OCR Interpretation


Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, April 06, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1909-04-06/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ft'*
/fi#P^
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR.
SOUTH AMERICAN GOVERNMENT
COMES TO THE FRONT WITH
OFFER.
PATIENCE WAS ABOUT GONE
8ineerety of Little Government IsIssue
Questioned In Sonie* Parts—Claimed
Offer of Settlement I* Only a Play
for More Time—State Department
However ip Satisfied Effort I* Real.
Washington, D. c£ April 5.—The
gratifying information was conveyed
to Secretary. Knox today that the
Nfcaraguan government would make
an early effort to settle, either by
compromise or by arbitration, the
claim for damages of the G. D. Em*
ery company, whose concession for
cutting mahogany was cancelled two
years and a half age for alleged vio
lation of the terms. Thrdugh Mr. Es
plnoza^ the Nicaraguan minister, the
secretary was told that a special
commissioner would come "immediate
ly to this "city, carrying instructions
"which would. empower, the minister
to reach! a settlement whereby the
whole coflltfdyersyt would Jbe:, adjusted.
If a compromise is not reached the
minister will sign a protocol submit
ting, the case to arbitration..
Diplomacy has well night exhausted
itself in the effort to reach a settle
ment. The last communication from
Secretary Knox the Nicaraguan
minister .was. ip^tftg-iSffiytt^^^fllt1
matum, in whiten tfie state department
submitte a protocol for the arbitration
of the case tQ .be signed by the m&
ister at the eatrliiB^t hour practicable
with hi«' ii^tfBi^l^s. $£fb£h::.':
There is '.m,^^^00^^-m
offioal quartel&t^iqulill^^
cerity a a
move, the axty^^Jbe/^^^ca^ that
it merely phi^ for time
and more" .d^wfe^^
ment hd^eTer,-||lfti|ci^^3Mxpr^ls
ecT over-the ou^ei^ 8%%f^ hptoe
for a prompt. seti^nieht is?^Bxpresf
odi .••''•••''• •'.: lllplilit
'jWC ""iii'tm ii 41
The steamer Hamburg, on which
Mr. Roosevelt was a passenger, com
ing in soon after noon, was greeted
on her way to the anchorage with the
blowing of whistles, t'ae fluttering of
many flags and the playing of bands.
Italian warships in the harbor,
steamers of various nationalities, pri
vate yachts and craft of all kinds
dressed in bunting and signal flags
from stem to stern, added to the pic
turesqueness of the scene, which he
himself characterized as magnificent
Great crowds,- too, waited fbr \\s
appearence, and when he rode in an
automobile he was greeted with an
enthusiasm that astonished him. He
met various official delegations at the
Hotel Excelsior, where apartments
'i had^been reserved for him, scores of
promine&t Americans and represen
I tatives of other countries, and to
them all he expressed his warmest
thank* for the welcome he had re-"
ceived. •. eH- i^stted the duke stad
.. duchess of Aofta at Capodimont, and
later dined, in private at the hotel,
'{. going on. board tb^ steamer Admiral
1^ aoout 101 o'etbek-in the evening. The
Admiral, which will convey Mr.
Rossevelt to Mombasa, was ready to
sail at midnight. The ex-prestdent's
ers. Chief among. these. were, bunch
es of red, white and black carnations
from the German emperor and a
great cluster of fragrant blossoms
|:SS''fbm• the empress.
!f"f Emper6r William, indeed, shiowe*
^|feat interest in the former presi
•fc% dent. The German consul general,"
ln the name of the emperor, carried
•to Ifr. Roosevelt the warmest greet-'
ings, and a letter In which the em
l»eror expressed the hope that he
would see Mr. Roosevelt In Berlin on
h^i return. In reply to tMii Mr.
syelt told the consul general to
tlMeinperor that he would
utintecan liv« and fight in
rTho emperor closed the let
"weldmannsheU," "hail to
ccessfol huatsman." Mr. Roose
wa* particularly touched by this,
-fa expreaalBg thanlca for thvl
irrackrasness, he said: "In a year
front now yon will bo In ,A position
ate whether I deserve such a
quartere^aboai^weW ftl^^ president, became exceeding
_.. __. _. __ lyJmpatient at tie delay, but eveni
when the.Scorpions' launch, with Mr.,
recervod by JCr
P^SSF?***
U.S. ATTORNEY QUOTES TAFT I
N
STANDARD OIL CASE YES-
TERDAY.
CONCLUDE ARGUMENT TODAY
in Case is Alleged Restrain of
Trade Practiced by Standard Oil
Company of New Jersey—Defense
Must. Complete Its Arguments By
Friday night.
SL Louis,' Mar''ifl^ ^^FoT^tlHr
first, time in the courts, of this county
a president of the United State* was
quote*} as A prevailing leagle author
ity today •iw vtte
v-
^bife'::-'Of:i:/:S^ml
Special United States Attorney Gen*4
eral Frank B. Kellogg's arguments in
the circuit court in the government's
ei^^disiieiv the Steadaird Oilnresidng,
Coinpiahy of New Jersey because of
an alleged, violation of the Sherman
act. Mr. Kellogg read at length from
a decision rendered by President Taft
in the Chase-Addstone Pipe case,
when he was a judge in Cincinnati.
The issue in the case Involved was
an alleged restraint of trade. The
federal lawyer hurried through his
argument today in a rapid manner,
promising to conclude' his open re
marks at noon tomorrow, leaving his
associate C. B. Morrison, to finish
with an argument covering the alleg
ed unfair competition of the defend
ants.
As one of the four Judges of the
court is to leave St. Louis Saturday,
Mr. Kellogg will insist upon the de
fense completing Its" argument by
Friday afternoon. This would leave
John G. Milburn of'Kew YorTc, TWfbr
ritz Rosenthal of Chicago, John G.
Johnson of Philadelphia, and David
B. Watson of Pittsburg, only two and
a half hours each to open their de
fense, with Friday fOr• the Standard
to.make ts concluding arguments, and
Saturday for Mr. Kellogg's. This, the
defense will bitterly '©f• ose. In all
liklihood the arguments will run well
into next weeky-asfuHr five days will
be required by the. defendant's law
ye/s„in 8tating4Xheiri.def«nse..
m\mrwM&-4tiM:*p^ ?-:fy
Naples, April 5. Ex-President. R'c^^eW^^r Merlnoitra" fr*om' a
Roosevelt spent several hours in Na- I Pro|4iftent ^eirjean w^Si lately was
in Jtome. -^fcefc#riter stated that he
hid gained thlie impression that the
pies today and in that time was given
many evidences of his popularity
with the Italian people, and of the
admiration which they have for his
distinguished services to his country.
VWican would have great pleasure in
receiving Mr. Roosevelt because of
tbe admiratfoa and high esteem in
which he was held there. Later Mr.
Roosevelt told the American ambas
sador that he should assuredly go to
the Vatican to see the pope if he vis,
ited Rome.
Three hours elapsed between the
arrival of the Hamburg and the land
ing of the expresident, as Mr. Roose
velt wished personally to superin
tend the handling of the baggage, of
which he had a large quantity. Afeari
while he was the object of a contin
ual ovation from Italian emigrants,
who broke.out into cheers every time
they caug'at a glimpse of him, from
the moment the Hamburg dropped
anchor.
As the vessel steamed .into the har
bor, the Italian man of war, several
German ships and a large contingent
of yachts and crafts oi all kinds, ran
up their bunting. The sun succeed
ed for a moment in piercing the
clouds, and lighted the bright colors
of t'ae steamers. The-bands on vari
ous ships :s'truck up the American na
tional anthem, and as Mr. Roosevelt
stood on the bridge and watched the
scene, he remarked that it was some
what ear-splitting, but picturesque
and magnificent. «,,. ,v
'The great crowds" ashore, which
had been -waiting for hours to see the
Roosevelt aboard, did come ashore,'
they were ignorant of the fact, and
the distinguished visitor reached the*
landing stage- practically. undiscover
ed. When, however^ he apeared in an
automobile, aiitf" proceeded to the
Hotel Excelsior, great roar broke*
tHelvC^^^Ao&^he' was
cehtinuouily alT along the
The oration moved Mr. Roose
a that the
i»^m«lte!5:a«.r:rtiiteh^noiae
vmm*r
aw t- -n
Arrive*«tth%-Hotel the ex-presl-
to ^he German caplUl1dentrecelve4 with.the gMatest cor-.
af his majoaty "ho the]d|ality the mass of foreigners who
hae gathered therentiouteawltle
to welcom hint.
spQke lo some Gug
Umo Ferrero, the hlatorlan, who re
cently returned film an extended
visit to tile United Hutes, and whom
Mr. ReoMvelt reeo^lioi imeaidlateT
ly. Many of those aasemhled. how
ewr, oould only reoelve a smile and
a handshake, as the^e was little Ume
for words. It belnc nearly S o'clock.
qot*lnu«d oi|^^
BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MORNING, APRIL 6, 1909.
GOVERNOR MADE HARD», FIGHT
AGAINST CASE COMING TO
TRIAL.
FRAUD IN JURY
His Associates.
SPECIAL TRAM FAILS
CALVIN WOMAN HURRIED TO THE
HOSPITAL FOR OPERATION
BUT DIES.
DICKINSON'S ELECTION
PsVpfe Come From all Parts of the Claim Backbone of Tariffs in State
Stat* to See Governor Tired for
For Fraud—Case Grew Out of Al
leged Land Grab By Governor and
Tulsa, Okla., April 5.—Governor
Charles N. Haskell, when sailed be
fore the federal court today to answer
to indictments charging him with
fraud in connection with the Musko
gee town lot cases, made a hard fight
against the case coming to trial
or
1
FATAL LAR1M0RE ACCIDENT FARM HANB HANGS SELF
GREAT NORTHERN BRAKEMAty IS* DETAIL OF AFAlR ARE MEAGRE
DEAD AS RESULT OF INJUR
IES RECEIVED.
FELL BENEATH WHEELS OF A
COACH WHILE ATTEMPTING
TO- MAKE COUPLING.
Larimore, N,. D~. April 5.—Neuman
^JAtMMiiii'-ri.i<p></p>Ei#Brs^^of^Crob1^0)nr^MInn
-i*lk-"a^»'a 'i %arr
••l'' -^:li•'"a
MANY MICHIGAN COUNTIES WENT
|bRYJAT ELECTION HELD
'-:M&1:* YE8TERDAY.
•r i&INyb I I". .•»'•'•*•
Judge Marshall of Utah, who Is that of the twenty-seven counties*
heard extended arguments
by both sides in the matter of Has- g, the sale or manufacture oi
hell's demurrer and likely will con-
Hask a to y8 ad
These allegations were" vigorously
denied by the government counsel. A
great crow attended the opening of the
trial. People came from all points
in the state to see the unusual spec
tacle of a governor on trial for al
leged fraud.
their fight by asking ^that the indict- renikfiiing, Jackson had voted fo»
ments be quashed, charging Special prohibition by the slender margin o|
Attorney General Rush with mlscon-
1
Dickinson, N. D., April 5.—In the
city^ejection for aldermen here today
R. H. Johnson, Al. While, J. K. Por
t(B|j, Chas. eTar, John Maser, B. F.of
Crawford, Frank Wanner and J.
Sciafer were elected for the ensuing
year. Election for the first time was
held in the Fifth and Sixth wards, there will be a lot more trouble before
these being newly created precincts the question is finally decided.
geexer^ Oum! Mumb
I traUon. I ain't go* as oSoe yot
ARE BmniSlASTK
Has Been Broken—Great Increase
In ajumber of Dry Counties as Re
'a£M|£of' Vote Cast Tntl-Saloor
League rlas Been Active in Work
Detroit, Mich., April 5.—"We havr
broken the backbone of the traffic in
Michigan," declared Superintendent
George W. Morrow of the Michigar
anti-saloon: league, at midnight to
night.
Definite returns at th~t time show
que
stion of abol-
their borders, nineteen ha"
0
sider a decision. gone ''dry," and seven had gone
*u
"wet," and indication* were the the
8 re
duct ng the grand jury inquiry, which eleven of the eighty-three counties o'
resulted in the indctments. It also the state were "dry
wasnchargedythat th granda
jury ha
bee illegall drawne that stenogd
rapher had been presenting the in
quiry and that competent testimony
had been the basis of the indict
ments.
today's election
Jackson, the last of the twenty
seven counties to give a complete
count, went "dry" by forty-one votes
SUPREME OOifBT RECONVENES.
Washington, D. April 5.—The
United States supreme court recon
vened today after recess extending
from March 22 till April 5. A deci
sion in the Hepburn commidities'
clause ,is expected.
AND NO CAUSE FOR ACT IS
S KNOWN.
CORONER HELD INQUEST LATE
%ESTERDAY BUT DETAILS
ARE LACKING.
April. 5.—Paul Laus8um
was farm hand employed on a farm
killed nere while attempting to make' near this place, commltteed suicide
a coupling between a baggage car, by hanging this afternoon,
and the engine. He slipped and*fell. Deceased has been an employe on
and both legs were taken off by the the Thobe farm for a number of
wheels of the car. He was.hurried to years and those who knew him are of
a hospital at Grand Forks- and died the opinion that the act was commit
at 1 o'clock.
teed while the victim was in a de
spondent mood. Details #f the affair,
however, are exceedingly meagre and
about all that is known is that he
was found hanging to one of the raft
ers of the Thobe barn. The coroner
held an inquest late today
GOING TO THE MERRY TRIAL
Devils Lake, N. D„ April 5.—In an, £. Dickinson, N. D., April 5.—Large
effort to save the life of •T.-s. W. H. delegations of lawyers and witnesses
Porter, wife of a Calvin physician, a left here today to attend the trial of
special train was chartered and the C. F. Merry at Hettinger, he being
woman tken to the hospital here held for obtaining money under false
where a difficult operation was per- pretenses. The numerous arrests and
formid. The operation was of no escapades make the trial one of un
avail, however, as Mrs. Calvin died usual interest to residents of the
Sunday night.
Slope country where he is very well
known.
IN FAVOR OF SEVENSON.
In a decision handed down by Judge
Winchester yesterday morning he
holds that the auditor of McLean
county must certify the election re
turns to the canvassing board and
thus decide a long, hard fight in favor
the division of MsLean county and
creating the county of Stevenson. The
case will undoubtedly be taken to the
supreme court by those who are in
favor of killing the division vote and
.rY^*i?y4'
with the admlnte-
WATER AND ELECTRIC LIGHTING
PLANT BONDS WIN IN A
WALK.
Bonds for Erection of Water Works
Plant and Distribution of Electricity
Carry With a Rush—Some Parties
Raise Issue of the Legality of Elee
tion Account Label of Ballots.
Fargo, N. D., April 5:—The bond
issue carried here today by a vote of
almost nine to one. The vote was a
heavy one following the hardest flgh'
that has ever been, waged in a muni
cipal election here. At 2 o'clock there
had been over sixteen hundred votes
cast and there is every probablity
that over 2,200 will be cast at the
time the ballots close.
There have been rumors in the aii
today that the legality of the election
will be questioned for two reasons.
First that the union label appeared
on all .he ballots where the law calls
for only the names of the candidates
and the questions that as* before th
people. The issue has been haised in
The statement has also been made
that the debt limit of the city har
been exceeded by the proposed issue
of bonds. All these issues will have
to be settled before the bonds can
be issued and the work of installing
the water system and electric llgh*
plant commenced.
PUDDLERS' WAGES CUT.
London, Pa., April 5.—Pursuiant
to notices issued by the American
Iron & Steel company, ten days ago,
puddlers today received $3.75 a ton
instead of $4.50, the past rate
McRae, Ga., April 5.—That Pope
Hill, a prominent attorney of Macon,
is the third victim of an assassin in
the now celebrated Dodge case, is the
belief of the authorities of this coun
ty. Hhe corontr's jury, after a care
ful examination, declared this after
noon Hill was murdered by "parties
unknown."
Hill was found dead in the office of
a local attorney at 7 a. m. today, a
bullet in his brain, and a revolver,
with one chamber discharged, grasp
ed in the right hand. The condition
of the office indicated a desperate
struggle. On the floor lay an unfin
ished court motion in the Dodge case,
drafted by the dead lawyer, which he
came here to file today.
Hill arrived here at noon Sunday
and later went to the home of the
proprietor of a hardware store and
said he had received some threaten
ing .letters and wanted a revolver.
He was so serious that the hardware
man opened the store and sold him
the revolver, which was found clasp
ed in his band. Today Hill re
turned to the office and was not seen
again alive. His body was found on
the flood this morning. He had been
dead several hours. The first idea of
suicide seemed contradicted by the
fact that there was no powder burns
on his face, and that there was ev
ery indication of a desperate struggle
in the office.
The trail of deaths and injuries in
the Dodge case began in 1891. In
that year Captain John C. Forsythe,
who represented the N. W. Dodge
WAS NEAR FATALWRECK
Dickinson. April 5.—The good
judgment of Engineer Buck Bartlett
of Northern Pacific train No. 3 prob
ably many lives this afternoon, as the
train was rounding a curev twelve
miles west of Mandan at hiflgh speed.
The engine tender left the track, for
tunately on the fhslde of the curve,
and, ripped up the rails for about
three ^rmin lengths, but broke no
rails and the balance of the train
passed over safely, but gave the pass
engers a bad scare and created a
panic Had the engineer applied the
air brakes a fearful wreck would
probably have followed and many In
juries resulted. The engineer was
highly praised by teh passengers for
bis presence of mind.
%#%%&&
other states and the label has beer iously to the adoption of the resolu
found not to invalidate the vote. The
other question is to whether the two
issues, the water and electricity were
presented in the proper form" Thr
rumors are not given much weight
here but is said by some that even
the report will have a tendency to
make the sale of the bonds a little
slower.
HOUSE WILL GO ON RECORD ON
TARIFF REVISION NEXT
FRIDAY. ,.".••'
DEMOCRATS FLAY BRYAN
Clark of Florida 'Denounced Bryan
and Bryanl«m and Populists and
Populism—Had Exciting W
With Randall of Texas—Clark De
fies all Democrats in the House.
Washington, p. C., April 5.—Thi^e
o'clock p. m., April 9, was the time
set by the house of representatives
today for a vote upon the Payne tar
iff MIL
The long expected resolution •from
the committee on rules closing the
general debate, providing for certain
committee amendments and a full and
free opportunity to alter the lumber
and hides* schedules, was reportedi
late in the day and) adopted wiw
sixteen votes to spare, notwithstand
ing the desertion of twenty Republi
cans. Four of the sixteen votes came
from the delegation which likewise
broke away from their party. Prev-3
tion there was some severe criticism
of it from the Democratic members.
Aside from the interest which war
attached to this proceeding was the
speech of Mr. Clark of Florida, who
denounced Bryan and Bryanlsm, popu
lists and populism, and who declared
that he would support the Payne bill
if it contained what his constituents
wante—a duty on cotton and protec
tion for fruits, pine apples, etc. His
remarks led him into an exciting col
loquy with Mr. Randall of Texas and
other Democrats, but he declared that
having been instructed by the legis
lature of his state and his constitu
ents as to the stand he should take
on the articles mentioned, he would
stand by his solemn obligation to
them. His whole attitude was one of
defiance to the Democrats of the
Before the rule was reported there
were numerous speeches on the bill.
TOLISTOFKILLED
estate, was assassinated. After six
weeks' trial, five men were sent to
prison for life for the crime. Soon
after this, Lucius Williams, one of
the claimants' attorneys, was killed,
and for weeks the entire country was
in a state of great excitement. Since
then there have been numerous en
counters growing out of the case in
which the participants received se
vere gunshot or stab wounds.
The Dodge lands cover some 400,
000 acres in Pulaski, Dodge, Telefer
and Lawrence counties.
The titles rested on ancient land
grants, and since 1882 there has been
continuous litigation over their own
ership. Many squatters settled on
different parts, and there was trou
ble every time an eviction was at
tempted. The Dodge heirs were
kept busy protecting their title and
disposing of squatters.
Pope Hill had been retained to rep
resent anew client whose name has
not been made known. When he ar
rived here Sunday, he carried cer
tain documents and deeds which he
proposed to offer to the court today
to sustain his client's claim. Tn the
last few years be has made a special
study of this case, and has been over
almost every acre of the eround. The
case seemed nearly settled recent
ly, and then the new client ap
peared.
Hill was 40 years old. was a mem
ber of the law firm of Harris & Har
ris. eH leaves a wife and one child.
His friends and business associates
are employing detectives.
A DIGHNSM EMBEZZLER
MAN ARRESTED IN ST. PAUL CON-
FESSES TO STEALING TAX
MONEY.
CLAIMED THAT HE WAS AT ONE
TIME TAX COLLECTOR I N
DICKINSON.
St. Paul, Minn* April 5.—When
brought into police court this morning
Peter Hnney told the Judge he had
given himself up to Officer OMaRey
at the Union depot and confessed to
the theft of $40 at Dickinson, N. Dv
while he was a collector of taxes
there. Tne ease was continued to
give an opportunity for further in
Ugatlon,
'-1'' T*rm$m•'•• ••'••••-••r\,
i&mm:^
^m-^mmm
PRICE FIVE CENT*
^.i-^^fSfi^-
:n
Pi'M
•l:??£$i
'^MkMlm
^.••^4M -if|!i6i
\'%W^
steals
•••. \^um
If 'y ••••'-#'^'4?"*3i^ai

xml | txt