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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, February 24, 1910, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1910-02-24/ed-1/seq-3/

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North Star
umber Co.
We have ibeen established In
your territory for a number of
years and have enjoyed having
our customers to continue
to deal with us. We
we are going to ask as a favor
not only to ourselves, but your
self as well, that when you are
in the market for anything in
our line, you come to our of
fice and allow our manager to
advise with you as to what kind
of material is best suited for
the purpose you wish to use it
for. We endeavor to keep our
managers posted on the changes
and they are in a position oft
en times to suggest to you arti
cles that will ssrve you purpose
to much better advantage and
not cost you as much as that
Which you often times call for
arbitrarily.
Give us a chance to serve
you and, if the above sugges
tion is not clear, allow our man
ager to explain to you how he
often times can save you mon
ey by his advice.
North Star
Lumber Co.
W. E. Gleason,
Local Manager
FACIAL
Defects
QUICKLY
Plastic Surgery Institute
Corner Sixth and Hennepin
MINNEAPOLIS. MINN.
THE OIL CASE.
I court, will
CORRECTEDI
The chief surgeon of the Plastic
Surgery Institute quickly rights
all wrongs with the human face
or features without knife or pain.
to the entire satisfaction and de
light of every patient. The work
is as lasting as life itself. If you
have a facial irregularity of anyj
kind write
flnp,,
...A*
"""I!
empiary nnes upon me u""""""
TOBACCO TRUST CASE MAY
NOTBEDECIDED BEFORE
FOURTEENTH OF MARCH
supreme cour1 th State
....,.,..-,„ ,„„
has already bee
It and Standard Oil Cases Are Very
Much Alike
NO INTIMATION HAS BEEN MADE AS TO THE POSSIBLE DECIS-
least until after the argument in the
case of the Standard Oil company,
which is set for March 14. Attorney
General Wickersham, in his motion
to advance the hearing of the latter
case, described the two as essentially
kindred, and suggested to the court
that they be considered together.
ION IN THE CASE BUT IS IS SUPPOSED |T HAS BEEN DECID-
ED AND WILL BE HELD UNTIL THE DECISION IS REACHED IN
Washington Feb 23—While the Standard Oil company, the raw pro-
no. th*e nUnited
statess
argueu
duct is to an extent produced by the
!has vouchsafed no intimation on the combination the raw material is pus
I subject, it is generally supposed here
I The two cases are alike in that they which in 1899 entered into the agree
are proceedings in equity to enjoin ments complained of'had long since
government seek to procure either merely to the
imprisonment of individuals or ex- turlng property, that manufactmlng
a a of a
a
that the decision in the case of the While the Sherman law does not
I America Tobacco Company., which specifically prohibit the organization
Deen argued ucxuxe .uviux uvm in
not De handed down at court declared in the
befor the of holding
companies,.
The government charges that from
the time of the organization of the
Standard Oil company in 1899, a
monopoly was obtained that in fact
for years prior to that a virtual mon
opol.y had existed, and that the.var
Lawyers here generally concur in „,,„. ....
the statement made by Mr. Wicker- ious forms which the conspiracy ai-[Duvall, commanding officer of the
sham to the court, that these two leged against the oil company has! army in the Philippines, is the urn
cases together present for its consid- taken, have been merely adaptations
eratlon "practically the entire range to the changing needs and conditions ment of Luzon is under the com
of modern Industrial organizations in of the times. mand of Major General William H.
this country," and substantially every Tn the tobacco case, it is alleged Carter. A curious effect of the man
feature of the "tiust question," so that originally when the merger was euvers has been the alarm shown by
far as it falls within the purview of consummated in 1890. there was a the native Inhabitants of some of the
the Sherman anti-trust law. Yet they monopoly only in the cigarette trade villages and towns in the "war" dis
'are not precisely alike Indeed, it Is the defendants claim that the control trict. Believing that real war had
said that in some particulars they are of the business then secured has since broken out, they fled to the moun
so dissimilar that the court might .materially dwindled. tains.
find in favor of the government in The Standard Oil's counsel have I
one case, and against It in the other contended that the corporations
alleged violations of the law of the ^ase to In standard Oil
land-neithe is ts essence a tobacco case the defendants contend
criminal action: in neither does the that their acts a been confined
the defendants, corporations are under no legal obli-
1 1
X»*i««
a
t^
In both suits the charges pressed ga ion jrohftlUon different
are those alleging unlawful combin- I
pany Out of its $100,000,000 capi- with offense against the Sherman law
Ital stock over $97,000,000 was ex- alone: the tobacco corporations are
'changed in 1899, according to the charged with offending also the Wil
!government figures, for stock In son tariff act of 1894, which extended
Nineteen other corporations, engaged the application of the anti-trust law
in the various branches of the pe- to any conspiracy restraint of
troleum business. trade, one party to which was an im-
ation and conspiracy In restraint of in an absolute necessity of life, as
interstate trade and commerce, and Hon as the ™"£*J™*W™™ distinguished from one that was not
continuing monopoly, or attempted rtfl0*"*}*'^^^**
The \merican Tobacco company is porter. Furthermore, the govern
'alleged to be both a holding and an ment is seeking to establish the rule
!operating companv. It is actively that a corporation entering into an
engaged in the tobacco business, owns agreement abroad which in purpose
'its own shops and sells the manufac- conflicts with American law, gains
Uured products. In the case of the no immunity from the fact that such
Beyond You Reach?
Don't worry about the foods that are beyond your
reach. Cut out the expensive foods for a while.
You can get along without them—but you will
need something besides starchy vegetables to sus
tain strength. Make your "meat"
SHREDDED WHEAT
It contains more real body-building nutriment than
meat or eggs. It is more nourishing, costs much
less. It is always the same price—always clean
always pure—always the same. Your grocer sells it.
ALL THE "MEAT" OF THE GOLDEN WHEAT
BISMARCK 6AILV TRIBUME, THURSDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 24, 1910.
supreme
Manilla. Pel). 23.—Ten thousand
troops under the command of Gener
als Daniel H. Brush and Ramsay D.
Potts, directing respectively the
"blue" and the "red" armies, were
ordered to engage in the extensive
maneuvero im tm
Northerncobe- jrules1
curitie case that the holding
pany constituted an organization in
restraint of trade and commerce.
a
T,
thee ooff theUZOn
game, the "blue'
army is the defending force, and the
"red" takes the offensive. The pro
gram of 'e maneuvers permitted a
landing of the "red'' army at any ac
cessible point between Sublg bay and
the Lingayen gulf, on the west coast
of Luzon, in the province of Zam
bales. Major General William P.
0f
the maneuvers. The depart
a a is a in
S
0 a
A 0
tho nrnhihitlnn
S 1 S
S S a I A between the «y "was charged with a public use
iInT\TsIndaTSirCompany of New'two cases lies in the fact that the
Jersey Is attacked as a "holding com- Standard Oil company is charged called
publitc
sted that the commod-
N a
j» »e
t°»»™ corporations
eT?,
S
a
Shredded Wheat Biscuit is made of the
whole wheat, steam-cooked, shredded
and baked in the cleanest, finest food
factory in the world. It is ready-cooked,
ready-to-serve. Two Shredded Wheat
Biscuits heated in the oven to restore
crispness, and eaten with a little hot
milk, and salted or sweetened to suit the
taste, will supply all the energy needed
for a half-day's work. If you like it for
breakfast, you will like it for any meal
in combination with vegetables, baked
apples, sliced bananas, stewed prunes
or other fruits.
a Wickersham in
rtUUimj 1
argument of the tobacco case ex-
a
nem-sltv. because such a commod-
ut.n companies
As the resul of thu hearing in the
circuit courts, othei differences were
either made or became apparent.
In the tobacco suit, the court did
not find sufficient evidence to hold
that there was a monopoly in the
trade in question, although it did opinions, are
hold that there was a combination in
restraint of trade. In the Standard
Oil case, the court was unanimous in
finding that there was an illegal mon
opoly, in addition to there being a
conspiracy.
TEN THOUSAND MEN IN WAR GAME
ON LUZON ISLAND, IN THE PHILIPPINES
BOSTON SENATOR THINKS PROB
AND AS CHAIRMAN Or THE
ALL LINES WILL BE OBLITE
FACTS IN THE CASE.
Newark, N.
J.. Feb.
to form
.—Facts, not
the basis on
which the senate committee appoint
ed to inquire into the price of com
modities and into rates of wages will
act. This declaration was made to
il i'-'ht by Senator Lodge, of Massa
chusetts, chairman of the committee
in an adrdess delivered before the
I Newark board of trade. The speak
er asserted further that "the facts
I will be collected and given out with
out any reference to any preconceiv
ideas and without any regard as to
what or whom it will help or hurt.
"We shall hew to the line," he said,
"and let the chips fall where they
will. The importance of this in
iquiry can not be over-estimated," he
'continued. "It is the intention of
the committee to make the inquiry
.thoroughly and lay its results before
the country at the earliest possible
moment."
The task of the committee is going
lto he a difficult one in the opinion
of Senator Lodge, who said that
"the questions involved are compli
'cated and difficult in the highest de
'gree."
I Personally he had given some
months to an investigation of these
questions, he said and the one fact
'of which he had become certain was
[that the questions Involved in the
.investigation were "extremely diffi
cult and could not be settled or rem
edied off-hand in five minutes" as
I some persons, he declared, seemed to
'think.
I After outlining in a general way
'the method of procedure which the
committee will follow in conducting
its Inquiry and giving a number of
specific facts which revealed some of
ithe difficulties the committee will
have to face, Senator Lodge said:
I "That combinations to control the
[sale of certain articles have, In some
(instances advanced prices artificial
ly I have not personally the least
doubt and if I am correct the facts
which will he gathered by the com
mittee will demonstrate and will
[show evils and wrong-doing in cer
tain particular cases which we ought
I to be able to reach. An example of
such evils is to be found in the case
of meat products and in the use of
cold storage to prevent a normal de
cline of prices which your own grand
jury has been investigating. But
many causes are at work affecting
prices and we do not want to jump
.at conclusions or fancy that we can
settle those questions by a stroke of
the pen."
He said the committee "will try to
determine whether the rise in prices
was sudden or extended over a ser
ies of years whether there has been
an advance in world prices or wheth
er the advance Is confined to the
United States whether wages, and if
possible, whether salaries, which are
most difficult to ascertain, have risen
with prices and to what degree, if
THREE
THOROUGH
E IS VERY IMPORTANT MATTER
COMMITTEE HE WILL SEE THAT
RATED IN THE SEARCH FOR THE
,any: whether the tariff has raised
[prices whether prices in certain
cases have been artificially and
wrongly advanced by combinations
seeking inordinate profits and finally
we shall make a comparison between
domestic and foreign wages and
prices."
Whatever the facts show will be
stated by the committee, said the
senator without any "attempt either
to blacken, to whitewash or to mis
lead." He said he had received dur
ing the past few days one letter
blaming the tariff and another blam
ing the trusts as the cause of high
prices.
"If the question were as easy of
solution," he added, "as the writers
of these two letters think, we could
deal with it very quickly."
As an illustration of the difficulties
which the committee will have to deal
with, Senator Lodge took three arti
cles of wide consumption, all neces
saries of life, raw cotton, refined pe
troleum and sugar, and made a com
parison of their changes In price and
of their relation to the tariff and
trust questions.
"Cotton is on the free list and has
been for half a century," he said,
"It is not controlled or handled by
any trust. Refined oil has been prac
tically and is now absolutely on the
free list and its sale is almost en
tirely controlled by the strongest,
best organized and most relentless
trust or combination of which we
have knowledge.
Sugas is in the hands of a trust or
combination and is highly protect
ed. Neither the trusts nor the tar
iff are present in the case of cotton.
The trust Is present and the tariff
absent in the case of oil. Both the
tariff and trust control are present
in the case of sugar.
'Now let us consider the facts in
regard to the prices of these articles.
Taking 100 as the basis In 1899 the
advance in cotton has ranged from
31 to 84 points. It was 59 points
higher in 1908 than 1899 and it is still
higher at the present time Petrol
eum, starting with 10O as the basis,
in 1899, has advanced 33 points in
ten years sugar during the same
time has declined 10 points.
"I make no comment on these
facts and offer no opinion. I leave
it to you to point out the cause of
the movement of prices in these ar
ticles which will meet every case.
"This is not a question nor is it
a time for reckless haste or violence,"
said Senator Lodge in conclusion,
"but it is a time and occasion for
firmness and for justice for a deter
mination to extirpate with a relent
less hand the evils born of greed and
unscrupulousness which tamper with
the food supply of the people or with
the necessaries of life, if laws can be
framed to do it."

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