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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, June 11, 1910, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1910-06-11/ed-1/seq-5/

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Saturday, June 11, 1910.
It is Bargains that make people turn
out to our Saturday Sales. Today is the
fourth of these Money-Making Days. It
is to your advantage to always watch
our ads.
ITEM ONE
In Our Millinery Department
FOR TODAY ONLY
rai&D mii
[email protected] Skirts
Excellent Values With Deep Flounces of New and
Attractive Lace and Embroidery
$-.00 Underskirts, today $ .80 $3.95 Underskirts, today 3.16
$1.50 Underskirts, today 1.20 54.00 Underskirts, today 3.20
»1.75 Underskirts, today 1.40 «5
Nightt
MAL PRIC
E
ITEM TWO
MUSLIN UNDERWEAR
THIS IS CERTAINLY AN UNUSUAL CHANCE YOU WILL HAVE
PUT BEFORE YOU A VERY LARGE VARIETY OF EVERY GARMENT IN
UNDER MUSLINS. NOTE THE PRICES:
OF FINE NAINSOOK AND MUSLIN,
TRIMMED WITH NEWEST EM
BROIDERY AND VAL., AND MALTA
LACE.
$1.00 Comb-nation Suits, today $ .80
$1.38 Combination Suits, today 1.10
$1.65 Combination Suits today 1-30
$1.75 Combination Suits, today 1-40
$2.25 Combination Suits, today 1.80
$2.75 Combination Suits, today 2.20
$2.95 Combination Suits, today 2.36
$3.50 Combination Suits, today 2.80
$4.75 Combination Suits, today 3.80
$5.25 Combination Suits, today 4.20
2 5 UnQerskirts,
$2.00 Underskirts, today 1 6t# j„.«.i,«,*„ a no
$2.95 Underskirts^ today 2.36 S?.50 Underskirts, today 6.00
$3.25 Underskirts, today 2.60 $9.25 Underskirts, today 7.40
Very Best Values at Regular Prices
$ .39 Corset Covers, today $ .29
$ .49 Corset Covers, today 39
$ .65 Corset Covers, today 52
$ .75 Corset Covers, today .. .60*1.50
$..89 Corset Covers, today 71
Good Values at Regular Prices
$ .29 Drawers, today .19
$ .35 Drawers, today 25
$ .45 Drawers, today 36
$ .50 Drawers, today ,4,0
$ .65 Drawers, today o2
$1.00 Drawers, today 80
today 4.20
$ .98 Corset Covers, today ,.
$1.00 Corset Covers, today
$1.25 Corset Covers, today
$1.65 Corset Covers, today
Not to be Surpassed for Worth and Beauty
$ .75 Night Gowns, today $ .60
$ .85 Night Gowns, today. .Ar... .68
$1.00 Night Gowns, today. 80
$1.25 Night Gowns, today 1.00
$1.50 Night Gowns, today... 1 2 0
.78
.80
1.00
1.20
1.32
Corset Covers, today
$2.25 Night Gowns, today 1.80
$2.75 Night Gowns, today 2.20
$3.50 Night Gowns, today 2.80
$4.50 Night Gowns, today 3.60
$5.75 Night Gowns, today 4.60
$1.25 Drawers, today 1.00
$1.50 Drawers, today 1 1.20
$1.75 Drawers, today 1.40
$2.25 Drawers, today 1.80
$2.50 Drawers,Hoday 2.00
ITEM THREE
A CHANCE TO BUY AT A SPECIAL
LIKE OF WHICH IS NOT TO BE
THAN BISMARCK. ALL SIZES A
PENSIVE GRASS RUGS TO THE
$ 1.25 Rugs, today $ 1-00
$ 2.95 Rugs, today 2.36
$ 4.Z5 Rugs, today .. 3.40
$ 7.50 Rugs, today 6.00
$ 9.75 Rugs, today 7.80
$10.75 Rugs, today 8.60
$11.50 Rugs, today 9-20
PRICE FROM A STOCK, THE
OUND IN CITIES MUCH LARGER
ND KINDS FROM THE LEAST EX
I NEST FRENCH VELVETS.
$15.00 Rugs, today 12.00
$26.50 Rugs, today 21.20
$33.50 Rugs, today 26.80
$39.75 Rugs, today 31.80
$43.50 Rugs, today 34.80
$53.00 Rugs, today 42.40
$67.50 Rugs, today 54.09
BROT
BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE
INNITE CML BEDS
EMINENT GEOLOGIST UNWIT-
TINGLY GIVES BOOST TO
NORTH DAKOTA
Senator McCumber Has Made Study
of Coal Situation in North Dakota
and Thinks it Means Much to State.
Mr. Edward W. Parker, a director
of the United States geological sur
vey, read a paper before the West
Virginia Mining institute at Hunting
ton, W. Va.
In this paper Mr., Parker proved
conclusively that manufacturing is
based on fuel, that the centers where
the deposits of coal lie must of a
necessity become great manufactur
ing centers. He outlined the growth
in wealth and power of Illinois, and
of a short time when industrial en-
where the coal was to be found,
Senator McCumber has given as
much study regarding the possibili
ties of North Dakota as any one. He
stated it as being his judgment, "that
the vast deposits of lignite found in
North Dakota would be the founda
tion of great industrial enterprises.
That all of the wheat raised in the
state would be ground into flour at
home. That we could make the best
flour in the world, and with cheap
power from lignite we could make
a flour that would compete with any
part of the world. That the state
should be the center in the manufac
ture of food products. That when
our farm crops were made into food
products at home, it would effect a
saving both for the consumer and the
producer. That the era of manufac
turing was at hand, and that it would
deliver the grain grower from the
hands of the Philistines at the ter
minals."
There is a growing belief that the
era of industrial development of the
state is at hand. The Hebron Fire &
Pressed Brick Company is an exam
ple of the successful industry in this
state. The plant represents an in
vestment of $300,000. Last year 8,000
tons of lignite were used in the brick
yards. Improvements have been made
which will enable the company to
double its output and give steady em
ployment to 125 men.
The clay industries are destined to
become most important. The varie
ties are so numerous that almost any
kind of china or pottery ware can be
made.
How important are the several clay
industries may be gathered from the
fact that in the United States more
than $180,000,000 is invested and
nearly 200,000 people are given em
ployment annually.
Congressman Hanna is quoted as
saying: "I regard it as an established
fact that the clay resources of our
state are of the first importance. The
brick yards of Kenmare, Dickinson,
Hebron and other cities bear me out
in this statement. Our lignite will
be the means of turning into gold
the banks of clay that are to be found
all over the state."
The government made a series of
tests of our lignite at St. Louis
(among the tests being its use in a
reverberatory furnace). The results
of these tests are to be found in Bul
letin No. 325 of the U. S. geological
survey. On page 160 is found the
statement: "The curve shows that
lignites could be used with preheat
ing, especially as some lignites
(North Dakota) are very low in sul
phur and burn freely with a long, hot
flame."
There is little doubt but that our
lignite can be successfully used for
any purpose for which fuel is re
quired.
THE LAST CHANCE
Sale ends today on those stylishly
tailored ladies' suits at exactly half
price. Greatest ladies', suit bargains
ever offered in Bismarck.
A. W. LUCAS CO.
PROF. BECKER'S MENU.
At the Bismarck Hardware Co. this
afternoon from 2 to 5 p. m.
Cheese Straws Devil's Food
White Cake Golden Cake
Between the hours of 3:30 and 4:30
the professor will roast an eight-lb.
beef roast, sweet potatoes, Irish po
tatoes, parsnips and Honey Comb
dressing, and three doz. baking pow
der biscuits.
This will all be done in an hour,
and on one pan in a Majestic range
oven, and everything will retain its
own flavor. Afterwards the professor
will lecture for an hour on how to
cook meats, steak and general cook
ing. This is the last appearance of
the professor in the city. Don't miss
it.
For fine shoe repairing go to "The
Bismarck Shoe Hospital." Carl
Juhnke's, No. 215 Fifth street.
ARE YOU READING WEBB
BROTHERS SATURDAY ADS?
Better see what today offers. Item
No. one is trimmed hats.
Hairdressing:
Shampooing, Manicuring
and Electric Massaging
MISSHERMINJUELL
Phone 234
TRIBUNE BUILDING
Every seat in the Bijou was occu
pied Friday evening, and standing
room was at a premium, at the com
mencement exercises of the class of
1910 of the Bismarck high school.
Friends, relatives and proud parents
of the successful graduates thronged
into the theatre at an early hour to
watch the members of the class re
explained that it was due to the coal ceive their sheepskins, and long be
deposits found in that state that 1111- the curtain was rung up the
nofs now stood third as a manufac- °l}*l}»l™»s
turing state, with an output of goods
crowded with persons who were
valued at $1,400,000,000. He' main" oblige* to remain on their feet Cur
tained that it was only a question,
ta**?_
ceremonies,
terprises would be forced to locate school orchestra favored the audience
Prior to the exercises the high
TtriTh* a a a oniAtiflid miialjt in
wit several splendiH musical1 numi-
bers. They deserve a large amount
of praise for their very capable ren
dition of the various selections.
Right here we would say a good word
for the excellent work done during
the past school year by the special
music teacher, Miss Marjorie Hansen.
The results of her efforts were very
apparent in the creditable perform
ances of both the high school orches
tra and the young ladies' glee club.
Miss Hanson deserves special com
mendation for having achieved such
laudable results in so brief a period
of time.
The front of the stage was very
prettily draped in green, and extend
ing across the top was the oiotto
"More Beyond" inserted therein in
huge letters of old gold, green and
gold being the class colors.
Promptly at nine o'clock the cur
tain went up, and the seniors filed
onto the stage, led by President Rich
olt of the board of education and
Superintendent Burnett. They made
a very pretty picture as they seated
themselves, the dainty white dresses
of the fair co-eds lending proper con
trast to the conventional black attire
of the young men.
Extending across the rear of the
stage was a large banner bearing the
words, "Bismarck—1910." The de
sign was worked out in cherry and
white, the class colors of the juniors.
Rev. Lehner of the German Evan
gelical church stepped on to the stage
from the wings and invoked the Di
vine blessing upon the class as it en
tered upon the more serious and
sterner duties before It. The invoca
tion was followed by an instrumental
trio by Misse3 Hazel Nichols, Bessie
Craven and Florence McGillis. The
young ladies played very well and
their number was warmly applauded.
Miss Lola Nita Welch then deliv
ered the salutatory address. Miss
Welch likened the present occasion
to a great family reunion. It had
required twelve years of hard study
to fit the graduates for this event.
At the present moment they were all
on an equal footing. Soon, however,
their ways would diverge and they
would all be scattered. She welcom
ed the friends present to their com
mencement exercises in a few well
chosen words, and then touched upon
the necessity of the members of the
class taking advantages of all the
favorable opportunities that might
present themselves if they wished to
make a success of their chosen car
eer. She cited instances of great men
of the battlefield, of the scientific
world and the field of literature, all
of whom earned their success by
recognizing their opportunities and
making the most of them.
Miss Mae Davis dwelt for a few
minutes on the topic, "Is America a
Christian Nation?" She emphasized
the perils and hardships endured by
the Pilgrim Fathers to found on these
shores a Christian nation. Americans
of today, however, seemed to have
lost sight of these ideals and worship
at the shrine of gold. Religion has
become subservient to commercial,
political and social interests. Peo
ple's hobbies have become their idols.
The responsibility of a Christian na
tion rested upon each one of us as
individuals—our to interpret, and
ours to fulfil.
Following Miss Davis' oration, the
young ladies' glee club of the high
school sang a pleasing number. The
girls were in good voice and were
the recipients of hearty applause.
The personnel of the club is as fol
lows:
Sopranos—Louise McGaha, Elsie
Smith, Rosa Huber, Mae Davis, Em
ma Bartel, Harriet Falconer, Emma
Wachter, Elizabeth Remington, Jessie
Webb and Florence McGillis.
Altos—Nettie Blanchard, Laura
Keenan, Minnie Wheeler, Gladys Fal
coner, lone Hutchinson, Ada Maurer
and Hazel North.
Soloist—Clara Tatley.
Pianist—Hortense Moore.
John Burt Rhud then discussed the
question, "What Relation has Intel
lectual, Industrial and Moral Educa
tion to the Welfare of the Common
wealth?" He said that men who have
solved great problems and discovered
wonderful inventions all attribute
their success to their mental educa
tion. Industrial education teaches the
.dignity of honest labor. By it men
1 learn to economize, and economy is
the pathway to success. Moral edu
cation has to do with the training
of men's hearts. It teaches them to
recognize their duties and obligations.
Moral influences are felt for ages.
Men should so live a3 to be shining
examples to those round and about
them.
Olga Lillie Rupp dilated upon the
great trust problem which confronts
the American people. Are trusts a
menace or a blessing? She defined
trusts and showed very clearly their
GRAMATBIJOU FRIDAY
LARGE CROWD OF FRIENDS OF GRADUATES PACKED HOUSE
ALUMNI BANQUET HELD AT THE METHODIST CHURCH PAR
LORS FOLLOWING EXERCISES AT THE HALL EVERY ONE
PLEASED WITH THE ENTIRE ARRANGEMENT.
good points and their bad ones. The
people, however, should control the
trusts. How this may be done is the
burning question of the day. State
legislation is ineffectual. The solu
tion of the entire problem lies in fed
eral control of the combines.
The orchestra then rendered another
agreeable number, after which Miss
Hutchinson delivered a very able ora
tioa. Miss Hutchinson prefaced her
remarks by citing the various forms
of the drama in medieval times. TL"
miracle play and the passion play
were the two more important forms.
The latter has survived to the pres
ent day in the Passion Play of Ober
ammergau. She then briefly describ
ed the Passion Play and told how
each performer of the different parts
moulded his life for the ten years
between each spectacle in accordance
with the character he assumed in the
play. From this fact she drew the
conclusion that men, by living the
lives of their ideals, may become
more and more like them every day.
The valedictory address was then
delivered by Miss Ada Maurer. She
mentioned the story of the handsome
ly uniformed officer who was present
ed to Napoleon. The sharp eyes of
the great Corsican penetrated the
silken sashes and golden braid of the
man who appeared to be so brave,
and seemed to search the fellow's
very soul. The hero of Austerlitz
asked just one question, "What has
he done?" Governments are judged
by the rest of the world for what
they have done and not for what they
have promised to do. Great charact
ers are the makers of history. One
must develop character in order to
arise to greatness. Men should make
their actions pleasing to the Supreme
Ruler of the universe, so that their
lives will be a fitting answer to His
final query, "What hast thou done?"
Miss Maurer then extended the
thanks of the class to the citizens of
Bismarck for their interest in the
high school and the class of 1910
inanThe
particular. Also to the board of edu
cation and to the corps of teachers
under whom they had attained their
knowledge. The teacher's influence is
a powerful factor in the lives of their
pupils. Turning to her classmates,
she then traced briefly their course
through the high school. If they
would remain there, the river of their
lives would become stagnant. They
must mingle with the broad ocean of
life. Lessons of experience must be
learned which no school can teach.
These can best be met by honesty,
faithfulness, and a firm trust in God.
"The world will judge us by what we
do, and what we do ourselves will
count."
Misses Clara Tatley, Laura Keenan
and Nettie Blanchard then sang a
beautiful trio, assisted by Donald Mc
Donald on the violin and Miss Hor
tense Moore at the piano. They were
forced to respond to an encore, which
was also heartily received.
Owing to the fact that Superintend
ent Burnett had a severe cold, the
presentation of the class to Mr. Rich
olt was dispensed with, although the
latter took occasion to thank the citi
zens of Bismarck for the interest
shown by them during the past year
in the progress of the schools. He
also thanked the different teachers
for the good work which they had
performed, and congratulated the
class of 1910 upon the successful ter
mination of their high school career.
He had in his hand the diploma of
his own son, Frank, which he said he
would ratbjer have signed than to
have given his boy a present of five
thousand dollars, as he thought it
meant more to him.
President Richolt then presented
the members of the graduating class
with their diplomas. As each pupil
stepped before the footlights to re
ceive the coveted sheepskin, the
audience applauded lustily.
The seniors assembled at the front
of the stage and sang their class song,
following it up with their class yell,
and the curtain was rung down upon
one of the most successful commence
ments ever held in Bismarck.
The following students were award
ed their diplomas:
Emma Caroline Bartel.
Theresa Margaret Brown.
Bessie Craven.
May Eleanor Davis.
Glayds Cameron Falconer.
Helen Dimond Hoskins.
lone Elizabeth Hutchinson.
Myron vVells Hutchinson, Jr.
Roy Perry Logan.
Florence Barnes McGillis.
Russell Duncan McCord.
Ada Marget Maurer, caledictorian.
Hazel Irene Nichols.
Hazel Marie Pierce.
Frank Henry Richolt.
Olga Lillie Rupp.
Lloyd Eugene Titus.
Paul Olsen Tucker.
Lola Nita Welch, salutatorian.
Following the graduation ceremon
ies, the members of the class repaired
in a body to the parlors of the Mc
Cabe Methodist church, where the
high school alumni tendered them the
annual banquet customary on such
occasions.
The parlors were prettily decorated
in green and gold, the class colors,
and there was a profusion of flowers.
Miss Olive Proctor officiated as
toastmistress in a very creditable
manner, and introduced the following
speakers, all of whom contributed
their share to the evening's enter
tainment: Misses Arline White, Haz
el Nichols and Mae Hanlon Messrs.
1
Five
A SKELETON
With Terrible Eruptions Grew
Worse inSpiteof Doctors—Wou Id
Scratch and Tear Flesh Unless
Hands were Tied—Mother Says
HE WOULD HAVE DIED
BUT FOR CUTICURA
"My little son, when about a year
•nd a half old, began to have sores
come out on his
face. I had a phy
sician treat hiai,
but the sores greT
worse. Then they
began to come on
his arms, then on
other parts of his
body, and then one
came on his chest,
worse than the
others. Then I
called another physician. Still he gre-w
worse. At the end of about a year and
a half of suffering he grew so bad that
I had to tie his hands in cloths at night
to keep him from scratching the sores
and tearing the flesh. He got to 09
a mere skeleton, and was hardly able
to w&lk
"My aunt advised me to try Cuticura
Soap and Cuticura Ointment. So great
was her faith in them that she gave me
a small piece of the Soap to try and
a little of the Ointment. I took them
home without any faith, but to please
her I tried it and it seemed to dry up
the sores a little. I sent to a drug store
and got a cake of Cuticura Soap and
a box of the Ointment and followed
directions. At the end of two months
the sores were all well. He has never
had any sores of any kind since. He
is now strong and healthy, and I can
sincerely say that only for the most
wonderful Cuticura Remedies my pre
cious child would have died from those
terrible sores. I used only one cake of
Cuticura Soap and about three boxes
of Ointment.
"I am a nurse and my profession
brings mo into many different families
and it is always a pleasure for me to tell
my story and recommend Cuticura Rem
edies. Mrs. Egbert Sheldon, R. F. D. 1,
Litchfield, Conn., Oct. 23, 1909."
Complete Externa] and Internal Treatment to»
Every Humor of Infants, Children and Adultsi con
stats of Cuticura Soap (25c.) to Cleanse the Skta.
Cuticura Ointment (50c.) to Heal the Skin and Cuti
cura Resolvent (50c.). (or In the form of Chocplntfl
Coated Pills. 25c. per vial of 60) to Purify tne Blood.
Bold throuchotit the world. Potter Drug & phera.
Corn. Role Ave ..Boston.
•7-MaileProoa..
Free.135Columbus
Cuticura Book on Skin Disease*.Mass
Sam Day, Frayne Baker, R. A. Petrie
James W. Foley.
banquet was largely attended
and all present report a very pleasant
time. All in all, it was one of the
most enjoyable affairs in the history
of the alumni association.
1 Try Tribun- Want Columns. 1
Cayou McLean
Soo Hotel 9uilding
Phone S3
Our Motto—QUALITY
Saturday Specials
HOOD RIVER BERRIES
Fancy Stock, 2 for 35c
LEAF LETTUCE
Large Bunch 5c
TOMATOES
Per Basket 40c
ASPARAGUS, Home Grown
3 Bunches 25c
BANANAS
Per Dozen 25c
CHOICE JAPAN RICE
Regular 10c Grade
4 Lbs. 19c
FRESH SODA CRACKERS
2 Lbs. for 15c
ABSOLUTELY FREE
Handsome Silver Plated
Butter Knife with each
purchase of $1.00 or over
COLUMBIA MILK
Regular 15c Size
Per Can 10c
KELLOG'S CORN FLAKES
(2 Packages 17c
USE
FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST
Telephone Orders sentCO. D,

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