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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, December 26, 1909, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1909-12-26/ed-1/seq-8/

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EIGHT
PRESIDENT HAS
STARTED WORK
SENSE OF SECURITY ENVELOPES
THE CAPITOL CITY OF NIC
ARAGUA.
ESTRADA IS STILL FIGHTING
MADRIZ SAYS HE REALIZES RE-
SPONSIBILITIES AND DANG-
ERS OF POSITION.
Zelaya Is Now On Board a Mexican
Battleship American Cruiser Re
fused to Salute Deposed President
—Man Stabbed for Shouting "Vivi
Madriz."
Bv Associated Press.!
Managua, Dec. 25.—Jose Santos
Zelaya, fhe ex-president of Nicara
gua, has taken himself out of the
count-y and is now aboard the Mex
ican gunboat. General Guerrero, and
is bound for Salina Cruz.
Under the cover of darkness Thurs
day morning Zelaya, accompanied by
a heavily armed guard, proceeded to
Corinto, in which port the 'Mexican
iwarship had been lying for several
days, close to the United States pro
tected cruiser, Albany. Other (Amer
ican warships swung anchor in the
harbor, with marines aboard', lazily
awaiting instructions.
Zelaya's coming was unheralded,
but a guard from the Guerrero receiv
ed him and he soon was safe under
the protection of the Mexican flag.
Where Has
That Button
Gone?
A button gone off the front of
your negligee shtirt—not another
in the house that iwill .match the
other®—no time to sew one on
anyway.
What an annoyance!
Why not patronize a Taumdiry
that sows on lost buttons, fixes nip
bursted button holes, and keeps
lycur limen Ini perfect repair at all
times—and free of charge?
Ours is such a laundry.
Enjoy the service—
Send us your "work.
Reade & Stevenson
Laundry
Phone 220 120 Sixth St.
At 5 o'olcck in the afternoon the war
ship .weighed anchor and pointed out
to sea. A salute of thirteen guns
were fired from the shore, and hun
dreds of sailors and citizens 'waived
the former dictator a farewell from
the beaieh. Zelaya stood alone and
waived back in answer. ^e uncover
ed his head when abreast of the Amer
ican cruiser, 'but .she 'made no re
sponse. Then he turned again to
wiaard the shore, gazing until out
of sight.
Shortly before the arrival of Ze
laya at Corinto, the United States
gunboat, Princeton got up steam and
proceeded for San Juan Del Soir.
The rumor spread that the Prince
ton intended to watch the movement
of the Mexican gunboat, hut she (pro
ceeded directly down the coast and
her arrival at htr destination was
later reported, greatly relieving the
anxiety of the Zehivan adherents.
Manragunas in general .were greatly
relieve.1 when they learned that Ze
laya had gone and President Mladriz
has already begun his promised work
of reform.
Ail reports that Madris intends to
resign the presidency are without a
shred of truth. He, himself, announc
ed that h" accepted the office only
after a mature consideration of the
opportunity the position gave him to
bring about harmony and peace in
Xiearagua and also of the dangers
which attended his acceptance. He
is willing to face the dangers, he
says, in order to save the country.
iNews of the overwhelming victorv
won by Estrada at Rama has now
rer.irhed the ears of all in Managua,
as 'well as the report that the revolu
tionary forces will soon be marching
in this direction.
•But Estrada is as yet along dis
tance off and the hope is held, that
before the men reach the capital, a
settlement satisfactory to all sides,
might be arranged.
Francisco iBaca, of Leon, the home
town of President Madriz, has hsen
appointed minister general in plac3
of Dr. Julian Mas, who resigned.
Irias, who at one time was spoken
of for the presidency, has deemed
it advisalble to withdraw himself
from public notiice as he became very
unpopular when the demonstrations
against Zelaya were at their height.
A dispatch received here todiay
from' Rivas says that a man who
shouted "Vtvi Madriz" was stabbed to
death by three soldiers.
Managua, Dec. 25.—Zelaya was en
tertained at luncheon at Corinto by
the late commandant of the port,
whose guests included the Mexican
minister and the officers of the gen
eral Guerrero. There were no toasts
but an informal discussion of the bat
tle of Rama was indulged in.
Zelaya expressed the fear that
President Madriz would not he able
to cope with the situation, as he was
not a military man. He said that
the army of the government had
been reduced to skeletons by priva
tions due to the failure of the new
administration to forward rations,
and he -was glad that the army bad
surrendered, as a great loss of life
was thus averted.
At 2:30 in the afternoon, the ex
president was taken off on a launch
and put aboard the Mexican warship
without the slightest opposition from
the American ships and no protest of
any kind. Until the general Guer
rero steamed away there was great
apprehension on the part pf Zelaya
that the United States would oppose
his departure. There was only a
feeble demonstration, and the leave-
The Minneapolis
Heat Regulator
Consists of a
ThermostQLt (or mechanical ther
mometer) a to and two cells of
Open Circuit BaLttery.
EASILY INSTALLED
Books of plain directions in Detail
with each Regulator.
THE THERMOSTAT is located in the
living room at an average tempera
ture point. All other parts of devica
are located in basement. The Ther.
mostat regulates by a* temperature
change of one degree.
Made with or without
TIME ATTACHMENT
Point of Temperature Control may be
changed instantly at the Thermostat
without going to the basement.
TWENTY-FIVE YEARS ON THE
MARKET.
PROVEN A SUCCES8 GUARAN.
TEED.
Booklet on Request.
I G.W. WOLBERT HARDWARE CO.
Agents for Bismarck, N. D.
llllllIlllllllllllllHIRIIlllli
FJ
taking of Zelaya was unimpressive.
No speeches were made, but a mili
tary band played a few airs in a hall
nearby.
The American officers ashore spent
most of the time making snap shots
of what appeared to be a very peace
ful scene
POLICE INTERFERE.
St. Louis, Dec. 25.—In a fifteen min
ute handicap wrestling match here
tonight, Frank Gotch failed to throw
Con O'Kelly, champion of Ireland.
Dr. Roller and Raoul De Rouen
wrestled fifteen minutes without a
fall.
The. police refused to permit James
J. Jeffries to put on gloves to box
with Sam Berger.
EXPECTED THAT JUNES
WILL PLEAD GUILTY
Fargo, X. D., Dec. 25.—If a report
which was receive,! from- Rugfby, N. D.
this morning is correct, Andy Jones,
Xorth Dakota's unique representative
of high financing, will offer no resis
tance when his case is called for trial
on Jan. 5 in the United States court.
A definite rumor that he will enter
a plea of guilty has gone out from
Rugby, which is verified 'by certain
ci'rcumstances here.
When asked concerning the mat
ter this noon, Judge Engerud, leading
noumsel for Jones, stated that he
knew nothing concerning such a re
port. He declined to make any state
ment concerning the matter, neither
affirming or denying it.
The Jones casn will b« flan first
cue called when the federal petit jury
convenes in Fargo the first week in
January. Thorough preparation has
been made by the government to
proseoute this action, the first on the
calendar. Special Agent Proctor, an
expert accountant, has been engaged
on the "books of the Rugby Nlationa'l
bank for the ipast two months and has
filed dSata with the department said
to ibe the most complete ever made
in a case of a similar nature.
All the books and records of the
defunct bank are held in the office
of the United States district attorney,
where tfhey have been since the gov
ernment took a band in the 'affair,
following the closing of the doors of
the institution. No effort has been
'viade by attorneys for Jones to review
rhe bank books, not more than, an
hour 'having been spent there in the
search of faiats and figures. Attorney
W. B. Purcell of W.alhpeton, who is
ar.qoeiateifl with Judge Engerud in
the defense, has spent no time here
on the case, so far as can be learned.
It ws anticknated that an application
would be made by tihe defense for ac
cess to the book* a large iiortion of
the time, /but such wias not the case.
'Mere interest is centered in the
Jones iclase than any action in the
federal ccmrt here for years. When
the adjourned term Is formally open
ed the eyes of the state wiM center
on Fargo, where the history of the
Rugby man 'will be aired.
DEPOSED PRESIDENT
fContinued from naare l.'H
removal and was one of the most
prominent residents of Greenwich.
The report of the investigation of the
insurance department of New York
to District Attorney Wm. T. Jerome
of New York declared that the com
pany had for years evaded an official
investigation at Sheldon's dictation
and that by consent of the directors
he had pledged the securities of the
company for loans. Sums aggregat
ing $250,000 had been loaned, it was
charged, to former officers of the
state insurance department. Sheldon
it was further alleged, had over
drawn his salary and had used the
company's funds in speculation.
Sheldon was born in New York 62
years ago and was a graduate of
Yale. In 1888 he was elected presi
dent of the Phenix (Fire) Insurance
company of Brooklyn.
A widow and two sons survive him.
How Welshwomen Carry Their Babies.
The quaint old Welsh way in which
Swansea women carry their babies at
tracts every one's notice wheu visiting
that town for the first time. A big
shawl over the right shoulder Is drawn
down to the left hip, where the two
ends of the shawl arc met and held
together, forming a sort of pouch or
pocket, in which the baby snuggles
cozily and safely. Its weight is so
supported by the hip and distributed
by thfc shawl over the whole upper
part of the body that there is no strain
at all nor any tiring of the arms. This
probably accounts for the upright car
riage of the Welsh mother. Moreover,
the method is comfortable for the
child and so safe that in Swansea
small b03's swathed in their mothers'
shawls are seen carrying the family's
latest baby.—London Chronicle.
An Easy Job.
Is antebellum days Colonel Moore
of Kentucky owned a large number of
•laves. One day one of the field hands,
named Jape, was guilty of some neg
ligence and was sent to the woods at
once to cut down and split up a black
gum tree, practically an impossible
task. Jupe cut down the tree and la
bored bard to split the tough wood,
but in Tain. In the meantime a thun
derstorm came up, and Jupe sought
refuge under a brush heap. Directly
the lightning struck a large poplar
near by, splitting it Into kindling wood.
After the storm had passed Jupe
crawled out from his place of security
and after taking a careful look at the
remains of the poplar tree, which were
scattered all over the woods, said:
"Mr. IJghtnin', I wish yon had Just
tried yo' ban' on dls black gum. Any
blame fool can split a poplar!"—Cleve
land Leader.
-•£*&
BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE, SUNDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 26, 1909.
TO LESSEN MINE DANGERS.
Safety Devices Suggested by John
Mitchell, Former Coal Miner.
"Coal mining is the most hazardous
Industry iu America."
John Mitchell, vice president of the
Americun Federation of Labor, who
for nearly ten years wns president of
the United .Mine Workers and who
himself WHS a digger of coal from the
time he was thirteen years old until
be attained the age of twenty-flve
years, made this statement in com
menting on the disaster at the mine of
the St. Paul Coal company at Cherry.
111., on Nov. 12. in which nearly 300
men lost their lives.
Mr. Mitchell suggests several safety
devices. One is the installation of tel
ephone systems in mines. Another is
the laying of pipes throughout the gal
leries and workings through which air
or liquid food could be pumped in case
of accident. A third suggestion IS that
mines be fitted with air tight compart
ments communicating with the surfuce
which would serve as havens of refuge
in case of disaster.
The Cherry mine disaster had its ori
gin in a pile of hay used to feed mules
stationed in the mine. A careless min
er threw a torch upon it, and the tim
bers of the mine later caught fire.
"Of course these calamities always
suggest means by whicb lives thus lost
might have been saved," said Mr.
Mitchell. "If coal mines were equip
ped with telephones throughout their
workings it would be possible for men
entombed to let those on the outside
know the location of the place hi which
they were gathered, or at least to let
them know what was then* condition.
And thus the work of rescue would
be greatly aided.
"If mines were equipped in all their
galleries with pipes through whicb
compressed air could be forced the
needed oxygen could be supplied. And
in like manner it would also be pos
sible to supply food, at least food in
liquid form, to sustain life for a few
days. No mines are equipped with
such devices as these, and my sug
gestion is not directed to the Cherry
mine alone.
"A very simple device which would
be of advautage in all mines In the
event of fire, explosion or any other
accident which would cut off egress to
the main shaft would be the building
of a number of compartments, each
large enough for a hundred or more
men to gather in. so arranged that the
doors could be closed, making them
ah* tight. If these compartments were
connected with air pipes to the surface
they would be havens of safety for
great numbers of men billed hi mines,
not by explosions themselves, but by
the afterdamp that always accumu
lates after explosions. This la done In
European mines and has been the
means of saving large numbers of
men entombed through fire or explo
sion."
NATIONAL CORN SHOW.
Features of Exposition of Grains to Be
Held at Omaha, Nob.
From Dec. 6 to 18 the National Corn
exposition will draw to Omaha. Neb.,
thousands of persons interested in
good husbandry. Last year fourteen
agricultural colleges sent exhibits and
delegations to tbe show and about
thirty states were represented. Nearly
50,000 ears of corn and approximate
ly 1,000 samples of the smaller grams
were displayed also a large number of
farm implements.
This year the department of agricul
ture will exbibit samples of tbe lead
ing cereals, embracing all those im
ported during the last few years. The
origin of each variety will be noted as
well as its value and the region to
which it is best adapted. Specimens
illustrating tbe effect on grams of
smut, rusts and other injurious fun
gous diseases complete the exhibit.
While exhibits from many states-will
give an idea of the corn grown in dif
ferent sections under favorable condi
tions, tbe department of agriculture
will have samples showing corn grown
under average conditions in every state
in the Union. This collection shows
what the plant was before It was cul
tivated and tbe successive stages of
Its development.
Orchard on State Reservation.
The Indiana forestry commission is
making arrangements to plant a large
orchard on the state reservation, nine
miles south of Scottsburg. Tbe com
mission heretofore has confined its at
tention to the cultivation and produc
tion of only the valuable woods for
use in crossties, cabinet work and
building. The new scheme will be a
means of testing the hardihood of the
various varieties of fruit trees, and it
will also show whether the knobs can
be used to advantage in tbe production
of fruit
New Cod Bank.
A new "cod bank" hi tbe gulf of St.
Lawrence, off the west coast of New
foundland, bas been discovered by tbe
Canadian government survey ship Eli
nor. Tbe new bank is situated about
twenty-five miles northwest from Point
Riche (the northwest point of Ingor
nachoix bay) and is reported to be
about twenty-eight miles long and ten
to twelve miles wide. The least depth
of water over the bank is said to be
•bout eighteen fathoms. Cod are re
ported to be in abundance.
Paris Apaches' Trained Dogs.
Tbe newest pest of tbe Paris subur
ban districts is the "Apache dog,"
which is taught by its masters to
jump at lonely pedestrians and bite
them while tbe hooligan rifles the vic
tim's pockets. It appears that, taking
a hint from the police methods, the
Apaches have recently trained several
animals of the same breed as the po
lice dogs to attack policemen and oth
ers.
I
PUBLIN
American Women
Superior toAll
Others.
J» J» By MARIE CORELLI. English Author. J» J»
GET TO SHINE.
HE AMERICAN WOMAN SPARKLES AND SCINTILLATES
LIKE A DIAMOND WHERE MANY WOMEN OF OTHER
NATIONS, BEAUTIFUL JEWELS IN THEIR WAY, FOR-
England's golden youth, whose gold is sometimes
apt to be rather scarce, are always ready to fall pros-
trate at the feet of every American heiress, but we must give them
credit occasionally for FALLING VICTIMS MUST TO THE«
CHARM OF HER AMERICAN PERSONALITY without her
dollars, for the charm is always there. It varies according to condi
tions and surroundings, but it is never entirely absent.
THE AMERICAN WOMAN IS NOT QUITE LIKE OTHER WO
MEN. THE SAME HEART, THE SAME EMOTIONS, MOVE HER AS
MOVED OUR MOTHER EVE, BUT THEY MOVE HER DIFFERENTLY.
SHE IS ABSOLUTELY ORIGINAL. SHE IS A COMPOSITE OF NEW
ETHEREAL VIBRATIONS.
She is not the daughter of an ancient kingdom rich in history,,
literature and tradition, which felt the hand of the Roman conqueror
before the Christian era. She has arisen, as it were, SUDDENLY
AND MIRACULOUSLY, like Venus from the foam of the sea.
She is the OFFSPRING OF THE LAND OF LIBERTY, a,
young country teeming with the impetuous rush of untried ideas, and?
as such she is ALWAYS FASCINATING, ALWAYS DEEPLY^
INTERESTING.
Individuals In Corporations
Are Responsible For
Doings of Combines*.
By WOODROW WILSON. President of Princeton University.
N our modem economic life men are in gigantic groups, and!
each feels that his CONSCIENCE IS POOLED. The
great danger is that men think they can compound their con
scientious icruples on the ground that they CANNOT
MOVE INDEPENDENTLY UNDER PENALTY OF BEING
CRUSHED.
It was easier in the simpler age, when the individual could act ac
cording to his choice.
THE LAW HAS SHIRKED ITS DUTY WHEN IT ATTEMPT8 TO
PUNISH CORPORATIONS. IT 18 AN IDLE UNDERTAKING AND WIL
NEVER BE SUCCESSFUL. THE ONLY RESPONSIBILITY TO WHICH
80CIETY HAS NEVER RESPONDED 18 THE INDIVIDUAL. THE LAW
MU8T FIND THE INDIVIDUAL IN THE MODERN CORPORATION IF
IT DESIRES TO CHECK THE EVIL8 OF THE BU8INES8 WORLD,
EVEN THOUGH FINE8 ARE NOW PILED HIGH IN THE TREASURY.
Every great age has been characterized by an indomitable indi
vidual, and every turning point of the world has been pivotal on some
one man. WE DIE SEPARATELY, NOT BY CORPORA
TIONS, and every man must live privately, and a most uncomfort
able existence it is.
Business Heads of Future
Must Be Highly Trained*
By CHARLES W. ELIOT, President Emeritus of Harvard University.
*^t TflTEANS of communication have changed utterly in the past
few years and have affected more than the transportation.
I of goods, as the change has affected man in his relations
with men.
The merchant of today is in constant touch with those at the East
India ports. HE KNOWS WHAT AND WHEN TO BUY AN
WHEN TO SELL, and when his ship leaves port for home he can
sell for future delivery, and the effect is the elimination of many risks.
The trader of today does not have to carry a big stock and run the
risk of falling prices as the trader of fifty years ago did.
Business today is REDUCED TO A CAREFUL PROCESS
OF COMPUTING, BOOKKEEPING, ETC. There are not such
large profits as formerly, but there is a steadier profit, to which keen
intelligence can be applied, and it is MORE LIKE PROFES
SIONAL BUSINESS than trading and dealing used to be.
That is why we need a MORE THOROUGH TRAINING
FOR OUR YOUTH, especially in railroading and in its every
branch, taking up the business of transportation, rates, tariff, etc., and
the multiplicity of possible exchanges for a factory. Business has
become a HIGHLY INTELLECTUAL OCCUPATION and re
quires, like the professions, a CAREFUL MENTAL TRAINING
FOR YOUNG MEN WHO ARE GOING IN FOR THE TOP.
IT DOESN'T MATTER WHAT THE INDU8TRY IS, THE MEN WHO
CONDUCT THE BUSINESS OF THE FUTURE MU8T BE HIGHLY
TRAINED. THE AGE WHEN THE HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS ARE
8TARTED ON THEIR CAREERS WITH RUNNING ERRAND8 AND
SWEEPING FLOORS IS PAST.
Public Opinion
Dominates America.
By BENJAMIN IDE WHEELER, President of the University of California.
OPINION 18 THE DOMINANT FACTOR IN AMERI
CA LIFE. THE MACHINERY OF GOVERNMENT 18 ONLY
THE EXTERNAL MANIFESTATION OF THE REAL POWER
WHICH LIE8 IN THE VOICE OF THE PEOPLE.
We in the United States have found out that government by
public opinion MEANS NEITHER REVOLUTION NOR RAD
ICALISM.
American statesmeu STUDY THE PEOPLE'S WILL, and,
once they have learned it they DARE NOT OPPOSE IT. Mr.
Roosevelt, despite his impulsiveness, was a conservative, and Mr.
Bryan would have become conservative if he had ever reached the
presidency.

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