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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, September 09, 1909, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1909-09-09/ed-1/seq-6/

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Only Dishonest
Wealth Is Open to
Criticism. J»
By Justice DAVID J. BREWER of the United State*
Supreme Court.
I E have our difficulties today as our fathers did ii? their
time—not the same, but none the less difficulties.
But OUR FATHERS TRIUMPHED, AND W E
SHALL DO THE SAME.
LET NO MAN*DE8PAIR OF THE REPUBLIC. THE
ACCUMULATION OF WEALTH, IF HONE8TLY MADE,
OUGHT TO CREATE NO PREJUDICE AND AS THE WAYS IN WHICH
THE FORTUNES WERE ACCUMULATED ARE MADE KNOWN WILL
NOT RESULT IN ,ANY PREJUDICE.
The building up of great fortunes is not strange when business
transactions can be arranged by telegraph and telephone to all parts
of the land and to all parts of the world. In a FEW MINUTES
contracts are made that will bring great results either of success or
disaster. But, of course, there will always be SOME WHO WILL
E DISSATISFIED if they are not as fortunate as their neighbors.
Monopolies are being formed all the time, more or less complete, but
combination of capital is in itself no more to be condemned than the
privilege acquired by it is subject to condemnation.
ONE DUTY WHICH REALLY RE8TS UPON MEN WHO HAVE
ACQUIRED WEALTH HONESTLY IS TO RECOGNIZE THE FACT
THAT THEY OWE TO THE PUBLIC THE MORAL DUTY OF USING
80ME PORTION OF THEIR WEALTH FOR THE PUBLIC GOOD. THE
MORE OUR WEALTHY MEN COME INTO THE HABIT OF HELPING
EDUCATION AND CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS AND ORGANIZA
TIONS THE MORE THEY WILL DISABUSE THE MINDS OF THE
LESS FORTUNATE OF THEIR PREJUDICES.
Undoubtedly there is not a little social unrest because of this
accumulation of capital, of wealth, in the hands of a comparatively
few but, on the other hand, there is a GREAT BODY OF OUR
'PEOPLE who have acquired homes, who are enjoying comfortable
livelihoods and who deprecate any disturbance which will affect their
present condition of comfort. It is true there are a great many in
the slums or suffering from want of work, and they are the ones to
whom the demagogue makes the most effective appeal.
Abraham Lincoln said he relied upon the PLALN PEOPLE, and
di-i not mean by that the class who are known as "bums" or deni
zens -f the slums." He meant-die GREAT BODY OF FARMERS'.
A N THOSE WHO ARE LIVING DECENTLY
NECESSARILY FRUGALLY, I N TH E CITIES. They today
are the great body of the American people, and upon them the
destinies of this republic rest
WITHOUT VINOICTIVENESS, BUT WITH FAIRNESS, THEY WILL
PURSUE THOSE WHOM THEY THINK HAVE ACQUIRED WEALTH
DISHONESTLY. THEY BELIEVE THIS IS THE BEST GOVERN
MENT AND BEST FORM OF GOVERNMENT IN THE WORLD, AND
THEY ARE GOING TO SEEK TO CORRECT THE EVILS THAT HAVE
CREPT IN WITHOUT IN.ANY* MANNER UNDERMINING THE PRES
ENT SYSTEM OF GOVERNMENT. .,. -.•
A Merry Laugh Is Better
'%M*^l£TS*an Any Doctor.wet
By the Rev. »r. MADISON PETERS of New York.
MERRY hearftdoetb good like a medicine," declares the
Bible. It is better than any medicine for the systeih. It is
the best .tonic in the pharmacopoeia of life, rousing the
dormant tissues to- action, BRINGING THE FLUSH
OF HEALTH TO /¥&$? FACE A N TH E VIGOR O
STRENGTH"'''TO' ^Tffl B&jDY, '-it is the simplest of prescriptions,
needing no eompoun/iing of elements, and is so cheap that it is \VTxH
LN THE REACH, OFs,ALL.
W VERY CELL TO ACTION AND
TINGLES Wtt^AWfvrTY^'EVElYif'OR E AND OPENING TO EXUDE
THE POWWSUS EXCRETA OF T&E BODY.
A beart^taigkis* BETTER I A N ROUGE FOR THE COM
I'LE^fll^lSbel^deifli^^or thejeyes. It calls a glow to the cheeks
ind gives^paiskle Ap thg pupils whioh nothing else can. In this respect
it js mpre.e^b.jja.rating J&ajiJbprseback riding, baseball or lawn tennis.
HOW DIFFERENT 18 THE FRANK, OPEN, CHEERY MAN WHO
APPROACHES YOU WITH OUTSTRETCHED HAND, A SMILE ON HIS
LIP8, AND WHO, AT YOUR FIRST WORD, BUR8TS INTO A .RING
ING LAUGH OF ENCOURAGEMENT! HE INSPIRE8 YOUR CONFI
DENCE AT ONCE. YOU ARE ATTRACTED TO HIM AS STEEL TO A
MAGNET. YOU FEEL THAT YOU. CAN TRUST HIM AND ARE AT
HOME IN HIS COMPANY.
If laughter is good for the bodily well being it is EQUALLY
GOOD FOR MENTAL HEALTH. Anxiety, fear, worry, are
•deadly enemies to the mind. Fight against them.
The mind to a great degree governs the body, and what affects the
one at the same time acts upon the other., Make every effort to
strengthen the mind. KEEP. IT CHEERY A N YOU WILE
IIEEP IT HEALTHY A N WHOLESOME 'AND YOUR
BOLY WILL BE I N ACCORD.
Man Has Always Held
Woman as His Inferior.
By Mrs. PEARCB BAItfiY. Woman SoflEraVIt* of H«W YoH^"'
E present infenoiity of woman dated back ftoai the time of
the great davs oi Babylonia, when women were the PER
S N PRlOPESTY OF THEIR HUSBAND S OR
%^ATHERS .and1 were k^pt secliidedin their harems from all
Since those times EVBR BEEN, BEIJTTLED W
I E I praise of mankind has gone, as a
prnteejrive' measure, to thfe women of beauty and its antithesis to those
of learning. There is a distinct sex antagonism./ '^'-^M^^'/f^oj.
THE QNLY WOMAN WHOi IS NOT EXPLOITED IS THE SERV
ANT GIRL. THE E N 0 0 NOT CARE ABOUT OR ARE AFRAID OF
HER. SNE HAS T*tE ABILITY TO CARE FOR HERSELF. THE
FACTORY G|RL%JS iGXPLOITEDs THE WORKING GIRLS OF ALL
CLASSES AND E S ARE EXPLOITED EVEN THE MARRIED
WOMA^ V/JTH THIRTEEN CHILD'REW IS EXPLOITED. THE»f W
itf^
i**»ww»rinit*i*tni'W*Mwte
../^^^nnawmiawirtkfe^Mj^ «a*4«t\\:(
MEXICAN WOOING.
From Malting Eyes at a Sehorita to
the/Grand Serenade.
Iii the uncertain Illumination of the
electric lamps some of the senorltas
of Tepic City- appeared very attractive
In breezy, fluffy gowns and fetching
mantillas^ and they knew it pretty
well too. They like to have you look
at them, directly and admiringly, and
they will not drop their. fJhpP'
If yon have the nerve to give one
a look of this kind—such a look as
would be considered extremely rude
in any American city—the chances are
when you meet her on the next turn
you will be rewarded with a smile and
a challenge from the black eyes. Rnd
if you have a sufficient stock of nerve
In reserve you will speak to her and
pay her some complimentary remark
upon the first opportunity that offers.
This is good breeding and will hot be
resented.
Should you then become infatuated
with the lady you will search out her
home, visit her barred window and
mope under for an bour„,or*»two
every morning, and if you impress her
favorably she will make your heart
glad by talking with you through the
bars or dropping little scented notes
to you.
Should you become real serious ypu
will hire a stringed band to serenade
her at night now and then. To con
form with the custom you should start
your band out at midnight and let it
play as long as your money lasts.—Out
ing Magazine.
COSTERMONGER.
The
The Waiting .Ones.
A gentleman meeting a young wo
man who bad formerly been a servant
in his bouse and In whose welfare he
was Interested, the following conversa
tion took place:.
"Why, haven't you got married yetf'
"No, sir." i.
"Well, 1 thought yon would hive
been married before now."
"Oh. no, sir there's two waiting.**
"Two! Why, you don't mean to
marry two, do you?" ,,£.-:
"No, sir." 1$••.
"Then who are they?'
"Why, the two that's waiting 1* the
parson and me. We are waiting for
the man."—London Scraps. fir.
BISMARCK DAILY Tf|liUNt,THUR8lP^Y,JI«0RNINQ. SEPTEMBERS, HOi.
W
Was
Word In Former Times
8palled "Costard-monger?*
The word costermonger is now nsed
of an itinerant fruit seller. It was
formerly spelled costard-monger and
In this form appears in Drant's "Hor
ace." to translate the Latin word
"pomarius."
Literally if means costard seller, cos
tard being a kind of apple, the* name
of which'Murray connects with coste.
a rib. V-!s!f
Some etymologists connect Jt.*wlth
custard, assuming that the pulp of ap
ples'was used in preparing this deli
cacy, but there Is no real reason for
this, since the "custard apple," men
tioned in Dampler's "Voyages" (1689).
Is quite different, fruit from the mid
dle English costard.
Some connect if, also with ^costard,"
the humorous name for a head—"Take
him over the costard with the hilt of
thy sword" (Shakespeare). But it seems
more probable that the bead' was
called after the apple than the apple
after the head.
The termination "monger" simply
means a dealer or trader, as In fell
monger and ironmonger., and is de
rived from £he Anglo-Saxon,. word
"mangian," to traffic or barter, which
is akin to the Latin "mango," a deal
er who' sets off and polishes up MB
wares.—London Standard.
Two Ribs Broken.
Several people saw him slip on a
step and fall. Partly extricating
himself from his umbrella, be set up
such a. wall of distress that every one
In hearing ran to his 'assistance re
gardless of the drenching rain.
1
"Are you hurt?" asked a chorus of
voices,
"Anything broken?" demanded an
other.,
•'Only two ribs.'.' he muttered in
{ones of deep anguish as be wiped his
bleared face on his' sleeve.
Helping bim up, a kind man
dragged him Into a drug store. One
thoughtful person suggested a jjlass
Of brandy, another more generous1 said
there were two ribs broken, and a sec
ond glass followed the first
"That'll make you feel better,' old'
man. Bibs hurt you now?"
"What ribs?" he puzzled, smacking
his lips.
"Why, the ones you said were
broken!"
"Oh," he replied, getting on his feet
and moving toward the door. "Dey
was de ribs In me umbrella."—Judge.
~j|s
The*Hot Air Balloon. Ift
It Is related that the hot air ttaV
toon had Its origin In a petticoat
Mme. Montgolfler had washed her
garment, intending to wear It to a
great festival the next day, and hung
It over a chafing dish to dry. The hot
air swelled out its folds and fi
ft up into the air. The lady. In
tonlshtbtet, caffsd her husband to
the sight. He at once grasped tha
idea- and" was not -long hv producing
the hot air balloon. „^s
Unrequited Love.
fixtit Office Boy—Me boss is awftil
cranky lately. I Wonder What makes
him so hard on a fellow. Second Of
fice Boy—Dat's easy. When a man's
hard on a fellow Ifs a sign he's sott
on a glrL—Llppincotfs.: ,v.', M'
Not His Fault.
-*.:.
The Poet—Poets are born, sot made
The Girl-I know. I wasn't blaming
you.--Bost©n Transcript
A Human Hies Cowed the Lion.
At Cape Town a lion tamer was go
ing through a performance in a cage
with a full grown lion lately caught.
Suddenly it was seeu -that the brute
was patting the trainer through bis
paces rather than being put through
itself Softly, crouching and creep
ing, the big cat edged Itself between
the thoroughly unnerved man and the
door of the den, fixing its victim with
two rolling yellow, orbs of flaming
ferocity and sawing the empty air with
its tufted tail as it crouched prepara
tory to springing. Many men among
the audience, used to the ways of wild
beasts, saw and comprehended,' but
only one man possessed the knowledge
and the presence of mind to avert the
apparently inevitable. Pursing up his
lips as though be were going to whis
tle, be emitted a hoarse, low. rasp
ing hiss. The beast heard and under
stood, for the sound was an exact im
itation of the noise made by the giant
constrictor when its huge body is
coiled for the throw that never misses,
that never relaxes and.that no beast
of the field Is strong enough to with
stand. Again and yet again the rau
cous sound rasped the stillness,'*and
the angry brute drew back its bead, its
great eyes grew small and dull, the
hackles rose and stiffened on Its back,
and it cowered, whining, on the floor
of the cage.
8he Waa the Champion.
A colored woman of generous pro
portions was on the witness stand,
and she made such good witness for
the plaintiff that the attorney for the
defense planned to throw "cold water"
on what she said by finding fault with
her character.
"Let me see—you have been arrest
ed, haven't you?" the attorney asked
in cross examination.
"Now, look a-heah," said the wit
ness, getting apgry, "do you think. I'm
goin' to tell you all my private busi
ness? I guess not"
"I have the right to know, and you
must tell me," the lawyer persisted
and the judge instructed the witness
that she would have to answer.
"I's 'rested for llckin' my husban',"
she said, her eyes flashing.
"That so?" said the attorney, with
great satisfaction. "What is your hus
band's name?" She told him. "What
is his business?"
"He's a prizefightah," she,said, and
the Cross examination abruptly ended
amid general"merriment—Indianapolis
News.
-Going Some.
"Yes, sir," said,Old man Braggart!,
"as soon as I see them birds I went
Into the house and took down theAdd
blunderbuss and pegged at 'em, and,
by gorry, I brought down thutty birds
to one shot. Can ye beat that?"
''Ya-as," drawled Uncle SI* Peavey..
"You know Bill Wiggins' frog:..pond'f'
"Yes," said old man Braggard.
'What of It?"
"Waal, I went down there the other
bight after sundown to shoot a couple
Of bullfrogs with my old shotgun,"
said Uncle SI. "There was $.000 of
'em. settled on.tbem there lfly pads,
and I just lifted that there gun to my
shoulder and let her go."
"S'pose you did," 'said old inan Brag
gard. "How does that affect my bird
story?"
"Beats It all holler," retorted Uncle
81. "The minute my gun went off
thorn hull denied 5,000 bullfrogs croak
ed."—Harper's Weekly.
Take Life Like a Man.
It is a pitiable thing to Bee a young
man whining over his lot in fife and
excusing indifference and Inaction be
cause of hard luck or some cruel fate
which has put stumbling blocks in his
way.
Wo matter what your environment
or what you may be called upon to go
through, face life like a man, without
whining. Turn your face to the sun,
your back to the shadows, and look
the world In the face without wincing,
ifake the most of your situation. See
the beauties In it and not the ugly
features. This is the way to improve
ah unfortunate environment.—Success
Magazine.
Old Time Salutations.
It was the custom in Prance in the
seventeenth century to kiss a lady
when safuting her and continued In
common usage In England for a'' hun
dred years later. Royal salutations In
France required extreme formality.
One saluted the bed on entering the
royal bedchamber, and in approaching
the apartments of the' king all head
covering, the skullcap" ol priests" "In
cluded, bad to be removed. In salut
ing' queens and princessei one klssted
the hem of the robe.
One Trouble Lots.
"I have bad indigestion all day,"
complained the man "with the "bay
window to the poet "Do you ever suf
fer from Indigestion?"
"Indigestion"la largely'due torsating,
Isn't It?" asked the poet wistfully.
"Tea," said the bay windowed -num.
"No," said the poet "I never have
#??~New Xork *ress*
j.i*»i' l'
was fined f60o' for putting
coloring matter tn'artificial 'butter."
"Well, didn't you deserve lt
"Perhaps.' But what made toe msd
was that the judge who Imposed the
fine had dyed whiskers."—Clefeland
.teader. ,: ,,' .,. •'-,. i^W:,
W c«ttino#iv
,£ord Chatham said of f6» members
of Lord North's cabinet, "They have
brought themselves where ordinary In
ability.. never arrives and nothing bat
first rate .geniuses in Incapacity can
reach.**, ':,.•'" •,.* ..''',.'•
None IS secure from desperation few
fronvsubtlety.-'Byron.
.• L«i^s«anrfnI#,S»»or.v '.
To the landsman" thef sea Bust si*
wavs possess dangeisikthat to the sailor
appear only as casual phenomena upon
which to exercise his skill. Th* pray
er book has a special petition for the
safety of those: Who .jgp'dbwn to the
sea In ships, arid' everyt oneVwho ven
tures to leave the.shore goes forth
with a conschSusness of awe at his
own daring. Yet in the Intricate com
plexity of modern civilisation safety
on land and safety at sea have walked
by no meanS: with equal step. Every
morning brings ttsaome. story of death
or accident on land, while the great
passenger ships come and go in monot
onous regularity, bringing no reports
more stirring than those of high seas
that have kept them from making new
records. With the present madness
for speed and Its attendant reckless
ness our streets demand, constant
alertness if one would cross them, with
safety. Speed at sea has come through
larger and more stoutly constructed
ships. So the familiar old story Qf the
saiiorman at sea in a storm who, se
rehe in his consciousness of ample
sea room,.piously ejaculated, "God help
the poor folks ashore tonlghtP is not
wholly fantastic.—I* Frank Tooker In
Century.
On Hiring a Cook.
The woman in need of a cook was so
well groomed and looked so generally
prosperous that the manager of tHo
employment agency thought he had at
last found a place for the high priced
French cook for whom he had been
trying to find a situation. But the
new customer would not even listen
to the praises of the French cook.
"Don't mention French cooks to
me," she said, "nor graduates of cook
ing schools. I've tried both. I like
their cooking, and I don't object to the
wages they ask, but they take up too
much room. My kitchen isn't large
enough to hold all the cooking uten
sils they require, and my income Isn't
large enough to buy them. Those
stylish cooks need four times as many
pots and pans and molds and things
as ordinary cooks use. If I hire a
fancy cook I shall have to move Into
a fancy apartment to get a«kitchen big
enough to accommodate her."
"That is a common, complaint
•against these experts, foreign and
American," sighed the manager. ''I
am beginning to tiitnk tiiere'must'be
something in It"—New'York Sun'.
The Twenty^Cont Rovenge.
She was in a very. bad temper as she
boarded'an Amsterdam avenue car.
Her temper waB not Improved by the'
fact that as she drew a quarter of a
dollar from bet je'wel^d gold purse the
coin slipped from her fingers and roll
ed on the floor of the car. She made
no move to,recover the money, but
when the conductor came in to collect
her 4are she..pointed withsthe tlp^of
her handsome parasol to the coin.
"I dropped my farV'ahe said'snip
plshiy.' "Pick It up."'
v. The youngs conductor looked-her in
the eye for just a moment and then,
stooping, he picked1 the coin from be
tween the slats on, the floor covering,.
Leisurely tie took' four nickels, from
his.'pocket and' put tnem where the
quarter had been before.- Maybe'lt
wasNtKe effort of bending that made
his.'face red. When he straightened
up., he rang up the fare, turned and
sauntered jiack to the rear platform.—
New York Press.
•rv
The Chauffeur*! Rebuke.
An elderly Colonel lii a New York
club'is very* Inquisitive,' and there''Is
ho-question- he hesitates' to:'ask The
other day he saw drawn up before a.
hotel a fine motor .car, and at the
wheel of the car sat a chauffeur who.
had formerly been in his own employ.
The colonel stopped and asked the
chauffeur'who his mastei*Was, hdW he
liked his job and what wages-he drew
The chauffeur answered. these ques
tions politely. There was a cold glit
ter in hhreye, though. He was wait
ing for an opening. It came when the
Inquisitive old clubman said:
"Br—Gaston, what—er—hoW much
did your employer pay for this car?"
"The fact iSj sir," the chauffeur an
swered 'prompt^, "I^herer *bid" the
Impudence to ssfeihhn/': '•-,• rM •.,-.,.
.••. Th».Old1 Rtfnian
The ballot was 'first introduced Into
Borne in the second century B. C.
This was the- real Australian ballot
The voter received, a sort of wooden
slate covered with wax_ on which the
names of all the candidates were
scratched. He made holes in die wax
opposite those of his choice' and
dropped his tabfet'ln the box. 'After
the downfall of the1 Botdan republic
popular government took a long sleep,
and there was' little use 'for a ballot
till quite modern .times. ..
,%2$ 3 'E^li :ApprecIatad..^. YV'•
"So you were deeply touched b7 the
poem young &r.'GUffsoh wrote to
yout* safe Mahdfc *-:v-
:-:--'V*-^-'-^'-
•='.•'.•',
"I wooM Uke mlgh«5y*to eajoy
riches." /'. ••:'•*•&*.'.•'.'•.:,\-.. .:•,•,
*Th»n why don't you.try .to many,
•em'?'
"As I said, I want to enjoy 'em."—
|Eansas CSty^Th^nea^, j.f,(^^^^^^||
Enjoyed Troubli
'^ow dri yOh ittow Bllg^inS'ei^oTa
trouble?*'
"Because he'd rather be the-umpl
'hi' a ba^ej^n fan^ tlutf'oca t,.^
a*"—Exchange. •'.... ^M
:ess often leads to IniOlenca^
':'.'it.• «H«»v«f ^•r«P |jl -&M
A case recorded bjr :Fluta*cb w«M*$
seem to that dur!uffi|
periods of protrafcted insensibility the|
spirit of the steepe*. freed' from the
body, wanders away to. realms and
scenes not conceivable by the ordinary
senses. A man named Thespius, be
tells us, fell from a great height and
was picked up to all appearances dead.
There were no external wounds about
W but the physicians were satisfied
of the fact of the decease. Arrange
ments were made for bis burial, but
on the third day after bis faU he re
vived, much to the «m«teraation4ihls
friends. In a short.''time it became
quite evident that the whole tenor of
the-raa»'s life had changed. Previous
ly bis character was that of a repro
bate and a vicious man, but after his
insensibility he ever followed after.
Virtue. On being asked the reason of
the change, Thesplus related that dur
ing his long sleep his spirit had been
liberated from his body and had soar*
ed away to a strange land, where It
had joined a whole company of other
spirits. His past life was disclosed to
nun la all Its hideousness, and the
glorious capabilities which were be
fore him were revealed In such a man
ner as to make him ambitious of at
taining them.
The Hearts of Sam Houston.
In the "Memoirs of a Senate Page"
Christian F. Eckloff recalls the years
just prior to the outbreak of the civil
war, when Sumner, Wade, Douglas,
Hamlin, Houston, John P. Hale, Breck
inridge, Thomas and Jefferson Davis,
were debating the great questions upon
which the north and south were at
variance. They were an imposing body
of men, mostly clad In black broad
cloth and wearing high silk hats.
But there waa one senator who re
fused to be dignified—Senator Hous
ton of Texas. "Day after day," says
Mr. Eckloff, "during spare moments
be sat there In his seat carving hearts
out of soft pine wood. They were
pieces about the size of the hand.
When he had completed one of these
works of art be would summon a page,
and, pointing toward some fair spec
tator in the gallery, would say, 'Give
this to that lady up there with Gen-'
eral Sam Houston's compliments.'"
Mr. Eckloff remembers Houston as
one of the gentlest and kindest of men.
8oc'k and Buskin.
In the early ages theatrical perform
ers disguised their faces with wine lees
or a rude pigment Aeschylus, the fa
mous tragic poet introduced masks,.
which were of various kinds, express
lug,.every age, .country, condition and^'"
complexion^ *A&" rwere^cdnst^^ej4||^''
with theNeatest nicety and preclslbh^l^
The dresses were also adapted to
characters assumed by" j^ aetorsi,^
What was known" as the' -huskth:'Was^flf
a hunting boot Those worn by tra
gedlans had soles, three .inches thick,
composed of layers of cork, and were
laced up in front as high as theI calfv
Sandals were also worn, and many of
these had thick cork soles. The col
ors of the foot' coverings were various, &*'
red being, the favorite, hue for, war--,
riors and purple for other characters.
Slaves wore a low shoe bearing the .:
name of sock, which was also the ordi
nary footwear of comedians. From.
this clrctunstance arose' "the Weill .:
known phrase of "sock and buaktoV's
So generally associated-withthe drama. 4)
Animals With Poekata.. ,^
Did .you ever think what a .curlous^s
fhlng It Is that some animals have
pockets—great, roomy,' fur lined. 'vest%^
pockets, big enough to carry, a famUy^S
of little ones about In? Many of the|^^
animals native to Australia and Tas4t?s|
mania have these convenient pockets, &
Sn4 so. has the' possum, a common^l^.
animal In our.'southern .states. .''7The!s||£l
kangaroo is the mrgest of this speciesi|^*i
Full grown kangaroos go sixteen feet^fjf
at a jump, and so when going.on a
long journey or running from hunters^
think what a comfort it niiist b*-*
Mother Kangaroo to khdW:'.'that
Vl
"Yes," answered Maymle. '••^f.i^
"Satlt was wot a? good poem/'
'1 don't care. It was just as much
trouble for him to write it as If he
had been Shakespeare.H-WMhlngton
•star ,:.-'
babies are snug and safe in her pock
et!—Exchange.
I
?M$A
a comfort it must b^^tollf,^iom
JihtfjpB
:'•'~'.4?.*'l:"':r^''?s|'^ yy
^"u:
•. i-'i -.?''£• .4 ••?••-.". j. !••,.-/ .'"y£iJfl"
3R- •'•'.••" iV-if-.'-ii'
.-:-?v ,,vV'-.'".. 8ecret ink. '•••-.&.••• •f' &-'^^"
A simple expedient when one wishes^
to confide his secrets to paper and Tstf^lv
keep-them is to use ordinary rice wa-I^J
ter instead of ink. It cannot be seeh|
when dry, but turns brae when t6^tt»!i(ll
is applied to it it be /desired'to S3'lf
make perfectly sure of .the -d«b^ct4on^?5|
of the contents of the letter a
has been read the pi»rp«ie^n^-be\a^C:i^
compllshed by writing it with a solu-i^f
tlon of iodldeof stai^ waten A
few days, later^the:^s«^ .WttI..-JMnre'»*.
disappeared^i^S' f?3%$:*-'•'?ffitf!$.fi'•
**':"..'." -?r'J ^^ml^^MM^
8o Eaayv ^#^^Sfgf.-v.
(ftvln—There's one thing I like about !l|l||,
Jones'-shop, you can order your goods!$$$£.
through the telepbbne and after "a Kf$h
Shortrwalt have them delivered. lB«d-1fei|
ley—That Is just What I don't like.
Gavin—What? Bailey -The shorty
weight-New York Journal.
^18
••$?.•$*)*'- ft'?' $. V*$lZi3F&l»"'V-rf("'''
if: Reason Enough'. .. \L:m^
,'Orl^e (as thevcbmposw'i^a-:hhii?M
last piece)-Very fine indeed. But what :'m
Is that passage whicbmskea,the coldfe^
cbDls run dowio* the back? eompoaWiv$M?
That Is,Where
tte'%Aad«er.•:•^•
hote^ bill brwight to him.-FHegende
Blatter. ::u^
tlw^''.^|'
Don't Mention It. •.v«i,
Sapphedd-You saved me from"be
ing killed by that auto. I owe my
Ufe to you. How-shall-'i «ver repiy:g
you? 8touten—Ioung man, don't let
grilling debts like that ::worry -ykkfi^&mgm
New York UJ«.
I 'SMfllolent Reason.
Ottf^Pirfiy' doh't you 'wmwTfn^i
authority as head of the family and
take matters |n yourbwn handsr Bead
of the House -(mournfully)—My wlfe'^
ore American.

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