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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, November 14, 1902, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1902-11-14/ed-1/seq-4/

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A MILD CASE
Of Contagious Blood Poison never eids
ted. It is always bad, though sometimes
no external symptoms of the disease ap­
pear for a long time.
Because the disease is slow in devel­
oping does not indicate that the case is
a mild one, for the poisonous virus at
work in the blood and system may be
spending its force upon some internal
vital organ while you are looking for ex
teraal signs. Contagious Blooa Poison
does not affect all alike. In most cases
the first little sore is quickly followed by
painful swellings in the groins, a red
eruption upon the body, sores or ulcers
in the mouth and throat, unsightly copper
colored blotches, loss of hair and eye­
brows and other symptoms of this^ miser­
able disease. When the poison is thus
fighting its way to the surface, exposing
the disease in all its hideousness, we call
it a bad case but Contagious Blood Poi­
son, whether working internally or exter­
nally, is a dangerous, treacherous disease.
S. S. S. is the only remedy that cures
Contagious Blood Poison thoroughly aad
permanently. It is an antidote for the
deadly virus that produces the awful
eruptions, sores and ulcers, and destroys
the bones. Mercury and Potash dry up
the skin eruptions, but in so doing drive
the poison further into the system, where
it slumbers for a time, but comes back
again with redoubled fury.
S. S. S. is a vegetable remedy that has
been used successfully for years in treat
ingthisvilediseaseand
curesitinallstagesand
forms. If you have the
slightest symptom an
kJP kJV occasional sore mouth,
or muscular and bone
pains, your blood is tainted and the disease
is liable to break out again at any time.
A course of S. S. S. will remove every
trace of poison and at the same time
build up your general health.
Write for our Free Home Treatment
book. No charge for medical advice.
The Swift Specific Co., Atlanta, Ga.
Snnff and a Crook.
Robert Pinkerton once told a story of
his father, the founder of the detective
agency, which illustrates the elder
Pinkerton's caution. A. noted criminal
was detained in Pinkerton's Chicago
office. The elder Pinkerton left the room
and when he returned took the precau­
tion of holding a revolver in front of
him ready for use.
He saw the criminal standing by the
door with a snuffbox he had picked
np from Pinkerton's desk in his hand.
"This is good snuff," affably re­
marked the crook as he took a sniff.
"For the eyes or the nose?" asked
Pinkerton, who knew that the crook
had intended to blind him in an effort
to escape.
"Well," remarked the criminal, "I'm
sorry to say that the nose gets it this
time."
Would Not Keep Her Back.
Saddler Slme was a droll character
and yet of a type by no means scarce
in the rural districts of the north of
Scotland, says the Dundee Journal. One
morning when a neighbor entered his
shop he was greeted with the follow­
ing:
"Man, Jeemie, I had an awfu' dream
last nicht. I thocht I saw my wife
fleein' awa' up to heaven wi' a great
'. big pair of weengs."
"Aye, man, an' did ye no try to pu'
her back?"
"Na, na I juist clappit my hands an'
cried, 'Shoo! Shoor I was feart she
wad never hae anither chance of get
tin' sae near in."
He Saw How It Fell.
An Irishman who was visiting Amer­
ica for the first time was lost in admi­
ration of the ^Niagara falls when a
friend accosted him:
"Well, Pat, and what do you think
of this? Isn't it a grand sight? There's
nothing in the old country to come up
to it. See how it falls'."
"Faith, I see how it falls," said Pat
"but, shure, there's nothin' to hinder
it!"—London Nuggets.
Natural.
Clarence—I wish I had lots of mon­
ey.
Uncle Henry—If one could get what
he wished for, I think I should wish
for common sense, not for money.
Clarence Naturally every one
wishes for what he hasn't got.—Boston
Transcript
He Knew Her.
She—Reggie, dear, there is something
of the old time love light in your eyes
tonight—something about you that re­
minds me of those sweet days of long
ago. I hope you have-
He- -Yes, I have a little left. How
much do you want this time?
CALIFORNIA
Is the land of perpetual
sunshine, fruit and flow­
ers, and the best way to
get there is to take the
I
gfiv-ri
i£~
$L^
OnlyShasta Route
a:
a
&
Prom Portland, Oregon.
Dining Cars, Pullman
Sleepers, and an
Trains leave 'Portland
daily at 8:30 a. m. and
8:30 p. m, reaching San
Francisco in less than
36 hours and Los An
10 hours later.
Portland to Los
Angeles and Ret'n
For illustrated pam-
S& phlets, maps, folders,
.etc., address,
%,|B. COMAN, G. P. A.,
Illffll Portland, Oregon.' •H'
$ WT+\?C
FLAGS ON
THE
CAPITOL.
What It Mean* When They Are Fly­
ing at Half Mast.
The flying of flags over the capitol at
half mast is regulated by the strictest
rules. Whenever these flags are seen
floating half way down the mast it is
a sure indication that a vice president,
senator or representative is lying dead
or that the action is taken in response
to a presidential proclamation ordering
the flags on public buildings at half
mast in respect to the memory of some
prominent official of the government
who has passed away.
When the sergeant at arms of the
senate or house of representatives
learns of the death of a member of
either of those bodies, he at once
orders that the flags over the senate
chamber or hall of representatives be
half masted. This is often done before
the houses of congress themselves are
officially notified of the death. A good
deal of discretion is exercised in the
manner of placing the news of a death
of this kind officially before the senate
or the house. Upon such an announce­
ment it is customary for the houses to
adjourn in respect to the deceased sen­
ator or representative, and in order
that the current business may not be
stopped, early in the day the announce­
ment is generally made just before the
houses are ready to conclude their
day's work.
Officers of the senate and house
when they fly the flags at half mast in
response to a proclamation by the pres­
ident regard their action as one of
courtesy, as they do not recognize the
power of the president to order con­
gress to do anything except to assem­
ble in extraordinary session. They
have always responded to the requests
of such proclamations. It would be a
nice question, if one could imagine that
it could ever be raised, to know to
what extent the president's authority
would allow him to order flags at half
mast on the capitol. While his author­
ity would not extend over the em­
ployees of the senate and house, yet
the capitol itself for many years was
in fact controlled exclusively by him
so far as the care of the building is
concerned, and the superintendent of
the building is today appointed by him
without confirmatory action on the
part of the senate.
As a matter of fact, the capitol has
for years been under the direct control
of the committees on appropriations of
the two houses of congress, but that
control has been accorded them by the
failure of the president to give any or­
ders to the architect or more lately to
the superintendent of the capitol. If
he should order that official to fly flags
over the capitol at half mast and the
order should be disobeyed, he would
have power to dismiss him and appoint
some one else in his place without the
concurrence of either branch of con­
gress, except so far as the appropria­
tion for the official's salary would be
involved. These are practically moot
questions, -but they occasionally form
interesting subjects for fireside talks
when flags are half'masted in response
to presidential proclamations.—Wash­
ington Star.
Thumb Nail Pictures.
In collections, centuries old, to be
seen in both China and Japan are
specimens of the most remarkable
drawings in the world, pictures of all
kinds drawn with the thumb nail. The
nails of the thumbs on the left hands
of the artists of these are allowed to
grow to an enormous length, some­
times to a foot or eighteen inches, and
are then pared down to a pen shaped
point. Dipping this oddly constructed
pen in beautiful vermilion or sky blue
Ink, the only kinds of ink used in these
sacred thumb nail drawings, the artist
gracefully outlines his work.
Occasionally the bold touches from
the studio of a master in this depart­
ment of "high art" are life size and
are sketched by a few sweeps of the
artist's arm. Like other pictures and
sketches of the orient, these sacred
thumb nail pictures are mounted and
rolled up like scrolls.
Some Words.
According to the late Richard A.
Proctor, says the London Chronicle,
the phrase "I guess," to English ears
so ridiculous, is really Identical with
the old expression, "I wis," meaning
"I know." The word "guess" has
changed its meaning entirely in Eng­
land, but has partly preserved it in
America, where of course the native
says "I guess" when he is more or less
in a state of certainty. There are many
other examples of words that have
played fast and loose with "g" and
"w," such as "guardian" and "ward­
en," "guard" "and "ward," "guichet"
and "wicket."
A Conscience Jar.
"Did you ever stop to think, my
love," said Mr. Micawber, gazing at
his plate of lobster salad, "that the
things we love most in this life are the
very things that never agree with us?"
"Will you be so kind, Micawber,"
said Mrs. Micawber, straightening up.
"as to tell me whether you are speak­
ing of the salad or of me, sir?"
Reckleaineia of a BeciBner.
Old Stager—I see this is your first
campaign.
Candidate—It is. How did yon guess
It?
Old Stager—You are distributing real
Havana cigars.—Chicago Tribune/
Exchfnge of ConpliMcat*.
Maud—My mamma says she can re
membep when your mamma kept a
grocer's shop.
Marie—My mamma says she can re­
member how much your mamma owes
her for groceries,
smm&w
one should take care tfiat be
behaves so well that bis enexnkc do
not behave better^—Atchison Globe.
PICTURESQUE BRITTANY.
A Market Scene In Thla Quaint
French Province.
Brittany is a land where the peasants
till the earth in zouave trousers, torea­
dor jackets covered with arabesque
embroideries and green waistcoats
around which run lines of crimson.
The women wear short red skirts,
great medici dollars and coifs that flut­
ter about their heads like the wings of
doves. From beneath the points of
their black caps the children gaze at
you with wide eyes full of the curiosity
of animals.
These people live in houses built of
sculptured granite and sleep in open­
work closets carved like the mouchara
bieks of Egypt.
In spite of the "Breton Interiors" and
"Returns of the Fishermen" with
which painters swamp the market this
race is still unknown or misunder­
stood, for they should be seen not in
paintings, but in their homes, In their
old time streets, on market days and
when, in fair time, the tents are pitched
in the village market places.
Fiery little horses draw to market
fish, fine vegetables and all the early
produce of Roscoff. They are spread
out upon the sidewalk. Chickens
cackle goats bleat pigs, tied by the
leg, strain toward the vegetables, sniff­
ing at the fresh greens.
Farmers in sabots, carrying great
blue umbrellas under their arms, with
the two ribbons of their felt hats float­
ing down their backs, pick their way
among the DInan china displayed on
the ground—capacious soup tureens,
cider jugs and plates covered with
painted flowers and grotesque figures.
The peasants converse with but few
gestures they bargain in gutteral
tones.
These taciturn people forget them­
selves in the barrooms on fair days.
The taverns are full of noise. You
may hear the sound of an accordion
and the plaintive note of the biniou (a
sort of bagpipe), leading monotonous
dances.
Into the harbor come boats laden
with fish other boats go out. The
fishermen are full of business. Next
week will occur the departure for the
new country. There are women who
weep.
Above all this agitation the smoke of
the village chimneys mingles with the
great white clouds. The quiet sea mir­
rors the sun.—Artist Castaigne in Cen­
tury.
LITERARY TREASURES.
Some Which Have Been and Some
Which Slay Be Lost to View.
The world, we have been assured
time, and again, knows nothing of its
greatest men. Perhaps it is equally ig­
norant about its greatest books. Are
we quite sure that the idols in our lit­
erary pantheon are arrayed in their
due order of precedence? The rules of
precedence change, and who shall as­
sert that tlnse prevalent at any given
time are the final ones? But, above
all, are we quite certain that there may
not be a notable work of genius lying
unnoticed and unknown amid the
wrecks of the river of time, waiting
only for some lucky accident that shall
reveal it in all its beauty to an aston­
ished world?
Such accidents with such results have
been frequent in the history of the
past. Indeed such accidents have pre
served or have revealed to the world
no insignificant proportion of its now
acknowledged masterpieces.
The books of the Bible themselves
have experienced the narrowest es­
capes from what might have resulted
in their total loss. The most notable
example is that of Deuteronomy, which
disappeared from the Jewish world for
over a century. The story of its re­
discovery by the high priest Hezekiah
during the reign of good King Josiah
is set forth in the Old Testament.
Shakespeare was practically forgot­
ten in the days when Addison wrote
his "Account of the Greatest English
Poets," with never a mention of the
name of the very greatest, yet it was
shortly afterward that Shakespeare
was resuscitated.
Fitzgerald's "Omar Khayyam" and
Blackmore's "Lorna Doone" dropped
stillborn from the press and later won
a sudden popularity by accident.—Wil­
liam S. Walsh in Era Magazine.
Patience With Eccentricity.
Many of the leading people in Eng­
lish society regarded Thomas Carlyle
with a feeling almost akin to reverent
delight when he chose to behave like
an ignorant boor in their .drawing
rooms, even taking his seat, it is said,
unbidden in the presence of the queen.
This generation, however, has little pa­
tience with such eccentricities.
It was an English bishop who, when
the historian Freeman had worn out
his patience with his rudeness, intro­
duced him to a waiting audience as
"the distinguished scholar that so ad­
mirably describes and illustrates the
savagery of our ancestors."
TfeatiBS Bans.
Cold water with ice In it is the
to use when an accidental burn from
acids or alkalis is encountered. Nitric
acid gets spilt at times, or even vitriol
may. A limb burned with adds most
be plunged in cold water and kept
there, so that the water may dilute
the traces of the acid in the skin as
mnch as possible. When add burning
causes injury, the water should be ren­
dered alkaline by adding soda to coun­
teract the add.
BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE: FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14. 1002.
Botanical Hate. •,
A fern In a Jardiniere and two little
sprouts in tin cans it pnt in 9 window
are sufficient to give the woman who
owns them the right to use the word
."fernery."—Atchisorj Globe.
W
5^
1 1
Some men arfe like telescope*—you
draw, them out see through them and
then shut them up.
haj Jhn
h* hii
s#yt -**,
Northeast quarter of southwest quarter
EUREKA SPRINGS
has flourished this jrear as sever before,
and the anpftMching Fall and Winter
promise welL
THE CRESCENT HOTEL
has been remodeled, aad opened under
the management of the Frisco System,
with Mr. IIt E. Sumner as proprietor.
It is' provided with new conveniences
and comforts of every description, and
111 be
open for business the year'round.
Illustrated descriptive literature of
Eureka Springs may be had from any
repceseatativa of thegp
wit
Pmnyr Traffic tophmw,
O
mJLTVTT ZOt7I*.
4
THE
NORTHERN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
Two through trains every day to'points east and west, the most modern
equipment and perfect service has made the Northern Pacific the favorite
route.
Try the "NORTH COAST LIMITED,"
It's the "Crack Train of the Northwest."
The Lake Superior Limited on the Duluth Short Line of the Northern
Pacific embodies every luxury'and comfort of modern passenger.train equip­
To
8T. PAUL
MINNEAPOLIS
DULUTH i|
AND POINTS I!
EAST fit SOUTH II
To
BUTTE
HELENA
8POKANB
8EATTLE
TACOMA
PORTLAND
CALIFORNIA
UAPAN
CHINA
ALASKA
KLONDIKE
Chat, 8.
FM,
6. P. A
wt. nn rant
Jr=lfl=3n=lr=. ~n==If=mr.
NORTH DAKOTA LANDS FOR SALE
By SMITH BROS., a
Southwest quarter 29
AUTUMN
mmmmmm AND mmmmmm
WINTER.
Are very pleasant seasons In the
Ozark Mountains. The altitude in this
region Is sufficient to insure a thin, clear
and the location is far
south to a piil4./JKn
winter.
srr ii^""' v'*-
no Temple Court, MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
Description Sec. Twp. Bnge,' Acres Price pr A.
Northwest quarter of northwest quarter 35 131 75 40 8.00
7 186 78 148.75 9 00
1 143 70 158.78 r-v 6 75
7 143 70 160
Northeast quarter of southwest quarter 1 131 78 40 7 00
South half of southwest quarter.. 1 131 73 80
100
Southwest qunrter of southeast quarter........ 1 131 78 40 7 00
West half of southeast quarter. 19 138 88 80 6 00
29 J38
188
N orthwest quarter 31 138 89 155.18 4 50
23 139 .80 160 6 00
North half of southeast quarter 29 140 81 80 7 00
North half of north half... 1 138 67 159.80 7 00
27 143 69 217,10 7 00
^,,r'
VESTIBULED TRAINS.
DINING CARS.
Time Card-Bismarck.
H'e« Bound.
No. 1, North Coast Limited... 10:05 p. m.
No.8. Paeiflo Express.... 12:22 m.
East Bound.
No. 2, North Coast Limited 12:55a.m.
No.4.AtlanticExpress 3:43p. m.
Way Freight.
No. 61, westbound .6:00 p.m.
No. 62, east bonnd 7:35a. m.
Gel Permit at Ticket Office for BB-Bt
Pallman first-class and Tonrlst Sleeping ears.
S. PYE CO.
Insure Anything Insurable
When your friends ask you to go on their bonds, send them to us.
We are General Agents for the
U. S. Fidelity and Guaranty Company
Brat on earth, and can bood them.
PIONEER AGENCY
OFFICE FIR8T NATIONAL BANK BLOCK
BISMARCK, N. D.
Good Idea.
If you have invented something—useful, hovel, new—and it is.
patentable, it will be well not to overlook the fact that there is:
good money in patented devices if properly promoted. The first
thing an inventor should do is to ascertain if his invention is
new and patentable. M. H. ewell, of the Bismarck Tribune,
who is a regularly registered patent attorney, will attend to all
patent' matters that may be Intrusted to his care.
7 140 78 320 8 00
-/,l,-••",* -*,
v'
'•iV
6 00
7 143 70 160.63 5 50
17 143 70 160 7 00
ie 143 70 170 6 50
9 144 70 160 10 00
85 144 70 160 10 00
1 1*3 71 162.90 6 50.
13 148 71 160 7 00
28 143 71 820 7 00
25- 144 71 160 V- 7 00
88 160 500
J38
188 88 160 5 00
Km
MINNEAPOLIS
j:
NLJV YORK,
NEW ENGLAND,
W
't
Vitk
UEBEC,
01
MJCHIQAU,
NEW#RUNSWICK,
NOVA SCOTIA.
TfcroBgfa~Sleei
|Mv
fleueml Mwiplfr
w.'ft. oaiuwiiv,
,«MMNUP#UtiV 4
Wholesale and Retail
...QROCERS...
Dealers in Coal, Wood,. Ice and
Grain.
Corner third and Broadway
^BISMARpK^-^-
1
Bismarck, WashburnGreat
Falls Railway Co.
Official Time Card No. 12. Taking effect at
6 a. m. Monday, January 13th, l&l.
Daily except Sunday.
N 1
I
Burlington
Route
Dihijtig Cars
a la Cairte
Our Dining Cars, operated on the
European plan, afford service of
the highest character, and have
ah international reputation.
Mr. 8. S." McClure of
McClure's Magazine,"
writes:
"I
W
N'r
X-'"
S a N 2
8:80 a. m. 0..Lv..Bismarck..t.. Ar. 3:00p. m.
9:10 a.m. 10..Lv. ..Arnold.. ..t..Lv.2^0 p. m.
9:50a.m. 18..Lv. Baldwin... t..Lv.l:50p. m.
26.Lv.Chapin Jet..... tiv
10:20a. m. 27.Ar.. Wilton t..Lv.l:15 p. m.
.Chapin. .....
11:30a.m. 27 L,y..Wilton....t..Ar.. 1:00p.
a Lv.RooBevelt....Lv..a
11:15a.m. 45 Ar..Washburn..t.Lv.. 12:15p.m.
a Stop on aigrnal. Telegraph station.
EDWIN C. WASHBUBN,
Genera) Mannjrer
E. 11.'WALKER,
Traffic Manager
0
EXAS
A NEW FAST THAI!
Between St. Louis and Kansas City and
OKLAHOMA CITY*
WICHITA.
DEOIISON,
SHERMAN*
DALLAS,
FORT WORTH
and principal points In Texas and the South­
west. This train la new throughout and is
made up ot the finest equipment, provided
with electric lights and all other modern
traveling conveniences. It runs via our nos
completed
Red River Division.
Every appliance known to modern car
building and railroading has been employe*
In the make-up of.this service, including
Cafe Observation Cars,
ander the management of Eked. Harvey.
Foil information as to rates and ail details ol
a trip via this new route will be cheerfully
tarnished, upon application, by any repres­
entative ot the
have traveled
on most roads in Europe.
and America, and have
dined on such as have res
tuarant cars. I would
rather dine on a Burling-iSSP
.. ton Route dining carltban
on, any other I know of in
the world." ', I
These cars are beautifully decor­
ated, lighted by electricity and ven
tijated by electric fans. The table
ware .was made to order for the
Burlington Route. Fresh flowerfe
are always on the tabels. Close
attention is paid tit every detail of
the service.
ASK YOUR HOME A0ENT FOR
TICKETS VIA THE BURLING­
TON ROUTE-f W^
SIJOdKHMlJ^pue
Wisiuoy
Merchant*
w.
A
it
mm
SHOULD ADVERTISE IN
THE WEEKLY TRIBUNE

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