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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, September 26, 1909, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1909-09-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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TRIBUNE
WANT AD8
BRING RESULTS.
Phone 13 or 32,
r— T:
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR.
OF RE80URCE8.
Pinchot before leaving tonight for
Washington, also issued a statement
in which he makes public a portion
of Taft's letter written to the Chief
Forester at the time the letter to
Secretary Ballinger was dictated.
The president said he hoped Pinchot
1 would not find reason in the Ballin
ger letter for resigning.
"I shall not resign," declared Pin
chot and he added that he is going
to continue to serve the government
along the same lines he has pursued
in the past concluding with the state-
THE FUTURE.
(By Associated Press.)
West Duxbury, Mass., Sept. 25.—
The end of the world, arranged as a
finale in a strange drama enacted
here during the past few days, not
having occurred as cheduled, most of
the actors tonight left the theatre of
their activities. Hereafter they will
await in their homes, with the same
implicit faith, the renderng of the
last act. The millenium is still im
pending, they claim. It is possible
that some members may again be the
recipient of a revealation appointing
the time and (place for the coming
of the Lord.
In that case a similar gathering Is
again possible. That it was merely a
miscalculation by a few of the more
radical members which resulted in
the gathering now dispersing, was
the statement of several conservative
members of the sect today. They
The doctor and the Surgeon—Hooray!
with us again.
.,,. ^atciJattwBiy* '***"*1 ••.**-^
Taft Hands Out Smooth Line of Jolly
and Satisfies Both
L:
1 4
PINCHOT TAKES PART IN EVENTS OF THE DAY BUT BALLINGER
(Bv Associated Press.)
Salt Lake, Sept. 25.—As a result
of several long conferences with th'e
Chief Forester Fifford Plnchot, here
today, President Taft tonight caus
ed to he issued a statement in which
it Is declared that never at any time
during the Ballinger-Pinchot con
troversy has the president intended
to reflect upon Pinchot and in which
Taft takes more a forward stand
than ever in favor of the Roosevelt
policies for conservation of natural
resources.
The president indicates that what
is to be done in the way of reclama
tion of arid lands must be done with
in the law but announces his inten
tion of applying to congress for such
confirmation and enabling legislation
as will put the Roosee... policies -on
the firmest basis.
HAS A "80RE THROAT" AND REMAINS IN HIS ROOM TAFT
TAKE8 STAND FOR R008EV ELT POLICIES IN CONSERVATION
ment "I believe in equality of op
portunity and the Roosevelt policies
and I propose to stand for them as
long as I have strength to stand for
anything."
Pinchot's statement was shown to
the president before it was given
out. The president's statement fol
lows: "In view of the published
statements that the letter of the
president to Secretary Ballinger was
to be considered in some way a re
flection on Plnchott, the president to
day authorized the publication of
the following: That at the time he
wrote the letter to Ballinger he also
wrote a letter to Pinchot assuring
him that the conclusions stated there
in were not intended in any way to
reflect on him, that the president
deemed Pinchot's continuance in pub
lic service as of the utmost value,
that he expected to continue the
Roosevelt policies as to the conser
vation of the resources, including the
reclamation of arid lands and the
preservation of our forests and prop
er restrictions in respect to the use
of coal lands and water sites as well
as the Improvement of our waterways
and to asw congress for such con
firmatory and enabling legislation as
would put the execution of those
policies on the firmest basis and that
(Continued on page eight.) 5
'.•« 1 1
LOOKING FOR THE MILLENIUM
.••*»*-*.,„
CONSERVATIVE MEMBERS AF SECT SAY END OF WORLD IS NEAR
-BU OVER ENTHUSIASTIC ON ES DID NOT GET THE RIGHT
8TEER LOOKING FOR MORE AUTHENTIC REVELATIONS IN
affirm that the end is near, but that
the time is uncertain.
Ashdod, "five miles from every
where" has been the stage of the
week's program. Tonight but fifty of
the 300 actors' remained and they
will probably go soon.
The last day of watching was pass
ed with Mttle change from the pro
gram of the week. Nervous systems
were eased somewhat by lessening in
services of prayer, song and supplica
tion. The day was marked by one
radical departure. The "Sinners,"
as represented by a small army of
newspaper men, which has beseiged
the little congregation, were admitt
ed for he first time within the -portals
of the meeting place. Here they lis
tened to exhortations on behalf of the
sect, on past history of Adventists
and on their faith' in the imminent
approach of the end of the world.
The busy football season is
BHHWHMHMWBWSPWSa
U^'ifr
STATE LAWRENCE BRACED
IN 8ECOND HALF.
(Bv Associated Press.)
Minneapolis, Minn., Sept. 25.—With
weather conditions perfect for a grid
iron game Minnesota defeated Law
rence on Northrop field 25 to 0 this
afternoon, in the initial game of the
season. The gridiron was in excel
lent condition for battle and there
was very little wind to interfere with
kicking.
Minnesota's line slightly outweigh
ed Lawrence, and the back field was
also a trifle heavier.
Minnesota did not find much oppo
sition in the first half and ran up a
score of 20 points, scoring three touch
downs and a safety.
In the second half Minnesota cross
ed the Lawrence line once, but Farn
ham failed to kick goal. The playing
of Capt. McGovern of Minnesota and
Johnson and Pickering, Minnesota
backs, featured the game.
"BOB" DUNN REFUSES
TO TALK POLITICS
CB. Associated Press.}
St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 25.—R. ^C.
Dunn of Princeton, the "Fighting Bob"
of the north star state, was at the
Merchans hotel yesterday.
"I can't talk politics now, it would
not be fitting," said he. "I came
down here to attend the funeral of
Governor Johnson, and I really can't
talk politics. Eberhart? Yes, Eber
hart will make a good governor—why
shouldn't he?
By an exthordinary coincidence,
Governor Johnson and Mr. Dunn were
to have luncheon together Thursday,
the day of the governor's funeral.
The date was fixed during the state
fair, and the two men, one the gover
nor, and the other a defeated" candi
date, were to have indulged in a good
old fashioned heart to heart talk. But
Duhri was a mourner afc^the bier of
his friend.
Mr. Dunn may eschew politics for
the time in hie obedience of the pro
prieties, but there are many quiet
Indications which lead to the belief
that he will put on the harness and
enter the gubernatorial race next
year.
DROPPED FROM BALLOON
AND FOUR ARE KILLED
.'By Associated Press.)
Moullns, France, Sept. 25.—While
passing over the National road which
leads from Paris to Antlbes, and
when at a height of between 500 and
600 feet, the French dirgible military
balloon Republique, exploded this
morning and fell to the ground
The four men on board were kill
ed. The car fell straight down, car
rying the fluttering remnants of the
envelope, and the occupants were
buried beneath the wreckage.
DIAMOND MAY GET
FRANK DAY'S JOB
(Br Associated Press.)
St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 25.—Frank A.
will vacate the office of the gov
ernor's private secretary No. 1.
John A. Diamond of Minneapolis,
and W. W. Rich of St. Paul, are men
tioned as Mr. Day's possible succes
sors. Mr. Diamond had a long con
ference with Governor Eberhart thia
morning.
Governor Eberhart announces that
he will make no changes in the state
departments and will folow the John
son policies as far as possible.
PURCHASING CURIOS
FOR-N. Y. MUSEUMS
'{Tribune Special Service.)
Independence, Fort Berthold, Sept.
25.—Rev, 6. L.. Wilson and wife of
Minneapolis, formerly of Mandan
has been staying with Mr. Shultis
for the past three weeks. He is
gathering some of the old myths and
stories for his books and is also
purchasing, as agent, some of the
old relics for a New York museum.
In December, 1908, Mr. Wilson wrote
a short account of the shrine he pur
chased of Wolf Shief. This he
bought for Q. O. Heye of New York
city to be placed in his private mus
eum.
GOOD YIELD OF WHEAT.
Max, Sept. 25.—Ed. Evenson has
threshed and reports that he had one
large field of wheat that yielded him
19% bushels per acre. His oats
went 45 bushel and Ed. feels well
satisfied with the returns received.
•WBUHpfiHHSBMMi
'M/' r^
BI8MARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, 8UNDAY MORNING, 8EPTEMBER 26, 1909.
MINNESOTA WON LAWSON'S NIECE
IN ELOPEMENT
GOPHERS HAD EASY TIME WITH
PIGSKIN WARRIORS FROM THE
METHODIST SCHOOL IN BADGER
PARENT8 HAND OUT THEIR BLES
SING WHEN TOLD WHAT HAS
HAPPENED MAKE TRIP IN
AUTOMOBILE ARE NOW ON
THEIR HONEYMOON TRIP.
fBv Associated Press.)
Boston, Sept. 25.—Miss Gertrude
C. Lawson, niece of'Thomas W. Law
son, ran away in an automobile with
Walter L. Shepard, a wealthy young
man who lives across the street from
the Lawson's in Melrose Highlands,
and the two were married.
Miss Lawson is 22 years old and
one of the prettiest girls in Melrose
Highlands. Her father Is John H.
Lawson, a brother of the financier
The young couple went riding In
Shepard's car Wednesday afternoon
and visited the residence of Rev. B.
F. Leavlttt, ,of the First Congrega
tional church of Arlington, where
they were married. Then they re-'
turned home, told their astonished
relatives what they had done, and
later departed on a honeymoon trip.
LOUISVILLE CINCHED
AM. PENANT
Louisville, Sept. 25.—Louisville,
cinched the 1909 American Associa
tion penant today by defeating Kan
sas City in the second game of the
series, while Columbus downed Mil
waukee in the second game of a
double header at Columbus.
Louisville can now lose the two
remaining games yet to be played
and still lead by half a game should
Milwaukee capture their two remain
ing games.
Flaherty pitched high class ball in
todays game but poor base running
and loose fielding proved costly for
him. Thielman was forced to give
way to Selby in the seventh and
the change proved effective. Carlis
les batting and three fast double
plays by the visitors were features.
A singular feature was that Louis
ville did. not have a man left on
bases.1 The season will be brought
to a close here tomorrow with a
double header.
ROOSEVELT'S EXPENSES
ARE PAID BY FRIENDS
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, D. C, Sept. 25—To set
at rest the allegations which have:
appeared quite generally over the]
country regarding the source of funds:
used by the Roosevelt hunting expe-t
dwltion in Africa, Secretary Walcott:
of the Smithsonian institution today,
auhorized the statement that not a
he institution or from the nUited
states government. It Is declared that
jo punj 9TO rao.ii samoo )soo jo }ueo
personal friends of the former presi
dent, whose names are not disclosed
have provided the funds.
GOOD ACREAGE.
Ryder, Sept. 25.—Threshing oper
ations are still going on unabated.
Weather conditions continue favor
able and all the- rigs will get a good
long run this fall. Wheat is aver
aging from 16 to 20 bushels in this
part of the country.
KWBlBMPHBpBfpn
The committee appointed to select
the route and landing place for the
Fulton arial flight, to be held in con
nection with the Hudson-Fulton cele
bration in New York. A prlte of $ 10,
000 is offered the first person who
travels by air from New York to Al
bany, duplicating the first trip of
Robert Fulton's Clermont.
Sitting from left to right—Dr. Lee
De Forest, inventor of the wireless
flB0KWKPSV3wWV^lpppn9K|Hp|V9B^'^fc1cag
BIG NAVAL PARADE OPEN!
ATNEWYORKON SATURDAY
Over Two Million Visitors Are in
tropolis to Witness Event
New York, Sept. 25.—With the
fulfillment of the prediction for a
bright day with a crisp breeze it
was early apparent that this would
be one of the most memorable days
in the history of American's me
tropolis long before the official
ceremonies of the first day of the
Hudson-Fulton celebation were to
begin, five hundred ships, ranging
from an ocean liner to a little mo
tor boat waited restlessly at their
moorings in the lower bay for a
signal which would start them in a
gay procession. About ten miles
of warships are at anchor in the
Hudson.
Every craft was decked with
flags and bunting and every band
in the vicinity of New York had
been engaged to provide music for
the hundreds of thousands of per
sons who were to make a circuit of
the international armada on those
boats.
Estimates as to the number of
visitors in the city vary from
1,000,000 to 2,000,000.
The boom of sunrise guns aboard
the warships In North river awoke
New York this morning to the first
day of the celebration, long planned
NW THOUGHT.
UNITED STATES REPRESENTED I N NAUTICAL EVENT WITH FIFTY
VESSELS WHILE FOREIGNERS HAVE SIXTEEN FIGHTING CRAFT
—IMMENSE THRONG VIEWS THE SIGHT FROM BOATS AND LINE
THE 8H0RE8.
PEARY'S FRIENDS WILL RETAIN LEGAL ADVISORS IN COMING
CONTEST TO SEE WHO IS A LIAR NEXT WEEK WILL SEE
THE FIRST SHOTS OF THE BIG WORD BATTLE FIRED IT IS
(By Associated Press.)
New York, N. Y., Sept. 25.—Friends
of Dr. Frederick A. Cook, whose claim
that he discovered the north pole
has been challenged by Commander
R. E. Peary, anticipates a bitter at
tack on his record. The announce
ment several days ago that a lawyer
representing the Peary Arctic club,
had been retained at Seattle, Wash,
to investigate all the details of Dr.
Cook's reporterd ascent of. Mount Mc
Kinlev, is now followed by Dr. fitook's
effort" to have one of the guides who
accompanied him on that expedition
to come to New York. He has sent
a telegram to this guide. Edward
Burrill at Hamilton, Mont., asking
A DISTINGUISHED GROUP.
telephone and telegraph Christopher
J. Lake, inventor of submarine boats
and designer of a ney airship Capt
Thomas S. Baldwin, builder of the
United States Government's Dirigible
No. 1 A. Holland Forbes, acting presi
dent of the Aero Club of America
and a celebrated aeronaut Alan
Hawley, aeronaut August Post, aer
onaut Cornelius Burns, Hudson-Ful-j
ton commission.
TRIBUNE
WANT ADS
BRING RE8ULT8.
Phone 13 or 32.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
e-
and long awaited, which honors the
deeds of Henry Hudson and Robert
Fulton.
The river that Hudson found and
where Fulton set his steamboat was
the place toward which the eyes of
5,000,000 persons turned today for the
most impressive pageant that ever
floated in New York harbor.
There were 1,000 vessels varying in
type from the one-man cat boat to the
mighty British cruiser, the battleship
Inflexible.
Fifty-seven Warships.
Fifty-'seven warships representing
the navis of the United States, Great
Britian, Germany, France, Italy, Hol
land, Mexico, and Argentine, 450,000
tons of steel, bearing 28,000 officers
and men, and armed with 1,897 guns.
Copies of th Half Moon and Cler
mont, so faithfully original models in
every detail that Hudson and Fulton
themselves would have been puzzled
to tell difference.
One hundred and twenty steam
boats and ferryboats, 75 steam yachts
75 motor boats, 300 tugs and steam
lighters, 400 sailing craft and small
launches.
MONTANA MAN WILLCOMETOTHE
FRONT WITH SOME STATEMENTS
him to lose no time in getting her*.
Ever since Dr. Cook's claim to
having reached the summit of Mount
MciKnley was questioned, Burrill has
remained silent, although one dis
patch quoted him as saying he would
be ready to make a statement when
Cook reacher America.
Among the papers and documents
whfoh Commander Peary turned over
to Gen. Thomas H. Hubbard in Maine
yesterday, are believed to be his
proofs that Cook did not reach the
north pole, and from Gen. Hubbard's
statement at Bar Harbor, it is pre
sumed that the full context of the
ePary charges will be made public in
a few days, possibly next week.
Standing from left to right—Hon.
Jacob L, Ten Eyck Richard S. Bar
rett, Hudson Fulton commission
Ralph Saulier. American representa
tive of Louis Blerlot Arthur Aloott
William A. Johnston, Aero club Arn
old Kruckman, Aero club Hon. Henry
Hudson, Hudson Fulton commission
Charles Heitman, Aero club, and Col.
Arthur McArthur, Hudson Fulton
commission.
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