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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, November 17, 1909, Image 1

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TRIBUNE
WANT AD*
BRING RI8ULT8.
Phone 18 op 82.
N
TWENT^-rfiNt»^yeAR.J
8TATE8 ATORNEY SAY8 HE-DOES
NOT WANT TO TAKE ANY
CHANCE8.
HEAT IN MINE IS INTENSE
CHIEF OF THE CHICAGO FIRE
DEPARTMENT 18 NOW ON
THE FIELD.
So Far No Violence Has Been Die
played When Bodies Will Be
Brought to the Surface la Not As
Yet Known Sand Show* Tem
perature of 110 Degrees.
Cherry, 111., Nov. 16.—Troops have
been called for to prevent any unto
ward, demonstration ait the St. Paul
coal mine when the bodies of the 3UJ
men, entombed by last Saturday's di
saajer, are brought to the surface.
1|$ "sheriff Asks for Troops.
Sheriff Skoglund, of Bureau county,
wtt* authority from States Attorney
Elkhart, telegraphed to Springfield,
life late today asking Governor De
neen to send several companies of
stpte militia.
Up far there has been no violence
displayed as a result of the disaster,
and State* ,Attor|$jr Bckhart hope*
Jbjtfthe presence .«*',*• sinjUtsguafaAto
prevent any 111 advised Jnove on the
part of the miners, whpse feeling*
have been wrought up the loss^f
their comrades. #•.•.,„& jy\
|ts Take No -Chances.
fWe want troops at once, thajt%|
all there is about it. We will |afce?
no chances," declared the states at
torney..
When the bodies will be brought
to^the surface is doubtful. ftpne of
the officials believe any of the 30ft
entombed men are alive,
$ir* in the mine tods*---*** •**&&>:
more intense, than, it was when the
men were en%tfjM$flv threejd&y* agtrt
and no efforts could je njade" to eii-'
ter It, "•\i:!U--.rl- ,,-'J'\ .'.'
Chicago Fibre Chief Psresent^.5-'
SHre Chief Horan of Chicago arriv
ed with assistance and a supply of
hose and chemical fire extinguishers.
The lid, or seal, over the mouth of
the shaft was perforated and it was
intended to force water and chemi
cals down through the pipes. A ther
mometer plunged into the sand scat
tered on the top of the seal showed
a temperature of 110 degrees, indi
cating that the heat in the interior
of"the mine must have been intense.
IBEf THREATENED
S W BLINDNESS
Han Francisco, Nov. 16.—Abe Ruef,
who was dictator of San Francisco
for five years, is threatened with
.total blindness and deafness. An op
eration on his eyes will be performed
Wednesday and on the success of this
will depend the eort to save his
hearing.
•^«*H^sti|tement|la- *r
l|^i?glMother
^ind"5* furthermore
\%$$$fthuk -leader" -.ig
feel .the
heri in
Ruef has been in the county Jail
for more than a year, pending appeal
of his case to a higher court. He
was sentenced to fourteen years im
prjsonment by Superior.Judge Lawlor
afte rhaving been convicted of brib
ing one of the "boodling". board 6f
supervisors In the overhead trolley perlments, but it would also be Im
franchise case. politic'to do so."
9
Boston, Mass., Nov. l&~Fpr'-twen-.
tyhoure—jten yesterday and tea |od»v
"_^Mrs. Augusta! E. Stetson o* "New
York accused of "mental malprac
itloer was in secret conference with
Otf, board of directors of the First
Jhurch of Christ Scientist in the in
Fne^ council grooms ofs the Mother
"While fn&^n^ttoe^^^
rel^its result was apparent late to
:nig^t when Mrs. Stetson issued a
dginints «f the
^rsIUfaUait her
em will obe*
unlUng with those
was rphtilo con
Wvthxm^Mi.-^.
Mr*. BW^t^Sta^wf'
beloved leader, Mary Baker
.••^^M ^|gj|^.f has requested us all to unite
»-^a those in- our church, who are
SMsMiylm^. has requested UB all to' unite
wm^^w&k' those in our .church who .ar
a?^K|Btt®orUng the" Mother church dirert
^orl* Today I have received a copy
of^her letter addressed to the trus
of our church.
-JK--: *•.- £*.K ^r'-V ".J"**- *?Wt '--J"** "5^*-" s-V* ,-'
",: ,.-.•'. .•"' v. •'''.."."'
4J':l4».
EX-WIFE OF DANIEL FROHMAN 18
ANXIOUS TO GET HITCHED
."'".'" TO NO, 4
PIKE THINKS ACTION SWIFT
JUDGE WHO GRANTED DIVORCE
ASKED TO OFFICIATE AT
CEREMONY.
Margaret lllington Is Looking for a
Home Where She Will Have a
Chance to Look After Kids and to
Darn a Few Socks—Tired of Stage
Life She'Says.
Reno, Nev., Nov. 16.—While Nevada
Is an easy grantor of divorces, not
all its judges are as freely given
to marrying persons who obtain di
vorces simply to get a change of
husbands.
This was shown on Saturday night
when Judge Pike, who last week
granted a divorce to Mrs. Dantel
Frohmah (Margaret IlUngton), refus
*fo marry that reared afiWess^to Ed
ward J.' Bowers, a wUUwiafre real
estate dealer U^txmiL
While three preachers were avail
able, but apparently the actress and
Bowers ipreTerM^a ,flfl^J^er^,to,
marM them. 0W.§^W^w-m
Justice Soucereatf aftej&wrfns? ob
tii&ied the necesaary Jlcense frtwn the
oouaty clerk's bfltee JMgus*
raiwements-short!* .3»*S» d^W
rcereau went to the actress' homi*
4 pe^rjned tbe c^r^mon^. The
ense was iewej. In th^ name of
Boston, Mass., Nov. 16.—Doctors
Cleveland F. Floyd *nd Wil^Uim P.
Lucas, members of the Harvard fac
ulty of medicine, are on the eve. they
believe, of a medicinal discovery
which when more fully developed,
will revolutionise the world of medi
cine. The discovery has been Vainly
sought ever since the days of Bsca
lupias. It is a universal panacea for
all Infectious diseases. ..
Both Metehmkoff, of Paris, and Dr.
Hiss, of New York, have recently
made known new details on the sub
ject, but it remalned.for the Harvard
instructors, both under 35 years of
age, to perfect what they believe to
be this life-saving cure. Both have
been experimenting during the past
year with the fighting white corpus
cles which combat disease and im
purities when they appear in the
system. They have concocted a leu
cocytic extract with great success.
Under its treatment the mortality
from pneumonia has been reduced 60
per cent in the Massachusetts general
hospital.
Dr. Floyd said concerning the matr
AT*
I believe we are on the verge of
a great discovery. It is not only too
early for us to make definite predic
tions as to the full value of our ex-
I OFJR.EDD
obeyed1 fier leading In every Ques
tiona have alwayi found that by
doing this rdrew nearer to God. My
students now that I have taught them
to do likewhj^,. without^ quest^phlng
her w?sd#»ji! lnMreforef none^lf! my
students bow need any word from me
in addition to what our beloved lead-
"They will know that it is right for
tthem to unite with those ,who sup-
Bhe assert* -thpte f,f»^ed^*h«^ Mo^i? 4l|iurch^
idKmSnt -o the Inthe^4|B^t"lii^ed.#iate!
the iuOwuent rendered agamat me.
mf
myleif^ave '-MBB olteyiaii that:
judgment^'and" ll8all epntlwe Hi
do soiKl-iflBall fttilhermoire dbip mf
^dei^'ivfJinlttogi^ith -^oMh whoi,
think It fas right^ to oondemU rae
lit theM tfiamony^i My leader* let
ter InduotB me to believe that I may
have been wronjg^ere I felt that*!
was absolutely,v-ii|Hli|'?•'•••'•',.$«••
••mm -|%i#|*iWeaw if
:wMci^%n«j§ajM itfr «uidjne| 4
strength in oorrectug every error
revealed to me by God and by my
'.Vv' uAHV'ft
•V f'V
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA/ VVJ
CENTENARIAN DIES
OLDEST RESIDENT OF INDIANA
TOWN 8UCCUMB8 AFTER A
BIRTHDAY FETE.
RETIRED FROM ACTIVE FARMING
lapsed earlier in the day, but by his
grim determination, lived until the,
program in his honor had been car
ried out. It was hjs expressed wish
to live for the.- celebration
Monster Reception Held.
The entire population of Greens
Fork turned out. It had been planned
that the aged man should hold a pub
lic reception, but nig condition caus
ed this plan to be dropped. Conse
quently Madaris spent 'the forenoon
at the home of his "daughter, Mrs.
John Martindale, where his friends,
called to see hilOv.. At nj0n..25O ofJMs
relatives gathered ajtrthe" town "hall
for th* dinner" oflgteig* planned a
a part of the celebration. Madaris
and members of his immediate fam
ily partook of a, dinners* the Martin
dale home. ..",7r*$.., .1
^m%:- itterafln rii#»-':'. ejcercises
were held in the M«thod|st charch.
Medaris has been a citJien of: Wayne
county for eighty yeaSfc until a few
years ago, when he went to make his
home-with his .daughter in Greens
Forltv.,
^Ps^tir
the firm, and' at tie
h(iretlred, he )*is^|iUE
(*px Uylw'.'.'.tjig}
"i sj^ppson^Baii^'wi^
Hfe was-idst and ten saflora barely
Escaped with their Ihti when tW
ateamer Louis Pa^hlow^wia wrecked
in thO storm which swept the lowe^
end 9 fLake Michigan today. The
Pablow left Ford Rivera?jjened with
lumber for the Edward Hf ie» Lumber
(Continued on pa» 4.)
&
LIFE AT AGE OF NINETY? 3.j
TWO YEAR8.
M:
'Richmond, Ind., Nov. 16.—-At the
close of a big celebration in honor ....
of the one hundredth anniversary of vwthe Big Four4 railroad, Is in jail
his birth, John Fletcher Medaris, of NMsht and a ^arrant has been is
Greens Pork,, a small town near here, *or arrest of Mrs. Jeanette
died late today. Medaris nil but col-f Swwart Ford, on a charge of receiv
PROF.L KS FO FI
Minot, Nov. 16.—In an effort to dis
cover the first camp of the first
white man who ever set foot in the
state of North Dakota, Dr. Llbby of
the department history of the state
university is in the city today and
this afternoon made a hurried trip
west in connection with his search.
Dr. Llbby has for several years
beein interested in ferreting out the
early history of the state. He has
discovered undisputable facts which
show that La Verendrye, a Montreal
fur trader, was the first white man
to travel InNorth Dakota, the date of
his entry having been fixed as 1738.
La Verendrye was In search of a
short route from the Great Lakes to
From present Indications there is about to be the usual football
THEFT ARRESTED.
3inclnnati, O., Nov. 16.—Charles
j|h.j Warrlner, former local treasurer
$1,000 of the $643,000 which
WfijViner is accused of having em
billed.
The warant against Mrs. Ford was
Issued tonight upon application of
utor Hunt Warriner previous
inforimed the 'prosecutor that he
ven part of-the money he Is. al
to have abstracted, to Mrs.
and that the last payment he
smade wiaw**on October 1.
.•"..
AY MORNINQ, NOVEMBER 17, 1909.
HELD IN
JAIL WITHOUT BAIL
N 8 FAIL TO COME TO RE8-
CUE AFTER HE PLEADS
NOT GUILTY. ._•'•
WOMAN AU.EGED TO HAVE
kSHARCO PROCEEDS OF THE
0§,
Plead* Not Guilty,
accused man appeared. in the
ooa at the criminal court to
to the -indictment returned
day by the grand jury charg
larceny tm hamth mahrdtfa
htm with embezzlement and grand
eny. He entered a formal plea
|iot .guilty and his bond was fixed
"20,000.
four men, however, who had
to his assistance when he was
Arrested, were not in evidence
renew their pledges.
seems that Mr
of- the law and
Regor has no
ist evening-an-
oilitrjfaid waa iqa^ein her place and
sjbk pint bottles? vo*f whiskey were
found hidden ir the woodshed.
Inhere-were three. sUldiers and two
cifftians in the place at the time the
I.{^d.was pulled off. It Is stated that
t*fl jwojooin. who evidently runs the
pla^plead with thev officers not to
It IB stated by th
posed to know that
Regor place are pi
ing owing to the fai
three young childr
years of age who
fact forced to mingle and associate
with the people whd frequent the al
leged dive.
whd' arwsuja
ndltionsat the
cularly disgust
that there are
all under ten
allowed and In
the Pacific Ocean and believed that
he would discover a river running
in a southwesterly direction that
would make the trip easy
The records preserved by the fur
trader show that his first camp was
pitched with a settlement of Indians
at latitude 48-12, a day's journey from
the second camp, which has been dis
covered in the northwest corner of
the Berthold reservation, a short dis
tance from the south of the Little
Knife. One of the trader'B sons who
accompanied him on the journey dis
covered the Missouri river at a point
where it was headed towards the
(Continued on uage eight.)
FOOD FOR STARVING THOU8AND8
IS NEEDED IN STRICKEN
VILLAGE.
GUEIfflf WANTS ASSISTANCE
ILLINOIS BURG A8K8 FOR HELP
FROM E OUTSIDE
:r^lTIE8.
Women and Children WHlAegin to
Face Hunger in Short Tlnje—Ques
tion of Clothes WHI B« "Hard One
to Handle One Thousand Orph
ans in Town.
Cherry, 111., Nov. 16.—There are
1,000 orphans in Cherry today and
unless food in large quantities is
rusbed Into the town many will be
hungry.
"We will need aid, and plenty of
it," said Mayor Connolly last night,
"and it must be forthcoming prompt
ly or there will be great suffering
among.the destitute families of the
miners.
"While we do not like to ask for
outside assistance this town is too
small- to handle the situation alone.
Most*of'our citizens are miners and
the-majority of them are down in
the mine, in all probability, dead.
We are doing everything possible to
handle the proposition, but it is too
big for us,"
Dr. Howe, in charge of the relief
work, said the need of food, ctothlns
and money is great and that the citi
zens ho the of Chicago and
other places 'wtt tajsist in relieving
the situittlbu.,,' •'•#V -w^^
"Before .anything elsli we will need
(Continued on page 4.)
.Mobile, Ala. Nov. 16.—Miss LU'.e
Sutton of Ocean Springs, Mio% «br
was sentenced last spring to serve
sev»n ears in the 'peni.tenti.ir/ by
Circuit Judge Hardy, on a cha.ve rf
burjr'.irj. the theft or a half po.:u.l of
butter and five eggs from the resi
dence of Fred Abbley, voluntarily
surrendered today to Sheriff Muliood.
Miss Sutton, through tha instri.'
niont.-ility of the King's Daughters
wai reiehsed on bonds which «ne
furulshed by selling her property and
iwttintr up the money as coH«uen!,
and has been living at Merri.l wl:a
relatives, pending the appeal of her
case to the supreme court, which
tribunal affirmed her sentence a few
days ago.
Left fatherless and motherless and
having the care of an invalid brother
Miss Sutton has led a solitary life,
which, it is believed, has impaired
her mind and rendered her irres
ponsible for the act.
PROB
E INT
O SUGA TRUST
New York, N. Y., Nov. 16.—A new
figure was introduced tonight into th«
controversy surrounding the investi
gation of frauds charged to the Amer
ican Sugar Refining company, when
Edwin I. Anderson a former superin
tendent of docks: for" the company
and a close- personal friend of the
late Theodore O. H&vemeyer, announ
ced through his attorneys, that he Is
the man referred to by James B. Rey
nolds, former assistant secretary of
the treasury, as the one who gavt the
department the Iteat specific informa
tion concerning the frauds.
Anderson has. filed: claims with the
customs authorities for compensation,
which he estimates will reach $1,
000,000.
For the last two years, he says,
he. has been engaged in furnishing
evidence to the government and it
was through him, he assetrs, that
Richard Parr, who now figures so
prominently in the case, gained his
lnformntion.
Anderson exonorates Mr. Reynolds
of any attempt to check the investi
gation, declaring that the former as
sistant secretary was at all imes en
thusiastic in his desire for prosecu
tion. In fact, the first activity came
as'-tie., result of encouragement which
Mr. Reynolds gave him, he says.
Review the case «oth by means of
affidavits which were made several
months ago, and by verbal statements
.„.•,-._.._... tonight, Anderson says that the
TRIiVNI .,
ri.. :.
WANT A
BRING BE8ULT1.
Phono It or'jl'''"^:'
••'••'.. A. -vt.••'••'
PRICE FIVE CfNTS,
WESTERN UNION AND BELL COM*
PANY IS O E IN A^REAT^
cdllllNE,-'
BILUON DOLLAR COMPANY
BIG COMBINATION CAUSED GREAT
DEAL OF COTMMENT IN COM-
MERCIAL WORLD.
Promoters 8ay It Is Merely a Mat
ter of Economy Many Lines Now
Are Paralleled Wires to Be Us
ed for Telegraph and Telephone is
the New PJan.
Boston, Mass., Nov. 16.—A long
stride towards the complete control
by one corporation of all wire ser
vice in the United States was made
today in the acquisition of the
American Telephone and Telegraph
company of the control of the Wes
tern Union Telegraph company.
In order to make the assorbtlon
complete, the incorporation of a new
billion dollar company, it is said, will
be necessary to include the $592,475,
400 of bonds and stock of the Amer
ican Telephone company, known as
the Bell company and the outstand
ing $165,000,000 of bonds and stock
of the Western Union.
The acquisition of the necessary
stock and voting rights of the Wes
tern Union by the Bell company ha*
been In progress for about six months
The work has been conducted quietly
and only a sufficient amount to in
sure control, said to be 51 per cent,
was taken over.
The officers of the Bell company
regard the step as one of economy
solely. They point out that ever
since the telephone has been a factor
in -human life It has had to compete
•been''paralleled"and'iSere^&'^eei
an immense amount-of duplication.
E MAN LODGED
IN JIMTOWN ASYLUM
Jamestown, Nov. 16.—The sheriff
of Foster county arrived today in
search of a man whose name is given
as Cook, and who is charged with
causing the death of a farmer named
Frank Batesole, who lives west of
Carrington. The men on the Kall
berg farm and Borne dispute arose
over the work. Mr. Batesole it Is
said struck Cook first, and this was
followed by a return blow from Cook
the effects of which developed Sat
urday. Cook was in Melville Satur
day and had a check cashed and it
is stated told the story of the trouble
to an acquaintance who came with
him to Jamestown. Cook left for
Minneapolis followed by the sheriff
and an uncle of the deceased. They
expect to secure the assailant of the
deceased who, it is said, does not
know that the man he struck. is
dead.
Amer'-an Sugar Refining company re
quested his resignation after Mr.
Havemeyer's death in 1903, on the
theory that "he knew too much."
He had then been in the company's
employ for thirty-two years. At that
time, he says, he had no positive
knowledge that frauds were being
committed, but he suspectd it, and as
a result of the investigations which
he then undertook, he came into pos
session of what he calls positive
proof that the government was being
defrauded of at least $500,000 a year
at the single refinery where he had
been employed.
When he laid his evidence before
the authorities at Washington, An
derson continued, the matter was at
once taken up. Kte made several
trips to Washington, meeting Col.
Gerry, ch&f of the customs depart
ment of the treasury, Beekman, Wln
throp and the assistant secretary and
others.
Both Gerry and Winthrop promised,
be says, that his clai mfor compen
sation should be allowed, and he ac
cordingly went ahead with his Inves
tigation.
As does Parr, Anderson says that
while hia investigation was In pro
gross, he was constantly shadowed by
detectives and and so far convinced
that h© waa te danger of attaaok and
possible ssassination that a secret'
JSitlfi
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