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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, January 16, 1910, Image 4

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Ihc §tawarrit l&tibunt
Evev Morning Except Monday and Weekly.
By M. H. JEWELL.
Publication Office:
FOURTH STREET. COR. BROADWAY
JWeeikly,
lwif01dest
Pioneer Express treats all topics in-
terestingly—even that of the cost of
Wheat crops have been raised
in this valley thi8 year that paid
$20 or more. an acre over and
above the cost of preparing the
ground, seeding, cutting and
threshing, but there have been
vastly more crops raised that
barely paid these expenses. The
principal factor, is the man be
hind the plow. As in every other
business, method and manner
make all the difference between
success and failure, other
things being equal.
The actual labor cost of put
ting in and placing in shock of
an acre of wheat approximates
$5 to this must be added the
price of twine and the threshing
bill. This means good wages to
the person hired to do it, or the
farmer who puts it in, both for
himself and horses for the num
ber of days work employed in
the specific work.
But it is quite evident that if
the farmer, or man hired, did
nothing else than cultivate that
one acre of wheat that he would
be a big loser at the end of the
year, because one ace of wheat
•at any price possible would not
support him and feed his horses
for the time.
Thus in the general round-up
of the year's work there might
be a loss ven at $1.25 per bushel
on a thirty bushel crop, unless
the farmer has figured to keep
himself, hired men and teams
busy working at the same wages
for the whole season.
On the other hand, another
man might try and spread him
self and four or five plugs over
several hundred acres and work
hard to get a five or ten bushel
crop—as he is most likely to do
in such a case—with a corres
ponding cost to him of more than
a dollar a bushel.
In our opinion the price set by
the Equity Society people of $1.25
per bushel makes a pretty good
price for the good farmer, and
that almost any possible price
would still find many farmers
losers.
Our friends "down east," how
ever, must not forget that while
they are receiving dividends on
their watered stock that the
farmer finds it necessary to wa
ter his stock also—sometimes
twice a day—and In winter espec
ially it is a cold disagreeable
job—and he wants his pay for
that work in the winter as well
as for his work in the summer
or, in plainer terms, while the
farmer does raise his crop of
wheat in about four months time
he is really spending a whole
year at it—in time, though not
in labor, and he must eat, drink
and wear during that time. If
one figure* that it takes twelve
months to raise the bushel of
wheat it makes the cost price
considerably more, but the fig
ures given by the Sun are cor
rect only when the actual time
spent in the field is counted.
A very neat booklet comes from
Minot. in furtherance of the move-
:.*"5S5S^»^!
in 9ute
Telephone- Business Office, 32 Editorial and
Local. 13.
Subscription Rates:
Daily by carried 50 cent* a month
Daily by mail \'Aiv*r
yZl
Weekly by mail $1-50 per year
No attention paid to anonymous contribu
tions. Writer's name must be known to t&e
editor, but not necessarily for publication.
ADVERTISING AGENTS:
I.a Coste & Maxwell. 140 Nassau Street,
New York. North Star Daily Press Asso
ciation, Gtrmania Building, St. Paul,. Minn.,
»or business in Minnesota. Wiscousin and
Soutli Dakota. -n t..
Manuscripts offered for publication will oe
returned it unavailable. Communications tor
tde Weekly Tribune should reach, this office:
on Wednesday of each week to insure pub- meet id.voi
Correspondents wanted in every city,
and precinct in the western part of the state.
Ml papers are continued until an explicit
order to discontinue is received, and until all
arrearages are paid.
Entered as second-class matter.
MtMUKKS Of ASSOCIATED PRESS.
THK COST OF RAISING WHEAT.
lioation in the current issue. Grand Forks wanted th state fair
Editor Wardwell of the Pembina
Jan.
ad in
Fre
in
a
statement of
Society of Equity's
wheat cost:
What it costs to raise a bushel
of wheat depends on many fac
tors. Soil,, sunshine and show
ers, weeds, hail, windstorms,
floods, bugs, rust, blight, mis
fortunes generally, or good for
tune for a numger of years.
way.
Commissioner Gilbreath is receiv
ing many flattering compliments for
the handsome booklet on North Da
kota recently issued. The booklet
contains views of the state institu
tions, with letter pi-ess showing what
is doing in the state and is like all
literature that comes from this de
partment—clever and effective.
PERSONAL,
—'Mrs. X. F. Prentica returned yes
terday afternoon from Minneapolis,
where she has been spending a few
weeks with her iparents.
—James Halloran leaves Tuesday
for 'Fargo to pursue a course in the
business college at that point. He
At Gussners' you find all the staple
lines of groceries that the market can
afford, with the lowest price for the
best goods.
There is one passion to which you
may make a complete surrender—
the passion of a lofty ideal.
HOT CHOCOLATE
TJalictously served
at
Twenty Years Ago
Items of Interest Gleaned From Issues of the Tribune
Printed a Score of Years Ago
Jan. 10, 1890—Walsh county citi- Mr. Bogue i8 long since dead and Mr.
zens protested agalust the long vaca- Small is out in the Judith Basin, Mont.
tion of the legislature on the grounds in the newspaper business,
of extravagance, and sent it to Bis-1 Linda W. Slaughter was at that time
marck, but it didn't seem to disturb booming Slaughter as the term
the members. Lieutenant governor! inus of a star mail route and an ex
didn't want to sign the vouchers of the cellent place for laud seekers. She
members covering the holiday ab-! was right. 'Northern Burleigh is now
sence, but the senate refused to ex-! well settled up with a desirable class
cuse him from the responsibility. of people.
Senator McCormick was pushing a Attorney General Goodwin, "set up
bill fixing salaries of district judges stoves," rendered an opinion that
aocording to the number of votes .poll- State Auditor Bray had no authority
ed in each district, tout it did not'. of law to issue vouchers for the time
—'but the legislature and the attor-
neIy
general did not
town located there permanentle and the was a dry year and were
ported sick in Washington. absent—from December 19 to Jan. 7
wheat raising, and in last week's is- the Montana legislature and Senators dead, .presided at the meeting of the ness under the name of the Troy
sue he comments as follows on the elect Sanders and Powers could not senators making the presentation. Laundry. April 1. 1892, Marquett
get their certificates of election. Shades of Cannon insurgentism was and Steiber disso.ved partnership,
use.
Commissioner of Agriculture Helge
sen had a scheme for furnishing seed
grain to needy farmers in Nelson,
Ramsey and other northern counties
—through special tax. Helgesen is
still in the limelight—wants to go to
congress—but he hasn't got out of the
hands of the "eliminating committee."
Jan. 14—Horace P. Bogue was nam
ed for postmaster at Bismarck and S.
J. Small was appointed for Casselton.
ment for the establishment of a
state normal at that city. The book
let sets forth the educations advan
tages of the Magic city, and inciden
tally some views of Minot's schools
I and other leading institutions. It
is neatly decorated and ought to
bring Minot prominently before the
people of the state in an educational
The advertisement of the Louisiana! mtny bills, and all led up to the bid er's employ. June t. 1888, Steiber
lottery was about the most prominent! of the Louisiana lottery people to and Marquett formed a partnership.
the state papers. In Bismarck help out with a hig fund. They purchased additional machin-
Miller's beer was not far be-1 Father Perrault. chaplain of the ery and moved to a building which
Ed. Henderson, formerly of the Bis- abroad twenty years ago. A scheme Steiber continuing- the business,
marck Tribune, was about to accept was concocted to oust Honest Dave About March 1, 1893, Steiber sold the
a position on a new daily to be es-1 Wellman from the shaker's chair, but Troy Laundry to Mrs. Ed. Sloan. At
tablished in West Superior. Hender- Dave was too smooth for 'em. Dave
with both feet. Hon. E. A. Williams
assisted in a lively preliminary fight
capitol is still at Bismarck—Stevens
Chief of the Department Carries Off
One of the First Prizes Some
Got Booby Prizes.
in
Following is the list of the ,prize.
winners in the events at the firemen's
bocby prize.
expects to be gone three months.
-R Hoskins has returned from Wet test-Chief of Police McDonald,,9
Fargo where he went as a witness in first.
the United States court. There were a number of boxing
—B. M. Sloan and James Yellow matches pulled off but the winners in
Eagle 'came down from Elbowwoods
last night on business.
—A. A. Trovatten, editor of the Far
go Fram, was in the city on business
yesterday.
—Attorney M. F. Minnehan of Gar
rison, was in the city Friday night on
his way home to Garrison.
—'Professor W. B. Snyder of the ex
periment station at Hebron, is a guest
in the city today.
—'F. H. Bingenheimer, one of Man
dan's hustling young business men,
'was in the city Saturday on business.
—Representative John A. Johnson
of Dogden, is in the city on his way
back from Dickinson.
--George M. Houghtaling of Black
water, McLean county, is in the city.
He formerly lived in Bismarck.
these were not announced. Most of
them were on the burlesque order.
READY FOR BOW-WOWS.
Everything Arranged for Comfort and
Care of Dogs at Kennel Show.
have been very busy getting the Gate
City garage, where the show will be I
held, in shape for exhibiting the dogs
and receiving the .public.
yetr hut Ave will also have the 'best
facilities for exhibiting the into ad-
BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE. SUNDAY MORNING, JANUARY 16, 1910.
senate, was presented with a fine gold stood on the present site of Homan's
12—There was a deadlock in I headed cain. Senator Haggart, now Bakery. They continued in busi-
son is up in Alaska. is now a resident of Bismarck—and Mrs. Sloan's employ, and he has con
A special legislative committee vis- still on the job. tinued in the laundry business ever
ited Sims to investigate the lignite Representative Zimmer introduced since.
coal deposits and acquaint themselves! a resolution .proposing an amendment Qct. 1, 1894, A. F. Marquett started
with its heat producing qualities with to the constitution so that the capitol
a view of legislation to encourage its .could be removed—to the Red River building. He called his plant the
one would think of capitol removal,
now,
PRIZE WINNERS AT
FIREMEN'S SMOKER
S
WERE INJECTED INTO THE
GROWTH OF LAUNDRY
BUSINESS IN GIH
ONE ENTERPRISE HAS GROWN
FROM HAND TO A BIG BUSI-
NESS.
In Spite of Setbacks Bismarck Steam
Laundry Has Made Wonderful Pro
gress in Last Y«trs.
a
a
valley—Grand Forks preferred at that Bismarck Steam Laundry. Sept. 1,
time—and George Walsh wanted to
About May 1, 1884, a man by the
name of Higgins opened a small
laundry in a building which stood on
the lot immediately south of the one
now occupied by Austin Logan's
store. He called his plant the Bis-
a a
agreecrops
Tribune acknowledged that Grand',poor in many .parts of the state as the fall of 1886 Steiber purchased
Forks was the best place for it—un- evidenced by the numerous emergency new equipment for himself, and
less it was Fargo—and Fargo was af- bills introduced to raise funds for the started the Troy Laundry in the
ter $15,000 a vear for an agricultural needy farmers. Irrigation and artes- building on Fifth street now
college. I ian wells were also the subject of as a pool hall by Pat McHugh
11—Governor Ordway was re-1 the members of the legislature were March 1, 1888, A
CONTESTS. {quarters. At this juncture they re
moved to the building on Fifth street
wn
Lung test—Wm. MrJCormack won new building. They installed the
first place and JoeHllare was given the very latest machinery to be had, and
Fargo, N. D., Jan. 15.—"'All is in
readiness for the dog show," said W.
R. Jenney of the North Dakota Ken
nel association, this afternoon. "Wei
^?!°a_L!!H!!i
ing which he occupied was destroyed
by fire in 1893. In the spring of
1886 W. C. Steiber came to Bismarck
and went to work for Higgins. In
used
F. Marquett
reached Bismarck and entered Steib-
later date Wm. B. Couch entered
laundry in the old Grand Pacific
189 6 0 a
have a vote on it. Representative Launjries consolidated under the
Stevens jumped onto the proposition
flrm a of
Laun
and finally secured an adjournment of Marquett's equipment from
the house by a vote of 29 to 28. The
and Williams are still here and no
tfl a
Bismarck Steam
he Bismarck Steam
dry, with A. F. Marquett and
a
proprietors. They
Pacific building to the
TrQj a bui
iamg, and remain-
re bJ fire Qf A
1898, wiped them out. But they met
defeat with true western indomit
ableness, and, phoenix-like, rose
from the flames with the masterful
purpose to win success in their un
dertaking. They went back to the
Grand Pacific building temporarily,
and in October, 1898, moved to the
building now occupied by the Pallad-
QME HASTE AND A LOT OF FUN ium Publishing Company. Here they
remained until October, 1900, when
they were obliged to seek still larger
ich is at present occupied by the
to re of
A
„_ ._ .. thax to those who fabor, and labor.
"Today we completed fixing up the
A. J. -~*i „i^»-^ ~t*\. diligently and faithfully, with only
stalls and I am greatly pleased with
*v i* TIT u, «„i *,„„* olthe best interests of their neighbors
the result. We will not only have a I
large number of fine dogs here this
a
vantage. The garage will be well \lnto &*"
lighted and heated. I
"The out of town dogs will begin
exhibitors will all have their dogs on
exhfbition IMondaythey
evening or early
Tuesday morning and we will foe able
to offer a complete show from the
minute the doors open on the appoint
ed hour Tuesday momins until they
close on Thursday night."
Mandigo & Son.
May 1 1 9 0 5 he
»"ron*
Bismarck Steam
Laundry Company was incorporated
a of lTle a N
a a
smoker at the Armor hall F+iday even- of the new corporation
c. A. Burton was elected
but in November of the same year he
Coupling contest—Hare and Hallo- disposed of his holdings to Messrs.
ran. Marquett and Couch, and Mrs. Rose
Potato race—Dave Swett first boo- E. Wright, who are the present own
by prize, John L. Peterson. ers of the company.
Sack race—Dr. Hibbs and Dr. Lo-! The gross business of the new firm
renzo were tied for the first place and increased so rapidly that in 1907 they
to settle the question had a round were obliged to look for still larger
with the boxing gloves, and Dr. Hibbs quarters. They procured a site at
was dec'.ared the winner. The booby the corner of Fourth and Rosser
prize went to Prof. Hirsch. streets, and erected thereon a fine
moved into their new home August
1907 in
l*?k[ne°™
da a at W
plant was totally destroyed by fire.
Their present plant is one of ths.
most modern and best equipped
steam laundries in the entire north
west. The arrangement of the in
terior is conducive to the very best
work with the least possible attend
ant confusion. The concern has
grown from a small hand laundry
earning a few dollars each week to
{a powerful firm with a gross business
today of nearly
This result has
$1,000 per week,
been attained by
hard work, conscientious efforts, and
painstaking attention to
most minute detail of the business.
jThe success of the proprietors forms
one more link in tWe chain of proof
.. __
a
it
hear shall come the
8
to arrive tomorrow. Thev will hejin their hearts, and by straightfor
assigned positions in the exhibition untiringoefforts achieving their
hall as rapidly as com ein. Local goal while yet in primeoof life.
Tt
a of
he of iv in
S
a us it
S
a 8 a
or re in
S
Th history The Bismarc Stea
Laundry Companythe
reads differ
ently than the history of hundreds
of other North Dakota firms. And
the west offers to the young men of
today just as vast opportunities as
it ever did before. It is with pleas-
ure that we look about us and see
young "old timers" who have
"fought the good fight" and made
good.
BISMARCK BUSINESS COLLEGE
NOTES.
The following students returned to'
work the first of the year alter two
weeks' vacation: Oleightie GriftTitih
Underwood Mary Marsh, Bismarck
Jennie Davis, Bismarck Katherine
Waldon, Bismarck Launa Rdbidou,
Bismarck HUma Anstrom, Wilton
Marie Morrow, Napoleon Cora Eld
ridge, Bismartok Margaret McDonald,
Gilencoe Mrs. Nolda Poe, Williston
Bertha Pierce, Bismarck Eva Mar
quett, Bismarck Isabel Holland, Bis
marck Alice Falconer, Bismarck, Se
gurd 'Hota, Bismarck Ralph Madland
McKenzie Leo Morris, Bismarck
John Benz, iMofnt Mark Maynard
Donnyhrook George Burch, Stewarts
da le Orman Wakefield, Livona Jesse
Miller, Bismarck Wm. Uberstetzig,
Andrew Ziegle, Hazelton Agnes Win
berg, Bismarck Terest Wolf, Bis
manctk Olive Proctor, Bismarck
Emanuel Brown, Bismarck, Ralph
Fisher, Bismarck Edward Collins
Silbley Butte.
The following are the new students
that have enroMed since Jan. 1: Jose
•phine Baker, Livona Nellie Moss
brucker, Bismarck Jessie Ramp, Bis
marck Winnie Jones, Bismarck Ruth
Wynkoop, Bismarck Mark Wynkoop
Bismarck.
Miss Bertha Pierce has accepted a
iposition 'with Larh Bros. Automobile
Co., after taking a three months'
course in shorthand.
Mr. John Forrester is ill at the
hospital Leo Morris is also absent on
aicicount of illness.
Oliver and Jay Goodenough were
callers at the college Monday.
A new No. 9 Burroughs adding ma
chine lhas been added to the commer
cial department. This department now
lhas two Burroughs adding machines.
Several calls have 'been received for
(bookkeepers who can operate adding
machines.
WOMAN MAKES $12,000
FROM 60 COWS IN A YEAR
OWNER OF DAIRY SAYS SHE EN
TERED BUSINESS TO SHOW
HOW IT COULD BE RUN
AT A PROFIT.
Chicago, 111., Jan. 15.—Mrs. Scott
Durand gave members of the Kane
County Farmers Institute at Geneva
yesterday a surprise when she told
them about her experiences as a
dairywoman. When a questioner
asked her to what she attributed
her success, she answered: "Because
I am a woman."
Mrs. Durand caused a surprise
when she said her profits from a herd
of sixty cows was $12,000 last year.
Asked what she did v»«h the money,
she said she spent it in keeping a
free kindergarten in Chicago.
"I became interested in the ques
tion of good milk for babies," Mrs.
Durand said, "and the more I tried
the more fascinated I became. The
outrages perpetrated upon the peo
ple by careless and money grabbing
milkmen made my blood boil, and I
made up my mind that I would show
them how to run a dairy and make
money, and at the same time malie
the dairy barn as clean and whole
some as my own kitchen."
NEED $3,500.
Washington, Jan. 15.—The interior
department today called upon con
gress for an appropriation of $3,500
with which to complete field work
notes on recent surveys in North Da
kota and Minnesota.
It Was Mistaken Charity.
The athletic girl bad been out iu tbe
woods taking pictures, and at evening
she started, for the car. wearily lug
ging the camnra and tripod. The cars
were throng«*d with workmen return
ing to their homes, aud she bad lo
wait some time before there came one
with even standing room inside. She
pushed her way across tbe platform
and just inside the doorway. The legs
of the tripod rested on tbe floor at her
side, nud she was trying to brace her
self against tbe door when a woman
who had been sitting in the corner
suddenly rose from her seat and gen
tly bat firmly pushed tbe young wo
man into it. with the remark, "Now
you sit right there you poor thingf''
The girl remained seated passively
and looked puzzled for a moment.
Then a dull flush covered her face.
"How awful r' she thought "That wo
man saw the tripod legs and thought
they were crutches. She thinks I'm
lame." Then she shrank back in the
seat and tried not to show her face
Exchange.
Torture.
A cowboy stopped a stage full of
passengers and made them all wait
while he read a poem of thirty-two
verses dedicated to his Mary Jane
There are some thipgs as bad as shoot
ing.—Argonaut
The best excuses are never given.
French Proverb.
IN E
Lodge
Room
MASONIC.
TANCRED COMMANDERY, No. 1, K.
T. Meets first and Third Thursday*
tin each month at Masonic hall. Wm.
O'Hara, E. M. J. McKenzie,
BISMARCK LODGE, No. 5, A. F. & A.
M. Meets first and third Mon
davs in each month at Masonic
hall. A. P. Lenhart, W. M. Louis
Magin, secretary.
0. E. S.
BISMARCK CHAPTER, No. 11, meets
first and third Fridays in each
month at Masonic hall Mrs. Grace
French, W. iM. Mrs. Gertrude Mil
ler, secretary.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS..
ST. ELMO LODGE, No. 4. Meets
each Wednesday evening at K. P.
hall. W. E. Parsons, C. S. John
son, K. of R. & S.
PYTHIAN SISTERS.
LINCOLN TEMPLE, No. 9. Meets
second and fourth Thursdays each
month at K. P. hall. Elizabeth
Belk. M. E. Mrs. Nellie Evarts.
M. of R. & C.
M. W. A.
BISMARCK CAMP, No. 1164. M. W.
A. Meets the second Tuesday in
each month. Carl Kositzky, V.
H. T. Murphy, clerk.
YEOMEN.
A FRATERNAL, LIFE AND ACCI
dent insurance organization. Meets
the fourth Tuesday in each month
in the K. P. hall. I. W. Healy,
foreman master of accounts, Elsie
McDonald correspondent, Eliza
beth Belk.
I. O. O. F.
CAPITAL OITY LODGE No. 2 Meets
every Thursday evening at Odd Fel
lows hall. Fred Seims, N. G. C. A.
iMeisner, V. G. John Yegen, treas
urer R. A. Petrie, financial secre
tary O. H. Benson, recording sec
retary.
A. 0. U. W.
BISMARCK LODGE No. 120. Meets
the first and third Fridays at Maen
nerchor hall ai 6 o'clock. M. J.
MicKenzis, M. W. Bradley C. Marks,
recorder.
G. A. R.
JAME& B. M'PHERSON POST, No.
2, Department of North Dakota,
Grand Army of the Republic. Meets
at their rooms in the Armory on
the second and fourth Thursdays
of each month. George Ward, com
mander A. D. Cordner, adjutant.
HOMESTEADERS.
CAPITAL CITY HOMESTEAD, No.
300. Meets second and fourth Fri
days of the month at K. P. hall, at
8 p. m. Mra Ida Powell, president
H. R. Clough, secretary.
REBEKAHS.
NICHOLSON LODGE, No. 40. Meets
the first and third Saturdays in
each month in Odd Fellows hall.
Emma Pillen, N. G. Mrs. Nellie
Evarts, secretary.
MACCABEES.
K. O. T. M. Meets every first and
third Thursday of each month at
8 o'clock m., at I. O. O. F. hall.
Visiting members cordially invited.
D. C. xiamp, commander Erick
Sriokson, record keeper.
CANTON.
COURT BISMARCK. No. 887. Meets
every fourth Thursday in each
mnoth at Odd Fellows hall John
Yegen, C. R. William Moore, R.
S. I. W. Healy, F. S.
M. B. A.
M. B. A. Meets first and third Wei
nesdays of each month at Maenner
chor hall. Themas Anderson, pres
ident A. F. Marquett, secretary.
ST. CLEMENS COURT, 747.
CATHOLIC ORDER OF FORREST
ers. Meets every second Monday
at 8 p. m., and every fourth Sun-
I
m-
M]
visiting mem-
bers invited. Frank Jassowlak, C.
Anton Beer, R. s.
COMMERCIAL CLUB.
COMMERCIAL CLUB OF BISMARCK
1
?,gula1r meeting of club member
SSfi.
r?t
ay to each
month regular meeting of board of
SSS^VlJ?
flrst
FrId*y
of
each
Skfr* Commercial club rooms.
E SrT\
F- L-
*£VviOS\
Conklin, presi-
dent F. E. Young, secretary.
TTXTT^«^ LABOR UNIONS.
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CAR
penters and Joiners, No. 1118.
5Sn£«.ev.?rVi
rhursay
evening at
A11brotner8
oord!-
ally Invited to meet with us. C.
B. French, president John Danrot,
SETS
w-G-Gor8ucn'
S
*Ted Anderson, financial secretary.
TYPOGRAPHICATUNION No. 140.
Meets flrst Sunday in each month
3 p. Chester Jones, secre
tary.
L. O. O. M.
BISMARCK LODQE. No. 14 Loyal
Order of Moo,e. Regular S
ZJf Y,°?*?*
n,gh
Ge°-
WeatheV
bead d«,ta*or S. 3. Register.
vfitiS5tac£&&£&>*$?'nc

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