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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, January 26, 1910, Image 4

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Evei Morning Except Monday and Weekly.
By M. H. JEWELL.
Publication Office:
t*s FOURTH STREET. COR. BROADWAY
t-stablishcd 5 Daily, 1881) oldestt in 9tate
Weekly. 187if
a 3 W
Telephone—Business Office, 32 Editorial and
Local, 13.
Subscription Rates:
Dailv by carried 60 cents a month
Daily by mail $« per ye»r
Weekly by mail $1.50 per year
No attention paid to anonymous contribu
tions. Writer's name must be known to the
editor, but not necessarily for publication.
ADVERTISING AGENTS:
J.a Coste & Maxwell, 140 Nassau Street,
New York. North Star Daily Press Asso
ciation,, Germania Building, St. Paul, Minn.,
for business in Minnesota, Wiscousin and
Pouth Dakota.
Manuscripts offered for publication will be
returned if unavailable. Communications for
the Weekly Tribune should reach this office
on Wednesday of each week to insure pub
lication in the current issue.
Correspondents wanted in every city, town
and precinct in the western part of the state.
All papers are continued until an explicit
order to discontinue is received, and until all
arrearages are paid.
Entered as second-class matter.
MEMBERS OF ASSOCIATED PRESS.
GOVERNMENT RETURN ENVEL
OPES.
Representative Tom Velle of Onto
has introduced a bill in congress to
do away with the government print
ing of return cards or stamped en
velopes.
This printing is done at less than
cost be the government, and is in
competition with the work of thous
ands of printing establishments
through the country.
There is no more reason that the
government should engage in the
printing business than that it should
engage in any other line of indus
try, where at a loss to itself it com
petes with private business institu
tions.
Representative Tom Velle's bill is
as follows:
Be it enacted by the Senate and
House of Representatives of the
United States of America in Con
gress assembled:
That from and after the approval
of this act it shall be unlawful for
the Postoffice Department, or any
officer, head of bureau, or chief'of
division thereof, to print or have
printed, or sell or offer to sell any
stamped envelope bearing upon it a
printed direction giving the name of
any individual, firm, or company, or
any number of any postoffice box or
drawer, or any street number or the
name of any building to which it
shall be returned if uncalled for or
undelivered: Provided, That this
shall not apply to those envelopes
printed with a return card left as to
name, address, box, drawer, street
number, or building, and which only
give the name of the town or city,
with the State, district or territory.
PUTTING LIFE INTO THE PLAT
FORM.
Chicago Record-Herald: For de
cades party platforms have been
jokes. Only in times of great na
tional turmoil such as the struggle
over slavery or over the gold stand
ard have the platforms really indi
cated party purposes. At other
times the platform pledges have been
so nearly disregarded that only new
comers in politics or naive visitors
from abroad have paid much atten
tion to them
And now in this age of irreverence
-and neglect we have a president who
suddenly stiffens his backbone, takes
the party platform in his hand an*
says, "Here is the test of party loy
alty." The transformation scene is
astounding.
On the instant our politics gets
new dignity and new value From
Tammanyism we rjse to something
akin to statesmanship. From a
quarrel between individuals whose
backers are for the most part con
cealed we rise to a real deliberation
over issues Conservation laws, rail
way control legislation, the postal
savings bank and statehood for the
two remaining territories in the
southwest come to the front and get
the center of attention formerly
monopolized by Cannon, the "whip"
and the insurgents. "What's the
platform between friends?"- can no
more be winkingly asked.
If President Taft can re-establish
the platform as the serious basis of
presidential elections and Of post
election policies, he will have accom
plished a feat which alone would
suffice to give him lasting fame.
PRINCIPLES AND PIE.
Aberdeen News: W. W. Ger
mane, Washington correspondent to
the Minneapolis Journal, is authority
for the statement taat President Taft
has secured the support of the insur
gent republican congressmen and
that the insurgent: and the regular
xvpu'olicans will work together to
cany out the itrei't'-i-i's policies.
If this prov.-a ccnect, the in
tmrgerit newj|n!er« :\YUh have been
jumping on President Taft because
they thought the insurgents in con
gress would continue their opposi
tion to the national administration,
are placed in a decidedly embarrass
ing position. Some of the insurgent
newspaper evidently believed the
congressmen were fighting for prin
ciple rather than pit, and the dis
covery that they decided to be good
as soon as the administration print
ed a notice and posted it above the
pie counter to the effect that no op
ponent of the presidential policy
need apply, must have come as a
shock to the editors who were not on
the inside. The country, at large,
however, will welcome the announce
ment of the peace pact between the
factions in the party in congress. It
means the enactment of needed leg
islation will be allowed to proceed
without the opposition of the ob
structionists,
SOME BASKETBALL.
Jamestown Wins By a Very Narrow
Margin.
The prophecy of tse Tribune came
true last evening when the 'basket
ball game between Bismarck and
Jamestown resulted in a victory for
the latter, by the score of 18 to 19.
There was some fine playinw and
some of the other kind on both sides
and there was never a dull moment
during the entire argument.
It is expected ther will be another
game arranged to be played on the
Jamestown oor in the near future.
There was a good attendance and a
large number remained for the dance
after the gam.
GIRLS ARE CAPTURED.
Fargo Runaways Apprehended By the
Police at St. Paul.
Fargo, IN. D., Jan. 25.—Word was
received (by Chief Gabe Grant late
last evening that Ethel Brown and
'Mary Reims, the 15 and 16-year-old
Fargo girls who ran away last Satur
day evening, had been apprehended in
St. Paul where they were held by the
poic awaiting instructions from this
city. It is expected that they will
arrive here this evening to join their
families, the members of which have
been worried concerning them.
VALLEY CITY LABORER
AGENT OF BLACKHAND
Toledo, O., Jan. 25.—The govern
ment closed its case against the four
teen alleged members of the black
hand conspiracy today.
Indicative of the alleged devious
methods of the 'band is a receipt
identified by a handwriting expert as
having been written iby Salvatore
Lima and mailed through an Italian
lalborer at Valley City. N. D., to Pab
iano Ohincola of Cincinnati, who tes
tified that he paid $1,500 to Salvatolre
Arringo.
'Documentary evidence was intro
duced, including what purports to be
the (written constitution of the Socie
ty of the Banana, the alleged 'blacfr
hand organization. Names of the de
fendants appear in this document.
JEFFRIES ANCESTORS
'New York, N. Y., Jan. 25.—Special
—A London newspaper which has just
reached this side, throws some light
on the ancestry of iJm Jeffries. It
says
"Jeffries former heavyweight cham
pion, is a direct descendant of Lord
Jeffries, the famous hanging judge of
olden times. Lord Jeffries had seven
sons, six of whom were prominent
Jacobites. After the rebellion they
escaped to Virginia and the puglist
traces his descent in a direct line
from one of them.
"Judge Jeffries conducted the fa
mous court held after the battle of
Sedgemoor in 1685 when 320 execu
tions were ordered and carried out.
He died in the tower of London."
THERE'S NO RISK
IF THIS MEDICINE DOES NOT
BENEFIT, YOU PAY NOTHING.
A physician who makes a specialty
of stomach troubles, particularly dys
pepsia, after years of studv, perfected
the formula from which Rexall Dys
pepsia Tablets are made.
Our experience with Rexall Dyspep
sia Tablets leads us to believe them
to be the greatest remedy known for
the relief of acute indigestion and
chronic dyspepsia. Their ingredients
are soothing and healing to the in
flamed membranes of the stomach.
They are rich in pepsin, one of the
.greatest digestive aids known to med
icine. The relief they afford is al
most immediate. Their use with -ner
sistency and regularity for a time
brings about a csesation of the pains
caused by stomach disorders.
Rexall Dyspepsia Tablet* will in
sure healthy appetite nutrition. As
evidence of our sincere faith in Rex
all Dyspepsia Tablets, we ask you
to try them at our risk. If they do
net give entire satisfaction, we will
return you the money paid for them,
without question or formality. They
come in three sizes, prices 25 cents.
50 cents and $1.00. Remember, you
can obtain them only at our store—
The Rexall Store—-Lenhart Drug
Co.
HOGS AS SIDE
ISSUENET $750
Braddock News: During 1909,
August Benz, a well-known farmer^
rancher living a few miles west of
Braddock, sold $750 worth of hogs,
the same being raised as a sort of
experimental side issue. In the
words of Mr. Benz, it costs him but
little more to raise a hog than it
costs him to raise a hen. When the
grass starts in the spring the young
pigs go out into the hog pasture
they get the *kimmed mik and the
refuse from the kitchen, along with
their grass d$et. When the corn
stocks arelarge enough to cut, quan
tities are. trhown into their pasture
as the grass*fcegins to failfcby that
time. From then on, until jhey are
ready to ship they are corn red hogs
and they demand the price of such
on the market at South ft. Paul,
Chicago or Sioux City. The* corn is
cut and fed through its different
stages until it "hardens" or ma
tures when the hogs are turned into
the field, where by cutting, husking
and shelling the grain they complete
their preparatory course for the
eastern packing house. Before the
corn is broken down by,the market
hogs enough is husked from the
field to tide the brood? sows' over
winter. Whilathe method is waste
ful in a measure, it is far superior
to exclusive stock raising or exclus
ive grain growing. It need not aec
essarily interfere with either and it
materially benefits both, and espec
ially the latter. It is a fact that all
do or should know that we cannot
for all time continue to grow wheat
on our land without suramerfallow
ing or practicing rotation—and the
growing of a crop of corn leaves the
soil in splendid condition for wheat
or other small grain, the nourish
ment required for the production of
the two crops being apparently dif
ferent, and the cultivating of the
soil and keeping it free from weeds
being better than summer fallowing.
PRICES OF FOOD
TAKE BIG SLUMP
New York, Jan. 25.—Milk, eggs,
and butter led the procession of re
ceding prices on the pro-food pro
ducts today. The nation-wide agi
tation aided by potential local .in
fluences have brought about a drop.
Meat, too, is on the decline follow
ing the greatly reduced consumption.
State anti-monopoly laws are to be
invoked in a movement to combat
the trusts that have advanced! food
prices.
Today the special gra'ndf jury,
whose particular office it wiir be to
consider the effect of combinations
among the dealers in food'stuffs,
was sworn in. While it is expected
first to deal with the alleged milk
combine, the meat question si likely
to be put to it strongly and possibly
the whole scope of the food situation
will be taken in during its probing.
TO INVESTIGATE
C. P. R. OISASTER
Sudbury, Ont., Jan. 25. Coroner
Howie of Sudbury began an inquest
into thc^Canadian Pacific passenger
train wreck at 'Spanish river today.
His action was taken despite the fact
that the jury impannelled by Coroner
oJnes of Webibood had already re
turned a perfunctory verdict stating
that the cause of the accident was
unknown.
Jones is employed by the railroad
company and it is therefore alleged
that he was not qualified to act. The
crown attorney of Sudbury district
will also take a hand in the investi
gation.
That the railroad officials expect to
find more bodies in the river is indi
cated hs the fact that a fresh supply
of rougn boxes went from here to
Spanish river.
The record of death now stands at
thirty-nine.
Dr. Hale's Day.
Dr. Hale and the late Bishop Hunt
ington of New York were fast friends.
The latter had been a Unitarian, and
his shift caused a sensation, says the
Christian Register. The Episcopalians
have saints assigued to the various
days in the year. When an Episco
palian minister writes a letter on any
day for which there is a saint be al
ways writes the name of the saint at
the close of the letter instead of the
date. Bishop Huntingtou learned all
these things quickly and began to prac
tice them at once. The first time be
bad occasion to write to his old friend
Dr. Hale after joining the church be
placed "St. Michael's day" after his
signature. A reply from the doctor
came, sod after his name he had writ
ten in a full, round band, "Wash day."
Too Full.
A man very much intoxicated was
taken to the police station.
"Why did you not Bail him out?" in
quired a bystander of a friend.
"Bail him out.!" exclaimed the other.
*Why, you couldn't pump him out!"
Allowances.
"Of course I admit your son Is ex
travagant. But you must make allow
ances he's young."
"That's all right! But the more al
lowances I make the quicker he blows
•em."—Judge.
To rob a robber not robbing.
French Prnvari*
BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY MORNING, JANUARY26, 1910.
NO MORE DISTRESS
FROM THE STOMACH
Every family here ought to keep
some Diapepsin in the house as any
one of you may have an attack of
indigestion or stomach trouble at any
time, day or night.
This harmless preparation will di
gest anything you eat and overcome a
distressed, out-of-order stomach five
minutes afterwards.
If your meals don*t tempt you, or
what little you eat seems to fill you,
or lays like a lump of lead in your
stomach, or if you have heartburn,
that is a sign of indigestion.
Ask your pharmacist for a 50-cent
case of Pape's Diapepsin and take
a little just as soon as you can.
There will he no sour risings, no
belching of undigested food mixed
with acid, no stomach gas or heart
burn, fullness or heavy feeling in the
stomach, nausea, debilitating head
aches, dizzifiess or intestinal griping.
This will all gb, and, besides, there
will be no sour food left over in the
stomach to poison your breath with
nauseous odors.
Pape's Diapepsin is a certain cure
for out-of-order stomachs, because it
prevents fermentation and takes hold
of your food and digests it just the
same as if your stomach wasn't there.
Relief in five minutes from all
stomach misery is at any drug store,
waiting for you.
These large, 50-cent cases contain
more than sufficient to cure almost
any chronic case of dyspepsia, indi
gestion or any other stomach trou
ble.
HILL TALKS OF THE
CONDITIONS IN WEST
iNew York, Jan. 25.—James J. Hill,
who had1 just returned to New York
after a trip through the northwest,
said today that the movement of
farm products in that section of the
country promised to be steady and
substantial right along. Speaking of
general conditions, he had this to
say:
"Western banks are loaned up very
closely, hut still there is 'plenty of
money. The only menace is a tend
ency to invest beyond the capital
available. If that happens the gov
ernment cannot help. Considerable
capital is sunk in new land, espec
ially in Canada.
"".Montana is being developed rapid
ly as an agricultural state. It has a
larger grain acreage than Illinois,
and on the average is the best wheat
yield country. Traffic is moving free
ly throughout the northwest, and all
business is good everywhere. The
condition of the soil is better than
nsual.
"The Great Northern is in fine
condition. It runs transcontinental
mail trains through on an average
runnng time of forty-eight hours,
which has never been duplicated on
any other long haul in the world."
SKATING RESUMED.
Popular Indoor Sport On the Pro
gram Again.
After being out of business for a
couple of nights the roller rink will
be opened to the public again tonight
and there will undoubtedly be anoth
er good crowd out.
This form of amusement is proving
very popular with the young people
of the city. The management still
has under consideration a couple of
unique attractions for the rink during
the next month. Thev will he an
nounced in due time in the columns
of the Tribune.
HIDDEN DANGERS
NATURE GIVES TIMELY WARN-
INGS THAT NO BISMARCK
CITIZEN CAN AFFORD
TO IGNORE.
DANGER SIGNAL NO. 1 comes
from tihe kidney secretions. Thejt
wiH warn you when the kidneys are
sick. Well kidneys will excrete a
clear, amber fluid. Sick kidneys send
out a thin, nale, foamy, or a thick,
red, HI smelling urine, full of sedi
ment :ami Irreeular oassaKe.
DANGER SIGNAL NO. 2 comes
from the back. Back pains, dull and
heavy, or sharp and acute, tell you
of sick kidneys and warn you of the
K-»nroach of dropsy, diabetes and
Bright's disease. Doan's Kidney
PlHs cure sick kidneys and cure
them permanently. Here's Bismarck
proof...
N. M. Dnnrot, 511 Seventlb street,
Bismarck, N. D., savs: "For the
past five years I suffered from sharn.
oiercing pains through my loins. Mv
kidneys wve also very weak and
at times the secretions from these
organs were so frequent as to oblige
me to arise many times during the
nieht. I used several remedies in an
effort to find relief, hut was unsuc
cessful until Doan's Kidney Pills
were brought to my attention. I
procured a box &t Lenhart Drug Co.,
and through their use was cured in
a short time."
For sale hy all dealers. Price 50
cents. Foster-Mirburn Co.. Buffalo.
New York, sole agents for the United
States.
(Remember the name—Doan's—and
take no other.
FROM JOKEVILLE.
Ryan Walker.
HE KNEW HIM.
The Bill Collector—Oh, I'll collect
this bill all right.
The Grocer—Don't be too sure.
That fellow has been dodging taxes
for 15 years.
SMALL IN HIS EYES.
First Trust Magnate—Hooker
stale $200,000 and was arrested.
Second Trust Magnate—I warned
him against petty larceny time and
again.
USED TO IT.
Mr. Dodgr—Your father scales up
these pyramids as thdugh he'd been
climbing up rocks all his life.
Miss AllcasM frankly)—Well, you
see papa started in life as a hod car
rier.
HOT CHOCOLATE
with Whipped Cream G^*
and iNabisco Wafers. JlinrWlfa
Served in China de jnjj|igDBfi^
Luxe.
Society in these latter days—I
mean the highest sort that has no
resemblance to the ancient order of
the social realm is proving to be no
more than the phantom forms of
marching ghosts. One has but to
lift the windingsheet to see the -grue
some forms.
I You can trace most complaints
about dull business to dull ad
vertlsing.
DON'T KICK!
If you are not doing as much
business as you should
There's Something Wrong
with your method of attracting
trade.
Try a Campaign of Catchy
Advertising In This
Paper,
Then KICK US If your business
doesn't Improve.
Bismarck Tribune Co
Advertising Department
MASONIC.
TANCRED COMMANDERY, No. 1, K.
T. Meets first and Third Thursdays
in each month at Masonic hall. Wm.
O'Hana. E. M. J. McKenzie.
BISMARCK LODGE, No. 5, A. F. & A.
M. Meets first and third Mon
days in each month at Masonic
hail. A. P. Lenhart, W. M. Louis
Magin, secretary.
O. E. S.
BISMARCK CHAPTER, No. 11, meets
first and third Fridays in each
month at Masonic hall Mrs. Grace
French, W. iM. Mrs. Gertrude Mil
ler, secretary.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS.
ST. ELMO LODGE, No. 4. Meets
each Wednesday evening at K. P.
hall. W. E. Parsons, C. S. John
son, K. of R. & S.
PYTHIAN 3ISTERS.
LINCOLN TEMPLE, No. 9. Meets
second and fourth Thursdays each
month at K. P. hall. Elizabeth
Belk. M. E. Mrs. Nellie Evarts,
M. of R. & C.
M. W. A.
BISMARCK CAMP, No. 1164. M. W.
A. Meets (he- second Tuesday in
each month. Carl Kositsky, V.
H. T. Murphy, clerk.
YEOMEN.
A FRATERNAL, LIFE AND ACCI
dent insurance organization. Meets
the fourth Tuesday in each month
in the K. P. hall. I. W. Healy,
foreman master of accounts, Elsie
McDonald correspondent, Eliza
beth Belk.
I. O.O. F.
CAPITAL CITY LODGE No. 2 Meets
every Thursday evening at Odd Fel
lows hall. Fred Seiras, N. G. C. A.
iMeisner, V. G. John Yegen, treas
urer R. A. Petrie, financial secre
tary O. H. Benson, recording sec
retary.
A. O. U. W.
BISMARCK LODGE No. 120. Meets
the first and third Fridays at Maen
nerchor hall at 8 o'clock. M. J.
MteKenzis, M. W. Bradley C. Marks,
recorder.
•'.. G. Jt :H""~-'iir^-* j:.-'r|
JAMES B. M'PHERSON POST, No.
2, Department of North Dakota,
Grand Army of the Republic. Meets
at their rooms in the Armory.on
the second and fourth Thursdays
of each month. George Ward, com
mander A. D. Oordner, adjutant.
REBEKAHS.
NICHOLSON LODGE, No. 40. Meets
the first and third Saturdays in
each month in Odd Fellows hall.
Emma Plllen, N. G. Mrs. Nellie
Evarts, secretary.
MACCABEES.
K. O. T. M. Meets every first and
third Thursday of each month at
8 o'clock p. m., at I. O. O. F. hall.
Visiting members cordially invited.
D. C. Ramp, commander Erlck
Srickson, record keeper.
CANTON.
COURT BISMARCK, No. 887. Meets
every fourth Thursday in each
mnoth at Odd Fellows hall. John
Yegen, C. R. William Moore, R.
S. I. W. Healy, F. S.
M. B. A.
M. B. A. Meets first and third Wed
nesdays of each month at Maenner
chor hall. Themas Anderson, pres
ident A. F. Marquett, secretary.
ST. CLEMENS COURT, 747.
CATHOLIC ORDER OF FORREST-'
ers. Meets every second Monday
at 8 p. m., and every fourth Sun
day at 2 p. m. All visiting mem
bers invited. Frank Jaszowiak,
Anton Beer, R. S.
COMMERCIAL CLUB.
COMMERCIAL CLUB OF BISMARCK
Regular meeting of club member
ship the first Tuesday in each
month regular meeting of board or
directors the first Friday df each
month, at Commercial club rooms.
Third street. F. L. Conklin, presi
dent F. E. Young, secretary.
LABOR UNIONS.
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CAR
penters and Joiners, No. 1118.
Meets every Thursday evening at
Kuntz's hall. All brothera cordi
ally invited to meet with us. C.
B. French, president John Danrot,
treasurer, W. G. Gorsuch, secretary,
Fred Anderson, financial secretary.
TYPOGRAPHICAL~UNION, No. 140.
Meets first Sunday in each month
at 3 p. m. Chester Jones, secre
tary.
L. O. O. M.
BISMARCK LODGE, No. 14 Loyai
Order of Moose. Regular meetings
every Monday night. Geo. Weather
head, d'eta'or S. E. Register, sec
retary.
HOMESTEADER8.
CAPITAL CITY HOMESTEAD, No.
300. Meets second and fourth Fri
days of the month a*- K. P. hall, at
8 p. m. J. T. Boyd, president C.
Adsit, secretary.

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