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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, August 17, 1909, Image 4

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1909-08-17/ed-1/seq-4/

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Sh* §fottrowfe Irffttttt*.
_ery Moving Except Monday tttd Weekly
BY M. H. JEWELL.
Publication Office:
*00 FOURTH STREET, COR. BROADWAY
Established $ & %B Oldest in Sute
telephone—Business Office, 32 Editorial and
Local. 13.
Subscription Rates:
Osily by carrier 50 cents a month
Eaily by mail per yew
Veekly by mail $1.50 per year
No attention paid to anonymous contnbu
jons. Writer's name must be known to the
editor, but not necessarily for publication.
ADVERTISING AGENTS:
La Coste & Maxwell, 140 Nassau Street,
New York. North Star Daily Press Asso
ciation, Germania Building, St. Paul, Minn.,
for business in Minnesota, Wisconsin and
South Dakota.
Manuscripts offered for publication will be
returned if unavailable. Communications for
^je Weekly Tribune shou'1 reach this office
ue Wednesday of each rtnek to Insure cub
lication in the current issue.
Correspondents wanted in every city, town
and precinct in the western part of the state.
All papers are continued unt/1 an explicit
orJer to discontinue is received, and until all
arrearages are ,-aid.
Entered as second-class matter.
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS.
RETURN OF PROSPERITY.
The Commercial National Bank of
Chicago, through inquiries made Of
some 4}000 bankers.and business men
through the middle west and north,
west, has prepared an elaborate state
ment of present business conditiins
and prosperity. The whole nature
of these reports indicates a return
of prisperous buisness conditions and
the following statement is made,
based upon the views of thousands of
widely distributed authorities:
It is no ibnger necessary to speak
in cautious terms of faint and scat
tered signs of industrial revival.
The evidence of improving conditions
is too abundant and conclusive to -be
gainsaid. The movement has devel.
oped so rapidly during the last three
months, and now includes so many
lines and has gained such momen
tum that, with fundamental condi
tions all favorable, a relapse .is no
longer to be feared. The industries
of modern society are so inter-de
pendent that starting the machinery
from a state of inaction is like start,
ing an eight horse team it is diffi.
cult at first to get them pulling to
gether, but when they have gained
momentum even the lagging mem.
hers are swept into line and are
soon keeping step and pulling their
share of the load.
All -of the signs that denote rising
prosperity and all the conditions pre
cedent are at Stoand. The wreckage
of the panic has been cleared away
the apprehensions which it aroused
have disappeared, and our people are
facing the future with an optimism
and courage born of knowledge of
the wonderful resources if this coun.
goods and the country has grown up
to its facilities and equipment, at
this opportune time to inaugerate a
new era of prosperity comes the best
ell-round crop ever produced in this
country:/,/. .-.'
Of thg conditions in the great agri.
qnlturai sections in the northwest the
following report is made: ",
The northwest Has yet to harvest
its crop to the indicated yield of
our correspondents, but the cutting
has progressed rapidly and over half
of the acreage is safe from blight
of heat or frost. A year ago a dry
area hung over the western half of
North Dakota, a touch of the black
rust nipped the plant in the southern
counties, and the northern fringe
of South Dakota. In the critical
stage this year rust was threatened,
and conditions favored its spread
but the changing moods of the weath.
er saved the best wheat crop of a
decade. The government indication
of 310,000,000 bushels in July was re
duced to 293,000,000 in August by
too rapid ripening under continued
warm exposures. This rapid ripen,
ing has been the only drawback, and
that but slight. The crop has reach
ed its maturity early and escaped
the great danger of the northern part
of the belt—frost. The Pacific
Coast returns to its usual large yield
though threatened atfh'le by the ear.
ly summer drought, and "though not
a record for that region, it is well
above the average.
While high prices were apparent
last summer and predicted in our
review, the return to the wheat far
mer this year willl be, yield con.
sidered, as remunerative. The
grain has come to ^SP. market at an
average price higher than last year,
when ea^v marketings in the south,
west were sold at 75 to 80 cents per
bushel and the early marketings this
year over the entire winter belt was
from $1 to $1.15. Tb,e price on the
farni now is from S6 to 92. The price
will be fixed by the European de.
mand, which this year will be auffl
lent to take care of all our surplus,
which will not be In excess of last
year as the replenishment of stocks
will absorb a large quantity over the
normal consumption. Wheat will be
remunerative to the farmer, because
values are trending higher, and the
conaaming public will be saved from
exhorbitant prices by the generous
harvest.
As the Tribune stated a few days
"ago the real basis of the country's
returning prosperity is the splendid
crop, which Is not confined to any
ime section, but is being harvested
over the entire agricultural area.
The tariff agitation is out of the way,
the last wreckage of the panic of
1907 has been cleared away, and the
(year ahead .bright with favorable
,A*HpH***(mil
indications. North Dakota's share of
the prosperous conditions will not
be small. The price of its lands will
increase. There will be an influx of
investors and buyers. Eastern capi
tal is seeking investment out this
way and financial and business con.
ditions in the state are sound and
continually improving.
GRAVE OP SAKAOAWEA.
At the time when North Dakota
club women are working to erect a
monument to the Indian girl Saja.
cawea, a paragraph from one of Wm.
B. Curtis's letters is of interest. The
letter is written from Fort Washakie,
Wyo., and in speaking of the mill,
tary cemetary near there Mr. Curtus
says:
Another eminent and deserving
public servant, who was never appro
priately rewarded, sleeps in the In.
dian burying ground on the hillside
about six miles from the agency. I
refer to Sacajawea, the Shoshone
girl, who is called "the mother of
Oregon," and whose statue was er
ected at Portland during the recent
exposition. While still a young girl,
you will remember, she acted as
guide for Lewis and Clark in their
memorable expedition from St. Louis
to Oregon in 1866.8. She was more
than faithful, and, but for her in
tuitions and vigilance, her diplomacy
in the treatment of the savage tribes,
and her instinctive qualities as a
guide, the expedition would have
been a failure.
Capt. Lewis urged Sacajawea and
her husband, Charboneau, a French.
Canadian trapper, tp accompany him
to Washington and" faake their home
with the.whites, but. they declined
to go, and during the lifetime of
her husband Sacajawea lived among
the traders and trappers along the
banks of the Shoshone and Wind
rivers. After his death she returned
to her tribe and spent her last fif
teen or twenty years at this agency,
where she died surrounded by a
large family, many of whom still
survive. The Rev. John Roberts, the
Episcopal missionary in charge of an
industrial school for girls here, per.
formed her funeral service and' he
tells me that Sacajawea was a true
Christian. A handsome monument
has been erected to her memory.
The Tribune acknowledges receipt
of a copy of the Seattle-Tacoma Ho.
tel News, published at Seattle and
devoted to the hotel Interests of the
coast country. Geo. L. Townes^ form,
erly a North Dakota newspaper man,
is one of the publishers.
In view of his victory as a candi
date for the presidency for the city
commission, the Mandan Pioneer sug.
gests Hon. A. M. Packard of Mandan
as a candidate- for governor.
LIFE JOB OFFER FOR HONESTY
Brakeman Won't Leave Railroad and
Is Promoted—He Found $30,000.
Declining a life position of $100 a
month, Brakeman William J. Uobelen
of the Long Island railroad, who a
few days ago found a hand bag be
longing to Mrs. A. Schwab containing
$30,000 worth of jewelry, announced
recently that he would stick to rail
roading and was forthwith promoted
from brakeman to be collector, which
is but a step removed from that of
conductor.
Robelen said he had been with the
railroad four years and as he is only
twenty-two years old he hopes ulti
mately to work up to a position in
railroading that will eventually pay
him seven, times $100 a month.
It was on his return from Rockaway
to Long Island City that Robelen found
the hand bag in a seat in a passenger
coach. Opening it he found it flHed
with diamonds and pearls, besides a
sum of money. He turned it over to
the company, and it was identified as
the property of Mrs. A. Schwab of 318
West Eighty-fourth street, New York
city, who had left It in the train when
she got off at Hammels station.
Representatives of Mrs. Schwab
gave Robelen $100, two suits of clothes
and offered him a life position at $100
a month.
Robelen will continue on his run. He
declined the company's offer of two
weeks' vacation wHh pay, saying that
be preferred to "keep on the Job."
FLOATING STORES.
Merchandise Steamers of the Muskoka
Lake Country'-in Ontario.
Among the interesting features of
life In the Muskoka lake country, in
Ontario, are the floating stores. A
good sized steam vessel fitted out with
every imaginable item of merchandise
that might be required makes a tour
of aa assigned- chain of lakes once
each week. On a certain hour of a
certain day the boat Is expected at
the different resorts and summer
homes, and enough merchandise must
be bought at each to tide over until
the next trip of the floating store.
Upon stepping on board the store
boats, says a writer in Popular, Me
chanics, the purchaser approaches a
counter with scales and cash drawer,
as In any other kind of store. Behind
the counter are shelves, on which are
displayed such articles as may tempt
the eye. Behind these shelves is the
entrance to the storeroom and hold. In
whleb more merchandise is stored.
Bach article has its place, and the
atorekeeper can find it in a moment.
Sometimes isolated farm* on the
lakes are not worth stopping at every
trip, ao a flag is flown when stores are
desired. The store vessel drops an
chor when the signal flag is flown,
and some member of the family rows
eat tod makes the parchases,
'§Mmtf^im# ."• mzmmMMiMM
WtfrtM^KW^T^^iWifi^i Wlfli*l3i
THE TONGUE.
It Appears That This Organ Can Be
Eloquent Even When Silent.
From the observations made by a
physiognomist it appears that the
tongue when quite still can be as elo
quent In giving its owner away as
when it Is wagging sixteen to the
dozen. This is a hard fact for a silent
man to swallow—in silence. His only
remedy is to keep well so as to obviate
the necessary injunction of the doctor
to put his tongue out, for by this
thrust out sign the doctor shall know
him.
The tongue of the talker when ob
truded inclines to the right-side of the
mouth, we are asked to believe, where
as the seldom used tongue gravitates
to the left side. Orators, preachers
and barristers are endowed with right
sided tongues. Verbally parsimonious
persons have left sided tongues.
Furthermore, "the tongue that
shoots out straight without turning or
wavering indicates^ a solid, reliable
man of affairs." Tongues that turn
up Indicate impractical natures. A
downward, drooping tongue belongs
Couldn't Turn It.
The eye of little Willie's teacher was
sad and sorry, for, notwithstanding
that be was her favorite pupil, he stood
before her convicted of the heinous
charge of a theft of candy from a fel
low pupil. It was a first offense, how
ever, and she did not desire to inflict
corporal punishment A moral lecture,
she thought would fit the case.
"Bear in mind. Willie," she conclud
ed, "that these temptations can be re
sisted If determination is used. Al
ways turn a deaf ear to temptation."
Little Willie's Up trembled.
"But, teacher," he answered, "I ain't
got a deaf ear."
Making Hubby Appreciative.
A doctor tells of a note he received
from a woman saying that her hus
band, who was about to make him a
professional call, found constant fault
with the dinner she prepared for him.
She appealed to the physician for aid.
The doctor examined his patient who
had a slight attack of indigestion, and
told him to cut out luncheons, to eat
nothing but a slice of toast and a cup
of tea. The scheme wprked excellent
ly. Of course hubby returns home in
the evening, eats everything in sight
and votes his wife's cooking even bet
ter than mother used to make.—Boston
Record.
BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MORNING, AUGU8T 17, 1909.
to a person born to poverty and a ,in England, more especially In Essex,
ready eye for the hopeless side of4-In "-e
things.
speaking organ with curled up edges is
the property of an imaginative and
artistic being. When the tongue is
sues forth as if gripped in a dental
vise it signifies a love of life more
than ordinary.
Finally we are warned that the In
dividual who thrusts forth bis tongue
tip its extremest verge is a person to
whom no secret should'ever be con
fided, for he is an irresponsible chat
terer.—London Chronicle.
I HE WANTED A PARROT.
the Use to Which the Old Man Would
Put the.Green Bird., ^,
We are. all striving for two things
success and happiness. To get these
many of us are struggling for a third
—fortune. In striving to attain our
desires many of us need a green par
rot In a little town in Iowa, in the
midst of a great stretch of timber and
meadow, a man built a castle. -Some
thing over $25,000 he spent in building
a home. It was finished within with
the finest polished woods. The founda
tion was of brownstone, the windows,,
of French plate, and every detail'was
carried out in the best manner. He
had grown to be an old man. He had
always lived in a modest cottage of
six rooms. This mansion had fifteen.
On one side there was a magnificent
stone arch over the paved drive that
led up to the house. He bad just com
pleted showing a friend over the
place and reached this point when the
visitor exclaimed:
"Well, John, you ought to be happy.
This is a magnificent home. Here Is
everything one could wish for,"
"Waal," replied the old man, who
was a cattle buyer, "a fellow always
wants something else."
"What on earth could you want?"
was the query.
"A green parrot to hang up thar in
the drive."
"Why a green parrot?"
"So every morning afore I drive out
he would say. 'John, you're a darn
fool.' "—Cleveland Press.
.Thrifty.:',J.,^:v,-v ,'•
A Scotsman and bis wife were trav
ellhg from Leith to London by boat
When off the Yorkshire coast a great
storm arose, and the vessel had sev
eral narrow escapes from foundering.
"Ob, Sandy," moaned bis wife,
na afeard o* deein', but I dinna care
to dee at sea." '.._.,
"Dinna think o* deein' yet** answered
Sandy "but when ye do, ye'd better be
drooned at sea than anywhere else."
"An* why. Sandy?" asked his wife.
"Why?" exclaimed Sandy. "Because
ye woukma cost sae muckle to bury."
."'.': ''T:':.Go»d AeMee.y---*^."'K
"Young man." said the boss, "come
hither and listen." He approached.
"When you've made a mistake for
get it and go on to the next job. Don't
potter around ail day adding a lot of
finishing touches.'*—Louisville Courier
Journal. ':::0
There never was a day teat did not
bring its own opportunity for doing
good that never: could have been done
before, and never can be again,—W. H.
Burleigh,•$j^||i?^|:^yfi^l?:%'-y:
THE SAFFRON PUNT.
It Is Among the Very Oldest of the
Vegetable Products.
The particular species of crocus that
has from time immemorial been culti
vated for its dried stigmas, a product
known under the name of saffron, is
Crocus sativus, which Is wild from
Italy to Kurdistan. Saffron may be
reckoned among the very oldest of
vegetable products, being alluded to in
the Song of Solomon among other
spices of Lebanon. The name crocus
is Chaldean or Greek and was first
used by Theophrastus of Eresus about
350 B. 0„ and that It was a well
known and admired flower in Greece
soon afterward Is shown by Sophocles,
who mentions the "crocus of golden
beam" in his "Cedipus at Colonos."
The word saffron seems to be a cor
ruption of the Arabic name "al zahafa
ran," and the product Itself was first
imported Into England as a spice or
condiment, being also used as a color
or dye for silks and other, fabrics of
the eastern looms.
At a later date, exactly when is not
known, the plant itself was cultivated
The cruel tongue flattens and broad- fact Again, we have in London Saf
ens when extended. The delicate I fron bill, which formerly was a site
included In the bishop of Ely's garden
at Holborn, once famous for Its saf
fron beds as weH *as for its strawber-1
rles. Today, however, saffron Is but
little used.—London Chronicle.
which count- th name o•* Saffro
Walden remains in evidence of the
SUGAR AND CANDY.
Satisfy the Cravings of the Children
For 8weets.
Children may eat too much sugar,
and they may also "#tay too long in
their bathtub, or in the creek when
they go,in swimming, or get tanned or
a headache from playing too long in
the sun, or chilled by staying too long
in'the open air, but Is that any sound
reason why they should be deprived of
sweets, sunlight baths and fresh air
or discouraged from indulging in
them?'., l'j. -,!"' '„'.,••
All that Is needed, says Dr. Woods
Hutchinson in Success Magazine, is a
little common sense regulation and ju
dicious supervision, not prohibition or
denunciation. Most of the extraordi
nary craving for- pure sugar and can
dy, which is supposed to lead the
average child to Inevitably "founder
himself if left to his own sweet will
and a box of caddy, is due to a state
of artificial and abnormal sugar star
vation, -produced by an Insufficient
amount of this invaluable food in its
regular diet.
Children who are given plenty of
sugar on their mush, bread and but
ter and puddings, a regular allowance
of cake and plenty of sweet fruits are
almost free from this craze for candy,
this tendency to gorge" themselves to
surfeit, and can usually be trusted
with both the candy box and the sugar
bowl.
Parker House Bolls.
Materials.—Three tablespoohfuls of
butter, one teaspoonful of salt, one-half
cupful of lukewarm water, one yeast
cake, two cupfuls of new milk, one ta
blespoonful of sugar, two egg whites
and six cupfuls of flour.
Way of Preparing.—Scald the milk
and add to it the sugar, salt and but
ter. Let stand until lukewarm, then
add three cupfuls of flour and beat for
five minutes. Add the dissolved yeast
and let stand until It is a very light
frothy mass, then add the egg whites,
beaten to a stiff froth, and the remain
ing flour. Let rise again until it Is
twice its original bulk, place oh your
molding board, knead lightly and then
roll into a sheet half an inch thick.
Take a large biscuit cutter and cut the
dough into rounds. Brush with melted
butter, fold over and press the edges
together. Place in a buttered pan one
inch apart Let rise until very light
and bake in a hot oven fifteen minutes.
—National Food Magazine.
A Duck of a Man.
Ellen Terry and Mr. Balfour met for
the first time at the table of Henry
W. Lucy in London. During the en
suing conversation Miss Terry re
mained strangely silent Presently
the Unionist leader had to leave for
the house of commons, and Ellen
Terry at last found her tongue. Her
host was relieved to find that she bid,
not been bored. Bringing her closed
hand down on the table, she exclaimed
with a glance toward the door through
which Mr. Balfour,had passed, "1
think that's a duck of a manl"
ini.ii 'l I I -I,' ™}"^ffi:^':
,,/r Advantages. fc.'fe^ii
ft suppose you are glad to be tree
sgain?" -v'
i. •..••.()•• .-' ,,*,'V:i
The eVcohvict sidestepped a trolley
car, dodged an auto and looked nerv
ously toward a clanging ambulance.,'
"Oh, of course, of course," he said.
"But let me tell you a main lu prison
feels mighty safe.*—Philadelphfai Led-
"Your ocean trip was pretfy nice, I
•poser-. _,.£, •-.'
.. "Oh, yes/* .:, -:,^yy^.^l^-ix-yi^ji':'^
"Saw icebergs and such things, eh
"Yes, but I missed toe billboard*, I
can tell you."—Washington Herald."
'•'"M~ .,Pa«tleii.'lirtwser4tne^"u^liggi
"You Jiave a night key?" Slv*K
-Of course," answered Mr, Meekton,
"only I'm so careless that Henrietta
keeps it locked up in the safety de
posit so that I wont lose it"-Wash
ington Star.
-•^Si:,.:yi Amateurish.
Am I thefirstgirl you ever kissed
"You are—1 swear it!"
"I accept your apology."—Cleveland
Leader. ^^:::^^&W^0^lfS,y- ':.•
,'iV.ytf& iK^
Crachievemene.tSLOCUM.classthet&a.nColorade
ytr "jtrr?: fM^*^mm-
Insufficient
on
The CITY draws not only the laborer who might go to the farm,|
but the bov raised on the farm. Outside the fascination of bright'.
iWh& amnsement and the excitement of mingling with people, there^
nvs the SHORTER HOURS A N TH E BETTER PAY The
farmer h^donbled his wages in the.last fifteen years, but the farmer|
in his busy season- must work sixteen hours a day, while in the city
eight hours has become the rule. .,
-A*
High Prices pfl
Food.
It would seem to be a wise policy to GET THE E O A
A W A FROM THE LARGE CITIES A N OUT INTO E
COUNTRY, where his services are needed and where he has a chance|
to grow into a property owner. On the other hand, many of
immigrants arriving would be of no use in the western country. They
fnm cities in Europe or have FARMED LN A I I I E
WAY A N WOULD NOT KNOW WHA TO DO WITH
OUR MODERN MACHINERY,
IT IS A PITY THAT OUR LAWS WILL NOT ALLOW AMERICAN
FARMERS TO IMPORT REAL FARMERS FROM EUROPE WHO:KNOVV|
HOW TO- DO THE WORK.
Glory, Not Physical Benefit,
Aim of College Athletics**
By JAMES WILSON, Secretary oT
Agriculture.' --.''-.^,- •••••^•i\
'i'\ -$.-i)\'*\'\\":ttM
HERE is one potent reason for the. high prices ofh
foodstuffs in the United States, and that is THE?
FARMERS CAN'T GET ENOUGH^ HELP.
WHILE TH E POPULATION OF THE UNITED
STATES HAS BEEN STEADILY INCREASING THROUGH
THE U8UAL ADDlTiONS AT HOME AND FROM I
$•*****#*!
MIGRATION, THE CULTIVATED AREA OF THE COUNTRY IS E
CREASING. THOUSANDS OF ACRES FORMERLY, RAISING PROD
UCTS THAT MADE THE FOOD OF THE COUNTRY A E O N
BACK TO PASTURAGE. THE FARMERS SIMPLY CANNOT GET THE^
MEN TO RAISE CROPS.
WILLIAM President of College. Colorado. •.'•'•. ffr.
HE time has.come when glory of an athletic^ battlefield is
much mor in evidence &
in the room
N There are at present one or two things which are seri
ously affecting physical training, especially in our colleges and uni
versities, the influence of which is also felt very directly in our jBeog
ondary schools. This is the outcome very largely of the INTENSE.
COMPETITIVE SPIRIT which has entered into the athletic sports
which are carried on among American students.
THIS COMPETITION HA8 BECOME SO FIERCE A IT IS
CENTERING THE INTfeRE8TS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN PRE
PARING ATHLETES FOR CONTEST* RATHER THAN TH E DEVEL
OPMENT OF THOROUGH SCIENTIFIC PHYSICAL CULTURE FOBf .V,
HE E LARGER NUMBER OF YOUNG MEN, AND WOMEN. -.•,".
The great danger of the game of football as it is at present played
between our American colleges and secondary schools is that it is
NOT DOMINATED A LOVE OF SPORT FOR ITS
OWN SAKE. It tends to produce an ABNORMAL TYPE OF,
PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, simply for the purpose of intense
competition. :', /'"'. '*'•".^fe-.:.': Ti"^'^-.,,
The escape from these conditions vqll come by the DEVELOP^
MENT OF SPORT FOR ITS OWN SAKE, as is the case in^
English colleges and secondary schools, and by inducing prac^ally )w
every student to have his own sport*. .„'.v. ,?::.r-,./-:.-::.._.
A Substitute Is Needed For 11
Decaying Modern Relig1bh|
By Dr. A. ELLWOOD, Professor of Sociology, *t the.University of Missouri.''•:'^*-r £.
ODERN RELIGION IS DECAYING IN TH E UNITED 8 A E 8
TODAY, AN IF SOME SUBSTITUTE TO REPLACE IT 18
NOT FOUND OUR INSTITUTION)* WILL CRUMBLE.
feThe idea that social ""iifo_^suut-"-"%Beit^ '«kir^ii|pV --"V^i3?iaBLCiTa^^^
RELIGION Is^failacious. There is not a singlei'-ygi^i^^yt\^^^
civilization of the pa^t has'.survived without reli^^ *?®l
the past who: developed a stable 'civilization '^a^''k-'^TiKMEm-.JRE^^'
LIGION. iThe decadence of religion in ancient Greece and Bomflj|j/
was Simmediately followed by the decadence of their faliiil^^andy |y
civilizationi'^:''^1'^:''":'^ .:a| -.. i' ..- $^^x^'^&^-!E^^^!^^'
The'purest forms of the family life existed in ancient Rome audi
among tie ancient Hebrews* Divorce was absolutely unlmown. Tuefgfl
STRONGEST. RELIGIOUS LIFE WAS PRESENT in these||f
families? A little later divorce was permitted for only two 8tatutory^|^
reasons* :..-t '-'.:.:-.../:' .^'%.KiV.V'.^'^«,^-- .-:••i' -^r^'^yi^'''-^i^0fiW^
4 THE MARRIAGE' BOND MUST HAVE A RELIGIOUS SIGNIFY
CANCE, FOR WITHOUT IT IT CANNOT BE PERMANENT. THE MAR-||
RIAGE BOND WILL NEVER BE PERMANENT IF IT IS CONSID
ERED MERELY AS A CIVIL CONTRACT AND CAPABLE E I N
DISSOLVED AT WILL FOR ANY REASON.''..^V
Government Ownership Wotilt»
Adjust Wi^mtts of RailroadSe
ALPHEUS B. STICKNEY. former President of tb« Chleafo Crest Weiler^'iRaflrMs^^^
OT UNTIL ALL RAILROADS ARE CONSOLIDATED dR'TH«^^|fcl
GOVERNMENT PROCEEDS TO DO':' DIRECTLY WHAT I
NOW ATTEMPTS TO DO BY INDIRECTION-VIZ, *IXE»i^|f
ABSOLUTELY ALL RAILROAD RATES—WILL THERE
AN- ERA OF- STABILITY AND OF PEACE AND: FAIR A
BOTH .TO THE RAILROADS AND. TO THE PUBLIC.
Under the method now pursued by the government it would 8eeni#i|yt
to be the purpose to keep the railroads apart, close their ears
LET THEM FIGHT IT OUT AMONG THEMSELVES.
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result is UNDERHANDED AND UNFAIR COMP1
with secret rates to favored shippers or favored localities. '&
Contprfifeion between railroads makes LOW RAXES AT COM
PETITIVE POINTS, and they are obliged to recoup by I O E
1VK CHARGES AT KONCOMPEflTIVE'• j^mm-'--^'''^'^
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