OCR Interpretation


Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, April 15, 1910, Image 8

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1910-04-15/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

EIGHT
MONEY TtO LOAN
I want $25,000 worth of First Mortgage Farm Loans
at once. None but applications on improved farm
lands will be accepted. Call or write
At All Hours
T. O W E N S Tribune Bldg., Bismarck.
I. J. MMMN r. J. MMMN, MaMgar T. J.
BISMARCK
Phone 489
Livery
«. LITTLE, PrMidrat. F. D. KENDHICK, Ylemltmt.
H. If. WBISKU. AwtaUnt Ctohter.
ELEeTRieee
E a W in a S
I S A N
Day and Night
Funerals Given Special Attention
A. C. HINCKLEY a CO
Phone 6. After 11 p. m. 30 208-210 Fourth Street
108 Third Street
Getting Acquainted
with
THE BEST PAINT
It makes no difference what paint
is made of, if it isn't mixed in PURE
LINSEED OIL it WON'T LAST.
Minnesota Paints
are mixed and ground in PURE LIN
SEED OIL of our own manufacture.
Most paint grinders buy their oil—
they make theirs from selected North
western flaxseed—the best in the
world—in their own mills and it never
leaves their buildings until it is mix
ed in Minnesota Paints.
The other things In their paint* are
PURE Wfoite Lead, PURE Oxide of
Zinc, PURE Tinting Colors and Dri
ers. Use them once end you'll never
use any other kind.
FOR 37 YEAR8 "THE BEST PAINTS
MADE."
6. W. Wolbert Hdw. Co.
Bismarck, N. Dnk.
U. S E O S I O
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
I S A N
Established In 1878
Capital and Surplus $130,000.00
O A N S A E O N A A N S
Safet Deposi Boxe for Rent.
THE COMFORTS OF LIFE
ARE^_^ENJOYED BY
MEI^MiwHO BEGA
PUTT
THEIRXCKIONEY IN
THE BANK
HENRY H. ROGERS was a poor boy. He
worked in a grocery. He saved bis money and
put it in the bank. He left an estate of 100
million dollars.
—L. L. Peterson of Wilton, and his
brother Joseph, were two Bismarck
visitors yesterday,
Make OUR Bank YOUR Bank.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
-J. Michaels of Jackson, N. D., was marck is moving.
J. L. BELL, Cashier
N
Afo-rz-*'
in the city between trains Thursday.
R. L. Lane of Olencoe, one of the
old boys, says that everthing in Bis-
PRES. TAFT STARTS SEASON
(Continued from Page 1.)
son, between Washington and Phila
delphia.
Mr. Taft took an active part in the
game. Just before play was started
Umpire Billy Evans made his way to
the Taft box in the right wing of
the grand stand, and presented the
president with a new ball. The pres
ident took the sphere. in his gloved
hand as though he were at a loss
what to do with it, until Evans told
him he was expected to throw it over
the plate when he gave the "signal.
The president watched the players
warm up and a few minutes later he
shook hands with the managers. Mc
Aleer and Mack.
The ex-president was frequently
recognized and respectfully saluted,
while sight seeing in. the morning,
many Americans insisted on Shaking
his hand and two enthusiastic Ameri
can gins, passing in a gondola, called
out so spontaneously that Colonel
Roosevelt gallantly wved his hat.
FRIAR LANDS
(Continued from Page 1.)
Henry W. Taft is,a member and of
which Attorney General Wichersham
has been a member, conducted the
early inquiries.
Martin said today that Chairman
Olmstead of the insular affairs com
mittee had refused to let him see
department and added that he may
"formulate specific charges against
the administration of the Philippines
both in Washington and in the
Island." Martin says he understands
that one of the attorneys who ad
dressed the insuiar affairs commit
tee yesterday, at a hearing on thea
Martin resolution declared he repre
sented Havemyer.
COOPER'S DONO
(Continued from Page 1.)
court yesterday on appeal, Col. Coop
er and his son were at liberty on
bonds of |25,000 each. According to
Attorney General McCarn, Robin
Cooper's case will be placed on the
docket of the Davidson county court,
and will come up at the next term
in May.
Gov. Patterson, .whose pardon of
the elder Cooper almost immediately
after the supreme court had affirmed
the sentence of twenty years in the
penitentiary, caused considerable of
a sensation, made no comment on
his action today except to say that
the pardon spoke for itself. The
governor has received about 150 tele
grams from his friends endorsing the
pardon.
While the events of yesterday were
still the chief topic of conversation
today there was not a gathering of
groups anywhere to discuss the mat
ter and there is no ground whatever
for several sensational rumors that
have gained currency.
WATER SHUT OFF.
It was announced yesterday that
the water supply would be shut off
between 10 a. m, and 2 p. m., to ad
mit of hydrant removal. Rain prevent
ed it. An attempt will be made today
(t-riday), .between the same hours,
weather permitting.
BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MORNING, APRIL 15, 1910.
He handed the ball to Mrs. Taft,
who weighed it carefully in her hand
while the president was doffing his
bright, new kid gloves in prepara
tion for his debut as a baseball pitch
er.
When the bell rang for the begin
ning of the game, the president shift
ed uneasily in his seat, the umpire
gave the signal and Mr. Taft raised
his arm. Catcher Street stood at the
plate ready to receive the ball, but
the president knew the pitcher was
the man who usually began business
operations with it, so he threw it
straight to the pitcher, Walter John
son. The throw was a little low. but
the pitcher stuck out his long arm
and grabbed the ball before it hit the
ground. The ball was never actually
put in play, as it is to be retained as
a souvenir of the occasion.
As the game progressed and Wash
ington maintained the lead it took at
the outset, the president became en
thusiastic and repeatedly applauded
the brilliant work of the young Wash
ington pitcher. He insisted on re
maining until the last Philadelphian
had been retired.
Vice President Sherman, who rare
ly ever misses a game *'hen he can
get out of the job of running the
senate, witnessed the contest from
another box, and seemed to get as
much satisfaction out of the victory
as did the president.
EX PRESIDENT
(Continued from Page 1.)
the grand duke and his Anorganetic
wife, who was Countess Sophia Chie
tek, but who was recently raised to
the rank of princess, .lunched in the
public dining room with awo maids.
The ducal party was traveling in
cognito and the duke, who is one of
the most powerful personage in Eur
ope, was not aware that he was un
der the same roof as the ex-president
of the United States, until the hotel
manager whispered to him in the din
ing room. Immediately his large, ex
pressive eyes flashed with interest,
and he turned and spoke to the prin
cess, and for several minutes they
talked with animation. While they
were still discussing the American
visitor, Mr. Roosevelt and his party
loft the hotel for the utation.
BISMARCK WATER SUPPLY CO.
—Henry M. Meyers of Underwood,
was in the city Friday.
—S. T. Parke of Sterling was in
the city on a land deal yesterday.
—E. A. Ford and G. W. Krouse of
Hettinger, were in the c/y on busi
ness Friday.
PRESIDENT TAFT HISSED AT
(Continued on page 1
fications in that statement. The first
is that that class must be intelligent
enough to know their own interests.
The theory that Hottentot or any un
educated class is fitted for. self gov
ernment I wholly dissent from, but
that is not applicable to this situation
tonight."
This utterance injected to the con
course of feminine delegates a feeling
of good nature, soon to be dispelled.
Thoy laughed heartily.
"But there is another qualification,
which is that that class which has
suffrage, should care enough for their
interests to take part ia the exercise
of political power, if conferred upon
them. If they do not, then it seems
to me the danger is, if the power of
suffrage is granted, it will be exercis
ed by that part of the Jtn.es which
is less desirable."
That was the signal of the presi
dent's distress and his hearer's up
heaval of spirits. The leaders of the
convention who sat on the platform
surrounding the president, blushed as
the hisses burst from their comrade's
lips. Those in the audience who did
not hiss frantically endeavored to re
strain their sisters who were hissing,
when the president took the situation
in his own hands and told i/ie ladies
what he thought of their action. He
did not speak at all angerly and im
mediately proceeded.
"If I could be sure," 'io continued,
"that women, as a class would exer
cise the franchise, I would be in fav
or of it. At present there exists in
my mind, considerable doubt."
JEFFRIE!! DAS
A BETTER DAY
MANAGER BERGER, HOWEVER,
STILL IS NOT SATISFIED
WITH WORK.
Ex-Champion's Wife Is to Undergo
An Operation andThis Is Said to
Be Worrying the Big Fellow Put
Negro Boxing Partner Onthe Run
In a Tryout.
Ben Lomond, Cal., April 14.—Re
freshed by his relaxation and diver
sion yesterday afternoon, James J.
Jeffries returned to the training quar
ters today with more ginger in his
work.
The first stunt on the.program was.
three rounds of boxing with Bob Arm
strong, the colored heavy weight.
Commencing with defensive tactics
in the first round to improve his
speed and foot work, Jeffries, who is
not much given to backing away, was
soon chasing the negro all over the
ring. Armstrong was glad when it
was over.
Jeffries' speed was a trifle better
than last Monday, but it was evident
he still needs a lot of boxing prac
tice to be anything like his former
self. Bag punching and handball fol
lowed and when the stunts were over,
the perspiration fairly rolled off ofson
him.
Fast as Jeffries appeared, Manager
Sam Berger though the undefeated
champion was a bit off in his work.
"He's worried," said Berger, "and
I know his heart was not in anything
he did this afternoon. It may seem
to the casual on-looker that he showed
plenty of ginger and life, but I know
him too well."
Jeffries is much worried over the
impending operation on his wife.
Mrs. Jeffries, accompanied by Dick
Adams, left tonight for Okland where
she is to undergo an operation Satur
day morning.
Her illness and departure has cast
gloom over hif and put an end to
plans ror a party tomorrow night in
honor of Jeffrie's birthday. He wi'l
be 35 tomorrow, according to Manager
Berger.
CONVICT TRYS THE
INSANITY GAME ON
Chicago, April 14.—"Eddie" Eng
lish, the former convict who is un
der arrest on a cnarge of attempting
to blackmail wealthy Chicagoians,
acted as if insane when arraigned
yesterday before Judge Dupuy. A
week's continuance was allowed so
that his mental condition might be
investigated.
Notes found in the prisoner's cell
Indicate that he intended to make a
plea of insanity. Part of one of
these notes follow:
"I am insisting that God is be
hind me, has in fact selected me as
his personal representative in estab
lishing the 'world's* industrial league
which shall become the center of the
world's government and industrial
activity for all time. I have com
piled a list of rich Chicagoans who
I shall compel to contribute in am
ounts ranging from $100 to $100,000.
"Wait until I start to collect from
A. Montgomery Ward, Chauncy
Blair, Dr. D. K, Pearsons and the
rest. It will be exciting ail right.
1
PERSONAL.
—H. L. Berndt was in Dickinson
relative to a case he had there.
—M. Towney and Jas. McCarty of
Sterling, visited the Capital City
Thursday.
The fifth street barber has put in a
new barber chair.
I MA
STRIKE ENDE
8TATED THAT SETTLEMENT IS
PRACTICALLY A VICTORY
FOR MEN.
All of the Strikers Are to Be Taken
Back and Guaranteed at Least $2
Per Day Until They Have Secured
Regular Runs 5,000 Men Stick
to the End.
Philadelphia, April 14.—The com
mittee of nineteen composed of rep
resentatives of the striking motor
men and conductors from each of
the barns of tne Philadelphia rapid
transit company, met tonight and
voted in favor of accepting asettle
ment offered by the company
through representatives of the Am
erican Federation of Labor.
The terms of the settlement have
not yet been made public but it is
said they include many of the fea
tures of the proposal made through
Mayor Reyburn on March 20, when
the company agrees to take back'all
the strikers and to guarantee then
$2 a day until regular runs could be
secured for them. The cases of the
174 men whose discharge precipitat
ed the strike on Feb. 19, will be sub
mitted to arbitration.
The transit company has been hir
ing new men every day since its first
offer of settlement was refused and
only yesterday representatives of the
company claimed to have enough
men to operate all cars on the sched
ules which were in effect before the
strike was called.
The strikers on the other hand
claimed that their ranks were un
broken and more than 5,000 men'
were still on strike.
Since the beginning of the strike
28 persons have been killed by trol
ley cars. These accidents, the strik
ers claimed, were caused by inexper
ienced motor men.
49ERS OF BROWN
SPOKANE MAN 86 YEARS OLO IS
ONE OF SIX LIVING OF THAT
CLASS.
WAS ADJUTANT UNDER STONE-
WALL JACKSON FROM 1861
TO 1864.
TELLS OF FRUSTRATED PLAN TO
CAPTURE "LITTLE PHIL"
SHERIDAN.
Spokane, Wash., April 14.—"Robert,
Alexander J. Two years in Deni
university, Granville, O. A. B.
and A. M. Brown, 1849 LL.B., Yale,
1851."
The foregoing inscribed on the reg
ister in the rooms of the University
club of Spokane, are Mr. Robert's
claims to membership in that organi
zation. He is one of the six surviv
ors of a class of eighty, called the
'49ers of Brown," of whom another
members is James B. Angell, presi
dent of the University of Michigan.
Mr. Robert, who came from Texas
to Spokane four years ago to engage
in truck farming and poultry culture,
is a native of Georgia, of French
Huguenot extraction, and served as
adjutant under General Stonewall
Jackson from 1861 to 1864. He was
wounded at Chancellorsville.
Though 81 years of age Mr. Robert
is in excellent health.
"College life in the early '40s, was
interesting," Mr. Roberts said after
he and Madam Robert had welcomed
the interviewer. "We did not travel
around playing baseball in those days.
We stayed at home and worked. Of
course we played ball some, too, but
it was among ourselves. We had sport
those days, but we did not make a
business of it.
"The boys went to college to betheir
BERT AND VIOLET 8TROUD IN THEIR MUSICAL COMEDY SKETCH
ENTITLED "THEIR FIRST RE HEARSAL," AT THE GRAND.
educated and not to become 'star' ath
letes, and it was exceptional for the
yearly expenses to exceed $500. There
were fraternities, but they did not
hold the important place in under
graduate days they do at present."
Some of Mr. Robert's reminiscen
ces of the early '60s throw light on the
stirring events of the war. His rec
ollection of the battle of Sfcenandoah
is an example. School histories tell
of Sheridan's ride from Winchester,
but they do not mention the fact, the
veteran said, that if the general had
not been away from home he would
have been in a southern prison the
eq? X«MB mm JCXIVO puv .,uqd WH,
9S(Jdjns o} pe)c89iap S«A qorq*
TOOO s.ueqoH JK
8
S
'I *P
8
night before the battle.
'No canteen, and not a word above
a whisper,' were the orders as they
started over the mountain and filed
into the *valley," said -Mr. Robert, in
tellirg the story. "Not even1 the
southern pickets heard tho departure.
The brushing of the branches, tiie oc
casional sound of a horse's hoof
sjiuinx i-.jr.'inst a stone al'»i)e disl- »l»
e.l tin midiight stlllneja.
"Tuerc stood the gen MM!'i: Mead
quarters, with only a sentry between
our met an one of the greatest lead
ers of the Union side. In three min
utes the house was surrounded. No
one could escape It alive. The signal
was given, the sentry surrendered
without a murmur, the door was forc
ed in an instant and the company
poured into an empty house—Sheri
dan was in WIncheste.."
Mr. Robert's recollections of the
conflict are not the romantic fancies
of a contemplative veteran—his mem
ory for facts is simply amazing.
NORTHDAKOTA'S
GREATEST EVENT
The coming Laymen's Missionary
convention at Fargo, April 19-21,
will be a nimportant one from many
standpoints, not the least of which
will be in determining what part the
laymen of the different churches in
North Dakota shall take In a move
ment so tremendous that it is elec
trifying the world.
Great speakers have been secured,
the leading men in the movement,
men who know by actual experience
about the work which they come to
talk about, men of affairs in the bus
iness world and men who are think
ers along lines of world progress. It
It will be an event well worth going
hundreds of miles to participate in
for it will not only afford informa
tion it will be an enlightenment and
an inspiration.
Registrations have been reecived
in such number that the success of
the convention is assured. It is en
cumbent of the men of this locality to
attend in as great numbers as possi
ble they will bring back to their
respective churches first hand infor
mation of how missionary money is
spent the details of administration
of affairs in the field the needs of
the present and the fire and enthus
iasm that is everywhere blazing up
and making possible the fulfillment
of the watchword of the movement
"the evangelization of the world in
this generation."
The great banquet at which it is
expected over 1,000 men will sit
down, and which will usher in the
three days convention, takes place
Tuesday evening, April 19, reserva
tions should be made at once either
through your pastor or by mail, tel
egraph at once direct to J. Monroe
Stick, Executive Secretary, Y. M. C.
A. Building, Fargo, N. D.
—L. L. Peterson of Wilton was In
the city yesterday shaking hands
with old friends.
—Ray Davenport and Will Joseph,
two of the old timers, were in the
city yesterday.
The city commissioners of Minot
settled the question of the cost of
high living by making slight raises
in salaries of employees all around.
The Gackle Republican is now
owned and edited by Tom Pettit of
Streeter, who will issue the paper
from Streeter and Gackle.
Minot has passed an ordinance
against spitting on the sidewalk. To
bacco chewers will either swallow
cud or take to the street.
rti

xml | txt