikes, burning of wheat
fields, burning of timber which the
government was planning to use for
airplane construction and a contin
uous anti-rally and anti-war propa-
There was evidence that GernuV
money was supplied plentifully as
shown In many letters and cancelled
«hecks. Indications pointed to a
group of men as movers in the great
conspiracy with a large number of
agents acting under their orders.
The nation-wide raid conducted
upon local I. W. W. headquarters in
many cities by agents of the depart
ment of hist ice on Sept. 8, disclosed
the evidence upon which the govern
ment proceeded to act.
One feature which the Investiga
tions brought out sharply, was the
large—almost predominating mem
bership of Austrian* in the ranks of
the I. W. W. local organizations and
also the large membership of the
various races which comprise Aus
tria-Hungary. Thousands of these
men, unrestrained because the United
States is not at war with Austria,
federal Investigators have found have
been very free to carry on whatever
ctlvities were planned.
It is understood that the indict
ment has been found under the sec
tion of the criminal coda defining "of
fenses against the existence of the
government".
The offensive charge in regarded
by officials aa next In gravity to
treason itself and is defined in the
criminal code immediately after the
definition of treason and the punish
ment therefor. The penalty is a fine
of not more than IS,000 or imprison
ment for not more than six yaars or
both.
REWARD FOR DESERTERS.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Sept. 28.—With a
To­
ward of $50 for the delivery of each
deserter, ,the provost marshal gen
eral's office today began a drive to
round up at once afl drafted men who
have not repcrted to their local boards
or to the adjutant genera) of their
respective states.
Where delinquency is shown not to
be wilful, they will only be delivered
to the proper camp*. Wilful desert
ers will be taken before the court
martial.
~H
'i, yy
SUCCESS OF NEW
LIBERTY LOAN
IS PREDICTED
McAdoo Predicts That It
Will Be Greatly Over
Subscribed
GREAT FINANCIAL
TASK IS AHEAD
Resources ofAmerica Were
Never So (rrat As They
»ow ArqL
(Bjr Associated Pi est.)
Atlantic city, N. J., Sept. 28.—Vast
oversubscription of the $3,006,000,000
second Liberty Loan was confidently,
predicted by W. G. McAdoo, secre
tary of the treaaury in an address
here today before the Amerioan
Bankers' association.
"It has be«n urfted on me,** he said,
"that many men qf wgalth will re
fuse to buy fh#vl tfr cent bonds
with liability to bup r-income taxa
tion. I should bt loath to believe
this but if It be true the man of
wealth, with patriotism or modified
patriotism or even without patriot
isms has a greater stake in the securi
ty of the government than any other
class because if the government's
credit is destroyed and disaster comes
upon the country, as it inevitably
will if the government's credit fails,
what Is property worth to the rich
man
Emphasising the tremendous finan
cial task ahead of the nation. Mr.
McAdoo pointed out that it would
be necessary to raise between $13,
OfiO.OOO.OOO and $14,000,000,000 by
additional bond issues before June
30, 1918. This will not be easy, he
aaid but It can be done by everybody
in every walk of life Joining hands
to see it through.
"Fortunately," he added, "the re
sources of America were never so
ample for ourselves and so formid
able for our enemies as now. The
combined resomc»s of th*» national
and state banks (including trust
companies) of the l-'nited States, are
now $37,000,000,u00. At the outbreak
of the Civil war the combined re
sources of the banks were estimated
to be $1,500,000,000 ar«d yet with
these limited banking resources the
union government raised $3,000,000.
000 by bond sales, or twlt^ the
amount of the banking resources of
the country. Upon the same basis
we should now be able to raise $74,
000,000,000 through government
loans.''
The campaign to sell $2,000,000.00*
in war savings certificates Frank A.
Vanderlip. hair man of the war aav
lritfs committee announced today will
Ije separate from the se^onil Liberty
Loan campaign and will not bejfin
The bankers were pleaaed with the
news McAdoo brought from the sec
retary of agriculture that the 1917
crop would be worth 17 billions of
dollars, a gain of two billions over
1916. These figures, he aaid, had been
estimated a few days ago by the
department.
FA8G0 BOYS WIDELY
SCATTERED AZ CAMP
Carlton Spalding Has Been Assign
ed to Regiment of Engineers
At Camp Dodge.
Word has
been
way
received
by
12 PAGES
Judge
and Mrs. B. F. Spalding of Fargo,
that their son, Carlton Spalding, a
member of a draft contingent leav
ing recently for Camp Iodge, has
been assigned to Company F, 318th
Regiment of Engineers.
Mr. Spalding wrote that he had
not seen a nmgle Kargo bov since
he had arrived at Camp Dodge, which
gives some idea of the \a*t extent
of that cantonment. Ue aieo »lale»
that arrivals there are given a very
stiff examination.
GERMANS FAIL IN
EFFORT TO SHAKE
BRITISH IN THEIR
NEW POSITIONS
Ground Won In Offensive
on Wednesday Held
Against Attacks
OSTEND BASE 18
NOW THREATENED
British Within Six Miles
of Railway Connecting
It With Lille
Efforts to break into the
new ground won by the
British in the renewal of
the Flanders offensive on
Wednesday, are being con
tinued by the Germans.
Failing to shake the British
line elsewhere they tried it
out last night at Zonnobeke
where the British have
pushed far along the road
to Roulers. The attack,
however, was broken up.
The present position of the British
in Zonnebeke places them within a.
half doir-n miles of the important
north and south railway line con
necting Lille with Ostend, on the
coast, the cutting of which or it*
domination by even medium range
artillery fire, would seriously handi
cap the Germans in their Flanders
operations.
In the Tower Hamlets and Poly
gon wood regions, the clearing up
process which followed Wednesday a
battle was carried out further
night and the Germans were driven
from Isolated positions to which
strong parties of them were cling
ing.
There has been little other military
activity of a notable nature except
In the Argonne region, on the French
front. The Germans made an at
tempt last night to break into the
French lines in this sector attacking
thr»-H times. Th»»se assaults were all
repula'-d, the (iermans susuunlnjtf^/
hativy losses, aays today's MfU* WMr v
office report **.,
T!.. a*ieeia.i reports
loss in the Baltic of the Russian
destroyer Ochotnlk which struck a,
mine.
Commends Pops's Prspsaals.
Amsterdam, Sept. 28. Dr.
Mkhaelis. the German imperial
chancellor In a speech to the main
committee of the reichstag. said that
the Pope's peace proposals were in
spired by moral seriousness and pure
Justness and neutrality which things
were lacking In the reply made by
President Wilson to the Pope.
May Reopen Pesos Debate.
Copenhagen. Sept. S8.—Charges
that certain government authorities
are supporting the pan-German and
conservative forces in the agitation
to resolve the reichstag majority
peace resolutions and commit Ger
many to the so-called Hindenburg
peace, may be made the subject of
an interpellation at the present ses
sion of th# reichstag. Berlin news
papers which arrived tonight assert
a three day interruption indicates
that the interpellation was discussed
at a meeting of the steering commit
tee of the reichstag on Wednesday.
It was decided to postpone action in
order to give Chancellor Micha^' s
and his aides an opportunity to nftjfcs
certain explanations.
Russians Taks T*wa
Tetrograd. Sept. 28—The Russians
have captured Oromaru, twenty-four
miles west of Meri In the Ca\iCAiUS
it la announced officially. ««s»
Korniloff As PatrlS^
IVtrograd, Sept. 28. —The last army
order issued by General Komflbff as
commander-in-chief, reprinted in
The Nova Zhlzn from a Mohilev
newspaper, tends to show that
Korniloff was compelled to launch
his revolt largely in an effort to
thwart German plana.
The order says it had been learned
that German agents had brought
about the great fire In Kazan had
expended millions of rubles in dis
organizing the coal mines In the
River Don region, and that, the Ger
mans were proposing a general of
fensive along the whole front for ths
purpose of forcing a disorganized
Russian retreat. The Germans also
had planned to blow up the bridges
across the Dnieper and
volga
rivers
and were organizing a movement of
Maximalists in Petrograd.
General Korniloff. the article adds,
had reason to suspect treason, among
the irresponsible Russian organiza
tion in German pay. The General,
not doubting that irresponsible influ
ences had the upper hand in Petro
grad and that Russia was on the
brink of an abyss, took an extreme
decision for the purpose of saving
the Fatherland.
GREAT WELCOMK
Hosesvslt Greeted By Tremsn4e»s
Crowds On Arrival.
(By Associated Press.)
Minneapolis, Sept. 28.—Theodore
Roosevelt was given a rousing wel
come here this afternoon by thous
ands who banked the streets along
e line of march to the railroad ista
tion to the Elk.- ciub wher?1 th
onel was guest ot JiQnor
m.
eon.
r*
^or
Immediate!v after* I
.'ort Hi rig to review the troop*
there before proceeding to St. Paul
for his lal« afternoon address, lie
ill speak at two mass meetings her*
tonight.

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