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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, August 25, 1909, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1909-08-25/ed-1/seq-5/

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RAY SCOTT PAYS BIG
PRICEJOR CHICKEN
TEMPTATION PUT IN HIS WAYSAW
AND THRESHING CREW
PEACHES ON HIM.
Judge Pierce Collected $18.75 From
Wogansport Farmer For One Little
Prairie Chicken.
The first arrest in the county un
der the new game law was made Mon
day afternoon, and Ray Scott, a young
farmer living near Wogansport, was
taken before Judge Pierce Tuesday,
and after pleading guilty was fined
$10 and costs, making a total of
$18.75.
Scott was on his way to town after
some help to harvest his crop and
carried a 22-calibre rifle with him and
when he saw a covey of chickens the
temptation was more than he could
resist and he fired and brought one
of the birds down. He attempted to
conceal it under the seat of his bug
gy but the head fell down below the
slats in the bottom of the seat box,
and was seen by some members of
a threshing crew where he stopped
for a few minutes to talk with a neigh
bor. The man who had seen the
chicken immediately sent word to
Fred Carstens, the newly appointed
deputy game warden for the county,
and he went and made the arrest
with the above results.
It seems that Scott was also a dep
uty game warden.
8TREET CARS RAISED $500.
Only Three Towns in the State Are
Affected.
The state board of equalization
raised the assessment of street rail
ways five rundred dollars per mile at
a meeting Monday. There are only
three cities In the state, Grand Forks,
Fargo and Valley City, that are af
fected by the raise, as the road in
this city is owned by cne state and
is not subject to taxation.'
GONE TO DENVER.
Rev. Charles Remington, who has
been visiting with his brother in this
city for the past two weeks, left Tues
day afternoon for Denver, where he
will remain for a short tibe mefore.
•returning to MB home in Texas.
Rebuilt
Steam Engines
for Sale
We have the following rebuilt
steam engines for sale:
One
One
22-horse
18-horse
power Buffalo Pitts
power Buffalo Pitts,
power Northwest,
power New Giant,
power Garr-Scott.
power Garr-Scott.
power Garr-Scott.
power C. Aultman.
power Minneapolis
power Geiser.
power Advance,
power Advance,
power Avery.
One 25-hores
One 20-horse
One 16-horse
One 22-horse
Two 25-horse
One 16-horse
One 25-ihorse
One 25-horse
One 22-horse
One 25-horse
One 22-horse
AH engines are in good running
order. If you want a steam engine
write us for descriptive circular,
prices, etc.
More Bros.
Fargo and Wimbledon, N. D.
AKOTA BUSINESS.
A modern school. 9
600 pui*. 400
poatwat flbd la* 9MC
Ful
DuuUunn'nk
BUTLERS RETURNED
FR01UTRIP EAST
MANY OF THE SIGHTS OF
THE EAST AND ARE PLEAS
ED WITH TRIP.
Visited Old Home and Attended Con
vention of Photographers—Guests
of the Eastman Company.
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Butler are back
from their six weeks' trip to the east,
and they report a most enjoyable
time.
They went directly to Chicago
where, they spent Sunday in looking
over the city, riding nearly all day
in the taxicabs.
Next day they took the special train
containing all the western photo
graphers, and started for Rochester,
N. Y., stopping at Niagara (Falls for
six hours on the wav.
Arriving at Rochester, they attend
ed the convention, at which 3,000
photographers were present.
The Eastman Kodak company gave
a banquet at Ontario Beach, a few
miles from the icity, at which nearly
four thousand were "present.
They next visited Albany, N. Y.,
and from there took the day ride
down the Hudson, the Rhine of the
United States, on the palatial steam
er Robert Fulton. Spending twenty
four hours in the largest city in Amer
ica they then went to Boston, the
Athens of the United States on the
Harverdy one of the fine steam
ers that ply on Long Island Sound.
They went to Maine from the "Hub"
and spent days in the vicinity of Mr.
Butler's birth place. The old home
was recently destroyed by fire and
many of the old land marks have
gone the same way.
Returning to Boston they took the
Yale, a steamer, back to New York
City where they spent two days in
taking in the sights of the modern
Babylon. On leaving there they came
directly back) to Minneapolis, and
then went to Hutchinson, Minn, where
Mi Butler's son is in business and is
succeeding better than he expected.
he reached Bismarck tired after
such a long trip but much benefited
by the change.
Bananas 10 cents a dozen or three
dozen for a quarter while they last at
Richholt's.
DR. CHAMBERS RETURNED.
Dr. Chambers and wife returned, to
the city Tuesday afternoon after an
absence of five weeks. The time was
spent in Detroit, Mich., although the
doctor attended a series of lectures
at Ann Arbor during the summer.
Mrs. Chambers visited with her par
ents at Detroit
PERSONAL.
—Attorney B. Auger has gone to
Chicago to engage in the practice of
law. He has been a resident of this
city for four years, and was assist
an states attorney under A. T. Pat
terson. His friends here wish him
success in his new field.
—Miss May Swift is back from a
visit to Wisconsin of two week's du
ration. She was accompanied by her
mother.
—August Raugust, clerk of the court
of McLean county, was a visitor in
the city last night.
—-Clyde E. Van Der Maaten of
Louisville, Ky., is in the city in the
interst of the "Interior," published
in Chicago.
—A E. Jones the land man, was a
guest in the city yesterday with a
number of prospective buyers.
Bananas 10 cents a dozen or three
dozen for a quarter while they last at
Richholt's.
Actual Bwi«
OLLEGEf
•lot mo.
SCENE FROM THE SECOND ACT O
JOU AUG
Correspondence
RONDA.
Good morning. It is good to be
alive these pleasant mornings and to
Hve in North Dakota.
We are pleased to note in the Trib
une that war has been declared on
blind pigs. Some seem to think the
law is not the right thing, but this
does not seem to be the case among
the good American element. If those
who complain could visit Kansas for
awhile and imbibe some of her pure
moral atmsphere they would see the
difference. By all means enforce the
law, one of the very best for North
Dakota or any other state. We are
pleased to see that a strong prohibi
tion movement is everywhere, which
goes to show that people are realiz
ing the great need of stricter morals
in all walks of life.
Jacob Hauck lost a horse recently
as did, also, Wm. Middlestetter. Both
died of old age.
An agent for the Watkins Medical
Co. passed through here recently.
Mrs. Hauck visited Mrs. Leach re
cently.
The farmers are busy cutting hay
and grain and the farmers* wives are
assisting in every way possible.
Mr. Benjamin Stotling is about to
resign is position as superintendent
of schools so he can better look after
his lumber Interests. This is' right
and we Ihope his successor will hare
no interests beyond his office. That
he will visit the schools and assist
the teachers as he should, for if any
one needs help and encouragement it
is our North Dakota teachers, who in
many catfes suffer all kinds of abuse
We would like to see the compulsory
education law rigidly enforced for if
we are going to make Americans of
our foreign children, this is one of
the greatest steps.
Many of our teachers have already
found employment.
An auto just went past. These are
ideal roads for auto-driving. Many
land-seekers are abroad in the land
The Ronda correspondent planted,
an ounce of pie-plant seed, costing
eight cents, last spring, and now hasgo
314 thrifty plants.
The difference between prohibition
and open saloons can be seen in Far
go and Moorhead.
CANFIELD.
Miss Elvira Peterson returned to
her homestead from Painted Woods
Tuesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Humphrey Bailey
went to Wilton Thursday. Mrs. Bai
ley remained in the hospital for medi
cal treatment and Mr. Bailey return
ed Thursday evening.
Miss Lillian Ong was hustling
goods in the Canfleld store Saturday,
during the absence of Mr. Sundberg.
There Is a preaching service an
nounced to be held in the Andrews
township school house, near Canfleld,
Sunday eveniug, September 5. Rev.
Samuel of Sterling will conduct the
service. Everyone is invited to at
tend.
Miss Dorothey Elrtek, is a} home on
her homestead after spending a few
weeks in the Canfleld neighborhood.
Some weeks ago we mentioned the
death of our neighbor, G. F. Our, the
following is the obituary:
George F. Our was born September
28, 1844, in Montour county, Penn.,
and died June 27, 1909, at St. Joseph
Mercy hospital at Waiverly, la, aged
64 years, 9 months. About 1857 -he
was confirmed in the Dutch Reform
ed church at Milton, Penn. At the
age of 13 he moved with his parents
to Muscatine county, la. In the sum
mer of 1861 he enlisted in Company
D, 11th Iowa infantry, Crocker's bri
gade. He was in the service until the
end of the war, being with Sherman
on the march to the sea, and ^passed
in grand review before President Lin
coln at Washington, D. C. On Sep
tember 28, 1869, Mr. Our and Miss
Jennie Peterson were married at
Wilton Junction, la., at .which place
they made their home for fourteen
years. Six children were born to
them, two sons and four daughters.
BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MORNING,, AUGUST 25, 19Q9.
"THREE WEEKS," AT THE Bl
UST 31.
In the fall of 1883 Mr. Our remov
ed with his family to Cass county,
la., where he remained until the fall
of 1903, when he changed his resi
dence to Mt. Vernon, 111. The stay
at Mt. Vernon proved to be t#ly a
short one and in the spring of 1906 he
started a new home in North Dakota
on the prairie. Mr. Our became brok
en in health, and the winter of 1908
and 1909 was one of great suffering.
When the weather became warm he
went to Ardale, la., for medical treat
ment. An operation seemed neces
sary and was successfully performed,
but the disease, diabetis insipidus,
had made such inroads upon his
strength that he was not able to be
out of bed again. He was connected
with the Congregational church for a
•number of years, where he served as
a deacon, and in later years with the
Presbyterian church, in which he was
an ordained elder. He was a devoted
husband and father and those who
knew him best loved him for his
beautiful Christian life.
He leaves a wife, one son and three
daughters, one son and one daughter
having preceded him to the future1
home, two brothers and five sisters.
The funeral services were conducted
by Rev. W. E. Fisher at the home of
Mr. Our*s daughter, Mrs. O. L. Minert,
at Ardale, la., on July 1. The last
resting place is in Union Ridge ceme
tery in Butler County, la.
A FUSSY LIGHT.
Capt. Hall of the Salvation Army
and Rev. Newcomb of the Baptist
church, gave the fourth open air lec
ture in the series last night on Main
street. The subject was "China's
Teeming Millions,,—second part Mr.
Newcomb was well under way in the
delivery of the lecture when the coils
of wire, which govern the current sup
plying the lantern, came in contact
with each other and .sudden darkness
ensued. After some time it was ad
justed and the lecture was all but
completed when it again gave trouble
and the crowd was dismissed. On
every hand the efforts of Messrs Hall
and Newcomb are being commended
for this enitiative in entertaining the
crowds that assemble on Main street,
with good, wholesome pictures, full
of Instruction and moral precepts.
The public is assured that Jill will
well on Friday evening, when a
new lecture will be given. The sub
ject will be announced subsequentlv
Notice of Teachers' Examination.
Regular teachers' examination will
be held in the court house at Bis
marck Friday and Saturday, August
27 and 28. The work begins at 8:30
sharp each morning and all those who
intend to write must be present on
time. Those teaching on permits or
conditional certificates must take this
examination or forfeit their right to
further teaohing.
0, L. VIGNESS.
County Superintendent.
Try The Tribune Want Columns.
Try The Tribune Want Columns-
CAYOU& Co
Soo Hotel Building
Phone 5 3
Our Motto— A I
PLUMS
PLUMS
PLUMS
N is the time for Plum
Extra Fancy Blue Plums
for preserving'
O A
$1.70 Per Case
45c Per Basket
Telephone Orders sent G. 0. D.
•U. .y:
Bananas 10 cents a dozen or three
dozen for a quarter while they last at
Richholt's.
MINOT NOW LEARNS THINGS.
Minot Optic: E. H. Stenvick, of
this city, returned yesterday from
Bismarck, where he has spending
the past few days. Mr. Stenvick
states that politics are beginning to
warm up and candidates are being
mentioned for next years campaign.
It is rumored tnat Chief Justice
Morgan will be a candidate for the
senatorial toga and if he enters
would be considered a strong candi
date. It is also understood in Bis
marck that Mr. Clifford of Mohall
and Mr. Brown of Brinsmade will
receive the appointments as grain
commissioners in the state. This
decision has been watched for with
great interest by the local A. S. of
E. men.
OPERA HOUSE
For People
with
Red Blood
•••*'s••:*'.*:•"
B. UTTLE, Prwidout. P. D. KENDBICK, Vio« Front. J. L. BELL, C«*htor»
H. M. WBI8EB. AwUtantCMhior.
U. 8 E O S I O
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
I S A IM.
Established in 1879
Capital and Surplus $125,000.00
Genera Bankin Business a a
O A N S A E O N A A N S
Safet Deposi Boxes for
ITS A PRETTYE^TCK)
TO GETJT.50V/HYN0T
BANK1
ITWIL E SAT
E THER
E
AND COM
HANDY.
RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS.
Will Hold a Special Meeting Thurs
day.
There will be another special meet
ing of the board of railroad commis
sioners at the office of the secretary
at the capitol Thursday of this week.
The board will pass on a number of
bonds that have Deen received from
elevators, flour mills and grain ware
houses, and will transact such other
business as may come before them
at that time.
E I
N MIGHTY
The an will seek business association it will
ask first old you are next how much you,
have. If you a no he will seek farther.
W will pay interest on the money deposit In
our bank and compound the interest every six month
jtuB?Ghs.~f*z?*
MONUMENTS
Wholesale and Retail
I S A
Marble and Granite Works
We receive all our goods in
car load lots in the rough, which
enables us to sell 20 per cent
cheaper than by buying in the
east.
HsfflsHf
Send for Catalogue and Price Lists
LQUISH. CARUFEL, Prop.
HUSH! Don't Tell We Are Going flRE YOU?
A Play for People Wh Think. Not for Children.
A SENSATION O W O CONTINENTS
Elinor Glyn's
Passionate Love Drama
Three Weeks
with Beryi Hope as "The Lady"
3,500,000 Copies of this Book sold and read.
1,000,000 People have seen this play in its first twenty weeks
of this tour.
PRICES: $1.50, $1.00, 75c, 50c
Belfltifil Scuts cf OLD EUROPE
BISMARCK. N. D.
Taken Up.
Taken up on farm of S. Harris,
near the Capitol building one bay
horse about 900 lbs, lame in front.
One bay mare about 1,000 lbs. Owner
call and pay charges.
ONE NIGHT
TUESDAY
J. P. JOHNSON.
AUG.31
No Seats
Sold to
Children
"fe
'.•!.-' j,.,i, 'i?f '&.ii
•"•v'Jd'.yl
'•wxi
X- T'^-^S^-^i.

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