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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, October 13, 1909, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1909-10-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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-TRIBUNE
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TWENTY-NINTH YEAR.
8TATE DEPARTMENT.
Washington, Oct. 12.—Charles R.
Crane of Chicago, minister designate
to China today was practically 'de
posed by a .demand from "Secretary
Knox for |cls resignation. ,i
high office because o£ alleged indis
creet disclosures through the press.
More-over, this minister breaking
through all old traditions* insisted
on defending himselffrom aspersions
cast upon him 'by the Secretary of
state, by the issuance of a statement
whfcb most people here comment up
on as certain ,to be very embarrass
ing to the administration.
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'•'=:•.•.•/. -••:,#•*»-:$V. ».*?••••
'"ChieftfO^Qct. lap^A• seyjare cold
-wave following :'?:la the:' tr»lJk..'.Qi: a
f« violent storm which raged today in
Hi the Lake Superior region is causing
Sf widespread suffering- and much danv
age tbrjttgput the middle west^and
Minwthweet.
-& .'^
•••*i
OVER SEVENTEEN THOUSAND PEOPLE BRAVED THE COLD TO SEE
Detroit defeated Pittsburg five to
0 today and evened up the count in
the world's championship series, each
team now having two victories to its
credit. The game was played with
the mercury at 34 degrees above zero,
-but 17,036 persons braved the chilling
temperature and freezing blasts and
the great majority of them felt well
repaid for their polar experiences, be-:
cause they were with Detroit.
The American league champions1
out-classed their rivals in every de-'
partment of the game and the pitch
ing of Geo' Mulliii, will make one off
the brightest-bjts in the base ball!
history of Detroit.' It' was hard to
conceive dt' any pitcher having his
opponents' more at his mercy than
Mullin had Pittsburg today. There
was never a moment when he was not
absolute master of the situation and
he was at his best with men on
bases. Four hits .represented the
ability of the visitors and notwp of
those were made in the same lining*
Mullin performed a feat in the
third Inning that will live long in the
annals of*1 base bail- and was frozen
on* tBirmifids of those who.saw it.
In the third inning he struck out the
mighty Wagner with two out and
men on second and third. That was
RESIGNATION DEMANDED OF.CH ARLES E. CRANE DESIGNATED AS
Thus a new-chapter in• American
diplomacy "was written. '?*'&citizen
ch8£ep$ wltfi special regard for his'
qu|ljMations for the post was recall
ed%jfore he" had embarked isom^San
Francisco" and ''dischargedfrom
VV"''~''"•*'''''''
Hi "Heavy'wo* fall* tor t«ie season of
•i:-\ th* year occurred in northern IHi
nois, southern Michigan-, Nebraska,
M-l^£%t.
South Dakota And low*. In some
8i
laces the fall wae five to six inches
depth. reported from various
jjfelnts in Mississippi rvelley that
fpanyaorea of grape* and much other
f^uit had been ruined by-frost, the
Mercury li» many places going as low
a» Zp abb^e ier« AV The aggregate
Jmoontat lose h*-this direction can
ohlyTb* estlmatM. but it is certain
m' that *K*§*ti *e/1ieitjf*v^^^?Hi\
mm
Pittsburg Beaten at Every Stage of the Qame Played
With Thermometer Hovering Around Freeze
THEIR FAVORITE8 DEFEAT HE MIGHTY MEN FROM THE
EAST PLAYERS WILL DIV IDE $66,924.90 AS THEIR 8HARE
OF THE RECEIPTS OF THE OUR GAMES.
a mighty feat, but just previously he
had struck out manager Clarke, the
hard hitter, with men on first and
second. A double steal on Clark and
the third, strike moved men to sec
ond and third, where they were when
Wagner came to bat. Lelfleld was
also the victim on strikes in this
same inning, giving Mullin three
strikeouts in one session. All told
he struck out the visitors ten times.
Detroit scored because it was able
tp hit when hits spelled runs. Jen
nings young catcher .distinguished
himself in the second inning by send
ing Detroit's fJpBt two runs across the
plate with a drive just out of Mil
ler's reach. In the fourth inning
Bush's ringing double into the over
flow crowd in left field, scored an
other" run .and it was immediately
followed by another two bagger into
the same place by Cobb,
another ithaud shrdl cmfwy rdluuau
The onslaughts, by Detroit In the
secondhand fourth innings drove Lei.
fields Pittsburg's stan left bander,
from the slab "ancThe^was succeeded
by the veteraniPWHppewh© was able
to stem the Detroit tide although"the
Tigers pressed him hard in the eighth
inning. Bight hits were made by De
troit and six of these Came in two.
innings when scores were made, only
two were wasted.
Outside of Mullin there were no
MINISTER TO CHINA CHAR GE IS THAT HE GAVE OUT NEWS-
PAPER 8TORY WHICH REFLECTED-ON THE WORK OF THE
%his
The history of this extra-ordinary
affair which began about a week ago
with the announcement that Crane
had been stopped at San Francisco
at the. moment:of embarkation ,for
his post by demand from Secretary
•Knox for his return to Washington,
reached at least its first crisis soon
after noon today, when the secretary
in a formal .statement announced
that Crane's resignation had been
invited and the^ minister designate
replied in. an 'equally formal state
ment that while his resignation al
ready had been, tendered to the pres
ident he felt himself very unjustly
treated. Moreover, Crane in his
Statement reflected very severely up
on officials of the state department,
(Continued on Page 8.)
REGION CAUSES HEAVY SUFFERING
and today the storm exhibited terrif
ic' force over the upper peninsular of
Flchlgan, northern portion of Lake
Michigan and western end of Lake
Superior. So far as known no ves
sels have been lost on the great lakes,
A report was current throughout the
day that a steamer had foundered
in-Lake Superior but the story could
not be confirmed. It Is believed pro
bable that later reports will bring
tidings of some disasters and It Is
known that many lake boats, were
caught by the atorm which at times
assumed the violence of a hurricane
and were unable to obtain shelter.
Tonight the storm la reported mov
ing rapidly In the direction of the
Gulf of St. Lawrence causing violent
gales, and heavy snow fall as it pro
ceeds. Freezing,temperature to pre
dicted for next twenty^four hours
throughout west and northwest.
CENTER EIELDER
IS STAROFGAME
BOSTON WON THIRD GAME OF
POST SEASON SERIES WITH
NEW YORK BOSTON THERE
WITHE THE STICK HOME
RUN WAS SENSATIONAL.
Boston, Mass., Oct. 12.—Speaker,
Boston's speedy center fielder, won.
the third game game of the New
York-Boston post series today, when
he smashed a liner to the right field
in the ninth inning and scored a home
run.
The locals led the visitors for eight
innings, hitting.Ames so freely that
he was taken out in the eighth to al
low Meyers to bat. In the ninth Hall
weakened and New York got three
runs, tieing the score. After two
men had been retired In Boston's half
Speaker, lined out a home run.
The paid attendance was 5,862 and
the gross, receipts $2,834.
The National commission receives
$283, clubs $1,020 and the players
will divide $1,530. Score:
Registration at BismarckC versAll LandstoBe Opened in Both North and South Dakota
Ai,
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 13, 1909.
stars on the Detroit team, but their'^retired,
ensemble work was brilliant. Every
man did the right thing at the right.
time and only one fielding skip mar-j
red an otherwise perfect perform-,
ance.
The cold apparently affected Pitts-'
burg fielding far more than it did
Detroit's as National league cham-j
pions put up a miserable exhibition!
in that department. Six errors were
charged to infield—Abstein, Miller,
and Philippe each getting two, The
six errors detract little credit from
Detroit's performance as only one of
them figured in the scoring.
The conclusive victory of Detroit
has toppled Pittsburg from its proud
(Continued on page 8.) ..
EX-BANKER MORSE IS
TAKEN SERIOUSLY ILL
New York, Oct. 12.—Officials at the.
Tombs prison today reported tha£[
Charles W. Morse, nancier, had been
taken suddenly ill. The illness was'
said to be nervous breakdown folr'j
lowing the failure ^yesterday ot|
Morse's appeal from his fifteen year.
prison sentence. Morse was reported
tonight to be resting quietly.
sflf.f
R.H. E.
Boston 5 12 2
New York 4 7 3
Batteries Hall and Carrigan
Ames, Crandall and Schlei.
A FBANTIC W1BEL3S8 PBfiM AMERICA,
'RooMvelt-~8ay, yon newspaper fel lows, what's the matter
Somebody is forgetting that I am orer here. "t^l^-.v'K
I" :i.vri' ••''.i-'jvw'' JW'V*
WAS WELL KNOWN HERE.
ttetired Army Officer Died at
Home in Washington.
His
Washington, Oct. 12.—Brigadier
ipeneral Amos S. Kimball, U. S. A.,
who saw forty years' ser
ylce in the army and was retired at
his own request in 1902, having been
made a brigadier general several
days before his retirement, died at
his home here yesterday at the age
of 69 years, heart failure being the
cause of his death.
News of General Kimball's death
will be of local interest. He was an
uncle of Mrs. W. H. Winchester, and
visited in the city several years ago.
JAFT HASTURNED
TOWARDEASTNOW
Riverside, Cal., Oct. 12.—After
spending eight days in California,
President Taft left here late tonight
and is speeding across the Colorado
desert. His way leads him for a time
beloW the level of the sea and to
morrow will find the chief executive
in Arizona, his journey back to the
east-well under way.
The president spent much of today
in the famous orange districts sur
rounding Los Angeles, driving for
mHgs 'hro'ieh prove* «t W"pr Hri0.
Altogether Mr. Taft did more than
miles by automobile todav. and
having fal'en twenty-five minutes be
hind bis schudl&at Kan Barporo. won
carried along roads between tba* oNv
and Riverside at a rate of SDeed that
at times exceeded thirty-five miles
an hour.
ROAD OFFICIALS
DENY RUMORS
St. Augustine, Fla., Oct. 12.—Reply
ing to rumors of great loss of life on
the Florida East Coast railway as
the result of the hurricane the fol
lowing statement: "Positively not
a life was lost in the recent storm.
Very little damage was done to the
right of way or work on the exten
sion. Our line will be opened for
traffic within 48 hours to Knights
Key. Warning by weather bureau
enabled us to fully protect all equip
ment and employes."
UNKNOWN STEAMER FOUNDERS.
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., Oct. 12
An unidentified steamer is reported
to have sunk off White Fish Point,
Lake Superior, in a gale yesterday.
POSTPONE GAME AGAIN.
Chicago, Oct. 12.—The National
American city championship game
was postponed again today on ac
count of the cold weather.
with yon?
'•mm
CASE INVOLVING
CHARGESHEARD
TEST CASE BEING MADE AGAINST
CHICAGO AND GREAT WEST-
ERN ROAD LIVE STOCK IN-
TERESTS ARE VITALLY INTER-
ESTED IN OUTCOME.
Washington, Oct. 12.—The case of
the Interstate Commerce Commission
versus Chicago and Great Western
and other railroads entering Chicago,
to the argument of which the su
preme court today gave Its chief at
tention, Involves the right of the in
terstate Commerce Commission to fix
terminal charges for the delivery of
live stock in Chicago. The railroads
formerly charged two dollars per car
and the commission issued orders
prohibiting a charge In excess of one
dollar. The case, was argued today
for the government by Wade H. El
lis, assistant to the attorney general
S. H. Cowen, representing live stock
interests and by Wm. D. McHugfa
and Walker D. Hines, representing
the railroads.
PROMINENT CITES.
Spokane, Wash., Oct. 12.—Mrs.t
Helen La Reine Baker, the richest
woman in eastern Washington, first
vice president of the Spokane Equal,
Suffrage club, one of the founders of
the College Equal Suffrage club, del
egate from the northwest to the in
ternational convention in London,
Eng., last spring and champion ot
militant methods, has been accorded
an unique honor by Governor R. S.
Vessey of South Dakota. This is an
invitation to discuss equal suffrage
before members of the state federat
ed clubs at Pierre the middle of this
month, when she will be the guest!
of Governor and Mrs. Vessey at the
executive mansion.
Mrs. Baker will leave Spokane on
October 12 for StUrgis, S. D., where
Mrs. Lydia Johnson, president of the
South Dakota Women's Federated
clubs and State Equal Suffrage asso-j
elation, has arranged a meeting,
RESTING AND HUNTING WILL BE
PROGRAM FOR TAFT AT RANCH
OF HIS BROTHER NEAR ELPASO
El Paso, Tex., Oct. 12.—On hisi
brother's ranch, President Taft and
members of his party will have the
opportunity to relax after their
strenuous trip. Formalities will be
eliminated as far as possible when
the president goes ranching on the
ranch he is expected to join in a hunt.
for wildcats.
He will visit for the first time the
town of Taft, named in his honor, I
which now has a population of 600.
Indianapolis. Oct. 12—Judge A. B.
Anderson of United States court of
the district today dismissed pro
ceedings against Delavan Smith and
Charles R. Williams proprietors of
Indianapolis News, who were resis
ting removal to the District of Col
umbia for trial under grand jury
Indictment charging them having com
mitted criminal libel in publishing
articles alleging that there was cor
rupt profit of $48,000,000 in the sale
of the Panama canal to United States
"That man has read history 4f
our institutions to little purpose,"
said Judge Anderson, in concluding
his decision, "who does not view with
LIBELCASEAGAINSTINDIANAPQUS
NEWS HAS BEEN KILLED BY JUDGE
TRIBUNE
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PRICE FIVE CENT!
WORK ON NEW
STEELJ.PLANT
WILL,, BE STARTED AT TH E
HEAD OF THE LAKES THI8
FALL FIRST UNIT WILL COST
NOT LE8S THAN TEN MILLION
Duluth, Oct 12.—The first official
announcement of the time of build
ing the new steel plant at the head
of Lake Superior, comes today in a
letter from Chester A. Congdon, au
thorized by Judge Carey, chairman
of the board of directors of the Unit
ed States Steel Corporation.
The actual construction work' on
the plant, the first unit of which will
cost not less than $10,000,000 will be
begun late this fall.
KILLING FROST IN NEB.
Lincoln, Neb., Oct. 12.—A minimum
temperature of 24 was recorded here
early today. There was a killing
frost in the south Platte region last
night.
ADDRESSS.D. FED.CLUBS
WILL BE GUEST OF THE GOVEK NOR OF SOUTH DAKOTA
STAY IN THE STATE
IS STATED TO BE THE RICHEST OMAN
IN EASTERN WASHINGTON— SPEAKS AT PIERRE AND OTHER
From there the party will go to the
governor's mansion in Pierre Mrs.
Baker will also address several pub
lie gatherings while at the capital.
Afterward, Mrs. Baker, accompan
ied by Mrs. Johnson, will visit other
cities in South Dakota, making ad
dresses on equal suffrage and starfirg\
work in the campaign for the option
al vote which is to be taken in Souta
Dakota at the same time the ques
tion is submitted in Washington nevt
year.
As a guest of Sarah Piatt Decker
of Denver, Mrs. Baker will study the
precinct system in Colorado, the unit
of organization to which is attribut
ed the greatest success of the suf
frage movement, and upon her re
turn in November Mrs. Baker will
begin active work with the local
lege club, which purposes to ma'te
a state-wide campaign to win the
battle for the ballot.
But that is only one of his recre
ations. The president is going Co
hunt wildcats and other game which
abounds down there. Mr. Green,
manager of the ranch, scoured Texas
and secured a pack of celebrated
hounds noted for their fighting qual
ities. In the language of the natives,
these "cat" dogs "can't be beat."
The president will have this thrilling
(Continued on Page &)
apprehension the success of such a
proceeding as tnis to the end that
citizens could be dragged from their
homes to the District of Columbia,
seat of government, for trial under
circumstances of this case. The de
fendants areldischarged,"
At the close today of argument in
hearing of Smith and Williams,
Judge Anderson said he was too busy
with other matters to write a long
opinion in the «ase. He would pro
ceed, be said, to samjup at once his
view of the evidence and argameai
"I am of the opladoa^V s*«r Judge
:..vMr.T^V"'
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