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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, June 10, 1910, Image 1

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TRIBUNE
TslsplWM
WANT ADS
BRING RESULTS
THIRTIETH YEAR
DELEGATION W.4IWMM I
TALK
wrniwrswEwrfDH
A TWiE.
ECHO OF BALLMER ROW
HARRISON'S INSINUATIONS A 8
TO PRESIDENTS HONESTY
BEAR FRUIT.
Secretary Norton Flags Around the
New York Representative and Al
lows His Friends to Interview But
Bars the Congressman Harrison's
Criticisms Recalled.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, June 9.—President
Taft today declined to receive repre
sentative Francis Burton Harrison,
democrat, of New York, who called at
the White House in company with
two other representatives to introduce
a number of Jewish rabbis who took
up with the president the question
of the expulsion of Jews from Russia.
™The president received the delega
tion and chatted with its various mem
bers for fifteen minutes or more.
Representative Goldfogle of New York,
acted as spokesman for the party,
and so adroitly had the situation been
•fcandled by Secretary Norton that not
one of the callers knew anything of
the incident until Harrison returned
to the capitol and there made a state
ment to the effect that he had been
rebuffed by the president.
Mr. Taft based his refusal to see
Mr. Harrison on statements attributed
by newspapers to the representative
in connection with his resolution in
the house calling upon Attorney eGn
eral Wickersham for full information
as to the connection of his office with
the Ballinger-Pinchot episode. Mr.
Harrison, according to the White
House version of the matter, charged
the president and the attorney gener
al with having wilfully attempted to
mislead congress in the back-dating
of the attorney general's summary of
the Glavis charges against the secre
tary of the interior.
Mr. Norton said that during the con
gressional receiving hour this morning
he noticed Harrison and Goldfogle of
New York and Killiher of Massachu
setts with a party of rabbis at the
head of the line, awaiting admission
to the president's office. He spoke
to all the members of the party and
a few moments later informed the
president of the presence of the dele
gation. Mr. Taft announced that he
would be glad to receive every mem
ber of the delegation but Mr. Harri
son. He declared that because of
tfie newspaper reports made by Mr.
Harrison he did not desire to speak
to him.
Secretary Norton thereupon invited
Mr. Harrison into his office, saying he
had some affairs to discuss with him.
Meantime, He had shown the presi
dent's office at the appointed hour and
a3ked Mr. Goldfogle to introduce the
callers in Harrison's absence. It was
the first time Mr.*Norton had ever
met Mr. Harrison, and when the two
(Continued on page 8)
WATCH DEATH
Haverstraw,, N. Y., June 9—Three
mourners, their pastor and their driv
er sat in a funeral coach here this
afternoon and watched certain death
come rushing on them at the rate of
fifty miles an hour. With a screech
on grinding brakes, a heavy West
Shore freight engine hurrying south to
pick up a train at Weehawken crash
ed into the coach, scattering its oc
cupants along the right of way and
came slowly to halt 150 yards beyond
the crossing.
The occupants were either killed out
right or fatally injured.
The Dead.
The Rev. Romath, pastor of the New
York City M. E. Church.
E. V. Seifred, New York City.
Mrs. E. V. Seifred, New York City.
William Beebe, Haverstraw.
Fatally Injured.
Mrs. Perry Kessler, skull fractured
and both legs broken and body badly
crushed.
TEDD JUNIOR 18 AN ACTIVE
FLOWER BUYER
New York, June 8—Special.—Theo
dore Roosevelt, Jr., has not had time
to worry about the carpet business
lately. Since he left his work in the
New England carpet factory a month
ago he has been very busy giving
dinners and arranging for his mar
riage to Miss Eleanor Alexander
June 20. Each day young Roosevelt
buys a bouquet of flowers, and he is
not satisfied with sending them, but
ho carries them to the home of Miss
Alexander. He is shown in the pic
ture carrying his daily bouquet.
SUGAR CO. JURY
CHARGED TODAY
END OF SENSATIONAL CASE IS
NEAR A HAND AFTER A
HARD FIGHT
Attorney for the Defendants Declare
One of Men is Simply "Old German
Sugar Cook," who was Only Follow
ing Orders—Havemeyer to Blame.
(Br Associated Pre»s.7
New York, June 9.—The jury in the
trial of Chas. R. Heike, secretary of
the American Sugar Refining Co.
Ernest W. Gerbraicht, superintendent
of the company's Williamsburg docks,
and James F. Benderaagel, former
cashier of the company, all of whom
are charged with complicity in the
short weight frauds, by which the
government was cheated out of more
than $2,000,000 in customs dues, de
cided by a vote of 8 to 4 tonight to I son, H. Coper, G. Schafer,' J,
postpone the hearing of Judge Mar
tin's charge until tomorrow morn
ing.
Former State Senator Clarence
Lexow argued for Gerbraicht that he
was only an "old German sugar cook,"
faithful to his orders, who had no
knowledge of the policy of the com
pany, for which H. O. Havemeyer was
responsible.
PENNED IN BETWEN CROSSING GATES F,IVE PEOPLE HELPLESS-
LY WATCH ONRUSHING LOCOMOTIVE KNOWING IT IS BRING-
ING SURE DEATH TO ALL—TARDINESS OF GATE MAN IS SAID
TO BE CAUSE OF TERRIBLE ACCIDENT.
The accident happened at the foot
of Graveyard hill, in full sight of the
returning funeral procession which
the wrecked coach was the first, and at the funeral.
of the terrified and helpless watch
man.
The watchman was eating luncheon
in his little cabin when the tikle of
an electric bell warned him of an
approaching train. Mechanically he
pulled the lever that set the heavy,
balanced gates in motion. The gates,
late in descending, blocked the coach
after it had crossed the first of the
two tracks and held it prisoner _pn the
rails where the terrified occupants sat
paralyzed gazing at the onrushing lo
comotive. The driver lashed his hors
es in a futile attempt to force the
vehicle from the track, until -with a
sharp crack, it seemed that the coach
literally blue up.
The bodies of Mr. anjLMrs. Seifred
were found side by side fifty yards
down the track. The wife was just
returning from the burial of her fath
er, by whose death she had come in
to a tidy fortune. Young Beebe, the
driver, was the son of a wealth livery
owner. He lay twenty yards distance
from the track, dead. Rev. Romath
was the clergyman who had officiated
The 1910 convention and tourna
ment of the volunteer firemen of the
state is a thing of the past. The last
of the firemen will have returned to
their homes by this morning and ev
eryone of them will carry the mem
ory of the best meeting in the history
of the association. There were over
five hundred delegates here and hun
dreds of other visitors, and all were
taken care of in a manner that made
a good impression for Bismarck and
her citizens.
Thursday morning the races sched
uled for the forenoon were called off
on account of the rain of the day
before and the fact that the track
was rather heavy. However, after a
great deal of work had been done on
the track with a grader, it was decid
ed to hold the races in the afternoon
and the course was found to be in
ideal condition. The hub and hub,
hook and ladder races were run
against time, instead of in competi
tions, as there was only one wagon
for the boys to use. There were
some good runs made. The Bismarck
team did not compete, as it is not the
custom to have the team from the
town in which the convention is held
to take part in the contests, although
some of the Bismarck boys ran with
Mandan, as the latter team was short
several men.
The personnel of the various teams
which competed in the different
events follows:
Fort Lincoln—Corp. Klock, team
captain Sergt. Hollander, Corporals
Lewis, Adams and Higgins Privates
Howard, Kemp, Holt, Irvin, Crane,
Glosser, Geisert, Patrick, Hagman,
Bose and Ford.
Glen Ullin—Aug. Herman, team cap
tain J. J. Tavis, D. W. Friesen, Geo.
Wangsick, Carl Pribbenow, M. We
land, Louis Dahl, John Wolf, M. Beas
ler, Geo. Norrin, Will Martin.
Lidgerwood—F. A. Hobva, team
captain F. W. Schroder, Wm. Buntin,
M. Slaby, J. Slaby, T. A. Fisher, J.
Herron, M. W. Allguire, M. Curry,
Geo. Goolsby, J. Franta, H. Sharwick.
Larimore—Chas. Eastgate, team,
captain J. Labine, F. Labine, R.
Cochrane, Earl Champion, L. C. Ma-
IS
Val-
erius, B. Edwards, W. S. Cullen.
Mandan—J. Lawler, team captain
A. Fritz, J. Sagmiller, Joe Baehm, M.
Karft, F. Grunenfelder, Ed. Francis,
CELEBRATES 50TH ANNIVERSARY
OF AUGUSTANA SYNOD A
ROCK ISLAND.
President of Augustana College An
nounces Completion of Quarter Mil
lion Dollar Endowment Bishop
Promises to Leave Finest Library
In Sweden to Svhool.
'B» Associated Press.)
Rock Island, 111., June 9.—The fifti
eth jubilee celebration of the Augus
tana synod opened tonight with a ser
mon by Dr. E. Norelius of Vasa, Minn.
its president.
While the exercises up to this time
pertained more particularly to the
fiftieth anniversary for, the next five
days the program will be devoted to
the parent organization. Bishop Von
Scheel today announced that at his
death his library, said to be one of
the most valuable in Sweden, would
be turned over to the Augustana col
lege to help stock the $200,000 library
building given by the F. C. A. Denk
mann heirs, and now being erected.
President Gustav Andreen of the col
lege, announced the completion of a
$250,000 endowment fund collected
during the last two years and re
ceipt of 100,000 crowns for the King
Oscar professorship, raised by the peo
ple of Sweden.
TRI-STATE WEATHER
North and South Dakota Fair
weather and rising temperature Fri
day and Saturday.
Minnesota Fair Friday and Sat
uraday with moderate variable east
winds.
Patli
*,
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 10, 1910.
Kentnare Giveit^First Prize for Parade Ap
pearance Wfednesjday
HIGH CARNIVAL HELD ON BUSINESS STREETS LAST EVENING—ALL THE FIREMEN HAVE GONE
EXCEPT LIDGERWOOD, HANKINSON AND OAKES, AND THEY LEAVE IN THEIR SPECIAL CAR
THIS MORNING—RACES WERE HELD IN SPITE OF THE RAIN—SOLDIER TEAM FROM FORT
COLN MADE GOOD IMPRESSION—ONE SLIGHf ACCIDENT DURING THE ENTIRE MEETING.
«$• «j »J «&
S
To the Citizens of Bismarck and
Members of the Bismarck Fire
Department:
I wish to express my personal
appreciation as well as the sim
ilar sentimet of the several fire
departments along the line that
came to the Capita) City on the
Soo special to attend the state
firemen's convention, for the ex
cellent treatment we received
from your hands, and for the un
stinted hospitality of all with
whom we came in contact. The
city of Bismarck is a hummer.
Never in the history of our as
sociation have we had as royal
a time as we had during the
tournament just ended. I wish
to take this public method of
showing to some small extent our
appreciation of the way you
took care of us.
Thos. Kahaleck, Chief.
Kenmare Fire Dept.
$
&
W. Fisher, W. McCormick, W. Albert
son, F. Donaldson, F. Cushing, D.
Swett, O. W. Roberts, C. B. Winter.
The time in the different races was
as follows:
Association Hook and Ladder Race
Glen Ullin—Running time, 23 1-5
final time, 30 4-5.
Lidgerwood—Running time, 22 2-5
final time, 29 2-5.
Fort Lincoln—Running tiaie, 21 3-5
final time, 30 flat.
Association Hose Race
Larimore—Running time, 33 2-5
final time, 44 1-5.
Lidgerwood—Running time, 33 2-5
final time, 39 4-5.
Fort Lincoln—Running time, 32
flat final time, 43 4-5.
Mandan—Running time, 30 1-5 fin
al time, 43 flat.
Hook and Ladder Hub and Hub Race
Glen Ullin—21 flat.
Lidgerwood—20 4-5.
Fort Lincoln—19 4-5.
Hose Cart Hub and Hub Race
Mandan—17 4-5.
Fort Lincoln—20 1-5.
Lidgerwood—20 flat.
Hook and Ladder Service Test
Fort Lincoln—Running time, 22
fiat final time,^ 3^
4 2-5^.
9 4
Woodruff, Wis., June 9.—Jas.
Phillips shot and killed Roy
Boreman late last night. Phil
lips was employed as night op
erator for the Northwestern
•3 road. He was working until 11
o'clock and after that he went
home and found Boreman at his
residence with his wife. He pick
ed up a gun and fired, the bullet
entering Boreman's spine. Bore
man ran about 200 feet and fell
dead.
.j, .j. .j. .j. .j» .j.
THIRTEEN N. D. MEN
AT MINNESOTA I).
St. Paul, Minn., June 9.—(Special)
—Thirteen North Dakota students
took degrees at the University of Min
nesota Thursday. Contrary to prev
ious custom, President Cyrus North-
rup, who will retire shortly as the
active head of the university, made
the graduating address at the request
of the outgoing students. The North
Dakota students are:
College of Literature, Science and
Arts—Alta Dunlap, Mandan Joseph
Alexander Reis, Jamestown Adel
Sefton, Ellendale Harold Hull, Wah
peton Robert W. Muir, Hunter Caro
line E. Newton, Casselton Henry Er
nest Michaelson, Bismarck Ole Mar
tin, Bolne, Sperry.
College of Civil Engineering—Leon
ard Johnson, Elliott.
College of Law—Harvey James Mil
ler, Buffalo.
Dentistry—Jack N. Greengerg,
Grand Forks Earl Leo Hughes, Hope
Chemistry—Carl A. Taylor, James
town.
LIN-
Glen Ullin—Running time, 24 flat
final time, 35 fiat.
Lidgerwood—Running time, 25 2-5
final time, 37 flat.
Wet Test
Mandan—68 sec.
The soldiers won two firsts, one
second and one third, but as they
are not members of the association
were not awarded any association
prizes. A special purse was given
them, however. They made good
time in the running, but in the hook
and ladder race they were a little
slow in getting the ladder up and in
the coupling contest they were not so
fast as some of the other teams in
getting the nozzle attached to the
hose. They brought forth cheers,
however, every time they appeared.
might be mentioned here that the
14th is making the best all-around
impression that has ever been made
by a regiment stationed at Fort Lin
coln, not only on account of their
appearance, but on account of their
personal conduct. A majority of
them are gentlemen and take plea
sure in seeing that the good record
of the company is upheld. One of
them had the misfortune to stumble
in the hose race and the cart ran
over him. He sustained several se
vere bruises, but was otherwise un
hurt and was able to get up and walk
back to the starting place of the races
without the aid of his companions.
Last evening the city was turned
over to the visiting firemen and con
fetti and other carnival adjuncts were
very much in evidence. The crowd
was good natured and took all of the
fun* in good part and at midnight all
had retired and the streets took on
a deserted appearance. When the
Kenmare special pulled out after nine
o'clock there was a good delegation
of firemen and citizens present to
bid the western boys a fond farewell.
Turned the Tables
After all the fun was supposed to
be over last evening, the Lidgerwood,
Hankinson and Oakes teams, who
came here in a special car, invited
the members of the Bismarck team
to their car and entertained them
royally. The members of the Bis
marck team called up the Tribune
and stated that it was one of the fin
est entertainments they had ever at
tended. The car will leave this morn
ing for home on the 9:30 train.
I
•J"
TELEGRAPH OPERATOR
WANTED FOR MURDER.
CORONER'S
KELLNER WAS MURDERED
BY WENDLING
Janitor Has Been Missing,for Some
Time Past—Woman who was in
Church Shortly Before Disappear
ance of Little Girl was Last Wit
ness Examined Before the Jury.
rLouisville, Ky., June 9.—Alma Kell
ner met her death at the hands of
Joseph Wendling, the missing janitor
of St. John's Catholic church, ac
cording to a verdict returned by. the
coroner's jury late today.
Mrs. Anna Grahle, who was in the
church after mass, told the jurors:
I saw the little girl at the commu-
ji
on ra
ue she was there a
an( wn
man opener the sacristy door, looked
out, and then closed it. I I said to
the woman in the pew with me, 'Do
you think anything could happen to
her?' pointing to the little girl.
"She replied, 'My, what could hap
pen to a child in a church?'"
Fair, but Stormy.
A gentleman boarded the Karori car
at Kelburne avenue. Recognizing a
friend on one of the seats, he nodded
pleasantly and then said. "Well, what
do you think of the weather?"
"Oh, horrible!" was the reply.
"And how is your wife today?"
"She's just about the same, thank
you!"—New Zealand Free Lance.
I LITERARY CRITIC AS READY
LOVE LETTER
WRITER.
(American Press Service.)
New York, June 8.—Professor Har
ry Thurston Peck, holder of the chair
in Latin at Columbia university,
president of the Latin Club of Amer
ica, magazine writer and literary crit
ic, has demonstrated that he is a
"ready letter writer." Miss Esther
Quinn has sued the well known writ
er for $50,000 for breach of promise,
and has produced scores of letters
alleged to have been written by Prof.
Peck in the most endearing terms.
Pfof. Peck is expected to fight the
suit.
Raving and shrieking, Mrs. Ford
escaped from a local hospital today
and it required the co-operation of
members of the police department
and several of her personal friends,
as well as her legal counsel, to ob
tain her return.
Following this sensational scene,
Prosecutor Henry T. Hunt sent to
Judge Caldwell a written order dis
missing the indictments still pend
ing against Mrs. Ford, in which she
fs charged with blackmailing Warri
ner and with having received stolen
money.
W
MURDERJUSPECTROOSEVELTCONCLUDES|AALMSDECIDEYJUR
IIRIBUNE
ARE DISMISSED
MRS,
FORD STATED TO BE A RAV-
ING MANIAC AND CASES
W I BE DROPPED
Was Charged with Blackmailing War
riner, who is Now Serving Term in
Pen for Embezzling More Than a
Half Million from the Big Four
Road—Mrs. Ford in Bad Condition
(By Associated Press.)
Cincinnati, O., June 9.—Indictments
against Mrs. Jeannette Stewart Ford,
"the woman in the case," a leading
figure in the trial of Chas. L. War
riner, now serving a term in the
Ohio penitentiary for the confessed
embezzlement of $643,000 from the
Big Four railroad, will not cocne to
retrial.
CALLED E MOST NOTABLE VISIT OF MODERN TIMES ONLY
SLIGHT RESENTMENT IN E A I N QUARTERS OVER HIS RE-
ately coinciding with the period of
national mourning, and for that rea
son shorn of much of the splendor
which would have accompanied it un
der happier circumstances, was nev
ertheless one of the most noteworthy
foreign visits paid to Great Britain's
shores in recent years.
No foreign ruler or aay man of
eminence could have aroused more
universal attention, received a warm
er welcome, or achieved a greater
popularity among every class of so
ciety. It is true that his strictures
on Egyptian affairs occasioned politi
cal resentment in some quarters, but
he left no rancor behind, because he
was regarded as a priivleged guest
in whom no unworthy or unfriendly
motive could be suspected, and the
frankness of its utterances is taken
as a measure of the strength of the
friendship binding the two nations.
Mr. Roosevelt spent today quietly
with friends in Hampshire, where he I
WANT ADS
BRING RESULTS
PRICE FIVE CENTS
GREAT INTEREST
IN AGRICULTURE
BY FARHSPECIAL
BRINSMADE, MADDOCK AND SHE
YENNE TURNED OUT LARGE
CROWDS.
TOWNS ADVERTISE W E
TH E "BETTER FARMING SPECIAL"
BALL TEAM WAS ORGANIZ-
ED ON TRAIN.
Every Town Visited Has Shown Great
Interest Agricultural Topics Held
Attention of Crowds to the Limit—
Field Sports Are Arranged at Some
of the Stops.,
(J. K. Doran, Staff Correspondent.)
Sheyenne, N. D., June 9—The fourth
day of the "better farming" special
tour found all workers ready for the
day's duties bright and early but while
yet at breakfast the occupants of the
train saw long processions of people
coming from the country, and by the
time the train was opened there was
a stream of people examining the ex
hibits.
This was at Brinsmade. After the
two hours had been devoted to the
demonstrations as many of the speak
ers as could be spared were sent to
the hall where an hour was spent
speaking to the people there.
Every town had something in com
mon with all the others in the way
of greeting the train and its people
such as committees, bands playing and
decorations, and yet there is some
thing new and different at nearly ev
ery stop. At Brinsmade the streets
were mudy from the late rains and
sone one hauled up a load of sawdust
and sprinkled the crossings. Now
that was a little thing, but it showed
the true feelings of the peole.
At MaddncVt the people, were in
throngs and" as the train pulled in
lunch was not fully served and the
first things noticed after the great
crowds were the decoration. Srouts
went up from the college men on the
train when they saw so many college
colors1 flying from so many flag
staffs.
The plan of work was recersed at
Maddock from that of any former
occasion. Instead of going through
the train first and examining the ex
hibits there and listening to the lec
tures, the cars were kept closed until
after the speaking at the hall when
the cars were opened and thronged un
til the train started to pull out.
The speakers at the hall were Hov
erstad. Hoover, Bolley and Willard
W. C. Palmer presiding after the
first opening.
The question was asked why so
many people were in attendance
from so great a distance, many having
come fifteen to twenty miles, and the
only explanation satisfactpry was that
they were interested in better farm
ing and that Maddox had judiciously
advertised.
The field sports at Maddox were
elaborate and pleasant events.
Two pleasant events occurred on
the train while it was in- transit to
day. One was the forming of the bet
(Continued on page 8)
MARKS ANEN E EGVPTI AN SITUATION LOOKED UPON
AS A FAVORED CHARACTER.
London, June 9.—Theodore Roose-• English songbirds. He returned
velt's brief visit to England, ending London tonight and will board
tomorrow morning, though unfortun
devoted considerable time studying! Judge.
W
VISITTO THE ENGLISH
to
the
train for Southampton 10 o'clock to
morrow morning.
The ex-president had to decline the
invitation of the mayor of Southamp
ton to a public luncheon in his honor
tomorrow. He also expressed regret
at his inability to lay the cornerstone
of the memorial to be erected on the
spot where the pilgrim fathers sailed
for America.
Couldn't Forget It.
"Saturday night some miscreant lug
ged off a whole cord of my wood, and
somehow 1 can't forget about it," de
clared Silas.
"Have you tried to forget it?" in
quired his friend.
"Yes. Sunday morning I went to
church, hoping 1 could get it off my
mind, and before I had been there five
minutes the choir started in singing
'The Lost Chord.' so 1 got out."—

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