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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, September 29, 1909, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1909-09-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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TWENTY THOUSAND PEOPLE AN
W
ALL NATIONS ATTENDED
DROME LAST NIGHT.
(Bv Associated Press.)
New York, Sept. 28.—Through the
streets ablaze with bunting and lin
ed with the geatest crowd ever
ered in New York thoroughfares, a
parade of 20,000 people and fifty-four
floats passed today '"before envoys of
twenty-one nations participating in
the Hudson-Pulton celebration. And
in passing, which occupied two hour's
time, were reviewed epoch, making
scenes of three centuries, represent
ed in gigantic figures of wood, plas
ter, paint and tinsel.
After a day and night of rain the
skies cleared this morning and the
"sun came out and with just enough
crispness in the air to add zest to
the crowd, the most spectacular land
feature of the celebration was held
without untoward incident. From
110th street, along Central Park, west
59th street and down Fifth avenue
to Washington Square in the lower
part of the city,- was the route of the
TAR ISNOW
&?*
Taft created much enthusiasm
when he announced that he would
urge upon congress the necessity of
authorizing the secretary of the in
terior to issue $10,000,000 bonds for
the completion of irrigation projectB
in the west upon which work has
been suspended because of the lack
of funds and the discovery that pro
jectors, in their enthusiasm, did not
closely observe the limitations of the
reclamation act.
Hardships have been worked upon
many settlers through the suspension
of work and Senator Borah of Idaho,
and other western senators and re
presentatives have urged upon the
president that a bond issue was the
only way by which justice could be
done.
Taft declared that congress did not
intend that the government should
Undertake projects which cowld not
be currently paid for out of the pro
ceeds of sales of public lands but
added that he has been impressed
during his viBlt to the west of the
necessity for immediate relief.
Taft gave credit both to Pinchot
and to Ballinger. He referred to
the wonderful work of Pinchot and
*s»?*lrSjwai -.-•"•—".
.'-'.»vw*»*l.,-
8TER PARADE TAMMANY
OF THE EVENT OR. COOK
AND NAVAL OFFICER8 OV
Police Have Difficulty in Alan^teg Crowds Anxious
Secure Souvenirs of the Occasion
FIFTY-FOUR FL0AT8 IN MON-
CLUB WAS PROMINENT FEATURE
HOBNOBBED WITH GOVERNORS
ER SIX THOU8AND SAILORS FROM
E PERFORMANCE AT HIPPO-
parade and in a distance of over five
miles, it is estimated that more than
two million people gathered.
On roofs, towers, poles, and win
dows and a few grand stands erect
ed for the almost entire length of
'the route, more fortunate, thousands
viewed the spectacle while the enor
mous crowd surged against the police
lines down at the curb. As a paarde
it was as democratic as it was his
torical, as cosmopolitan as it was
democratic.
Mayor George B. McClellan and
Herman Ridder, vice president of the
Hudson-Fulton celebration commis
sion, headed the line and covered
the entire distance afoot. There was
no military show, no distinguished
personages in vehicles all, with the
exception of platoons of police mount
ed on their shiny coated hay horses,
were afoot.
A number of the patriotic scenes
were wildly cheered. Among them
EXPONENT
FORT OY THEO. ROOSEVEL
Makes Long Looked for Speech on Conservation of
Natural Resources at Spokane, Wash., Tuesday
PRAI8ES WORK O BOTH I N O AN BALLINGER TELL S O
(By Associated Press.)
Spokane, Wash., Sept.,28^-Taft de^
livered here today his long antici
pated speech on conservation of nat
ural resources and outline' the poli
cy of his administration on this sub
ject of supreme importance to all
the west. Taft broadly took the
stand that while the present adminis
tration is pledged to folloow out
the policies of Roosevelt, such pledge
does not inw lhlemoetaoicarryp
does not involve him in any obliga
tion to carry out these policies with
out congressional authority. The
president added, however, that he
would take every step and exert ev
ery influence upon congress' to enact
legislation which shall best subserve
the purposes and requirements of^the
situation.
W A E POWE LANDS 8 A S IRRIGATION W O SHOUL
BE 8TARTE AGAIN A 8 SOON A 8 POSSIBLE SURPRISED A
RESULT 8 OF ARTIFICIA MOI STUR E O N LANDS.
said that while that work had
brought denunciation at first, it was
now generally realized that reforms
inaugurated by Pinchot were not on
ly necessary but should have been
begun ten years ago. The president
defended the reopening of lands by
the present administration as in com
pliance with existing laws and de
clared Ballinger's views are in strict
accord with those of the adminis
tration and that he has been help
ful and will use his powerful influ
ence as Secretary of the Interior to
support the president in securing
congressional action that will put
the Roosevelt policy of conservation
on a firmer basis.
•Taft stated that 4,700,000 acres o*
water power lands withdrawn from
general entry by the last adminis
tration has been reduced to 450,000
acres under the present administra
tion. The latter number, however,
he pointed out, contain more ascer
tained power sites than did the orig
inal withdrawals.
The president announced that it
must be understood that these with
drawals are only temporary to per
mit congress to act upon the recom
mendation he will moke, that the
government be authorized to grant
or lease power sites to private con
cerns to be developed under general
government control and supervision.
If congress fails to act upon this
recommendation the president says,
he knows of.no way, in which the
withdrawals can longer be withheld
from claims filed under the general
land laws. A J3
Since his entry Into the west and
the testimony of his own eyes as to
the miracles wrought by the touch of
water upon .virgin land, the presi
dent has been an enthusiastic expon
ent of irrigation and declared today
no one could visit this section with
out being convinced of the necessity
of proper treatment of arid lands.
were: "Pulling down the statue of
George m.," "Publishing the consti
tution," "Storming of Stony Point,"
"Capture of Andre," and "Washington
taking the oath of office."
It was before a distinguished gath
ering, seated in the court of honor
on the grounds of the New Republic
Library building at 42nd street and
Fifth avenue, that the paraders pass
ed. Vice President James I Sherman
was flanked on either side by Admir
als Leopold and Seymour, of the
French and English squadrons, re
spectively. Governor Hughes, Seth
Low, Prince Kuni of Japan and the
German grand admiral, Von Kosster
were seated near by.
Tammany, with a thousand stal
wart members in "Prince Alberts"
and high hats, made a picturesque
showing. Squads of school children,
New York University, -Columbia col
lege students, members of Irish, Ital
ian, French, Scotch,) Swedish and
other cosmopolitan socities followed.
{Continued on Page 8.)
{UAKEFEF
IN 4 STATE
S
H0U8ES ROCKED AND PEOPLE
WERE AWAKENED BY SHOCK
—8T. LOUIS FELT TREMOR AT
6:37 O'CLOCK.
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, WEDNE8DAY MORNING, 8EPTEMBER 29,1909.
WITNESS THE
*i
Evansvllle, Ind., Sept. 27~An
earthquake at 3:45 this morning
shook this city. Houses rocked and
cracked and pictures on the the wall
swayed.- Many people were awak
ened by the shock. A rumbling noise
accompanied the disturbance. The
movement seemed to be from the
southeast to northwest.
St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 27.—A slight
earthquake, which was felt through
southeastern Missouri and southern
and central Illinois and Indiana and
Tennessee, occurred today. In St
Louis the tremor came at 6:37 o'clock
and so far as has been learned no
damage resulted*
The general direction of the shock
was from west to east and it was felt
more clearly in the thinly settled
districts. The settling of the earth's
crust, with the seat of the disturb
ance many miles distant, is the gen
eral cause of the disturbance.
The probability of a renewal of the
shock is negatived by local scien
tists.
LOOK FOR
On September 24 Mars was 15,00
usual.—News Item.
DEFEATED
CLEVELAND YESTERDAY
(By Associated Press.)
Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 28.—Phila
delphia defeated Cleveland this after
noon 7 to 0, it being the third shut
out victory for the home team in
the series of four games. Moran held
Cleveland to five hits, three of which
were made by the visitors in the
sixth Inning, but Heitmuller prevent
ed the scoring by a fine running catch
of Goode's fly. Young's curves were
hit bard and he was taken off the
rubber at the end of the sixth In
ning.
HILL OPENS
MINOT FAIR
FIRST WARD COUNTY AGRICUL-
TURAL FAIR OPENS UNDER FA-
VORABLE AUSPICES-HILL 8AYS
DIVERSIFY BIG BAND OF IN-
DIANS AT THE FAIR.
Minot, N. D., Sept. 28.—The first
Ward county agricultural fair opened
this afternoon with an address by
James J. Hill. Mr. Hill dwelt prin
cipally upon the conservation of the
soil, diversified farming and the ben
efits of the following advice given
by the agricultural colleges of the
various states. He was introduced
hy Judge E. B. Goss of the district
court.''- ,«•,--•"••».• •*.,"«. .. -.~
Senators McCumber and Johnson
were in, attendance and delivered
short addresses.
A band of thirty Indians strong are
in attendance from Fort Berthold
reservation.
An immense crowd is In attendance
from all the surrounding towns of
the county.
DETROIT TAKES LAST OF
SERIES FROM NEW YORK
\Bv Associated Press.)
New York, Sept. 28.—Detroit's last
appearance in New York this season
was marked by a 5 to 0 victory, the
visitors thus making it three out of
four on the series, and maintained
their lead og .016 over the Athletics.
Both Donovan and Wilson pitchea
gilt edged ball. Detroit received su
perior support, being invincible with
men on bases. Two of the New
York's three errors helped eDtro'
to runs. The visitors also used two
of Wilson's bases on balls to advan
tage.
earth than
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, D. C, Sept. 28.—An
almost forgotten Incident in which
the present sercetary of war, Jacob
M. Dickinson, heroically rescued Jas.
P. Poy, a Detroit lawyer, from the
Detroit river fourteen years ago, was
recalled today when a handsome solid
gold medal, suspended from a rib
bon held in the beak of an American
eagle, was presented to Dickinson on
behalf of the United States govern
ment
The medal, approved by Taft be
fore his departure on his trip, and
commemorating the courage of the
war secretary in saving the life of a
JURED.
North Dakotas Dead:
O E N Dion Lake.
JACOB MOTZ, Kulm.
FRED KOCH, Dickinson.
JOHN POSTLE, Winona.
Injured-
Peter Johnson, Egeland, fracture
of arm and scalp cut.
Harmon Wlrth, Hankinson, right I
foot cut and severe burns.
Chicago, III.. Sept. 28.—Seven men.
were killed and a dozen seriously in
jured early today by an outbound
passenger train crashing into the rear
end of a Chicago, Milwaukee and St.
Paul stock train at Fourteenth and
Bar Harbor, Maine, Sept. 28—Ma
terial which Peary will produce to
support his contention that Cook did
not reach the North Pole is now in
completed form. As soon as it has
been passed upon by the Peary Artie
Club it will be made public.
General Hubbard, president of the
Club and Peary concluded their con
ference on the subject today and
the explorer will probably return to
his home in Eagle Island tomorrow.
The papers which are to play such
an important part in the Cook con-
LOW THE RAILROADS.
CT'-.bunc Special Service.)
Spokane, Wash., Sept. 27.—"Colonel
Roosevelt has only begun to learn of
the enormous quantities of big game
in British East Africa, Uganda and
the lake regions. There is a revela
tion ahead of him when he treks
westward to Lake Victoria,"
W. G. Sewall, explorer, hunter,
graduate of Harvard, London club-
'i«^^!Bli3fe*m«^
FOURN.DAK. STOCKMEN
MEET AN AWFUL DEATH
WRECK IN CHICAGO IS FATAL O RESIDENTS OF NORTH DAKO-
TRIBUNE
LIFE SAVING STUNT BY PRESENT
SECRETAR OF WA REMEMBERED
WANT AD8
RESCUE FELLOW PAS8ENGER ON STAEM LAUNCH —UNDOUBT
EDLY SAVED 'JOY'S LIFE.
TA WERE IN CABOOS7 OF STOCK TRAIN WHEN THE CRASH
CAME TWO OTHER NORTH DAKOTANS ARE SEVERELY IN-
BRING RESULTS.
Phone 13 or 32.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
•*, ...,,.
GOVERNMENT COME8 TO THE FRONT WITH A MEDAL AFTER A
WAIT OF FOURTEEN YEARS— JUMPED INTO THE WATER TO
fellow man, was presented by assist
ant Secetary of Treasurer HiHes.
On August 29, 1895, the American
Bar association, then in session at
Detroit, was entertained at S Clair
flats, frhe guests were conveyed
there in steam yachts. Judge Dick
inson, Charles H. Campbell, Frank
O. Loveland and others were enter
tained on the steam yacht Truant It
was a very dark night when the Tru
ant returned and a small landing
plank was put out. In attempting to
cross it James F. Foy, a member of
the Detroit bar, fell over board. The
water at that point was twenty feet
deep. Dickinson plunged into the riv
er and rescued Joy.
Roswell streets. The victims were
stockmen, members of a stock train
crew. No persons on the passenger
train were injured.
WILL NOT STATE JUST WHEN HE WILL MAKE HIS DOCUMENTS
When the accident occurred, a few
minutes after midnight, most of the
victims were sleeping in the rear of
the stock train. This train was do
completely wrecked and the victims
so mutilated that hours later only
four had been identified.
Four cars were telescoped and the
wreckage was set afire. Many of the
injured were extracted with difficulty
from the burning debris by firemen,
and others who had come to the scene
of the wreck.
PEARY STILL CLAIMS HE HAD THE
EDG
E ON COO IN CONTROVERSY
PUBLIC HOWEVER MEETING OF THE PEARY ARCTIC CLUB
WILL BE CALLED IN NEW YORK FOR THE COMING WEEK.
TRAVELERTELLSOFBIG
GAMEIN EASTERNAFRICA
SAYS AFRICA CONTAINS VAST POSSIBILITIES FOR BOTH HUNT-
troversy are to be only the opening
guns in the campaign -which Peary
will wage on Cook.
It is intimated that Peary has yet
other information to prove his con
tention but he thinks it will be un
necessary to make that public at this
time. Although there has been no
definite statement as to the exact
date when proofs will be made
known. It is announced that Gen
eral Hubbard is planning to call a
meeting of the Peary Artie Club in
New York next week.
ERS AND INVESTORS CLAIMS ROOSEVELT HAS NOT SEEN
THE BEST PART OF THE COUNTRY YET SETTLERS FOL-
man and owner of 70,000 acres of
land in British East Africa, who has
come to Spokane to make an investi
gation of the bonanza wheat fields in
eastern Washington and Oregon,
north and central Idaho and western
Montana preliminary to seeding his
vast holdings, made the foreging re-
(Continued on Page 8.)
1
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