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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, February 22, 1902, Image 17

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Third
Section.
I^State NEWS
The Griggs County Courier man is
thankful to be out of quaiantine.
Linton wants a doctor, whether any­
one is sick theTe or not.
A 480 acre tract near Hankinson re­
cently soldifor $10,000.
Valley City hopes to get an exten­
sion of the Milwaukee road from Far
lean.
The selfish single men of Grand
Forks have organized a bachelors'
club.
Valley City is preparing to entertain
the firemen at this year's tournament in
royal style.
The law students of the state univer­
sity will shortly establish a monthly
publication.
E. T. Kraabel of Hope was elected
president of the North Dakota Retail
•Grocers' association.
Anna Callahan has been appointed
postmistress at Casselton, and Thos.
Wilham at Ellendale.
Minnesota's game warden "copped"
out a nice mess of white grouse, shipped
from Buford this week.
The State Hardware Dealers' associa­
tion took a fall out of the "merger"
proposition and adjourned.
On March 2d a large party of Iowans
will leave for Devils Lake region. Tht
spring rush has commenced.
Twenty cars of immigrants' move­
ables and fifty people from Iowa came
west over the Soo Thursday.
The state industrial school wants to
break in on the school funds to the
extent of $30,000 for a new building.
Editor Smith of the Oakes Repub­
lican hasn't proceeded beyond "we
stop-the-press-to-announce" stage yet,
Kidder county collected $25,000 out of
§30,000 levied, which indicates the faith
as well as the prosperity of the property
owners.
The institution for feeble minded is
to be erected in Grafton this season—
something over $30,000 being now
available.
Wolves are becoming so plentiful
near Jamestown the services of Uncle
Ben Corbin may be needed in that
direction.
The warm weather up in Mcllenry
made a dog go mad an.i several cattle
have since died—the dog finally being
cornered in a hen coop.
Walsh county has $200,000 in the
county treasury which moves the Graf­
ton Record to philanthropically urge
the building of a hospital.
Dr. C. C. Young, having graduated
in medicine, will now open an office
with the N. P. people, Chicago, for the
sale of North Dakota lands.
Lloyd W. Wells was so pleased with
Souris, the terminal town of the Rugby
extension of the Great Northern, he
moved his paper, the Republican, from
Bisbee.
The Hackney-Boynton Land company
recently sold 11,505 acres of Stutsman
county land to the American Live Stock
company for ranch purposes for approx
im ately $26,000.
The new settlers in the western and
northern parts of the state are having a
snap to what the old timers experienced
•a quarter of a century ago, says the
Farge Forum—an ol mer that knows
The constitution of the state ol
North Dakota provides that the state
school fund may be loaned to! farmers
under certain restrictions, at a low
rate of interest, an amount not exceed­
ing one-third the actual value of the
land to be loaned on any one quarter
section.
The population of the state according
to the government census of 1900 was
319,146. It is now considerably over
400,000. The population of the lead­
ing cities in 1900 was as follows:
Fargo, 9,589 Grand Forks, 7,652 Bis­
marck, 3,319 Jamestown, 2,853 Val­
ley City, 2,446 Grafton, 2378 Wah
peton, 2,228 Dickinson, 2,076 Devils
Lake, 1,729 Mandan, 1,658. All have
materially increased in population
and importance since the census year.
John Homan, the baker, will erect a
fine two-story brick on his Fourth
street lot this year. He will put in
a first class restaurant in connection
with his bakery.
Ole Johnson, the tilo sidewalk man,
is making a superior quality of blocks
this winter, in readiness for the con­
templated ew walks all over the city
this season.
The beat ice—and more of it—than
-ever before—is now being put up In
Bismarck.
Fire at an Early Hour This Morning
Destroys the Park Avenue Hotel
In New York.
Flames Originate In the Armory of the
Seventy first Regiment and
Spread to Hotel.
Guests Awakened by Crash of Falling
Walls and Many Jump from the
Windows to Ground.
New York, Feb. 22.—The Park Ave­
nue Hotel and the armory of the Sev­
enty-first regiment, National Guard,
at Thirty-second and Thirty-third
streets were destroyed by fire this
morning. A conservative estimate
places the number of lives lost at 18,
and the number of injured at 50. The
property loss is estimated at two mil­
lion dollars. Firemen and others did
heroic work during the progress of the
flames and scores of unconscious were
carried out of the burning hotel.
The flames originated in the Sev­
enty-first regiment armory at 2 o'clock,
and reduced thajt building to ashes in
half an hour. Leaping to the Park
Avenue Hotel, sparks flew through thr
open window to the sixth floor, it is
claimed, and set fire to inflammable
hotel furnishings. Meantime the am­
munition in the armory began explod­
ing, felling the walls of that structure
in a series of crashes and shocks. In
the hotel, which was rapidly filled with
dense smoke, panic reigned among the
guests who were awakened by crashing
noises and shouts of the people, and
found themselves in the midst of dense
choking smoke. Then it was they
sought egress, some taking option of
jumping, while others felt their way
about in effort to find stairways. The
firemen soon rushed up scaling lad­
ders to the windows yelling to the peo­
ple on the sills to hold on until they
could be reached and many were taken
down in this manner.
Among the dead are
TWENTY-SECOND YEAR. BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1902.
ex-Congressman
Robbins of Alabama, and Col. Piper,
U. S. A.
MAKE A CAPTURE
BRITISH SCOUTS CAPTURE A BOER
FORCE AND MAKE A NUMBER
OF PRISONERS.
London, Feb. 22.—A dispatch from
Lord Kitchener says Colonel Park with
o00 mounted scouts recently surprised
a Boer force at Nooitgedcht, Trans­
vaal Colony, and captured 104 pris­
oners, together with a quantity of mu­
nitions of war and a number of horses
and wagons.
TIDAL WAVES FATAL
MANY LIVES LOST ON SOUTH AM­
ERICAN COAST BY TIDAL WAVE.
Panama, Colombia. Feb. 22.—Tidal
waves on the Salvadorian coast have
caused the loss of more than fifty lives
and the parital destruction of seven
villages.
WE MAY DIG NOW
FINAL RATIFICATIONS OF THE
HAY-PAUNCEFOTE
TREATIES
HAVE BEEN EXCHANGED.
Washington, Feb. 22.—The final rat­
ifications of the
Hay-Pauncefote
treaty,
giving England's assent to the con­
struction of a canal across Central
America by the United States hav€
been exchanged at the state depart­
ment. There was very little cere­
mony about the exchange of ratifica­
tions.
THE WAR TAX MEASURE.
Washington, D. C., Feb. 22.—It is
likly that the repeal of the war tax
measure that passed the house una
mously Monday will not be put through
the senate for some time and there is
a feeling among the senators that the
demands in the way of appropriations
be considered well before repealing a
measure yielding $77,000,000 revenue.
THE DAY AT WASHINGTON
Washington, D. C., Feb. 22.—Th
day is being properly observed here,
all departments and business houses
being closed. The Sons and Daugh­
ters of the Revolution and other patri
otic societies are holding appropriate
exercises.
OF INTEREST TO BEER DRINKERS.
Washington, D. C., Feb. 22.—Repre­
sentative South wick of New York
wants better beer and his bill in con­
gress provides that no other products
besides barley, wheat and rice shall
enter into the manufacture of beer and
ale..
(FEAR FOR MISS STONE
pbmarcli pitilij ©ribtme.
POSSIBLE THAT SHE HAS BEEN
SPIRITED AWAY OR MURDERED
BY THE BRIGANDS.
Washington, Feb. 22.—Fear is ex­
pressed that Miss Stone has again been
spirited away or murdered by brig­
ands, even before the ransom was
paid. It is estimated at the state de
partment that fifteen days have now
elapsed since the money for Miss}
Stone's ransom was paid to agents of
the brigands.
STUDENTS ON STRIKE
MEMBERS OF FRESHMEN CLASS
IN IOWA UNIVERSITY STRIKE
BECAUSE OF SUSPENSION OF
CLASSMATES.
Iowa City, la., Feb. 22.—Thirty
eight members of the freshmen med­
ical class of the university of Iowa to
day went on a strike when nine of their
classmates were suspended for parti
cipating in a lecture-room row, during
which Miss Olga Avikionf, a Russian
student, was injured.
WEST MISSOURI METROPOLIS
SEAT OF GOVERNMENT OF ONE
OF THE LARGEST COUNTIES IN
THE STATE-SOME OTHER MOR­
TON COUNTY TOWNS.
Mandan, situated on the west side of
the great Missouri river, is one of the
hustling, wide awake towns of this west­
ern empire, and its citizens are possessed
of that enterprising spirit that insures a
continuation of the high degree of pros­
perity that is now being enjoyed. It is
the chief trading mart of a wide scope of
country, extending from the Knife river
on the north to the Cannon Ball on the
south, embracing a strip of from forty to
fifty miles on either side. It is sur­
rounded on all sides by a country that
is rich in natural resources, and in no
section of the great Missouri Slope
country are there more fertile acres than
are within the borders of Morton county,
of which Mandan is the seat of govern­
ment and commercial center. Its hills,
the heritage of its herds and flocks, are
sodded with the richest grasses that
grow anywhere on these western ranges
and its valleys possess wonderful fertil
ity.
Mandan is the division headquarters
of the Northern Pacific railroad, midway
between Fargo and Glendive, having ex­
tensive roundhouses, machine shops,
coal docks, etc., its monthly pay ro~~
amouuting to thousands of dollars.
On the banks of the Heart river, which
flows through the town, is located the
largest flouring mill in the state. Here,
also, in the level valley of the Heart, are
located the State Fair grounds, where
annually are held exhibitions of the
products of the fields, ranges and feed
lots, and in no state just passing through
the pioneer period are better exhibits
shown.
The Little Heart creamery, just west
of town, is a Mandan institution, and by
the superior quality of its product, has
done much to attract attention in the
east to the wonderful adaptability of
this section as a dairy region.
Morton county's court house—an ele
gant three-story brick structure—is one
of the finest county buildings in the
state, and the city has good hotels and
many fine brick business blocks.
Mandan has two banks that figure
among the leading fiduciary institutions
of the state as among the most solid—
the First National and the State Bank
of Morton county. Their statements
show a steady increase in deposits and
in amount of surplus.
NEW SALEM.
Twenty-eight miles west of Mandan is
the prosperous town of New Salem, in
the midst of a community of as thrifty
farmers as are to be found anywhere in
the state. It is the headquarters for
some half dozen creameries that are
scattered over the country contiguous
to the town, and it is perhaps due to
these as much as to any one cause that
so many evidences of thrift exist. The
buildings in town and country are, in
large measure, modern and up-to-date,
all showing that its people are enjoying
an era of prosperity that is permanent
and lasting, and that its commercial and
agricultural operations have struck the
level of adaptability to natural environ­
ment. There are inexhaustible deposits
of a superior quality of coal in close
proximity to town.
HEBRON.
Hebron is near the western boundary
of Morton county, and it, too, is in the
midst of an environment that is rich in
agricultural resources, having cream
eriesand a flouring mill, where the best
products of the field and dairy are re­
duced to the form most nearly ap­
proaching the household necessities.
All these towns are enjoying a good
healthy trade, because the farmers and
merchants in the mid^t of whom they
are situated are prosperous.
GLEN ULLIN.
Glen Ullin is another Morton county
town that is thriving as a result of its
being surrounded by an incomparably
rich agricultural district. Here also
area number of creameries, and the
quality of their product is gaining wide
repute east and west, and have already
done much to demonstrate that nowhere
are the native grasses so well adapted to
the manufacture of dairy products as on
this great West Missouri plain.
HEY IJI 1M
Former Attorney General Said to Have
Declared Railroad Merger Will
Not Hold Goo'1.
Opinion Alleged to Have Been Given
Burlington Officials When Deal
Was First Talked.
Stated That the Northern Securities
Company May Not Carry Case
to the Courts.
Minneapolis, Feb. 22.—W. E. Has­
kell, proprietor of the Times of this
city, wires his paper from New York:
The belief today in the street among
the men of the inner circle is that the
Northern Securities company will not
stand the test in the courts. It is
moreover asserted that Mr. Morgan
and his associates, knowing the senti­
ment of the administration and of the
country, will not permit the test to be
made in the courts. I learned today
from a very prominent banker in Bos­
ton, a man whose name is as well
known on State street as that of Mr
gan of Wall street, that he was in­
formed by Richard Olney, attorney
general under Cleveland, that Olney
was consulted by the oflicials of the
Burlington road when the merger was
first contemplated, and that he ha
given them as his opinion, after care­
ful study and research, that the merger
would not and could not stand the tesi
of the Sherman law. This opinion is
considered as valuable as a dictum
from a chief justice and is having its
influence."
PHILIPPINE QUESTION
SENATOR McCUMBER DELIVERS
AN ADDRESS SUPPORTING GOV­
ERNMENT POLICY.
Washington, Feb. 22.—In the dis­
cussion of the Philippine question, Mr.
McCumber, North Dakota, presented a
carefully prepared address in support
of the administration policy on the
Philippine question. He did not think
that congress had the moral right to
bind the hands of the American peo­
ple, of the future, by prematurely
pledging them to any particular course.
In conclusion he said that the com­
mercial advantages of the Philippine
Islands should be considered but they
were overshadowed by three great du­
ties—duty to the people of the Philip­
pines, to the people of the world and
to the United States. When these
duties had been performed, and when
all had been done for the betterment
of the Philippines, that could be don
by the United States, then it would be
time to determine what should be the
final disposition of the islands so far
as this country was concerned.
SENATORS IN A FIGHT
VICIOUS FIST FIGHT ON FLOOR OF
SENATE BETWEEN TILLMAN
AND M'LAURIN.
Washington, Feb. 22.—In the senate
this afternoon a fist fight occurred be­
tween Senators Tillman and M'Laurin.
McLaurin said Tillman's statement re­
garding him was a "willful, malicious
and deliberate lie." Tillman jumped
over the chairs and struck McLaurin
in the face. A vicious encounter en­
sued. Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms
Layton sprang between them and sev­
eral senators seized the men and parted
them.
DEMOCRATS MEET.
PROMINENT DEMOCRATS OF THF
COUNTRY WILL MEET AT NEW
YORK TONIGHT TO DISCUSS
THEIR DIFFERENCES.
New York, Feb. 22.—Democrats from
nearly every state in the union will
meet tonight at the Manhattan club
to discuss differences. Among the
speakers will be J. G. Carlisle, David
B. Hill, W. Bourke Cochran, Patrick
Collins of Boston, Edward M. S. How­
ard and Judge Charles S. Truax.
Grover Cleveland will not be present
but he has sent a long letter which it
is understood outlines plans for the
rehabilitation of the party. W. J.
Bryan was invited but sent a letter of
regret.
THREE DAYS TO QUIT.
Barcelona, Feb. 22.—The captain
general has allowed the rioters three
days in which to deliver up all arms.
After the expiration of that time any
person found in possession of arms
will be tried by drumhead court mar­
tial.
HENRY MAY BE LATE
FURIOUS "STORM AT NEW YORK
MAY DELAY THE CROWN
PRINCE.
New York, Feb. 22.—Snow followed
by rain and sleet today created in this
city and vicinity the most disagreeable
weather conditions known in many
years. It is feared Crown Prince
Wilhelm with Prince Henry on board,
will be delayed by the gale.
New York, Feb. 22, 4 p. m.—The
Crown Prince Wilhelm with Prince
Henry on board has not yet been re­
ported. Wireless telegraphy stations
have been endeavoring since early
morning to reach the ship but no sig
nals have been received. Weathei
outside Sandy Hook is thick.
TWINS AT MEDORA
A DAUGHTER AND A NEWSPAPER
CAME ALONG AT THE SAME
TIME.
Medora, N. D., Feb. 22.—There were
two births in Medora today, first a
daughter to States Attorney and Mrs.
W. T. Denniston, second a newspaper
to Medora. The latter is named The
Little Missourian.
DEVILS LAKE INDIANS
REPORT OF SPECIAL INSPECTOR
SAYS THEY HAVE NOT AD­
VANCED AS THEY SHOULD
HAVE—RATIONS RECOMMENDED
DISCONTINUED TO FORT BER
THOLD INDIANS.
Washington, Feb. 22.—The secretary
of the interior, in a communication to
congress, gives an interesting report
of the condition of the Indian service
in the various states.
The investigation made by Frank C.
Armstrong was to ascertain what pro­
gress the Indians are making in the
art of civilization, the propriety of re­
ducing the size of their reservations
and the advisability of continuing an­
nuity payments in the northwest. The
investigations were made principally
in North Dakota concerning the Devils
Lake Indians in that state. Mr. Arm­
strong says their advancement is not
near as much as it should have been.
He said that these Indians are back­
ward and lack progress.
As to the Turtle Mountain band In­
spector Armstrong says they are in­
dustrious and are trying to earn their
support by hard labor. Concerning
the Indians at Fort Berthold. the state­
ment is made that they are well ad­
vanced in civilization. "But they are
too well cared for," says Mr. Arm­
strong. He recommends that rations
be no longer issued to them.
CAPITOL GOSSIP.
Governor and Mrs. White have spent
several days at Valley City this week,
and the routine affairs of the gover­
nor's office have been under the effi­
cient charge of Elizabeth Waggoner,
stenographer to the governor.
State Auditor Carlblom returned to
Forman this week, after having at­
tended the meeting of the state board
of university and school lands. The
state auditor has been suffering for
the past three weeks with an attack
of grippe and has not yet completely
recovered.
T. H. Poole, M. M. Cook, W. A.
Brown and C- L. Merrick are four
bright young men at the state capitol
who have organized the Missouri Slope
Realty company, for the purpose of
dealing in North Dakota and especially
Missouri slope lands. The gentlemen
are fully qualified to conduct a suc­
cessful business.
Under the supervision of the state
department of public instruction, lec­
tures covering important and timely
topics are being delivered at the var­
ious educational institutions of the
state. In this line of work Superin­
tendent Devine went this week to
Grand Forks where he delivers a lec­
ture appropriate to Washington's
birthday to the students of that insti­
tution.
Hon. Ford. Leutz, state commissioner
of insurance, was down from Hebron
this week, consulting with Deputy
Gilbreath regarding the affairs of the
office. Mr. Leutz expects a large at­
tendance at the creamery meeting to
be held at New Salem today and
hopes the meeting will be of much
benefit to the creamery men of the
western part of the state. Professor
Kauffman. state dairy commissioner.
Commissioner of Agriculture Turner
and others will be in attendance. Mr.
Leutz says nothing has been heard yet
regarding the offer of his company to
buy a million acres of laud from the
Northern Pacific road west of the
river.
Pages
17 to 24
FIVE-CENTS
[HE If OF IHE
Judge Pollock Administers the Sti£fest
Sentence Ever Given Under State
Prohibition Law.
N. A. Way ^Sentenced to Six Months
In Jail and a Fine of a Thousand
Dollars.
Way Filed Affidavit Against Judge
Cowan and Got Out of Frying
Pan Into Fire.
Devils Lake, N. D., Feb. 22.—The
hardest blow ever given in this coun­
try to transgressors of the prohibition
law was today administered to N. A.
Way at the hands of Judge Pollock of
Fargo. Way was fined $1,000 and
given a six months sentence in the
county jail, besides being taxed up
with the costs, amounting to $284. If
the fine is not paid the jail sentence is
a year. The fine and costs become a
lien against any property he may pos­
sess. Fred Baker received propor­
tionately the same sentence.
If there is any humor in the ease it
is that Way filed an affidavit of preju­
dice against Judge Cowan who sat in
the trial of Way a few days previous,
in which the jury disagreed. Judge
Pollock was immediately summoned
and a new jury called, who convicted
Way with the result as above outlined.
POLITICS STIRRING
GRAND FORKS MUNICIPAL ELEC­
TION BEGINNING TO ATTRACT
LOCAL ATTENTION.
Grand Forks, Feb. 22.—There are in­
dications that the coming city cam­
paign here will be a lively one and
there is a good deal of interest taken in
it as it will be the first contest for th^
chief place on the ticket that there has
been for eight years. Mayor Dinnie
is away and it is not known what his
position is. The friends of Dr. H. M.
Wheeler have circulated a petition
nominating him for the position, and
yesterday he authorized a statemen.
that he was a candidate. Meantime
the friends of Dinnie have not been
idle, and they have just concluded to
place the mayor again in nomination.
A petition to this effect is now being
circulated and will be filed with the
auditor unless Mr. Dinnie d. -lines to
run, which is not expected.
CROPS OF 1901
NORTH DAKOTA RAISED 250 i!LSH
ELS OF WHEAT, 100 BUSHELS
OF FLAX, 75 BUSHELS OF OATS
AND $7U WORTH OF CATTLE FOR
EVERY MAN, WOMAN AND
CHILD IN THE STATE.
The fame of North Dakota as a pro­
ducer of wheat has gone far and wide,
but beyond this but little is known of
the resources of our fair state by the
public at large. The general impres­
sion of the east is apparently that it is
a comparative wilderness, with a
frigid climate, small population, small
resources, and small prospects. It is
true that only a comparatively small
proportion of the state is yet under
cultivation, and that the short period
of about thirty years practically com­
prises the history of the state's devel­
opment. Some figures may serve to
some extent to correct the wrong im­
pression of the state's resources, as
well as indicating some of the reasons
for its prosperity. During the season
of 1901 this state raised an average
of 250 bushels of wheat. 100 bushels
of flax, and 75 bushels of oats to every
man, woman and child in the state.
It has an average of $70 worth of live
stock to every man. woman and child
in the state. It has raised during the
last year not only the largest wheat
crop of any state in the union, but at
the same time has raised more than
half of the entire flax crop of the
United States, and besides has raised
its full share of oats, barley, rye, po­
tatoes. and hay. North Dakota is new
as a corn raising state, but during
1001 raised about two million bushels
of corn. In the way of vegetables
and root crops, etc., the amounts have
not been so large, comparatively little
having been raised except for local
markets and home use. but the aggre­
gate value thereof will amount to many
hundred thousand dollars. North Da­
kota has more than doubled its farm
acreage during the past ten years.—
Grand Forks Herald.
BEVERIDGE AT CHICAGO.
Chicago. 111., Feb. 22.—There Is a
general observance of the day here.
Senator Albert Beveridge of Indiana is
the orator of the day.

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